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1

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MiamiImageURL&_cid=277910&_user=10&_ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-co2-capture-project-ph Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This paper describes results of Phase 2 of the Storage Program of the

2

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Program of the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project (CCP), a coalition of eight oil and gas companies and two associate members that are working together to reduce carbon...

3

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

4

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

5

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

6

NETL: Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0013687 GE global is constructing and operating a continuous, bench-scale CO2 capture system that employs a phase-changing silicone solvent . Experimental data obtained at the laboratory scale in a previous ARPA-E funded project, including mass transfer and kinetic information, is being used to determine process scalability and perform a techno-economic assessment of the commercial scale process. The manufacturability of the solvent is being examined to obtain the material needed for bench-scale testing. Data obtained from the bench-scale system will include mass transfer parameters, kinetic parameters, heat transfer parameters, solvent stability, effects of flue gas contaminants, and recommended operating conditions. Other data such as absorption/desorption isotherms and solvent regeneration energy will be determined in laboratory testing. The solvent manufacturing cost, the bench-scale engineering data, and the laboratory property data will be used to complete the techno-economic assessment and to develop a scale-up strategy for commercialization.

7

NETL: Solvents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvents for CO2 Capture Project No.: R&D 048 The most attractive physical solvents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture are those having such properties as high thermal stability,...

8

Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture: High Performance Metal Organic Frameworks/Polymer Composite Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: A team of six faculty members at Georgia Tech are developing an enhanced membrane by fitting metal organic frameworks, compounds that show great promise for improved carbon capture, into hollow fiber membranes. This new material would be highly efficient at removing CO2 from the flue gas produced at coal-fired power plants. The team is analyzing thousands of metal organic frameworks to identify those that are most suitable for carbon capture based both on their ability to allow coal exhaust to pass easily through them and their ability to select CO2 from that exhaust for capture and storage. The most suitable frameworks would be inserted into the walls of the hollow fiber membranes, making the technology readily scalable due to their high surface area. This composite membrane would be highly stable, withstanding the harsh gas environment found in coal exhaust.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reactor Design for CO2 Capture Using Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Design for CO 2 Capture Using Sorbents Background Carbon Sequestration is rapidly becoming accepted as a viable option to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 )...

10

Archer Daniels Midland Company: CO2 Capture from Biofuels Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company: CO 2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone Background Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial processes, among other...

11

Capture, Separation and Triggered Release of CO2 with Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Capture, Separation and Triggered Release of CO2 with Metal ... pores can be tailored to act as high capacity sites for carbon dioxide capture.

12

Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Peoples Republic of China  

SciTech Connect

This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage. It's the process of capturing and storing or re-using carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants and industrial sources. In Decatur, Illinois, a new carbon capture...

14

Large-scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stri ngent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Luckow, P; Wise, M; Dooley, J; and Kim S. 2010. Large-scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Volume 4, Issue 5, 2010, pp. 865-877. Large-scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems are a potentially large contributor to meeting stringent global climate policy targets by the end of the century....

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

16

Biominetic Membrane for Co2 Capture from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomimetic Membrane for CO Biomimetic Membrane for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport, and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post

17

IGCC Design Considerations for CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains technical design, plant performance, cost estimates, and economic analysis of IGCC power plants designed with future retrofit for full CO2 capture in mind. The gasification technologies supplied by General Electric, Shell, and Siemens studied in the report were designed to initially produce power without CO2 capture; but their designs included moderate pre-investment to economically accommodate retrofit of full CO2 capture at a later date. The base plant designs include deep sulfur r...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

NETL: Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007553 Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) is developing a new type of membrane contactor (or mega-module) to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plant flue gas. This module's membrane area is 500 square meters, 20 to 25 times larger than that of current modules used for CO2 capture. A 500-MWe coal power plant requires 0.5 to 1 million square meters of membrane to achieve 90 percent CO2 capture. The new mega-modules can drastically reduce the cost, complexity, and footprint of commercial-scale membrane module integration. Energy savings due to low-pressure drops for gases circulated through the modules, as well as improved countercurrent flow, are additional benefits. The feasibility of using mega-modules in several different hybrid process designs is being evaluated for future development potential.

19

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Klaus S. Lackner (kl2010@columbia.edu; 212-854-0304) Columbia University 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 Patrick Grimes (pgrimes@worldnet.att.net; 908-232-1134) Grimes Associates Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 Hans-J. Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov; 505-667-7265) Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O.Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Abstract The goal of carbon sequestration is to take CO 2 that would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere and put it in safe and permanent storage. Most proposed methods would capture CO 2 from concentrated sources like power plants. Indeed, on-site capture is the most sensible approach for large sources and initially offers the most cost-effective avenue to sequestration. For distributed, mobile sources like cars, on-board capture at affordable cost would not be

20

Program on Technology Innovation: Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive overview of current post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies and potential directions for future development.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An intelligent system for monitoring and diagnosis of the CO2 capture process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amine-based carbon dioxide capture has been widely considered as a feasible ideal technology for reducing large-scale CO"2 emissions and mitigating global warming. The operation of amine-based CO"2 capture is a complicated task, which involves monitoring ... Keywords: CO2 capture, DeltaV Simulate, Intelligent system

Qing Zhou; Christine W. Chan; Paitoon Tontiwachwuthikul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Converting Captured CO2 into Useful Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010... algae production technology that can capture at least 60 percent of flue gas CO2 from an industrial coal-fired source to produce biofuel and...

23

Biomimetric Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomimetic memBrane for co Biomimetic memBrane for co 2 capture from flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post combustion applications - absorption, adsorption, reaction and membranes chemically facilitated absorption promises to be the most cost-effective membrane solution for post combustion application. The Carbozyme technology extracts CO 2 from low concentration, low pressure sources by means of chemical facilitation of a polymer membrane. The chemical

24

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Solvents for Efficient CO 2 Capture Background Post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture presents technical challenges because the flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and the CO 2 concentration is 10 to 15 volume percent, resulting in a low CO 2 partial pressure and a large volume of gas that needs to be treated. In spite of this difficulty, post-combustion CO 2 capture offers the

25

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the development trends in post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) scouted carbon capture technologies worldwide and applied filtering criteria to identify those best suited for EPRI support. Those criteria included a technology developer's interest in working with EPRI, the potential for EPRI investment to provide significant advancement, the technology's suitability for broad application, and its potential ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.  

SciTech Connect

This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z [University of Cincinnati; Dong, J. H. [University of Cincinnati

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

28

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA July 8 - 11, 2013 ION Novel Solvent System for CO 2 Capture FE0005799 Nathan Brown ION Engineering...

29

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Combining Geothermal Energy Capture with CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Geothermal Energy Capture with CO2 Sequestration Cold CO2 from emitter CO2 compressor geothermal heat hot CO2 permanent CO2 storage Martin O. Saar Dept. of Earth Sciences University of Minnesota saar@umn.edu CO2-Plume Geothermal (CPG) #12;Cold CO2 from emitter CO2 compressor geothermal heat hot CO

Reich, Peter B.

31

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland Dagfinn Snarheim and control of a semi-closed O2/CO2 gas turbine cycle for CO2 capture. In the first part the process predictive control, Gas turbines, CO2 capture 1. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are widely used for power

Foss, Bjarne A.

32

Novel Solvent System for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent System for CO Solvent System for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

33

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture for PC-Boiler Using Flue-Gas Recirculation: Evaluation of CO2 CaptureUtilizationDisposal Options Project No.: FWP49539...

34

Screening test of solid amine sorbents for CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric levels of many greenhouse gases are increasing, especially that of carbon dioxide, which has increased by 30% over the last 200 years. A wide variety of processes have been developed for the removal of acid gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from gas streams including physical/chemical absorption, adsorption, membrane process, and oxygen recovery from O2/CO2 recycle combustion. The most common option for separating CO2 from flue gases or other gas streams is scrubbing the gas stream using various amine sorbents. The objective of this research is to study the total absorption/desorption capacity, cyclic capacity, absorption/desorption rate, and effect of blending amine on CO2 capture for several chemical solid sorbents.

Lee, Seungmoon (U. of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Filburn, T.P. (U. of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Park, J-W. (Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea); Song, H-J. (Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea)

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sorbents Carbon Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal re- serves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio of post- and oxy-combustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants in the event of carbon constraints. Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants are large, stationary sources of CO

36

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005313 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International is researching fluorinated polymer membranes for carbon dioxide capture. RTI's research effort includes membrane materials development, module design, and process design. RTI is pursuing the development of two hollow-fiber membrane materials. First, RTI is working with Generon to develop a membrane material constructed of polycarbonate-based polymers. Lab-scale membrane modules are being studied with simulated flue-gas mixtures with and without flue gas emission contaminants. Two larger-scale polycarbonate membrane module prototypes are being tested with a slipstream of actual flue gas from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Multipollutant

37

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO Membrane Process to Capture CO 2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

38

NETL: 2013 Conference Proceedings - 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Previous Proceedings 2012: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting Proceedings of the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, July 8 Opening/Overview Post-Combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Tuesday, July 9 Post-Combustion Solvent-Based Capture CO2 Compression Wednesday, July 10 Post-Combustion Membrane-Based Capture Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Thursday, July 11 ARPA-E Capture Projects System Studies and Modeling Oxy-Combustion and Chemical Looping Posters PRESENTATIONS Monday, July 8, 2013 Opening/Overview Introduction [PDF-MB]

39

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 06, 2010 Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Six Projects Selected by DOE Will Further Important Technologies for Helping Reduce CO2...

40

The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Part I: CO2 Pipeline Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Part I: CO2 Pipeline Transport Nils Johnson and Dr the economics of transporting carbon dioxide via pipeline from the point of capture and compression at large studies identify pipeline transport as the most economical method for moving large volumes of CO2 overland

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a...

42

CO2 Capture Poject CCP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

companies and government organisations that are undertaking research and development of carbon capture and storage technologies. References CO2 Capture Poject (CCP)1 LinkedIn...

43

Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRACE is a project consortium that aims to develop cost improving technologies for carbon capture and separation. References Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project...

44

NETL: 2011 Conference Proceedings - 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting August 22 - 26, 2011 Previous Proceedings 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting 2010: 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Proceedings of the 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, August 22 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Post-combustion Membrane-Based Capture Tuesday, August 23 Post-combustion Solvent-Based Capture ARPA-E Capture Projects Wednesday, August 24 Oxy-Combustion and Oxygen Production Chemical Looping Process CO2 Compression Thursday, August 25 FutureGen 2.0, CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects System Studies and Modeling Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Friday, August 26 Pre-combustion Capture Projects Posters

45

Analysis of data for the carbon dioxide capture domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To tackle the global concern for adverse impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the post combustion carbon dioxide (CO"2) capture technology is commonly adopted for reducing industrial CO"2 emissions, for example, from power generation plants. The ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide capture, Data modeling, Expert validation, Neural networks, Sensitivity analysis

Yuxiang Wu; Christine W. Chan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture 11 -13 July 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Tufts European Center Talloires, France Institute | | Clean Air Task Force | | Asia Clean Energy Innovation Initiative | #12;Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Talloires, France PROCEEDINGS: Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop

47

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background Development of innovative environmental control technologies is key to maintaining coal as an affordable and environmentally sound energy source. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies, specifically post-combustion CO 2 capture, for coal- fired power plants is a major focus area in addressing climate change concerns. Post-

48

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

49

Composition and Method for Rapid and Equimolar CO2 Capture ...  

The emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from burning of fossil fuels has received worldwide attention because of its implication in climate change, which threatens ...

50

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

51

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration 73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

52

NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A process developed by researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) that improves the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants while reducing the cost has been selected to receive a 2011 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. The Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process separates CO2 from the flue or stack gas of power plants, preventing its release into the air. The captured CO2 can then be permanently stored in a carbon sequestration

53

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

54

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

55

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

56

NETL: 2010 Conference Proceedings - 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting September 13-17, 2010 Table of Contents Presentations Monday, September 13 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent Based Capture Post-combustion Solvent Based Capture Tuesday, September 14 Post-combustion Membrane Based Capture Pulverized Coal Oxy-combustion ARPA-E Projects Wednesday, September 15 National Carbon Capture Center Chemical Looping Processes Systems Studies and Modeling Efforts CO2 Compression New CO2 Capture Projects Thursday, September 16 New CO2 Capture Projects - Cont'd CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects Pre-combustion Capture Projects Friday, September 17 Pre-combustion Capture Projects - Cont'd Posters Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) NETL Office of Research and Development Research Projects

57

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO 2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Background Pulverized coal-fired power plants provide more than 50 percent of electricity needs while accounting for a third of the total carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States. However, capturing CO 2 from the flue gas stream in coal-fired power plants using current commercial CO 2 capture technology could consume up

58

5th International CO2 Capture Test Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 CMU Descriptor - include initials, orgdate Novel CO 2 Capture Technologies For Power Generation Point Sources Scrubbing with Regenerable Sorbents Amine-Enriched Sorbents...

59

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 2009 Planned Activities Phase I: * Determine the relevant physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the sorbent that are relevant for effective CO 2 capture from...

60

NETL: 2009 Conference Proceedings - Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off Meetings Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off Meetings Pittsburgh, PA November 12-13, 2009 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations PRESENTATIONS Welcome/Sequestration Program Overview [PDF-842KB] Sean Plasynski, Sequestration Technology Manager Hydrogen Selective Ex-foliated Zeolite Membranes [PDF-3.4MB] University Of Minnesota Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods [PDF-746KB] Pall Corporation Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor [PDF-1.7MB] Arizona State University CO2 Capture from IGCC Gas Streams Using the AC-ABC Process [PDF-842KB] SRI International A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture [PDF-1.2MB]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes May 27, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the creation of a new National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to develop and test technologies to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-based power plants. Managed and operated by Southern Company Services Inc., the center is expected to focus national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation. Southern Company will establish and manage the NCCC at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Ala. The NCCC will meet a critical need of the Energy Department by serving as a test center for

62

NETL: CO2 Capture from IGCC Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Project No.: DE-FE0000896 Batch scale...

63

Technology qualification for IGCC power plant with CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Summary:This thesis presents the technology qualification plan for the integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture based on DNV recommendations. (more)

Baig, Yasir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supported polyethylenimine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 emissions produced from fossil fuel combustion are believed to contribute to undesired consequences in global climate. Major contributors towards CO2 emissions are fossil fuel-fired power plants for electricity production. For this reason, CO2 capture from flue gas streams together with permanent sequestration in geologic formations is being considered a viable solution towards mitigation of the major greenhouse gas1. Technologies based on chemical absorption with alkanolamines have been assessed for first generation CO2 post-combustion capture primarily due to its advanced stage of development. However, limitations associated with these chemical solvents (i.e., low CO2 loadings, amine degradation by oxygen, equipment corrosion) manifest themselves in high capital and operating costs with reduced thermal efficiencies. Therefore, necessary design and development of alternative, lower cost approaches for CO2 capture from coal-fired combustion streams are warranted.

Fauth, D.J.; Gray, M.L.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture and Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vent Stream Vent Stream (out) CO 2 Product Stream (out) Flue Gas Stream (in) CO 2 CCU Skid Government of Canada Gouvernement du Canada An Integrated Approach for Oxy An Integrated Approach for Oxy- -fuel Combustion with CO fuel Combustion with CO 2 2 Capture and Capture and Compression Compression Kourosh Zanganeh, Ahmed Shafeen, and Carlos Salvador Zero-Emission Technologies Group, Clean Electric Power Generation CANMET CO 2 R&D Consortium CANMET Energy Technology Centre - Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a significant reduction in anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Fossil fuel combustion is expected to dominate the energy structure in at least the next few decades.

66

Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ?30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

68

Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project November 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that combines the separation performance of inorganic membranes with the cost-effectiveness of polymer membranes. The breakthrough technology has vast commercial potential for use at coal-fired power plants with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), a key element in national efforts to mitigate climate change. Before the carbon dioxide (CO2) generated at a power plant can be securely

69

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

70

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operation Project No.: DE-FE0004278 American Air Liquide, Inc. will develop a system for CO2 capture based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The...

71

Thermophysical Properties of Carbon Dioxide and CO2-Rich Mixtures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions; and will help maintain the nation's leader- ship in the export of gas turbine equipment. In this NETL-managed project, the National Institute of...

72

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

73

NETL: 2012 Conference Proceedings - 2012 NETL CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of a Heat Integrated CO2 Capture System PDF-1.12MB Jim Neathery, University of Kentucky Efficient Use of Waste Heat to Reduce Parasitism of CCS PDF-714KB...

74

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Simteche Hydrate CO2 Capture Process  

SciTech Connect

As a result of an August 4, 2005 project review meeting held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to assess the project's technical progress, Nexant/Simteche/LANL project team was asked to meet four targets related to the existing project efforts. The four targets were to be accomplished by the September 30, 2006. These four targets were: (1) The CO{sub 2} hydrate process needs to show, through engineering and sensitivity analysis, that it can achieve 90% CO{sub 2} capture from the treated syngas stream, operating at 1000 psia. The cost should indicate the potential of achieving the Sequestration Program's cost target of less than 10% increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of the non-CO{sub 2} removal IGCC plant or demonstrate a significant cost reduction from the Selexol process cost developed in the Phase II engineering analysis. (2) The ability to meet the 20% cost share requirement for research level efforts. (3) LANL identifies through equilibrium and bench scale testing a once-through 90% CO{sub 2} capture promoter that supports the potential to achieve the Sequestration Program's cost target. Nexant is to perform an engineering analysis case to verify any economic benefits, as needed; no ETM validation is required, however, for this promoter for FY06. (4) The CO{sub 2} hydrate once-through process is to be validated at 1000 psia with the ETM at a CO{sub 2} capture rate of 60% without H{sub 2}S. The performance of 68% rate of capture is based on a batch, equilibrium data with H{sub 2}S. Validation of the test results is required through multiple runs and engineering calculations. Operational issues will be solved that will specifically effect the validation of the technology. Nexant was given the primary responsibility for Target No.1, while Simteche was mainly responsible for Target No.2; with LANL having the responsibility of Targets No.3 and No.4.

Nexant and Los Alamos National Laboratory

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Novel regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbents for CO2 capture at warm gas temperatures  

SciTech Connect

A novel sorbent consisting of Mg(OH)2 was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture at 200-315 C suitable for CO2 capture applications such as coal gasification systems. Thermodynamic analysis conducted with the FactSage software package indicated that the Mg(OH)2 sorbent system is highly favorable for CO2 capture up to 400 C at 30 atm. MgCO3 formed during sorption decomposes to release CO2 at temperatures as low as 375 C up to 20 atm. MgO rehydroxylation to form Mg(OH)2 is possible at temperatures up to 300 C at 20 atm. The experimental data show that the sorbent is regenerable at 375 C at high pressure and that steam does not affect the sorbent performance. A multicycle test conducted in a high-pressure fixed-bed flow reactor at 200 C with 28% CO2 showed stable reactivity during the cyclic tests. The capture capacity also increased with increasing pressure. The sorbent is unique because it exhibits a high CO2 capture capacity of more than 3 mol/kg at 200 C and also is regenerable at a low temperature of 375 C and high pressure. High-pressure regeneration is advantageous because the CO2 compression costs required for sequestration can be reduced.

Siriwardane, R.; Stevens, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2 concentration resulted in incremental loss in IAS performance and revealed progressive degrees of staining upon testing. Adsorption of SO2 by the IAS necessitates upstream removal of SO2 prior to CO2 capture.

Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A data analysis decision support system for the carbon dioxide capture process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development process of an expert decision support system for pre-filtering and analysis of data from the carbon dioxide (CO"2) capture process. Chemical absorption has become one of the dominant CO"2 capture technologies because ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide capture process, Data filtering, Expert decision support system

Yuxiang Wu; Christine W. Chan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

Chakib Bouallou

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

Bouallou, Chakib

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Novel Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Project No.: DE-FE0001124 Membrane Technology Research (MTR) is developing a high-temperature stable polymer membrane to separate hydrogen from carbon dioxide (H2/CO2). MTR will investigate novel high-temperature-stable polymers identified by Tetramer for use in H2/CO2 selective membranes. They will also conduct bench-scale testing of optimized membranes and membrane modules with simulated syngas to evaluate the membrane performance and lifetime under expected operating conditions. The advantages of this technology are that the process can be done warm/hot to reduce the need for heat exchange and nitrogen sweep can be used to maintain permeate fuel gas at turbine pressure.

84

Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio

85

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture from Flue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption Project No.: FG26-05NT42488 Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Hampton University researched a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption concept, phase transitional absorption, that utilizes a two-part proprietary absorbent consisting of an activated agent dissolved in a solvent. Phase separation of the activated agent from the chemical solvent occurs during CO2 absorption and physical separation of the two phases exiting the absorber reduces the volume of process liquid requiring thermal regeneration. This unique aspect of phase transitional absorption also decreases the amount of energy (i.e., steam) required to liberate the CO2. If the proper liquid

86

NETL: Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Project No.: DE-FE0013303 ION Engineering is conducting small pilot-scale (~ 0.7 MW) testing of an advanced CO2 capture solvent technology that has previously undergone bench-scale testing. The small pilot-scale testing will involve continuous long-term operation in order to gather the necessary data ultimately required for further scale-up. Activities will include the design and fabrication of the 0.5-0.7 MWe (equivalent) slipstream pilot plant; scale-up of solvent manufacturing; testing, data collection, and analysis of solvent performance; degradation and air emission analysis; modeling and simulation for the detailed preliminary and final techno-economic analyses; and decommissioning of pilot plant equipment upon completion of solvent testing. The advanced solvent is anticipated to have significant operating and capital cost advantages over other solvents currently in development. Advantages include significant reductions in parasitic load and liquid flow rates which directly translate to smaller more efficient CO2 capture processes. Make-up water and amine emissions rates will be examined during this project. There is the potential that additional solvent, system, and integration savings will be identified, which could result in further operating and capital cost reductions.

87

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

88

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and Sequestration of CO Capture and Sequestration of CO 2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae Takashi Nakamura (nakamura@psicorp.com; 925-743-1110) Constance Senior (senior@psicorp.com; 978-689-0003) Physical Sciences Inc Andover, MA 01810 Miguel Olaizola (molaizola@aquasearch.com; 808-326-9301 Michael Cushman (mcushman@aquasearch.com; 808-326-9301) Aquasearch Inc. Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Stephen Masutani (masutan@wiliki.eng.hawaii.edu; 808-956-7388) University of Hawaii Honolulu, HI 96822 Introduction Emissions of carbon dioxide are predicted to increase this century 1 leading to increases in the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. While there is still much debate on the effects of increased CO 2 levels on global climate, many scientists agree that the projected increases could have a

89

NETL: CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

molecular basket sorbent for CO2 capture from flue gas. Energy Fuels 2011, 25, 456-458. XX Wang, SQ Zhao, XL Ma, CS Song, CO2 capture from gas streams with low CO2...

90

EFFICIENT THEORETICAL SCREENING OF SOLID SORBENTS FOR CO2 CAPTURE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is a major combustion product of coal, which once released into the air can contribute to global climate change. Current CO2 capture technologies for power generation processes including amine solvents and CaO-based sorbent materials require very energy intensive regeneration steps which result in significantly decreased efficiency. Hence, there is a critical need for new materials that can capture and release CO2 reversibly with acceptable energy costs if CO2 is to be captured and sequestered economically. Inorganic sorbents are one such class of materials which typically capture CO2 through the reversible formation of carbonates. By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO2 sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of identifying thermodynamic properties of CO2 capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. For a given solid, the first step is to attempt to extract thermodynamic properties from thermodynamic databases and available literatures. If the thermodynamic properties of the compound of interest are unknown, an ab initio thermodynamic approach is used to calculate them. These properties expressed conveniently as chemical potentials and heat of reactions, either from databases or from calculations, are further used for computing the thermodynamic reaction equilibrium properties of the CO2 absorption/desorption cycle based on the chemical potential and heat of reaction. Only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are predicted at the desired process conditions are selected as CO2 sorbent candidates and further considered for experimental validations. Solid sorbents containing alkali and alkaline earth metals have been reported in several previous studies to be good candidates for CO2 sorbent applications due to their high CO2 absorption capacity at moderate working temperatures. In addition to introducing our selection process in this presentation, we will present our results for solid systems of alkali and alkaline metal oxides, hydroxides and carbonates/bicarbonates to validate our methodology. Additionally, applications of our computational method to mixed solid systems of Li2O and SiO2 with different mixing ratios, we showed that increasing the Li2O/SiO2 ratio in lithium silicates increases their corresponding turnover temperatures for CO2 capture reactions. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with available experimental findings.

Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C; Luebke, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle assessment of carbon dioxide capture and storage fromSpecial Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. 2005.DM, Smit B, Long JR. Carbon dioxide capture: Prospects for

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0009484 Alstom is advancing the development of Limestone Chemical Looping Combustion (LCL-C(tm)) technology. Chemical looping has no direct contact between air and fuel. The looping process usually utilizes oxygen from a metal carrier, but in this case, limestone is used. Economic evaluations will be made of four LCL-C plant configurations. The base configuration plant has already been completed and will be updated from previous reports. A second case will compare the effects of designing the reducer reactor using CFB sizing standards. A third case will investigate the effects of using a pressurized reducer reactor. Pressurizing the reducer reduces the reactor size and reduces the amount of compression required for the CO2 outlet gas stream. A fourth case will investigate the use of an advanced ultra-supercritical (USC) steam cycle. The advanced USC steam cycle should increase overall plant efficiency and lower the cost of electricity. Mass and energy balances will be done for each case. The four LCL-CTM cases will be compared against a supercritical pulverized coal-fired plant without CO2 capture.

93

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with Greenfield and retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study is part of the CoalFleet Program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes deployment of advanced coal technologies, including IGCC, ultrasupercritical pulverized, oxy-fuel combustion, and supercritical circulating fluidized bed technologies. Two types of coalPittsburg...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

NETL: Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0000465 Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. URS and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are investigating a dry sorbent process configured to combine the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for coal gasification systems. A combination of process simulation modeling and sorbent molecular and thermodynamic analyses will be performed to predict optimal sorbent properties and identify optimal operating temperature and pressure ranges

95

NETL: News Release - DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2011 DOENETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Provides Overview of RD&D Efforts to Provide Cost-Effective Advanced CO2 Capture and Storage Technologies for...

96

Reversible Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

Acid gas scrubbing technology is predominantly aqueous alkanolamine based. Of the acid gases, CO2, H2S and SO2 have been shown to be reversible, however there are serious disadvantages with corrosion and high regeneration costs. The primary scrubbing system composed of monoethanolamine is limited to 30% by weight because of the highly corrosive solution. This gravimetric limitation limits the CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the system. Furthermore the scrubbing system has a large energy penalty from pumping and heating the excess water required to dissolve the MEA bicarbonate salt. Considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1), low capacities and the high corrosion we set out to design a fully organic solvent that can chemically bind all acid gases i.e. CO2 as reversible alkylcarbonate ionic liquids or analogues thereof. Having a liquid acid gas carrier improves process economics because there is no need for excess solvent to pump and to heat. We have demonstrated illustrated in Figure 1, that CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) have a high CO2 solubility paired with a much lower specific heat (<1.5 J/g-1K-1) than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs are a subsection of a larger class of materials known as Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs). Our BOLs have been shown to reversibly bind and release COS, CS2, and SO2, which we denote COSBOLS, CS2BOLs and SO2BOLs. Our BOLs are highly tunable and can be designed for post or pre-combustion gas capture. The design and testing of the next generation zwitterionic CO2BOLs and SO2BOLs are presented.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Yonker, Clement R.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Phased Construction of IGCC Plants for CO2 Capture - Effect of Pre-Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, conceptual plant designs for integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) have taken two approaches regarding the capture of CO2. Baseline plants have placed emphasis on producing power with a minimum cost and maximum efficiency without CO2 capture. The primary rationale for designing these plants without CO2 capture is that there have yet to be regulations promulgated that require the capture and sequestration of CO2. Conversely, grass roots IGCC designs with provisions for CO2 capture and c...

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

99

Microsoft PowerPoint - 130709 DOE-NETL CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an amine- based post-combustion capture technology for CO 2 capture from coal-fired power plant flue gas DOE funding award DE-FE0007453 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting...

100

CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter, Issue 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of EPRI's CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter includes highlights of these meetings: The DOE meeting for the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in October 2008 The Ninth Annual MIT Carbon Sequestration Forum, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in October 2008 Stanford GCEP meeting held in Stanford, California in October 2008 The Ninth Greenhouse Gas Technology (GHGT9) conference held in Washington, DC in November 2008

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter Issue 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issue 5 of EPRI's CO2 Capture and Storage Newsletter includes the highlights of these meetings: The 3rd Annual Algae Energy Summit, held in San Diego, California in October 2009 The 10th Annual MIT Carbon Sequestration Forum, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts in October 2009 Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP), 5th Energy Research Symposium, held in Stanford, California in late September early October 2009 The 36th IEA GHG Executive Committee Meeting, held in Zurich, Switzerland in October...

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture: A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATKs design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect

The novel concept of using a molecule possessing both physi-sorbing and chemi-sorbing properties for post-combustion CO2 capture was explored and mixtures of aminosilicones and hydroxyterminated polyethers had the best performance characteristics of materials examined. The optimal solvent composition was a 60/40 blend of GAP-1/TEG and a continuous bench-top absorption/desorption unit was constructed and operated. Plant and process models were developed for this new system based on an existing coal-fired power plant and data from the laboratory experiments were used to calculate an overall COE for a coal-fired power plant fitted with this capture technology. A reduction in energy penalty, from 30% to 18%, versus an optimized 30% MEA capture system was calculated with a concomitant COE decrease from 73% to 41% for the new aminosilicone solvent system.

Robert Perry; Teresa Grocela-Rocha; Michael O'Brien; Sarah Genovese; Benjamin Wood; Larry Lewis; Hubert Lam; Malgorzata Rubinsztajn; Grigorii Soleveichik; Sergei Kniajanski

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of a Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent-Based Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO 2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants Background Currently available commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from flue gas streams are costly and energy intensive. RTI International is heading a research team to continue development and scale-up of an innovative process for CO 2 capture that has significant potential to be less expensive and less energy intensive than conventional technologies. The "Dry Carbonate Process" utilizes a dry,

106

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-fired Power Plants Background Retrofitting the current fleet of pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants for the separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one of the most significant challenges for effective, long-term carbon management. Post-combustion CO 2 capture using solid-sorbent based technologies is a potential resolution to this challenge that could be appropriate for both new and existing PC-fired power plant

107

Economic modeling of CO 2 capture and sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As policy makers look for strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, they need to understand what options are available and under what conditions these technologies could be economically competitive. This paper explores the economics of carbon capture and sequestration technologies using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. We model two of the most promising carbon capture and sequestration technologies, one based on a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) capture plant and one based on an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) capture plant. The technologies have been fully specified within the EPPA model by production functions and we simulate how they perform under different policy scenarios. The results show how changing input prices and general equilibrium effects can influence technology choice between the coal and gas capture plants and other technologies for electricity production. BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION The heightened concern about global change has aroused interest in carbon capture and sequestration technologies as a means of decreasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Projects are already underway to research and implement such technologies in countries like the

Sean Biggs; Howard Herzog; John Reilly; Henry Jacoby

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Selective CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using Metal-Organic Frameworks?A Fixed Bed Study  

SciTech Connect

It is important to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas which is considered to be the main reason to cause global warming. CO2/N2 separation by novel adsorbents is a promising method to reduce CO2 emission but effect of water and CO2/N2 selectivity is critical to apply the adsorbents into practical applications. A very well known, Metal Organic Framework, NiDOBDC (Ni-MOF-74 or CPO-27-Ni) was synthesized through a solvothermal reaction and the sample (500 to 800 microns) was used in a fixed bed CO2/N2 breakthrough study with and without H2O. The Ni/DOBDC pellet has a high CO2 capacity of 3.74 mol/kg at 0.15 bar and a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 38, which is much higher than those of reported MOFs and zeolites under dry condition. Trace amount of water can impact CO2 adsorption capacity as well as CO2/N2 selectivity for the Ni/DOBDC. However, Ni/DOBDC can retain a significant CO2 capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity at 0.15 bar CO2 with 3% RH water. These results indicate a promising future to use the Ni/DOBDC in CO2 capture from flue gas.

Liu, Jian; Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to review the current state of CO2 capture technologies in order to provide input into the design of a CO2 capture and storage test facility. First, an overview of the three major approaches to CO2 capture is provided, noting that only one of these options, post-combustion capture, is compatible with the design criteria for the test facility. Second, current research efforts for post-combustion capture are reviewed, giving examples of technologies that may be appropriate for...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

110

NETL: DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update May 2013 Edition This comprehensive handbook provides an update on DOENETL R&D efforts on advanced CO2 capture technologies for...

111

NETL: CO2 Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Project No.: DE-FE0007466 Battelle Pacific northwest Division is developing a new CO2 capture...

112

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project...

113

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory (DOENETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC)...

114

NETL: News Release - Reining in CO2 Emissions....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reining in CO2 Emissions.... DOE Selects Eight Innovative Projects to Capture and Store Carbon Dioxide from Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - New ways to capture carbon dioxide from...

115

Commerical-Scale CO2 Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

On June 8, 2009, DOE issued Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number DE-FOA-000015 seeking proposals to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources. This FOA called for what was essentially a two-tier selection process. A number of projects would receive awards to conduct front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies as Phase I. Those project sponsors selected would be required to apply for Phase II, which would be the full design, construction, and operation of their proposed technology. Over forty proposals were received, and ten were awarded Phase I Cooperative Agreements. One of those proposers was CEMEX. CEMEX proposed to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from one of their existing cement plants and either sequester the CO2 in a geologic formation or use it for enhanced oil recovery. The project consisted of evaluating their plants to identify the plant best suited for the demonstration, identify the best available capture technology, and prepare a design basis. The project also included evaluation of the storage or sequestration options in the vicinity of the selected plant.

Adolfo Garza

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

NETL: Development of a Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Process Using High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Development of a Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Process Using High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow-Fiber Membrane Project No.: DE-FE0012965 SRI is conducting a slipstream-scale demonstration of a CO2 capture system using a high-temperature polymer-membrane-based gas separator. The system was developed at bench-scale as part of a previous project, and is being optimized for integration into an IGCC plant. Membrane modules of sufficient capacity will be fabricated to process a synthesis gas (syngas) stream of approximately 0.1 MWe equivalent from an operating, oxygen-blown, coal gasifier. Design and steady-state performance data will be obtained for membrane modules under relatively long duration conditions. The membrane fabrication technology will be transferred to an industrial firm that specializes in the manufacture of hollow fiber membranes for making the membrane modules. Polybenzimidazole (PBI) will be used as a membrane material to separate H2 and CO2 at elevated temperatures (200 to 250°C). PBI will be made into hollow fibers and the fibers will be assembled into bundles and cased as membrane modules for insertion into high-pressure chambers. These modules will be tested using the syngas slipstreams available at the National Carbon Capture Center at ~225°C and 30 bar.

117

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced per kilowatt-hour ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels? You can calculate the amount of CO2 produced per kWh for ...

118

A dynamic model for optimally phasing in CO2 capture and storage infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO"2 capture and storage (CCS) is a climate-change mitigation strategy that requires an investment of many billions of dollars and tens of thousands of miles of dedicated CO"2 pipelines. To be effective, scientists, stakeholders, and policy makers will ... Keywords: CO2 capture and storage, Climate-change policy, Infrastructure modeling, Pipeline modeling, SimCCS, Spatiotemporal optimization

Richard S. Middleton; Michael J. Kuby; Ran Wei; Gordon N. Keating; Rajesh J. Pawar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology titled "Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which CO 2 is first separated / captured from gas streams followed by permanent storage. Carbon capture represents a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology including increased CO

120

NETL: Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Project No.: DE-FE0007634 FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed a novel system concept for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane. The proposed membrane has its genesis from the company's patented Direct FuelCell® (DFC®) technology. The prominent feature of the DFC membrane is its capability to produce power while capturing CO2 from the flue gas from a pulverized coal (PC) plant. The DFC membrane does not require flue gas compression as it operates on the principles of electrochemistry, resulting in net efficiency gains. The membrane utilizes a fuel (different from the plant flue gas, such as coal-derived syngas, natural gas, or a renewable resource) as the driver for the combined carbon capture and electric power generation. The electrochemical membrane consists of ceramic-based layers filled with carbonate salts, separating CO2 from the flue gas. Because of the electrode's high reaction rates, the membrane does not require a high CO2 concentration in its feed gas. The planar geometry of the membrane offers ease of scalability to large sizes suitable for deployment in PC plants, which is an important attribute in membrane design. The membrane has been tested at the laboratory scale, verifying the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. is advancing the technology to a maturity level suitable for adaption by industry for pilot-scale demonstration and subsequent commercial deployment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL - Low-Energy Solvents for CO2 Capture Enabled by a Combination...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Low-Energy Solvents for CO2 Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics Project No.: DE-FE0007741 Novozymes North...

122

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTROL ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Query Sheet Q1: AU: short title OF A GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland, Dagfinn Snarheim, and Bjarne A. Foss Department-closed / gas turbine cycle for capture. Some control strategies and their interaction with the process design

Foss, Bjarne A.

123

Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

124

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Program...

125

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture of CO 2 from gasifier process producing electricalPlaquemine, Louisiana. The gasifier is a proprietary designGasifier .

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Proof-of-Concept Testing of Advanced CO2 Capture Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about the impact of greenhouse gases on climate change has focused attention on carbon-capture technologies. The Chilled Ammonia CO2 capture process (CAP) uses cold ammonium carbonate to absorb CO2 from flue gas. The report contains a summary of the various findings of the mini-pilot tests conducted from November 2006 through March 2007 that demonstrated the ability of the CAP to capture CO2.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

NETL: News Release - NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2011 NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer Commercialization Another Important Step in Deploying...

128

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Potential Improvements in IGCC Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This overall project is aimed at experimental proof-of-concept testing and validation of high-risk, early-stage ideas for CO2 capture. If successful, such processes are likely to reduce the energy penalty of CO2 capture processes significantly, or in other cases, they will increase our understanding of the practical limits of CO2 capture. This particular report focuses on potential improvements that are under research and development for the pre-combustion capture of CO2 in integrated-gasification-combin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Process for CO2 Capture Using Zeolites from High Pressure and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Process for CO 2 Capture Using Zeolites from High Pressure and Moderate Temperature Gas...

130

NETL: Application of A Heat-Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Project No.: DE-FE0007395 The University of Kentucky Research Foundation is...

131

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy...

132

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Keywords: CO 2 capture Cost estimates Experience curveshand, reliance on cost estimates for current technology hassummarizes the nominal cost estimates for each system based

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Moderate and High Temperatur...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,314,847 entitled "Regenerable sorbents for CO 2 capture from moderate and...

134

Failing Drop CO2 Deposition (Desublimation) Heat Exchanger for the Cryogenic Carbon Capture Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cryogenic carbon capture removes CO2 and other pollutants from flue and waste stream gases produced from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, natural (more)

James, David William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electrochemical CO2 Capture and Instant Conversion into Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, burning fossil fuels produces CO2, emission of which to atmosphere causes global warming and climate change. A near-term realistic solution to...

136

Study of Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CO 2 ) is a greenhouse gas that is customarily released to the environment during the usage of fossil fuels, including electric power generation. With the projected increase in...

137

Regulating carbon dioxide capture and storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines several legal, regulatory and organizational issues that need to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal, regulatory, and organizational ...

De Figueiredo, Mark A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A technical and economic analysis of a natural gas combined cycle power plant with carbon dioxide capture using membrane separation technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the potential effects of climate (more)

Ducker, Michael Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NETL: Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor Project No.: DE-FE0000470 Arizona State University is developing a dual-phase, membrane-based separation device which will separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from typical water gas shift (WGS) mixture feeds and produce hydrogen, which can be introduced into the combustion turbines of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. The objectives of the project are experimental studies of the synthesis of a high-temperature, chemically and thermally stable and CO2 perm-selective dual-phase membrane and its use as a membrane reactor for WGS reaction to produce H2 and CO2 rich streams. Concept of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes for CO2 separation. Concept of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes for CO2 separation.

140

Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Although carbonate solvent systems have been used for CO 2 removal in high-pressure applications such as natural gas sweetening, they have not been considered practical for flue...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection Boosts Oil Recovery, Captures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbine generator to provide thermal energy for a 25 million gallon-per-year corn ethanol plant. The project then recovers some of the CO2 that is a byproduct of the...

142

Porous Organic Molecular Materials for CO2 Capture Applications  

~4.6 in diameter 0 100 200 300 400 500 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 Pressure, psi 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Time, min CO 2 wt% 25% of the crystal volume is ...

143

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

144

ass combustion CO2 capture coal conversion mat on biofuels geologic storage hydrogen renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ass combustion CO2 capture coal conversion mat on biofuels geologic storage hydrogen renewables storage fuel cells CO2 capture photovoltaics ma conversion biofuels batteries conversion biofuels stion CO Stanford University About GCEP #12;Explored novel approaches for enhanced biofuel production, such as

Nur, Amos

145

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced when different ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels?

146

Novel Regenerable Sodium Based Sorbents for CO2 Capture at Warm Gas Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel sorbent consisting of NaOH/CaO was developed for CO2 capture at 315 C suitable for high-temperature CO2-capture applications, such as coal gasification systems. The sorbent is regenerable at 700 C, and steam does not affect the sorbent performance. A multicycle test conducted in the atmospheric reactor at 315 C indicated that the sorbent improved the performance with an increased number of cycles. The sorbent can also capture CO2 at a wide range of temperatures from ambient to 500 C. However, the mechanism of CO2 capture is different at ambient temperature. The sorbent is unique because it has a high CO2-capture capacity of more than 3 mol/kg at 315 C and is regenerable at 700 C

Siriwardane, R.V.; Shen, Ming; Robinson, Clark; Simonyi, Thomas

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Chemical Looping Combustion for inherent CO2 capture in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with temperature #12;11 Application to IGCC 12 IGCC without CCS Gasifier + Cooling Air Separation Unit Sulfur;13 IGCC with physical absorption CCS Gasifier + Cooling Shift Reactor Air Separation Unit Sulfur Removal2 recovery and compression H2 CO2 H2 14 IGCC with CLC Gasifier + Cooling Air Separation Unit Sulfur

148

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solvents B-6 Pre-Combustion solvents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 Co 2 CaPture from igCC gas streams using...

149

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

membranes membranes B-370 Post-Combustion membranes u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 eleCtroChemiCal membrane for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture & Power generation primary project goals FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is developing an electrochemical membrane (ECM)-based Combined Electric Power and Carbon Dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture that also provides additional electrical power generation. The project includes bench-scale testing of an 11.7 m 2 -area ECM (molten carbonate fuel cell) system for CO 2 capture, purification, and compression. technical goals * Perform contaminant effect testing to establish maximum permissible concentrations of

150

DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it will provide $36 million for 15 projects aimed at furthering the development of new and cost-effective technologies for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. "Currently, the existing U.S. coal fleet accounts for over half of all electricity generated in this country," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The projects announced today will combat climate change and help meet current and future energy needs by curbing CO2 emissions from existing coal-fired plants."

151

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA July 8 - 11, 2013 ION Novel Solvent System for CO 2 Capture FE0005799 Nathan Brown ION Engineering Presentation Outline 2  ION Advanced Solvent Background  Project Overview  Technology Fundamentals  Progress & Current Status  Plans for Future Commercialization  Acknowledgements ION Engineering Background 3 Mission Statement: Develop new solvents and processes for economic removal of CO 2 from industrial emissions. Markets:  Coal-fired flue gas  NGCC-fired flue gas  Sour gas processing 1 st & 2 nd Generation CO 2 Capture 4 Aqueous MEA Commercial Use Existing Commercial Technology Lateral Transfer of Existing Technology Aqueous MEA

152

A comparison of two data analysis techniques and their applications for modeling the carbon dioxide capture process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of the carbon dioxide (CO"2) capture process requires a good understanding of the intricate relationships among parameters involved in the process. The objective of this research is to study the nature of relationships among ... Keywords: CO2 capture process, Data modeling, Neural network, Sensitivity analysis, Statistical analysis

Yuxiang Wu; Qing Zhou; Christine W. Chan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: A Low-Cost, High-Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0007580 TDA Research, Inc is developing a low cost, high capacity CO2 adsorbent and demonstrating its technical and economic viability for post-combustion CO2 capture for existing pulverized coal-fired power plants. TDA is using an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity to adsorb CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. The sorbent binds CO2 more strongly than common adsorbents, providing the chemical potential needed to remove the CO2, however, because CO2 does not form a true covalent bond with the surface sites, regeneration can be carried out with only a small energy input. The heat input to regenerate the sorbent is only 4.9 kcal per mol of CO2, which is much lower than that for chemical absorbents or amine based solvents.

154

Separation and Capture of CO2 from Large Stationary Sources and Sequestration in Geological Formations: A Summary of the 2003 Critical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and the resulting global warming effect, is a major air quality concern. CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas emitted by fossil-fuel combustion for power generation, transportation, and heating. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2 will require many mitigation measures, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, renewable energy sources, and carbon sequestration. The feasibility of capturing CO2 from large point sources and subsequent geological sequestration is the subject of this years Critical Review.

White, C.M.; Strazisar, B.R.; Granite, E.J.; Hoffman, J.S.; Pennline, H.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing many currently active stations. Records since about 1960 (depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote stations, which represent changing global atmospheric concentrations rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A

156

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D)...

157

APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS PRE-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES POST-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS POST-COMBUSTION SORBENTS POST-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES OXY-COMBUSTION OXYGEN PRODUCTION CHEMICAL LOOPING ADVANCED COMPRESSION R&D COLLABORATIONS B-1 APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS B-6 SRI International - CO 2 Capture Using AC-ABC Processt B-7 PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS B-14 TDA Research - CO 2 Capture for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems B-15 URS Group - Sorbent Development for WGS B-18 Air Products and Chemicals - Advanced Acid Gas Separation B-24 Ohio State University-Department of Chemical Engineering - Calcium Looping for Hydrogen Production B-33

158

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

159

Scientific and Technical Posters from the 2010 NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology Meeting  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NETL hosted the 2010 CO2 Capture Technology Meeting on September 13-17, 2010 in Pittsburgh, PA. The Meeting provided a public forum to present carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology development status and accomplishments made under NETL's Innovations for Existing Plants, Carbon Sequestration and Demonstration Programs. In addition, ARPA-E Program Director Mark Hartney highlighted the Agency's CO2 capture portfolio. Both ARPA-E and NETL projects were featured in the poster session, and these posters are now available online. ARPA-E posters are:

  • Low-Cost Biocatalyst for Acceleration of Energy Efficient CO2 Capture Solvents, James Lalonde (Codexis Inc.)
  • A Solvent/Membrane Hybrid Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants, Kunlei Liu (University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research)
  • High-Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal-Organic Frameworks for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Jeffrey Long (LBNL)
  • CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change, Joan Brennecke (Univ of Notre Dame)
  • Cryogenic Carbon Capture, Larry Baxter (Sustainable Energy Solutions, BYU)
  • Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology, Edward Swanson and Tushar Patel (Columbia University)
  • CO2 Binding Organic Liquids for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture, Aqil Jamal (RTI International)
  • Development of Stimuli Responsive Metal-Organic Frameworks for Energy-Efficient Post-Combustion CO2 Capture, Hongcai Zhou (Texas A&M)
  • Electrochemically Mediated Separation for Carbon Capture and Mitigation, Fritz Simeon (MIT)
  • Phase Changing Absorbents for CO2 Capture, Teresa Grocela (GE Global Research)
  • Bio-Mimetic Catalysts for Carbon Capture with Optimized System Placement, Joshuah Stolaroff (LLNL)
  • MOF Polymer Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture From Flue Gas, David Sholl (Georgia Tech)
  • Achieving a 10,000 GPU Permenace for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture with Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes, Kathyrn A. Berchtold (LANL)
  • A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System ICES, Vladmir Balepin (ATK)
  • Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Carbon Sequestration, Aleksandr Noy (Porifera Inc.)
  • CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue, Harry Cordatos (United Technologies Research Center)
  • Resin Wafer Electrodeionization for Flue Gas Carbon Dioxide Capture, Wayne M. Carson and Jitendra T. Shah (Nalco Co.)
  • Electric Field Swing Adsorption (EFSA) for Carbon Capture Applications, David Moore and Kai Landskron (Lehigh University)
  • Pilot Scale Testing of the Syngas Chemical Looping Process, Fanxing Li (Ohio State University)

Posters featured from NETL are:

  • Lab Scale & Computational Studies of Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) for Efficient Carbon Capture, Douglas Straub (NETL)
  • Novel Warm Gas Temperature Sorbent Development for CO2 Removal from Synthesis Gas Streams, James Fisher II (URS/NETL)
  • An Investigation into Molecular Electron Density Relationships to Amine CO2 Capture Reaction Energy, Anita Lee (Carnegie Mellon)
  • Using Hydrophobic CO2-philic Polymers to Design CO2-selective Liquid Solvents and High Permeability CO2-selective Crosslinked Membranes, Robert Enrick (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Investigation of Amino Acids for Dry Sorbents, Bingyun Li (West Virginia University)
  • Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-Combustion, Clint Bedick and Kent Casleton (NETL)

160

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

Sherman, S

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005. LFEE 2005-002 Report #12;#12;i ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologies environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal (PC), integrated coal gasification combined cycle

165

Hybrid Solvent-Membrane CO2 Capture: A Solvent/Membrane Hybrid Post-combustion CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: The University of Kentucky is developing a hybrid approach to capturing CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. In the first, CO2 is removed as flue gas is passed through an aqueous ammonium-based solvent. In the second, carbon-rich solution from the CO2 absorber is passed through a membrane that is designed to selectively transport the bound carbon, enhancing its concentration on the permeate side. The teams approach would combine the best of both membrane- and solventbased carbon capture technologies. Under the ARPA-E award, the team is enabling the membrane operation to be a drop-in solution.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products July 6, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects are located in North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and Quebec, Canada (through collaboration with a company based in Lexington, Ky.) and have a total value of approximately $5.9 million over two-to-three years, with $4.4 million of DOE funding and $1.5 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the

167

NETL: Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process through Heat Integration Project No.: DE-FE0012914 ADA-ES is conducting bench scale testing and computer modeling of...

168

Application of a Heat-Integrated Post-combustion Co2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology...

169

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

170

Computational Evaluation of Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of porous solids comprised of metal-containing nodes linked by organic ligands, have become promising materials for gas separations. In particular, their flexible chemistry makes them attractive for CO2 capture from flue gas streams in post-combustion plants. Although numerous efforts have been exerted on the investigation of MOFs for CO2 capture, the exploration of the effects from coexisting components present in very dilute proportions in flue gases is limited because of the experimental difficulty to determine the coadsorption of CO2 with trace components. In this regard, molecular simulations show superiority. In this study, molecular simulations are used to estimate the in?uence of impurities: water, O2, and SO2 on post-combustion CO2 capture in MOFs. Firstly, two MOFs with coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), HKUST-1 and Mg-MOF-74 are explored. Increase of CO2 adsorption is observed for hydrated HKUST-1; on the contrary, the opposite water adsorption behavior is observed in hydrated Mg-MOF-74, leading to decrease of CO2 adsorption. Further, water effects on CO2 capture in M-HKUST1 (M = Mg, Zn, Co, Ni) are evaluated to test whether comparing the binding energy could be a general method to evaluate water effects in MOFs with CUMs. It is found that the method works well for Zn-, Co-, and Ni-HKUST1 but partially for Mg-HKUST1. In addition, the effects of O2 and SO2 on CO2 capture in MOFs are also investigated for the first time, showing that the effects of O2 may be negligible but SO2 has negative effects in the CO2 capture process in HKUST-1 systems. Secondly, the influences of water on CO2 capture in three UiO-66 MOFs with functional groups, NH2, OH and Br are explored, respectively. For UiO-66-NH2 and -OH, the presence of water lowers CO2 adsorption significantly; in contrast, water shows much smaller effects in UiO-66-Br. Moreover, the presence of SO2 decreases water adsorption but enhances CO2 uptakes slightly in both UiO-66-NH2 and -Br. Finally, the effects of impurities on CO2 capture in a MOF with suitable pore size (PCN-200) are analyzed. The adsorption of both CO2 and N2 decrease substantially even with 1% water present in the mixture. In addition, the presence of low SO2 does not show obvious effect in PCN-200. However, a lower CO2 adsorption is observed for a mixture with a high SO2 content. In collaboration with experimental groups, the performances of three new MOFs in CO2 capture are evaluated using molecular simulations. The computational results demonstrate the feasibility of precisely designing single-molecule traps (SMT) for CO2 capture. Also, a multi-functional MOF with micro-porosity, open Cu2+ sites and amine groups has also proved computationally the selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4 and N2. Last, we demonstrate that charge separation is an effective strategy for improving CO2 capture in MOFs.

Yu, Jiamei

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

An Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Natural Gas-Fired Combined-Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) assessment on the technical feasibility, performance, and associated costs of applying post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology to a natural gasfired combined-cycle (NGCC) power station.

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

CO2 Capture Options for an Existing Coal Fired Power Plant: O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion vs. Amine Scrubbing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: O 2 /CO 2 RECYCLE COMBUSTION vs. AMINE SCRUBBING D. J. Singh (djsingh@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-496-2064) E. Croiset 1 (ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca;+001-519-888-4567x6472) P.L. Douglas (pdouglas@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-888-4567x2913) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1 M.A. Douglas (madougla@nrcan.gc.ca; +001-613 996-2761) CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Nepean, Ontario, Canada, K1A 1M1 Abstract The existing fleet of modern pulverized coal fired power plants represents an opportunity to achieve significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the coming years providing efficient and economical CO 2 capture technologies are available for retrofit.

173

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction allows a taxpayer a deduction to adjusted gross income with respect to the amortization of the amortizable costs of carbon dioxide capture,...

174

Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very useful and effective in a process simulator environment for improving efficiency and flexibility of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture. In addition, the study identifies a number of key design variables that has strong impact on the efficiency of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Ethylenediamine was detected in a degraded solution of MEA/PZ solution, suggesting that piperazine is subject to oxidation. Stripper modeling has demonstrated that vacuum strippers will be more energy efficient if constructed short and fat rather than tall and skinny. The matrix stripper has been identified as a configuration that will significantly reduce energy use. Extensive measurements of CO{sub 2} solubility in 7 m MEA at 40 and 60 C have confirmed the work by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 to 181 mpy in lean solutions of 6.2 m MEA/PZ as piperazine increases from 0 to 3.1 m.

Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Amornvadee Veawab

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The pilot plant data have been reconciled using 17% inlet CO{sub 2}. A rate-based model demonstrates that the stripper is primarily controlled by liquid film mast transfer resistance, with kinetics at vacuum and diffusion of reactants and products at normal pressure. An additional major unknown ion, probably glyoxylate, has been observed in MEA degradation. Precipitation of gypsum may be a feasible approach to removing sulphate from amine solutions and providing for simultaneous removal of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. Corrosion of carbon steel in uninhibited MEA solution is increased by increased amine concentration, by addition of piperazine, and by greater CO{sub 2} loading.

Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Amorvadee Veawab

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

CO2 Capture and Regeneration at Low Temperatures: Novel Non-Aqueous CO2 Solvents and Capture Process with Substantially Reduced Energy Penalties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: RTI is developing a solvent and process that could significantly reduce the temperature associated with regenerating solvent and CO2 captured from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. Traditional CO2 removal processes using water-based solvents require significant amount of steam from power plants in order to regenerate the solvent so it can be reused after each reaction. RTIs solvents can be better at absorbing CO2 than many water-based solvents, and are regenerated at lower temperatures using less steam. Thus, industrial heat that is normally too cool to re-use can be deployed for regeneration, rather than using high-value steam. This saves the power plant money, which results in increased cost savings for consumers.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer model that supports prediction of heat transfer profiles for larger permeators Tasks 3. 4.1, 4.2--Temperature Range of Enzymes--The goal was to determine if the enzyme operating temperature would limit the range of thermal conditions available to the capture system. We demonstrated the ability of various isozymes (enzyme variants) to operate from 4-85 C. Consequently, the operating characteristics of the enzyme are not a controlling factor. Further, any isozyme whose upper temperature bound is at least 10 C greater than that of the planned inlet temperature will be stable under unanticipated, uncontrolled 'hiccups' in power plant operation. Task 4.4, 4.4--Examination of the Effects of SOx and NOx on Enzyme Activity (Development of Flue Gas Composition Acceptance Standards)--The purpose was to define the inlet gas profile boundaries. We examined the potential adverse effects of flue gas constituents including different acids from to develop an acceptance standard and compared these values to actual PC flue gas composition. Potential issues include changes in pH, accumulation of specific inhibitory anions and cations. A model was developed and validated by test with a SO{sub 2}-laden stream. The predicted and actual data very largely coincided. The model predicted feed stream requirements to allow continuous operation in excess of 2500 hours. We developed operational (physical and chemical) strategies to avoid or ameliorate these effects. Avoidance, the preferred strategy (noted above), is accomplished by more extensive cleanup of the flue gas stream. Task 5--Process Engineering Model--We developed a process-engineering model for two purposes. The first was to predict the physical and chemical status at each test point in the design as a basis for scale-up. The second was to model the capital and operating cost of the apparatus. These were accomplished and used to predict capex, opex and cost of energy. Task 6--Preliminary Commercialization Plan--We carried out analyses of the market and the competition by a variety of parameters. The conclusion was that there is a l

Michael C. Trachtenberg

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy  

SciTech Connect

For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Advanced Amine Solvent Formulations and Process Integration for Near-Term CO2 Capture Success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Phase I SBIR project investigated the economic and technical feasibility of advanced amine scrubbing systems for post-combustion CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Numerous combinations of advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were screened for energy requirements, and three cases were selected for detailed analysis: a monoethanolamine (MEA) base case and two advanced cases: an MEA/Piperazine (PZ) case, and a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) / PZ case. The MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ cases employed an advanced double matrix stripper configuration. The basis for calculations was a model plant with a gross capacity of 500 MWe. Results indicated that CO2 capture increased the base cost of electricity from 5 cents/kWh to 10.7 c/kWh for the MEA base case, 10.1 c/kWh for the MEA / PZ double matrix, and 9.7 c/kWh for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. The corresponding cost per metric tonne CO2 avoided was 67.20 $/tonne CO2, 60.19 $/tonne CO2, and 55.05 $/tonne CO2, respectively. Derated capacities, including base plant auxiliary load of 29 MWe, were 339 MWe for the base case, 356 MWe for the MEA/PZ double matrix, and 378 MWe for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. When compared to the base case, systems employing advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were estimated to reduce reboiler steam requirements by 20 to 44%, to reduce derating due to CO2 capture by 13 to 30%, and to reduce the cost of CO2 avoided by 10 to 18%. These results demonstrate the potential for significant improvements in the overall economics of CO2 capture via advanced solvent formulations and process configurations.

Fisher, Kevin S.; Searcy, Katherine; Rochelle, Gary T.; Ziaii, Sepideh; Schubert, Craig

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

viability of using air capture for generating both sequestration- ready CO 2 and CO 2 for algae-biofuel processes will be considered. GT will characterize the behavior of three...

183

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1,2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marus Hiilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1.2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

186

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solvents solvents B-6 Pre-Combustion solvents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 Co 2 CaPture from igCC gas streams using aC-abC ProCess primary project goals SRI International is developing, for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)-based power plants, a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture technology based on the use of a high-ca- pacity and low-cost aqueous ammoniated solution containing ammonium carbonate (AC), which reacts with CO 2 to form ammonium bicarbonate (ABC).

187

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solvents solvents B-198 Post-Combustion solvents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 DeveloPment anD Demonstration of Waste heat integration With solvent ProCess for more effiCient Co 2 removal from Coal-fireD flue gas primary project goals Southern Company Services is developing viable heat integration methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) produced from pulverized coal (PC) combustion. The project will quantify energy-efficiency improvements to the CO 2 capture process by utilizing a waste heat recovery technology, High-Efficiency System (HES). technical goals * Reduction of the amount of extraction steam required for sensible heat load in the

188

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Irrigation, and Nitrogen (1992) (NDP-037) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp037 image Data image PDF file Investigators B. A. Kimball, J. R. Mauney, R. L. La Morte, G. Guinn, F. S. Nakayama, J. W. Radin, E. A. Lakatos, S. T. Michell, L. L. Parker, G. J. Peresta, P. E. Nixon III, B. Savoy, S. M. Harris, R. MacDonald, H. Pros, and J. Martinez This NDP presents data on the effects of continuous CO2 enrichment of cotton during five consecutive growing seasons, 1983 to 1987, under both optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior CO2-enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions with

189

NETL: IEP - Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone solvent to capture CO2 with a continuous bench-scale system. The project will utilize both computational and experimental methods. Previously measured experimental data from a continuous laboratory-scale CO2 capture system will be used to design this bench-scale system. Data from the bench-scale system, such as kinetics and mass transfer information, will be used to determine scale-up effects and needed design parameters to develop a scale-up strategy, update cost of electricity (COE) calculations and perform a technical and economic feasibility study. A manufacturing plan for the aminosilicone solvent and a price model will be used for optimization. The final objective of the program is to demonstrate, at the bench-scale, a process that achieves 90 percent CO2 capture efficiency with less than a 35 percent increase in the COE. Development of this scalable bench-scale process combined with a rigorous process model and thorough manufacturability analysis for the solvent, will enable a practical technology path to later development at larger scales and commercialization. The technology will eventually be retrofittable to coal-based power plants.

190

Advanced Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases by Shrikar Chakravarti (shrikar_chakravarti@praxair.com; 716-879-4760) Amitabh Gupta (ami_gupta@praxair.com; 716-879-2194) Balazs Hunek (balazs_hunek@praxair.com; 716-879-2250) Praxair, Inc. Process & Systems R&D, CO 2 Technology 175 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 44 Tonawanda, NY 14150 USA key words: flue gas, carbon dioxide, separation, amine absorption, oxygen tolerant process, amine blends First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 15-17, 2001 Copyright 2001, Praxair Technology, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1 Abstract Cost effective carbon sequestration schemes have been identified as a key need for dealing with carbon dioxide's (CO 2 ) impact on global climate change. Two main

191

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration 46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas Overview DOE completed a final environmental assessment (EA) for a project under Area I of the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use . Based on the analyses in the EA DOE determined that its proposed action - awarding a grant to Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. to design and demonstrate a state-of-the-art system to concentrate carbon dioxide (CO,) from two steam

192

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-14 Pre-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture teChnology for low-rank Coal integrateD gasifiCation CombineD CyCle (igCC) systems primary project goals TDA will investigate the technical and economic advantages of using an integrated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbent and water-gas shift (WGS) catalyst system in an integrated gasifi- cation combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, fueled with low-rank coal, and designed to capture more than 90% of the CO 2 emissions. technical goals * TDA will evaluate the physical mix of the sorbent and catalyst pellets within the same

193

American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Electric Power (AEP): American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1) Background A need exists to further develop carbon management technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO

194

Plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To eliminate the harmful effects of greenhouse gases, especially that of CO2, future coalfired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture. The loss in efficiency for CO2 capture is less in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant compared to other conventional coal combustion processes. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. With this objective in mind, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture has been developed. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of about 96 mol% of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. The clean syngas is sent to a gas turbine (GT) followed by a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. A 5 % ramp increase in the flowrate of coal is introduced to study the system dynamics. To control the conversion of CO at a desired level in the WGS reactors, the steam/CO ratio is manipulated. This strategy is found to be efficient for this operating condition. In the absence of an efficient control strategy in the AGR process, the environmental emissions exceeded the limits by a great extent.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

CO2-Binding Organic Liquids, an Integrated Acid Gas Capture System  

SciTech Connect

Amine systems are effective for CO2 capture, but they are still inefficient because the solvent regeneration energy is largely defined by the amount of water in the process. Most amines form heat-stable salts with SO2 and COS resulting in parasitic solvent loss and degradation. Stripping the CO2-rich solvent is energy intensive it requires temperatures above 100 ?C due to the high specific heat and heat of vaporization of water. CO2-capture processes could be much more energy efficient in a water free amine process. In addition, if the capture-material is chemically compatible with other acid gases, less solvent would be lost to heat-stable salts and the process economics would be further improved. One such system that can address these concerns is Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs), a class of switchable ionic liquids.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001780 DOE is partnering with the University of Akron (Akron) to conduct research and training to develop an effective solid amine sorbent for large scale post-combustion CO2 capture from power plant flue gas. Sorbent materials developed by Akron consist of immobilized carbon and hydrogen structures (paraffin) distributed inside of the amine pores and aromatic amines located on the external surface and the pore mouth of the sorbent. The immobilized paraffinic amines have been shown to display excellent CO2 capture capacity by adsorbing CO2 at temperatures below 55 °C and releasing it at temperatures between 80-120 °C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that generally have large pore space, high surface area, and/or high thermal conductivity.

197

Coal Technologies with CO2 Capture Status, Risks, and Markets 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and International Energy Agency (IEA) studies have concluded that CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technology must play a vital role in stabilizing atmospheric levels of CO2; however, CCS technology is still at the development stage. The G8 nations have agreed upon a goal that 20 large-scale CCS demonstrations should be in operation by 2015. Meanwhile, China and to a lesser extent India are building new coal plants at a fast pace and CO2 emissions from the world's coal plant fleet will continue to incr...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Novel Theoretical Method to Search Good Candidates of Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect

The increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is the most important environmental issue of global warming that the world faces today. During past few decades, many technologies have been developing to separate and capture CO2 from coal gasifier. As high temperature CO2 absorbents, solid materials are potential candidates. Lithium silicate(Li4SiO4) and zirconate(Li2ZrO3) have been studying for CO2 capture by researchers at Toshiba and found that they absorb CO2 at 773K and release CO2 around 973K. Based on these well-known experimental exploring results on these lithium salts, we have been developing a novel theoretical methodology to search better solid materials for CO2 capture: (1) Based on the crystal structures of solids, the density functional calculations are performed to obtain their electronic structural properties and their binding energies. The energy change(?E) for the reaction solid_sorbent+CO2 ? sorbent_CO2+ solid are evaluated. (2) For a vast of data-bank of solid materials, as our first filter if |?E|<|?GLi2SiO4|, where ?G is the free energy change for reaction of Li2SiO4+CO2? Li2CO3 +Li2SiO3, we select this solid as a potential good candidate for CO2 capture. (3) For these possible candidates, we further perform phonon calculations and obtain their vibration frequencies. With them, partition functions of solids(Z) can be calculated out. With Z, the thermal dynamical properties (zero point energy, entropy, enthalpy, free energy, etc.) under different conditions (temperature(T), pressure(P)) can be readily calculated. With them, the chemical potentials(??)(functional of T and P) for the sorption/desorption reaction are evaluated. (4) Using ?? as our second filter, we can reduce the number of our selected good candidates to a small number of better candidates. (5) The last step is to make the fine tune (the 3rd filter) the better candidates to a small set of the best candidates by considering the operating conditions(T, P, etc.), absorbing CO2 weight percentage, stabilities, and the associated costs, etc.

Duan, Yuhua

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporations Econamine Plus carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOEs Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately funded projects studying CO2 sequestration in basalts will be heavily leveraged in developing a suitable site characterization program and system design for permanent sequestration of captured CO2. The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an integrated energy system that combines the production of substitute natural gas through coal hydrogasification with an algae process for beneficial carbon dioxide (CO2) use and biofuel production (funded under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FE0001099). The project planned to develop, test, operate and evaluate a 2 ton-per-day coal hydrogasification plant and 25-acre algae farm at the Arizona Public Service (APS) 1000 Megawatt (MW) Cholla coal-fired power plant in Joseph City, Arizona. Conceptual design of the integrated system was undertaken with APS partners Air Liquide (AL) and Parsons. The process engineering was separated into five major areas: flue gas preparation and CO2 delivery, algae farming, water management, hydrogasification, and biofuel production. The process flow diagrams, energy and material balances, and preliminary major equipment needs for each major area were prepared to reflect integrated process considerations and site infrastructure design basis. The total project also included research and development on a bench-scale hydrogasifier, one-dimensional (1-D) kinetic-model simulation, extensive algae stressing, oil extraction, lipid analysis and a half-acre algae farm demonstration at APS?s Redhawk testing facility. During the project, a two-acre algae testing facility with a half-acre algae cultivation area was built at the APS Redhawk 1000 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant located 55 miles west of Phoenix. The test site integrated flue gas delivery, CO2 capture and distribution, algae cultivation, algae nursery, algae harvesting, dewatering and onsite storage as well as water treatment. The site environmental, engineering, and biological parameters for the cultivators were monitored remotely. Direct biodiesel production from biomass through an acid-catalyzed transesterification reaction and a supercritical methanol transesterification reaction were evaluated. The highest oil-to-biodiesel conversion of 79.9% was achieved with a stressed algae sample containing 40% algae oil. The effort concluded that producing biodiesel directly from the algae biomass could be an efficient, cost-effective and readily scalable way to produce biodiesel by eliminating the oil extraction process.

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy T

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plantspower plants, petroleum refining, chemical processing industries, and natural gasnatural gas. If CO 2 capture and geologic sequestration from coal-fired power plants

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Design Considerations for Coal Plant Load Following Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of large scale 90 CO2 post combustion capture (PCC) on pulverized Coal (PC) power plants for both new build and retrofit scenarios. The CoalFleet program has undertaken extensive engineering and economic assessments of state-of-the-art ultra-supercritical (USC) PC with capture, alongside plants retrofitted with highly integrated PCC systems. Based on extensive knowledge accrued to date, this report aims to illustrate the ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Slipstream Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO Testing of a Membrane CO 2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of

204

Low-Energy Solvents for CO2 Capture Enabled by a Combination fo Enzymes and Ultrasonics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Solvents for CO Energy Solvents for CO 2 Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of

205

Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

CO2 Capture by Aqueous Absorption/Stripping Opportunities for Better Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture Capture by Aqueous Absorption/Stripping Opportunities for Better Technology by Gary Rochelle Department of Chemical Engineering University of Texas CO 2 Emissions by Source (1998) C o a l E l e c G a s E l e c . P e t r o . E l e c . I n d . C o a l I n d . G a s I n d . P e t r o . T r a n s . O t h e r MMTCE 0 100 200 300 400 500 Comparison of Power Technologies (500 MW Power Plant) P F & F G D G T C C I G C C CO 2 Wet Vol. % 5 15 0 10 20 Flue Gas (scfm) 0.0 5.0e+5 1.0e+6 1.5e+6 2.0e+6 2.5e+6 The Plan * Base Case MEA * Thermodynamics: Solvents for Reduced Energy: * CO2 Kinetics: Solvents for Increased Rates * Energy Integration * Amine Makeup: Degradation, Corrosion * Contactor Innovations * Four Promising Solvent Systems Typical Absorber / Stripper Flue Gas 2-10% O 2 3-10% CO 2 Rich Amine HX Lean Amine AB SO RB ER STRIPPER 100-120 o C CO 2 H 2 O (O 2 ) CO 2 < 2% Reboiler 1-2 atm

207

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005287 In this project, the Georgia Tech Research Corporation is using totally novel chemistryto engender the dramatic changes needed for widespread implementation of CO2 capture in a both environmentally benign and economical process. Current methods of CO2 post-combustion recovery from coal-fired power plants focus on such techniques as absorption in aqueous ethanolamine scrubbers - and this is now a mature technology unlikely to achieve a quantum change in either capacity or cost. The objective of this project is to develop a novel class of solvents for post-combustion recovery of CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants which will achieve a substantial increase in CO2 carrying capacity with a concomitant plummet in cost. The project team is a combination of chemical engineers and chemists with extensive experience in working with industrial partners to formulate novel solvents and to develop processes that are both environmentally benign and economically viable. Further, the team has already developed solvents called "reversible ionic liquids," essentially "smart" molecules which change properties abruptly in response to some stimulus, and these have quickly found a plethora of applications.

208

Valuing Gas Power Plants with CO2 Capture and Tradable Quotas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze investment in a gas fired power plant in a regime with tradable quotas for CO 2 emissions and with an option to install CO 2 capture technology. Such equipment is very costly and we find that high subsidies are required to entice the investors to install it, even when the captured CO 2 can be sold for enhanced oil recovery. Investment valuation is based on market prices of long term prices of energy forward contracts. The plant's operating flexibility and the investment delay opportunity under gas and electricity price uncertainty is taken into account. Based on prices from the Scandinavian electricity market and the UK natural gas market we find that the power plant investment should be delayed.

Thomas Dobbe; Stein-erik Fleten; Sjur Sigmo; T Power Plant Lifetime [years

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Demonstration Development Project: Large-Scale Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Demonstration Project Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has reviewed proposed demonstration sites for retrofitting post-combustion CO2 capture onto an existing coal-fired plant. This report discusses and reviews this set of demonstration projects to provide background information and the rationale for EPRI to pursue being involved in one or more of these projects.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

None

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Efficient Theoretical Screening of Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture Applications*  

SciTech Connect

By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO2 sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of allowing identification of thermodynamic properties of CO2 capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. For a given solid, the first step is to attempt to extract thermodynamic properties from thermodynamic databases and the available literatures. If the thermodynamic properties of the compound of interest are unknown, an ab initio thermodynamic approach is used to calculate them. These properties expressed conveniently as chemical potentials and heat of reactions, which obtained either from databases or from calculations, are further used for computing the thermodynamic reaction equilibrium properties of the CO2 absorption/desorption cycles. Only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are predicted at the desired process conditions are selected as CO2 sorbent candidates and are further considered for experimental validations. Solid sorbents containing alkali and alkaline earth metals have been reported in several previous studies to be good candidates for CO2 sorbent applications due to their high CO2 absorption capacity at moderate working temperatures. In addition to introducing our computational screening procedure, in this presentation we will summarize our results for solid systems composed by alkali and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides, and carbon- ates/bicarbonates to validate our methodology. Additionally, applications of our computational method to mixed solid systems of Li2O with SiO2/ZrO2 with different mixing ratios, our preliminary results showed that increasing the Li2O/SiO2 ratio in lithium silicates increases their corresponding turnover temperatures for CO2 capture reactions. Overall these theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with available experimental findings

Duan, Yuhua; Luebke, David; Pennline, Henry

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

213

Engineering and Economic Evaluations of Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant Designs with Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. The base cases are Greenfield designs without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture; two additional cases were studied with retrofitted full CO2 capture. The study represents Phase 3 of a multiyear study executed on behalf of the CoalFleet for Tomorrow program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes the deployment of advanced coal technologies, i...

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Cooling Requirements and Water Use Impacts of Advanced Coal-fired Power Plants with CO2 Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to the large cost impact that comes with including CO2 capture in coal power plants, the consumption of water also increases. The increase in water consumption could represent a significant barrier to the implementation of CO2 capture. Although it is assumed that technology improvements might reduce the cost and power consumption of future CO2 capture systems, it might not be feasible to implement CO2 capture if additional water is not available at a site. In addition, because many regions of...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846:...

216

Available Technologies: Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology ...

217

Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost - Energy Innovation ...  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a method that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology ...

218

Amine Enriched Solid Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,547,854 entitled "Amine Enriched Solid Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture."...

219

CO2 Capture Using Electrical Energy: Electrochemically Mediated Separation for Carbon Capture and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: MIT and Siemens Corporation are developing a process to separate CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants by using electrical energy to chemically activate and deactivate sorbents, or materials that absorb gases. The team found that certain sorbents bond to CO2 when they are activated by electrical energy and then transported through a specialized separator that deactivates the molecule and releases it for storage. This method directly uses the electricity from the power plant, which is a more efficient but more expensive form of energy than heat, though the ease and simplicity of integrating it into existing coal-fired power plants reduces the overall cost of the technology. This process could cost as low as $31 per ton of CO2 stored.

None

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental targets and quality of the feed to other sections, wherever applicable, without violating the operating constraints, and without sacrificing the efficiency. However, it was found that the emission of acid gases may far exceed the environmental targets and the overshoot of some of the key variables may be unacceptable under transient operation while following the load. A number of operational strategies and control configurations is explored for achieving these stringent requirements. The transient response of the plant is also studied by perturbing a number of key inputs.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Review of CO2-Capture Development Activities for Coal-Fired Power Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is used to produce a large proportion of the power generated in the US and around the world and is likely to continue doing so well into the future. Nevertheless, it faces a huge challenge in reducing its emissions of CO2 in response to concerns over global warming. One solution is to capture the CO2 and store it in geological strata beneath the surface of the earth. Research investigating this approach is being carried out worldwide, reflecting the global nature of the issue. The two most favored c...

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Amine-Based, Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns over global warming, technologies need to be developed that capture and store the CO2 released by fossil- fueled power plants. A study carried out in 2000 by Parsons and co-funded by the US-DOE and EPRI investigated the thermal and economic performance of supercritical pulverized coal (PC) combustion, E-Gas integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and natural gas combined cycle power plants with and without CO2 removal. The general conclusion was that for power plants with C...

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Progress in carbon dioxide capture and separation research for gasification-based power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present work is to investigate novel approaches, materials, and molecules for the abatement of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the pre-combustion stage of gasification-based power generation point sources. The capture/separation step for CO2 from large point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the Office of Research and Development of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the present research is focused on the capture/separation of carbon dioxide from fuel gas (precombustion gas) from processes such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process. For such applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical sorption, chemical sorption with solid sorbents, and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, processes based on dry, regenerable sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.; Luebke, D.; Jones, K.; Myers, C.; Morsi, B.; Heintz, Y.; Ilconich, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh Universitys approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Capturing and Sequestering CO2 from a Coal-Fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing and Sequestering CO Capturing and Sequestering CO 2 from a Coal-fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pamela L. Spath (pamela_spath @nrel.gov; (303) 275-4460) Margaret K. Mann (margaret_mann @nrel.gov; (303) 275-2921) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 INTRODUCTION It is technically feasible to capture CO 2 from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant and various researchers are working to understand the fate of sequestered CO 2 and its long term environmental effects. Sequestering CO 2 significantly reduces the CO 2 emissions from the power plant itself, but this is not the total picture. CO 2 capture and sequestration consumes additional energy, thus lowering the plant's fuel to electricity efficiency. To compensate for this, more fossil fuel must be

226

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Benefits Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: energyenvironment.pnl.gov/news/pdf/PNNL-19112_Revision_1_Final.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/smart-grid-estimation-energy-and-carb Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: "Resource Integration Planning,Mandates/Targets,Enabling Legislation,Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

227

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Project No.: DE-FE0013118 Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is developing and evaluating a hybrid membrane-absorption CO2 capture system. This work builds on prior DOE-funded work and combines MTR's Polaris(tm) membrane, in a low-pressure-drop, large area, plate-and-frame module, with UT Austin's piperazine (PZ) solvent and advanced, high-temperature and pressure regeneration technology. Preliminary estimates indicate that this hybrid system could lower the regeneration energy by 30 percent compared to that required with 30 weight percent monoethanolamine (MEA). MTR is evaluating two variations of the hybrid design consisting of the cross-flow Polaris membrane, which enriches flue gas to approximately 20 percent CO2, and an advanced 5 molal PZ advanced flash stripper with cold-rich bypass. The flash stripper will be optimized to take advantage of the higher CO2 concentration. In the first variation, the two systems are operated in series; in the second, the flue gas flow is split and treated by each system in parallel. The first phase of this project will include an examination of both hybrid configurations, using an integrated process model and a preliminary techno-economic assessment. In the second phase, MTR will manufacture and test a low pressure drop, large-area membrane module and UT Austin will modify their 0.1 MWe pilot plant and operate it under simulated series and parallel configurations. Based on the model and test results, the most promising configuration will be identified. In the final stage of the project, the membrane module will be integrated into the pilot plant where the fully integrated hybrid system, in its most promising cost optimized configuration, will be tested on simulated flue gas.

228

Performance Analysis of Existing 600MW Coal-Fired Power Plant with Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the techno-economic performance of 600 MW coal-fired power plant with and without ammonia-based CO2 capture process, based on the operating data of an existing power plant. The simulation and analysis, with fully consideration of ... Keywords: CO2 capture, aqueous ammonia, existing power plant, techno-economic performance

Gang Xu; Liqiang Duan; Mingde Zhao; Yongping Yang; Ji Li; Le Li; Haizhan Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A monitoring and diagnostic expert system for carbon dioxide capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research objective is to design and construct a knowledge-based decision support system for monitoring, control and diagnosis of the carbon dioxide capture process, which is a complicated task involving manipulation of sixteen components and their ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide capture, Diagnosis, Knowledge-based decision support system, Monitoring

Q. Zhou; C. W. Chan; P. Tontiwachiwuthikul

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Integration of H2 Separation Membranes with CO2 Capture and Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of H Integration of H 2 Separation Membranes with CO 2 Capture and Compression November 30, 2009 DOE/NETL- 401/113009 INTEGRATION OF H 2 SEPARATION MEMBRANES WITH CO 2 CAPTURE AND COMPRESSION DOE/NETL-401/113009 FINAL REPORT November 30, 2009 NETL Contact: Eric Grol Chemical Engineer Office of Systems, Analysis, and Planning National Energy Technology Laboratory www.netl.doe.gov ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by JM Energy Consulting, Inc. for Technology & Management Services, Inc. (TMS), at the request of the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This study was conducted over a forty-three month period beginning in April 2006. Project Managers Mr. Eric Grol (Dec. 2008 - Nov. 2009) Mr. Steven Ostheim

231

EPRI's Pulverized Coal Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Study Summary (Supplemental Project Funders' Issue)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) of CO2 to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power plants for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This overall project intends t...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Coal Technologies with CO2 Capture - Status, Risks, and Markets 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on advanced coal and CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies and demonstrations.BackgroundThe last year has been a challenging one for coal power generation in general and CCS in particular. New coal generation is slowing in many parts of the world outside of China and India, particularly in the United States, where low natural gas prices have caused a dash to gas, and proposed EPA regulations may make ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

234

NETL: Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Project No.: DE-FE0012862 Akermin is conducting laboratory and integrated bench-scale pilot testing to validate the performance of their next generation Biocatalyst Delivery System (BDS). This effort builds upon work conducted under a previous project. The novel system enables on-stream replacement of the catalyst and enables integration with an advanced process flow scheme. Akermin is exploring an enzyme-enabled advanced process flow scheme with non-volatile capture solutions, AKM-24 and potassium carbonate. The advanced process flow scheme is projected to have lower parasitic energy requirements and lower capital costs resulting in greater than 30 percent reduction in the cost of capture. The novel flow sheet enabled by the biocatalyst permits regeneration at lower temperatures allowing heat integration with the lowest grade steam from the power plant and minimizing water consumption. The existing 500 standard liters per minute (SLPM) bench unit will be modified to incorporate the next-generation BDS, accommodate the new process flow scheme, and reduce heat loss for better quantification of energy performance. The modified bench unit will be operated at the National Carbon Capture Center on actual flue gas.

235

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changesgas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.dioxide (CO 2 ) from fossil-fuel combustion (Raupach et

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvAnced compression AdvAnced compression B-540 AdvAnced compression U.s. depArtment of energy AdvAnced cArbon dioxide cAptUre r&d progrAm: technology UpdAte, mAy 2013 novel concepts for the compression of lArge volUmes of co 2 primary project goals Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing novel compression technology concepts to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) compression power requirements by 10% compared to conventional compressor designs. The basic concept is a semi-isothermal compression pro- cess where the CO 2 is continually cooled using an internal cooling jacket rather than using conventional interstage cooling. The project has completed thermodynamic (Phase I) and prototype testing (Phase II). A full-scale demonstration of a multi-stage, internally cooled

237

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems and CO{sub 2} capture processes. Financial models were developed to estimate the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, cost of electricity, and CO{sub 2} avoidance cost. Results showed that, depending on the plant size and the type of coal burned, CO{sub 2} avoidance cost is between $47/t to $67/t for a PC +MEA plant, between $22.03/t to $32.05/t for an oxygen combustion plant, and between $13.58/t to $26.78/t for an IGCC + Selexol plant. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact on the CO2 avoidance cost of the heat of absorption of solvent in an MEA plant and energy consumption of the ASU in an oxy-coal combustion plant. An economic analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant was also conducted. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 100 million gallons/year was estimated to be about $13.92/t.

M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International 1 is heading a research team to develop an innovative process for CO 2 capture that employs a dry, regenerable sorbent. The process is cyclic in that the sorbent...

239

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Capture Retrofit Options: Duke Edwardsport Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project supported by Duke Energy using tailored collaboration funds to study the potential impact to plant performance of retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture on the Duke Edwardsport integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Duke Edwardsport IGCC plant is under construction and scheduled to begin operation in September 2012. Details on the project have been published in a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, Duke Edwardsport Gener...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects Sleipner, Snhvit, In Salah and Weyburn are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the publics willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earths climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport, injection, monitoring, management and verification for most large CO2 source types and in most CO2 storage formation types, exist.

Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

243

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/15536/carb Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-capture-and-storage-de Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This report discusses the value of carbon capture and storage (CCS)

244

Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

245

Optimal control system design for IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing an optimal control system for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture addresses the challenge of efficiently operating and controlling a coal-fed IGCC plant with the desired extent of CO2 capture in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. The control system design needs to optimize a desired scalar objective function while satisfying all the operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. Various objective functions can be considered for the control system design such as maximization of profit, maximization of the power produced, or minimization of the auxiliary power. The design of such a control system makes the plant suitable to play an active role in the smart grid era as the plant will have the required agility. In addition, other penalty function(s) such as emission penalties for CO2 or other criteria pollutants can be considered in the framework as well as losses associated with any hydrogen or carbon monoxide loses. The proposed control system design is performed in two stages. In the first stage, a top-down analysis is performed to generate a list of controlled, manipulated, and disturbance variables considering a scalar operational objective and other process constraints. In the second stage, a bottom-up approach for simultaneous design of the control structure and the controllers is used. In this paper, the first stage of the two-stage approach is applied to the IGCCs acid gas removal (AGR) process which removes both H2S and CO2 from the shifted synthesis gas. While these results are still preliminary, they demonstrate the application of the proposed approach for a commercial-scale plant and show some interesting results related to controlled variable selection. Such an approach can be followed not only to design control systems for new power plants, but also to retrofit control systems for existing plants with suitable modifications.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS R&D CollaboRations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D CollaboRations R&D CollaboRations B-556 R&D CollaboRations U.s. DepaRtment of eneRgy aDvanCeD CaRbon DioxiDe CaptURe R&D pRogRam: teChnology UpDate, may 2013 paRtneRship foR Co 2 CaptURe primary project goals The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) is conducting pilot-scale testing to demonstrate and evaluate a range of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture technologies to develop key technical and economic information that can be used to examine the feasibility of capture technologies as a function of fuel type and system configuration. technical goals * Integrate a high-efficiency flexible capture system with existing pilot-scale combustion

247

Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labs total carbon footprint.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

249

Review of CO2 Capture Development Activities for Coal-Fired Power Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is to be implemented and play a role in keeping electricity prices affordable under proposed emission restrictions, its rate of progress needs to be accelerated. Demonstration plants need to be deployed in the short-term to allow the technology to evolve and become more efficient and costeffective. Achieving this objective is the primary objective of EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow Program. This report provides an up-to-date review of the progress being made in pilot and d...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simultaneous H2 purification and CO2 capture in a post-gasifier membrane reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NETL envisions that the gasification of carbonaceous feedstocks may be the near- to mid-term sources of hydrogen for the transition to a renewable, hydrogen-based economy. However, the environmental impacts associated with the generation and emission of greenhouses gases from the gasification process remains a substantial concern. Therefore, NETL has devoted substantial resources towards the identification of efficient hydrogen separation and carbon capture/sequestration technologies. Hydrogen membranes integrated into a water-gas shift membrane reactor have been identified as a promising means of maximizing the production of pure hydrogen while simultaneously yielding a high-pressure, concentrated CO2 containing stream ready for sequestration.

Morreale, B.D.; Howard, B.H.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; Iyoha, O.; Ciocco, M.V.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon dioxide captured by a clean coal project in the state. The Bureau of Economic...

252

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Carbon DioxiDe Capture from flue Gas usinG Dry reGenerable sorbents Background Currently...

253

Accelerating progress toward operational excellence of fossil energy plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This paper will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Turton, R. Bhattacharyya, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NETL: Carbon Capture FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is CO2 captured? How is CO2 captured? Chilled Ammonia CO2 Capture Process Facility at American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Plant Chilled Ammonia CO2 Capture Process Facility at American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Plant Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture involves separating CO2 from other gases generated by industrial processes or burning fossil fuels. CO2 capture can remove as much as 95% of the CO2 from these processes. There are two major types of anthropogenic CO2 sources: mobile and stationary. Mobile sources include things like cars, trucks, trains, boats, and aircrafts that burn fossil fuels and generate CO2. Capturing CO2 from mobile sources is currently impractical. Stationary sources include power plants and industrial facilities that burn fossil fuels, as

255

Qualitative and Quantitative Comparison of Two Promising Oxy-Fuel Power Cycles for CO2 Capture Presentation at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide ever rising emissions of greenhouse gases to atmosphere-> global warming and environmental change Kyoto Protocol demands the reduction of greenhouse gases, mainly CO2 In EU: strong pressure on utilities and companies to reduce CO2 emissions Carbon capture and storage (CCS) as short and mid term solution Background- II (CCS Technologies) Post-combustion: CO2-Capture from exhaust gas (chemical absorbtion, membranes, ) Pre-combustion: Decarbonization of fossil fuel to produce pure hydrogen for power cycle (e.g. steam reforming of methane, ) Oxy-fuel power generation: Internal combustion with pure oxygen and CO2/H2O as working fluid enabling CO2 separation by condensation Which technology has the best chances to dominate future power generation?

Thermal Turbomaschinery; Asme Turbo Expo; Wolfgang Sanz; Herbert Jericha; Bernhard Bauer; Emil Gttlich

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS R&D CollaboRation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D CollaboRations B-556 R&D CollaboRations U.s. DepaRtment of eneRgy aDvanCeD CaRbon DioxiDe CaptURe R&D pRogRam: teChnology UpDate, may 2013 paRtneRship foR Co 2 CaptURe primary...

257

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration in Deep Geological Formations  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations has quickly emerged as an important option for reducing greenhouse emissions. If CCS is implemented on the scale needed for large reductions in CO2 emissions, a billion of tonnes or more of CO2 will be sequestered annually a 250 fold increase over the amount sequestered annually today. Sequestering these large volumes will require a strong scientific foundation of the coupled hydrological-geochemical-geomechanical processes that govern the long term fate of CO2 in the subsurface. Methods to characterize and select sequestration sites, subsurface engineering to optimize performance and cost, safe operations, monitoring technology, remediation methods, regulatory oversight, and an institutional approach for managing long term liability are also needed.

Benson, Dr. Sally [Stanford University; Cole, David R [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Carbon dioxide capture and separation techniques for advanced power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (postcombustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for hybrid membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic silanes incorporated into an alumina support or ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. An overview of two novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of each technology.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Jones, K.L.; Ilconich, J.B.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessment Hydrogen Production with CO2 Capture, Volume 1: Baseline State of the Art Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Production with CO 2 Capture Volume 1: Baseline State-of- the-Art Plants August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1434 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

260

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Use of Ionic Liquids as Physical Solvents for Selective Capture of CO2 from Fuel Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

This study is to investigate the potential use of ionic liquids (ILs) as physical solvents for selective CO2 capture from post water-gas-shift reactor streams at elevated pressures and temperatures. The equilibrium gas solubility (x*) and the volumetric mass transfer coefficients (kLa) for CO2 and H2 in two different ILs (TEGO IL K5 and TEGO IL P51P) were determined. The data were obtained in an agitated reactor, equipped with sight-windows, in wide ranges of pressures, temperatures, mixing speeds, and liquid heights. Under the operating conditions investigated, the CO2 solubilities in the two ILs increased with pressure at constant temperature and decreased with temperature at constant pressure. Also, the volumetric liquid-side mass transfer coefficients of CO2 increased with mixing speed, pressure, and temperature and decreased with liquid height. The CO2 solubilities in the TEGO IL K5 were greater than those in the other two ILs at 500 K. Under similar operating conditions, the CO2 solubilities in the two ILs were greater than those of H2, which reflects the selective nature of ILs for CO2 capture. In addition, the ILs appeared to have negligible vapor pressure up to 500 K, which presents an advantage over conventional physical solvents currently employed for CO2 capture from post water-gas-shift reactor streams. This study demonstrated the thermal stability of the ILs and highlighted their ability to selectively capture CO2 at temperatures up to 500 K and pressures as high as 30 bars.

Heintz, Y.J.; Sehabiague, L.; Morsi, B.I.; Jones, K.L.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Combining geothermal energy capture with geologic carbon dioxide sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of disposal, it could also be used as a working fluid in geo- thermal energy capture. CO2's high heat facility, and biofuel plants. Geothermal energy could be used for electricity generation, district heating spacing and higher permeability. [12] Fluid mobility density divided by dynamic vis- cosity (i

Saar, Martin O.

263

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be...

265

Synthesis and Characterization of Microporous Coordination Polymers as Adsorbents for CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The accumulation of CO2 in the Earths atmosphere is an important environmental issue, and coal-fired power plants are significant contributors to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The (more)

Kizzie, Austin Cornell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CO 2 in an enhanced oil recovery system. Environ Sciwhich coal, natural gas, and oil contribute about 41%, 21%,of CO 2 emissions. Natural gas- and oil-fired power plants

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Field Demonstration of CO2 Capture from Coal-Derived Syngas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. A significant portion of these CO 2 emissions are caused by the combustion of fossil fuels. One approach to controlling CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants is...

268

Microsoft PowerPoint - 130709 DOE-NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Linde Presentation v1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slipstream pilot plant demonstration of an amine- Slipstream pilot plant demonstration of an amine- based post-combustion capture technology for CO 2 capture from coal-fired power plant flue gas DOE funding award DE-FE0007453 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting Krish R. Krishnamurthy, Linde LLC July 8-11, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA 2 The Linde Group Overview and Carbon Capture Expertise 1 Linde Engineering Technology-focused Air Separation Global #1 Air Separation Global #1 Hydrogen/Syn Gas Global #2 Hydrogen/Syn Gas Global #2 Olefins Global #2 Olefins Global #2 Natural Gas Global #3 Natural Gas Global #3 HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants ASU Tonnage Plants >300 plants ASU Tonnage Plants >300 plants ECOVAR Std Plants >1,000 plants ECOVAR Std Plants >1,000 plants

269

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Load-following control of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a decentralized control strategy is considered for load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture without flaring the syngas. The control strategy considered is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the power load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. However, the syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant timedelay. In this work, a modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is considered for syngas pressure control given that conventional PID controllers show poor control performance for integrating processes with large time delays. The conventional PID control is augmented with an internal feedback loop. The P-controller used in this internal loop converts the integrating process to an open-loop stable process. The resulting secondorder plus time delay model uses a PID controller where the tuning parameters are found by minimizing the integral time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) for disturbance rejection. A plant model with single integrator and time delay is identified by a P-control method. When a ramp change is introduced in the set-point of the load controller, the performance of both the load and pressure controllers with the modified PID control strategy is found to be superior to that using a traditional PID controller. Key

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regenerable Sorbent Technique for Capturing CO2 Using Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

This technology allows foroptimal CO2 removal capacity for a given absorption and regeneration reactor size. Management of water loading in this ...

275

In Situ Molecular Spectroscopic Evidence for CO2 Intercalation into Montmorillonite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO2 (scCO2) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e. close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 C and 90 bar). The CO2 molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO2 conditions is due to CO2 migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO2 molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO2 does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state.

Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Thompson, Christopher J.; Miller, Quin RS; Martin, Paul F.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rau et al., pg. 1 Rau et al., pg. 1 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington D.C., May 14-17, 2001 Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Greg H. Rau 1,2 , Ken Caldeira 2 , Kevin G. Knauss 2 , Bill Downs 3 , and Hamid Sarv 3 1 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (L-103, LLNL, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550; 925-423-7990, rau4@llnl.gov) 2 Energy and Environment Directorate, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550 3 McDermott Technology, Inc., 1562 Beeson Str., Alliance, OH 44601 Introduction Various methods have been proposed for mitigating anthropogenic CO 2 release to the atmos- phere, including storage via enhanced biological uptake on land or in the ocean and via sub- terranean or -marine injection of captured CO

279

An Introduction to CO2 Separation and Capture Technologies Howard Herzog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Chemical Plant in Trona, CA, which uses this process to produce CO2 for carbonation of brine Chemical Co. Trona, CA 800 coal boiler Carbonation of brine (soda ash) Kerr-McGee MEA Operational since

280

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant withAnalysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.of CO 2 emissions. Natural gas- and oil-fired power plants

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY FROM COAL WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) reactors. Our focus is on separating H2 from the syngas and processing the carbon-bearing raffinate are replaced by, in order: syngas cooler, low-temperature WGS reactor, H2S and CO2 physical absorption units

282

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Plant-Level Simulation Model for Evaluating CO2 Capture Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-, SC-, USC-PC) Dry feed gasifier and sulfur capture system (Shell) Added gas turbine option for IGCC

284

Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

286

TABLE OF CONTENTS Carbon Dioxide Reduction Metallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Utilization of Sequestered Carbon Dioxide as a. Booster of Hydrogen ... CO2 Capture and Sequestration Implications for the Metals. Industry.

287

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-Concentrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amine Absorbent Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory (DOENETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC)...

288

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center Launched in Decatur, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the nations largest carbon capture and storage endeavors includes an education center for students and local residents.

289

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be removed in the steam condensate prior to CO 2 compressionremoved in the steam condensate prior to CO 2 compression.CdS and precipitate with steam condensate. B Calculated to

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of Ionic Liquids in Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

under vacuum with heating N N NH 2 BF 4 2 + CO 2 N N N H N N H 3 N O O 2 BF 4 Bates, E. D.; Mayton, R. D.; Ntai, I.; Davis, J. H., J. Am. Chem., 2002, 124, 926....

291

Modeling the release of CO2 in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of capturing and disposing of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants has recently received attention as a possible mitigation strategy to counteract potential global warming due ...

Liro, Christopher R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage of Captured Carbon Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands May 8, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1358 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

293

THE ECONOMICS OF CO2 SEPARATION AND CAPTURE Howard J. Herzog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the closure of these capture facilities. However, the North American Chemical Plant in Trona, CA, which uses North American Chemical Co. Trona, CA 800 coal boiler Carbonation of brine (soda ash) Kerr-McGee MEA

294

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal beds (for coal-fired plants) and natural gasgas combustion, coal-fired plants require the capture ofbe old, inefficient coal-fired plants, resulting in a large

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

An Intergrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, the project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted.

Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests are in operation phase. The experimental installations are discussed in this paper.

Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Retrofit of CO2 Capture of Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant target for control of CO2 emission would be stationary power plants as they are large sources and relatively easy to control. Most of the focus of studies has been on new plants Only a few have looked at retrofits of the existing plants and those have mainly concentrated on coal-fired systems. However, there are a large number of existing gas-fired combined cycle plant in existence and understanding whether retrofit of these plants is realistic is important. This study considers retrofit of...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Framework for viewing theoretical, technological, economic and market potential of carbon dioxide capture and storage  

SciTech Connect

Paper presents an intelectual framework for viewing how the theoretical, technological, economic and market potentials of carbon dioxide capture and storage are related to each other.

Dooley, James J.

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the development of an advanced chemical looping combustion (CLC) system for coal-fired power generation that removes greater than 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) with a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon dioxide capture from coal-fired power plants : a real potions analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2) price environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal ...

Sekar, Ram Chandra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a novel class of CO{sub 2} capture solvents, Reversible Ionic Liquids (RevILs), that offer high absorption capacity through two modes of capture: chemical reaction (chemisorption) and physical solubility (physisorption). These solvents are silicon containing alkaline compounds such as silylamines that form a liquid salt (ionic liquid) upon reaction with CO{sub 2}. Subsequently, modest elevations in temperature reverse the reaction and yield pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. By incorporating Si in the molecules we have reduced the viscosity, thereby improving the mass transfer rates of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption and decreasing the processing costs for pumping the solvent. In this project, we have made systematic changes to the structure of these compounds to improve several physical and thermodynamic properties important for CO{sub 2} capture. Through these structure-property paradigms, we have obtained a RevIL which requires only a third of the energy required by conventional aqueous MEA process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture.

Eckert, Charles; Liotta, Charles

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Accelerated Development of Promising Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has actively searched and evaluated new post-combustion technologies to understand their merits and potential application to the utility industry. This technical update report presents an update to the following five previously published EPRI reports on the subject:Assessment of Post-Combustion Capture Technology Developments (1012796)Program on Technology Innovation: Post-Combustion ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Laboratory of Energy Science and Engineering of ETH Zurich is offering a PhD position "Production of hydrogen with simultaneous CO2 capture via the sorbent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam reforming reactions of, e.g. methane or glycerol, are investigated, i.e. the steam reforming "Production of hydrogen with simultaneous CO2 capture via the sorbent enhanced steam reforming reactions will be functionalized via the addition of reforming catalysts, e.g. Ni or Rh. Ultimately, the bi-functional catalyst-CO2

Daraio, Chiara

305

MathematicalModelingofCarbonDioxide(CO2)Injection intheSubsurfaceforImprovedHydrocarbonRecoveryand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA World Energy Demand Global energy demand from fossil fuels is expected to remain over 70% in 2035 [1]. Society must balance its high demand, CA, USA). Carbon Dioxide Injection for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery Simulation of diffusion

Firoozabadi, Abbas

306

An Integrated Hydrogen Producton-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted. The experimental results are discussed in this paper.

Z. Wang; K.B. Bota; D. Day

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for 1100 F Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previously published (2000) evaluation of the post-combustion capture (PCC) of CO2 by Parsons and cofunded by DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) concluded that the technology was not an efficient or cost-effective way to proceed. However, since publication of the study, significant improvements have been identified. This proposed study is intended to incorporate and quantify the identified improvements and reevaluate amine solvent-based processes for post-combustion CO2 capture, estab...

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

EIA - Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? International Energy Outlook 2010 Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world'ss carbon dioxide emissions? The pursuit of greenhouse gas reductions has the potential to reduce global coal use significantly. Because coal is the most carbon-intensive of all fossil fuels, limitations on carbon dioxide emissions will raise the cost of coal relative to the costs of other fuels. Under such circumstances, the degree to which energy use shifts away from coal to other fuels will depend largely on the costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants relative to the costs of using other, low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources. The continued widespread use of coal could rely on the cost and availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies that capture carbon dioxide and store it in geologic formations.

309

EPRI's Pulverized Coal Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Study Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed power plants, for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous ultra supercritical (USC) PCC design studies by CoalFleet is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This overall project aims to highlight ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using SOlid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas Using Solid from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

311

Coal Technologies with CO2 CaptureStatus, Risks, and Markets: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a technical review of the different types of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies that can be applied to each coal power generation type and updates key advances in CCS that occurred in 2013, including ongoing and proposed CCS demonstrations.BackgroundWhile coal power continues to be the fastest growing power source globally, it has been targeted by recent greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction environmental policies in some countries ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Theoretical Predictions of the thermodynamic Properties of Solid Sorbents Capture CO2 Applications  

SciTech Connect

We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promising CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.

Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan; Luebke David; Pennline, Henry

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit to Intermountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power plants for five host participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultrasupercritical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant designs, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This project highlights the technical and economic issues a...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture ...  

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Other Gases Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

315

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

Robert Finley

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis Ram Chandra Sekar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture in Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation

322

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

CO2 capture, reuse, and sequestration technologies for mitigating global climate change  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently supply over 85% of the world`s energy needs. They will remain in abundant supply well into the 21st century. They have been a major contributor to the high standard of living enjoyed by the industrialized world. We have learned how to extract energy from fossil fuels in environmentally friendly ways, controlling the emissions of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates. Even with these added pollution controls, the cost of fossil energy generated power keeps falling. Despite this good news about fossil energy, its future is clouded because of the environmental and economic threat posed by possible climate change, commonly referred to as the `greenhouse effect`. The major greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the major source of anthropogenic C0{sub 2} is combustio of fossil fuels. The potential impacts of global climate change are many and varied, though there is much uncertainty as to the timing and magnitude (Watson et al., 1996). Because of the potential adverse impacts, the world community has adopted the Framework Convention on Climate Change (see Box 1). The urgency of their work was recently underscored when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued their Second Assessment Report which stated that `the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate`. The goal of stabilization of greenhouse gas emissions at their 1990 levels in the year 2000 will not be met by the vast majority of countries. Based on this experience, it is obvious that more aggressive technology responses are required if we want to control greenhouse gas emissions.

Herzog, H.J., MIT Energy Laboratory

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CANMET CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CANMET CO2 Consortium-O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion Project No.: IEA-CANMET-CO2 (International Agreement) Photograph of CANMET's Vertical Combustor Research Facility. Photograph of CANMET’s Vertical Combustor Research Facility. The CANMET carbon dioxide (CO2) consortium will conduct research to further the development of oxy-combustion for retrofit to coal-fired power plants. Research activities include: (1) modeling of an advanced, supercritical pressure oxy-coal plant, including an analysis of the impact of oxygen (O2) purity and O2 partial enrichment, overall process performance, and cost; (2) testing of pilot-scale CO2 capture and compression; (3) investigating CO2 phase change at liquid and supercritical states in gas mixtures

326

ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the second year of the program, January-December 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes and confirmation of process economics, significant future progress is expected. Concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been investigated. OTM reactor combustion testing was delayed to insufficient reliability of the earlier OTM materials. Substantial improvements to reliability have been identified and testing will recommence early in 2004. Promising OTM material compositions and OTM architectures have been identified that improve the reliability of the ceramic elements. Economic evaluation continued. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton CO{sub 2}.

John Sirman; Leonard Switzer; Bart van Hassel

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Engineering Feasibility of CO2 Capture on an Existing U.S. Coal-Fired Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEASIBILITY OF CO FEASIBILITY OF CO 2 CAPTURE ON AN EXISTING US COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT Nsakala ya Nsakala (nsakala.y.nsakala@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2018) John Marion (john.l.marion@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4539) Carl Bozzuto (carl.bozzuto@power.alstom.com; 860-285-5007) Gregory Liljedahl (greg.n.liljedahl@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4833) Mark Palkes (mark.palkes@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2676) ALSTOM Power Inc. US Power Plant Laboratories 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 David Vogel (david.c.vogel@us.abb.com; 713-821-4312) J.C. Gupta (jcgupta@us.abb.com; 713-821-5093) ABB Lummus Global Inc. 3010 Briarpark Houston, TX 77042 Manoj Guha (mkguha@aep.com; 614-223-1285) American Electric Power 1 Riverside Plaza Columbus, OH 43215 Howard Johnson (hjohnson@odod.state.oh.us; 614-644-8368)

328

Better Enzymes for Carbon Capture: Low-Cost Biological Catalyst to Enable Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Codexis is developing new and efficient forms of enzymes known as carbonic anhydrases to absorb CO2 more rapidly and under challenging conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Carbonic anhydrases are common and are among the fastest enzymes, but they are not robust enough to withstand the harsh environment found in the power plant exhaust steams. In this project, Codexis will be using proprietary technology to improve the enzymes ability to withstand high temperatures and large swings in chemical composition. The project aims to develop a carbon-capture process that uses less energy and less equipment than existing approaches. This would reduce the cost of retrofitting todays coal-fired power plants.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal-fired Plants .capture technologies to coal-fired plants is also likely togroups. Conventional Coal-fired Plants Sulfur During

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Update on Utilization or Storage of CO2 Through Chemical, Biological, or Mineral Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere are regulated, carbon capture from fossil-fired power plants is likely to become required. Many options for storing, sequestering, reusing, or converting the captured CO2 have been proposed. While storage or sequestration of the captured CO2 can reduce emissions to the atmosphere, beneficial reuse or conversion of the CO2 can potentially be much more advantageous by not only reducing emissions but also producing a ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. CO 2 COMPRESSION AT THE FOSSIL ENERGY COMPLEX ..106States. Starting from todays fossil energy system, assessDesign of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and

Ogden, Joan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Impact of Post-Synthesis Modification of Nanoporous Organic Frameworks on Selective Carbon Dioxide Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Porous organic polymers containing nitrogen-rich building units are among the most promising materials for selective CO2 capture and separation applications that impact the environment and (more)

?slamo?lu, Timur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W.P. , Srivastava, R.K. and Wendt, J.O.L. , 1995. SorbentT.W. , Shadman, F. and Wendt, J.O.L. , 1994. Metal capture

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Value of the Option to Capture and Store CO2 From Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of different generation technologies are vying for the next round of generation investment including new coal generation, but new coal faces a number of challenges. While technology solutions are available to comply with currently contemplated regulations on SO2, NOX, and mercury, methods to capture and store CO2 are just beginning to be tested at small scale. Potential future climate policies that limit the emissions of CO2 by charging for CO2 emissions can significantly affect the cost of coal...

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment - Eliminating CO2 Emission  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the potential of a new process technology to reduce the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission from the production of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) pigment. TiO{sub 2} is one of the most commonly used minerals in the chemical manufacturing industry. It has been commercially processed as a pigment since the early 1900's, and has a wide variety of domestic and industrial applications. TiO{sub 2} pigment is currently produced primarily by the use of the so called ?chloride process?. A key step of the chloride process relies on high temperature carbo-chlorination of TiO{sub 2} bearing raw materials, hence producing large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The new method uses a chemical/metallurgical sequential extraction methodology to produce pigment grade TiO{sub 2} from high-TiO{sub 2} slag. The specific project objectives were to 1) study and prove the scientific validity of the concept, 2) understand the primary chemical reactions and the efficiency of sequential extraction schemes, 3) determine the properties of TiO{sub 2} produced using the technology, and 4) model the energy consumptions and environmental benefits of the technology. These objectives were successfully met and a new process for producing commercial quality TiO{sub 2} pigment was developed and experimentally validated. The process features a unique combination of established metallurgical processes, including alkaline roasting of titania slag followed by leaching, solvent extraction, hydrolysis, and calcination. The caustic, acidic, and organic streams in the process will also be regenerated and reused in the process, greatly reducing environmental waste. The purpose and effect of each of these steps in producing purified TiO{sub 2} is detailed in the report. The levels of impurities in our pigment meet the requirements for commercial pigment, and are nearly equivalent to those of two commercial pigments. Solvent extraction with an amine extractant proved to be extremely effective in achieving these targets. A model plant producing 100,000 tons TiO{sub 2} per year was designed that would employ the new method of pigment manufacture. A flow sheet was developed and a mass and energy balance was performed. A comparison of the new process and the chloride process indicate that implementation of the new process in the US would result in a 21% decrease in energy consumption, an annual energy savings of 42.7 million GJ. The new process would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 21% in comparison to the chloride process, an annual reduction of 2.70 million tons of CO{sub 2}. Since the process equipment employed in the new process is well established in other industrial processes and the raw materials for the two processes are identical we believe the capital, labor and materials cost of production of pigment grade TiO{sub 2} using the new method would be at least equivalent to that of the chloride process. Additionally, it is likely that the operating costs will be lower by using the new process because of the reduced energy consumption. Although the new process technology is logical and feasible based on its chemistry, thermodynamic principles, and experimental results, its development and refinement through more rigorous and comprehensive research at the kilogram scale is needed to establish it as a competitive industrial process. The effect of the recycling of process streams on the final product quality should also be investigated. Further development would also help determine if the energy efficiency and the environmental benefits of the new process are indeed significantly better than current commercial methods of pigment manufacture.

Fang, Zhigang Zak [University of Utah] [University of Utah

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generation. Large coal-fired power plants will requireof CO 2 from coal- fired power plants. Aside from economics,of CO 2 from coal-fired power plants (the largest stationary

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Economic Evaluation of CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancement Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO2 in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of the carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MWe integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study w...

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teChnology uPDate, may 2013 eleCtroChemiCal membrane for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture & Power generation primary project goals FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is developing an...

342

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Hot Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same

343

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

344

A Summary of EPRI's Pulverized Coal (PC) and Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Post Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Studies: The Five North American Retrofit Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) technology to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized bed (CFB) power plants, for five different host participant sites. The knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical PCC design studiesdescribed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for 1100 F Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sorption of Carbon Dioxide from Oxy-fuel Combustion by Lithium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials for CO2 Capture and Conversion. Presentation Title, Sorption of Carbon Dioxide from Oxy-fuel Combustion by Lithium Orthosilicate.

346

Membrane Process to Sequester CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MeMbrane Process to sequester co MeMbrane Process to sequester co 2 froM Power Plant flue Gas Background Carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to contribute significantly to global warming climate change. The direct approach to address this problem is to capture the carbon dioxide in flue gas and sequester it underground. However, the high cost of separating and capturing CO 2 with conventional technologies prevents the adoption of this approach. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a new membrane process to capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. Description Direct CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas has been the subject of many studies. Currently, CO 2 capture with amine absorption seems to be the leading candidate technology-although membrane processes have been suggested. The principal

347

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel High Capacity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005310 GE Global Research is using both computational and laboratory methods to identify and produce novel oligomeric solvents for the post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). An oligomer is a polymer with relatively few structural units. Molecular and system modeling, advanced synthetic methods, and laboratory testing will be used to identify oligomeric solvents that have the potential for high CO2 capture capacity with corresponding low regeneration energy requirements. GE Global Test Equipment GE Global Test Equipment Related Papers and Publications: Aminosilicone Solvents for Low Cost CO2 Capture [PDF-2.0MB] (Sept 2010) Presentation given at the 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting

348

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO31.5H2O  

SciTech Connect

By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO2 absorption/desorption reactions with dehydrated potassium carbonates through K2CO31.5H2O + CO2 = 2KHCO3 + 0.5H2O(g) are analyzed. The energy change and the chemical potential of this reaction have been calculated and used to evaluate its thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. The results indicate that the K2CO31.5H2O can only be applied for postcombustion CO2 capture technology at temperatures lower than its phase transition temperature, which depends on the CO2 pressure and the steam pressure with the best range being PH2O ? 1.0 bar. Above the phase transition temperature, the sorbent will be regenerated into anhydrous K2CO3. If the steam pressure PH2O is much greater than 1.0 bar, it is possible to use the K2CO31.5H2O sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture technology. Compared to anhydrous K2CO3, K2CO31.5H2O requires less energy for regeneration.

Duan, Yuhua; Luebkes,David R.; Pennline, Henry W; Li, Bingyun Li; Janik, Michael J.; Halley, Woods

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Barriers Abstract This report discusses the value of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies for developing countries and identifies financial approaches for CCS...

351

Updated Cost and Performance Estimates for Clean Coal Technologies Including CO2 Capture - 2003: Updated Economics of Fossil Fuel Power Technologies Including an Assessment of CO2 Capture - 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are considerable uncertainties about the emissions regulations that will be applicable to both existing and new coal-based power plants. However, most observers anticipate a progressive tightening of emissions regulation with regard to SOx, NOx, particulate, and mercury emissions. Since coal-fired power plants produce 31% of the U.S. CO2 emissions and they are the largest point sources, there is also the possibility of legislation requiring the reduction of CO2 emissions. The optimum choice of tech...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary February 2013 DOE/EIS-0473 Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (304) 285-4145 or Mark.Lusk@netl.doe.gov

353

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

CO2 Impurities Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to identify what chemical contaminants exist (or are expected to exist) in a post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using aqueous amines and to gather and summarize some representative thermodynamic, chemical, and environmental fate and transport data/properties for these species. The eventual goal of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) work in this area is to identify liquid/solid/gaseous contaminants and evaluate or predict their fate in the env...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Applied to Great River Energy's Coal-Fired Coal Creek Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed power plants for five "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This project highlights the technical and economic issues associated with retrofitting existing PC...

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the evaluation of CO2-EOR projects has been developed. This model includes both reservoir simulation to handle reservoir properties, fluid flow and injection and production schedules, and a numerical economic model that generates a monthly cash flow stream from the outputs of the reservoir model. This model is general enough to be used with any project and provide a solid common basis to all of them. This model was used to evaluate CO2-EOR injection and production strategies and develop an optimization workflow. Producer constraints (maximum oil and gas production rates) should be optimized first to generate a reference case. Further improvements can then be obtained by optimizing the injection starting date and the injection plateau rate. Investigation of sensitivity of CO2-EOR to the presence of an aquifer showed that CO2 injection can limit water influx in the reservoir and is beneficial to recovery, even with a strong water drive. The influence of some key parameters was evaluated: the producer should be completed in the top part of the reservoir, while the injector should be completed over the entire thickness; it is recommended but not mandatory that the injection should start as early as possible to allow for lower water cut limit. Finally, the sensitivity of the economics of the projects to some key parameters was evaluated. The most influent parameter is by far the oil price, but other parameters such as the CO2 source to field distance, the pipeline cost scenario, the CO2 source type or the CO2 market price have roughly the same influence. It is therefore possible to offset an increase of one of them by reducing another.

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Guidelines for carbon dioxide capture, transport and storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this effort was to develop a set of preliminary guidelines and recommendations for the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies in the United States. The CCS Guidelines are written for those who may be involved in decisions on a proposed project: the developers, regulators, financiers, insurers, project operators, and policymakers. Contents are: Part 1: introduction; Part 2: capture; Part 3: transport; Part 4; storage; Part. 5 supplementary information. Within these parts, eight recommended guidelines are given for: CO{sub 2} capture; ancillary environmental impacts from CO{sub 2}; pipeline design and operation; pipeline safety and integrity; siting CO{sub 2} pipelines; pipeline access and tariff regulation; guidelines for (MMV); risk assessment; financial responsibility; property rights and ownership; site selection and characterisation; injection operations; site closure; and post-closure. 18 figs., 9 tabs., 4 apps.

Hanson, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT APPENDIX H BEG MODELING REPORT DOE/EIS-0473 NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 Reservoir modeling and simulation for estimating migration extents of injectate-CO 2 in support of West Ranch oilfield NEPA/EIS Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin May 4, 2012 Summary It is anticipated that anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2-A) will be injected into the deep (5,000-6,000 ft below sea level) subsurface for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) at the West Ranch oilfield beginning in early 2015. The purpose of this report is to present reservoir modeling and simulation

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Power of Monitoring Stations and a CO2 Fertilization Effect: Evidence from Causal Relationships between NDVI and Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two hypotheses are tested: 1) monitoring stations (e.g., Mauna Loa) are not able to measure changes in atmospheric concentrations of CO2 that are generated by changes in terrestrial vegetation at distant locations; 2) changes in the atmospheric ...

R. K. Kaufmann; L. F. Paletta; H. Q. Tian; R. B. Myneni; R. D. DArrigo

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

363

ARM - Measurement - CO2 concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 concentration The amount of carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas, per unit of volume. Categories Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is...

364

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program:U.S. Department of Energy, Carbon Sequestration Atlas of theand liability for carbon capture and sequestration, Environ.

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products Background Many industrial processes contribute large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the earth's atmosphere. In an effort to reduce the amount of CO 2 released to the atmosphere, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding efforts to develop CO 2 capture and storage technologies. In addition to permanent storage of CO 2 in underground reservoirs, some

367

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2004 and March 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. RTI has produced laboratory scale batches (approximately 300 grams) of supported sorbents (composed of 20 to 40% sodium carbonate) with high surface area and acceptable activity. Initial rates of weight gain of the supported sorbents when exposed to a simulated flue gas exceeded that of 100% calcined sodium bicarbonate. One of these sorbents was tested through six cycles of carbonation/calcination by thermogravimetric analysis and found to have consistent carbonation activity. Kinetic modeling of the regeneration cycle on the basis of diffusion resistance at the particle surface is impractical, because the evolving gases have an identical composition to those assumed for the bulk fluidization gas. A kinetic model of the reaction has been developed on the basis of bulk motion of water and carbon dioxide at the particle surface (as opposed to control by gas diffusion). The model will be used to define the operating conditions in future laboratory- and pilot-scale testing.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Amine enriched solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The new method entails treating a solid substrate with acid or base and simultaneous or subsequent treatment with a substituted amine salt. The method eliminates the need for organic solvents and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt executive summary Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) referS to the Set of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts raises new issues of liability and risk. the focus of this briefing paper is on the storage of carbon

371

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jerry Y.S. Lin Jerry Y.S. Lin Chemical Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287 Jerry.lin@asu.edu Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor 2 Background 3 CO 2 Capture Methods and Efficiency Improvement Coal, Natural gas, Biomass CO 2 separation Power plant CO 2 compression, conditioning for sequestration Gasification Reforming Shift CO 2 Separation Power plant Power plant Air separation N 2 /O 2 CO 2 Post- combustion H 2 /CO H 2 /CO H 2 CO 2 H 2 O/N 2 /O 2 CO 2 H 2 Pre- combustion Air N 2 O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 CO 2 Oxyfuel Combustion Air separation Air Air separation Air Air separation Air Air Air Air Air separation Air Air separation Air N 2 Air separation Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air separation Air N 2 Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air Air separation N 2 Air 4 Water-Gas-Shift Reaction and Membrane Reactor Reforming

372

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B-54 Pre-Combustion membranes u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 aDvanCeD hyDrogen transPort membranes for Coal...

373

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DioxiDe CaPture teChnology sheets national energy teChnology laboratory aDvanCeD aCiD gas seParation teChnology for the utilization of low-rank Coals primary project goals Air...

374

NETL: IEP-In-House Post Combustion CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture Chemical Sorbents Chemical Solvents Membranes Miscellaneous The objective of this National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development (ORD) multi-faceted project is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for coal-based power plants that lower the costs and energy penalty associated with those systems. Research and development in the capture area is aimed at developing systems that are low in capital cost, have low parasitic load, can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and can be integrated within the power generation system. A majority of the research will occur on laboratory- and bench-scale reactors. Further information on ORD's CO2 capture projects can be found by using the links found in the adjacent blue box.

375

A TECHNICAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF AMINE-BASED CO2 CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY FOR POWER PLANT GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power plants is gaining widespread interest as a potential method of controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Performance and cost models of an amine (MEA)-based CO{sub 2} absorption system for post-combustion flue gas applications have been developed, and integrated with an existing power plant modeling framework that includes multi-pollutant control technologies for other regulated emissions. The integrated model has been applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing coal-burning power plants. The cost of carbon avoidance was shown to depend strongly on assumptions about the reference plant design, details of the CO{sub 2} capture system design, interactions with other pollution control systems, and method of CO{sub 2} storage. The CO{sub 2} avoidance cost for retrofit systems was found to be generally higher than for new plants, mainly because of the higher energy penalty resulting from less efficient heat integration, as well as site-specific difficulties typically encountered in retrofit applications. For all cases, a small reduction in CO{sub 2} capture cost was afforded by the SO{sub 2} emission trading credits generated by amine-based capture systems. Efforts are underway to model a broader suite of carbon capture and sequestration technologies for more comprehensive assessments in the context of multi-pollutant environmental management.

Edward S. Rubin; Anand B. Rao

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates or intermediate salts through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that high calcination temperatures decrease the activity of sodium bicarbonate Grade 1 (SBC No.1) during subsequent carbonation cycles, but there is little or no progressive decrease in activity in successive cycles. SBC No.1 appears to be more active than SBC No.3. As expected, the presence of SO{sub 2} in simulated flue gas results in a progressive loss of sorbent capacity with increasing cycles. This is most likely due to an irreversible reaction to produce Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. This compound appears to be stable at calcination temperatures as high as 200 C. Tests of 40% supported potassium carbonate sorbent and plain support material suggest that some of the activity observed in tests of the supported sorbent may be due to adsorption by the support material rather than to carbonation of the sorbent.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Low-Energy Solvents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charles Freeman, Kayte Denslow, Joseph Charles Freeman, Kayte Denslow, Joseph Remias, Balraj Ambedkar, David Fitzgerald, Scott Hume, Alan House, Sonja Salmon Low-Energy Solvents for CO 2 Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 9, 2013  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT SUPPORT. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0007741.  DISCLAIMER. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

378

Tuning the Physicochemical Properties of Diverse Phenolic Ionic Liquids for Equimolar CO2 Capture by the Substituent on the Anion  

SciTech Connect

Phenolic ionic liquids for the efficient and reversible capture of CO{sub 2} were designed and prepared from phosphonium hydroxide and substituted phenols. The electron-withdrawing or electron-donating ability, position, and number of the substituents on the anion of these ionic liquids were correlated with the physicochemical properties of the ionic liquids. The results show that the stability, viscosity, and CO{sub 2}-capturing ability of these ionic liquids were significantly affected by the substituents. Furthermore, the relationship between the decomposition temperature, the CO{sub 2}-absorption capacity, and the basicity of these ionic liquids was quantitatively correlated and further rationalized by theoretical calculation. Indeed, these ionic liquids showed good stability, high absorption capacity, and low absorption enthalpy for CO{sub 2} capture. This method, which tunes the physicochemical properties by making use of substituent effects in the anion of the ionic liquid, is important for the design of highly efficient and reversible methods for CO{sub 2}-capture. This CO{sub 2} capture process using diverse phenolic ionic liquids is a promising potential method for CO{sub 2} absorption with both high absorption capacity and good reversibility.

Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Yu, Bo [ORNL; Li, Haoran [Zhejiang University; Wang, Congmin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Oxy-Fired 1100F (593C) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600-800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant for comparison with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Oxy-Fired 1100ºF (593ºC) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant along with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Program on Technology Innovation: Oxy-Fired CFB with CO2 Capture and Storage at Jamestown (NY) Board of Public Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way of reducing the costs of capturing CO2 (at a purity sufficient for geological storage) from coal-fired steam-electric power plants. To date, only lab and test-stand studies have been conducted, focusing primarily on the combustion process. The next major development step is to field an integrated oxy-coal power plant. Such a project has been proposed and is being developed for deployment at the Jamestown (NY) Board of Public Utilities (BPU) Carlson Genera...

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

383

A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developed Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hckel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0C to 300 C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model can be used to predict the effect of various salts on the water content and water activity in CO2-rich phases on the basis of parameters determined from the properties of aqueous systems. Given the importance of water activity in CO2-rich phases for mineral reactivity, the model can be used as a foundation for predicting mineral transformations across the entire CO2/H2O composition range from aqueous solution to anhydrous scCO2. An example application using the model is presented which involves the transformation of forsterite to nesquehonite as a function of temperature and water content in the CO2-rich phase.

Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre; Wang, Peiming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sound ways to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. Onegeological storage for carbon dioxide. In: Baines SJ, WordenGeological storage of carbon dioxide. Geol Soc Spec Publ

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Coal Power Systems with CO2 Capture: EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow Vision2011 Upd ate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has examined current and potential options for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electric sector. EPRIs analysis shows that a significant contribution from advanced coal power systems with carbon capture and storage (CCS) will likely be required to achieve economical GHG reductions; however, CCS technology has not yet been deployed at commercial scale.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC{number_sign}3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO{sub 2}. Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO{sub 2}/20% H{sub 2}O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO{sub 2} at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. CO{sub 2} evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC{number_sign}3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first carbonation cycle, CO{sub 2} removal rates declined from 20% to about 8% over the course of three hours. Following calcination, a second carbonation cycle was conducted, at a lower temperature with a lower water vapor content. CO{sub 2} removal and sorbent capacity utilization declined under these conditions. Modifications were made to the reactor to permit addition of extra water for testing in the next quarter. Thermodynamic analysis of the carbonation reaction suggested the importance of other phases, intermediate between sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, and the potential for misapplication of thermodynamic data from the literature. An analysis of initial rate data from TGA experiments suggested that the data may fit a model controlled by the heat transfer from the sorbent particle surface to the bulk gas.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

CO2 Blast Cleaning Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) (dry ice) cleaning is a process in which dry ice particles, accelerated by compressed air or nitrogen, are propelled at high velocities to impact and clean a surface. Because CO2 technology produces no secondary waste, the CO2 blast cleaning process has many applications for the cleaning of electrical equipment.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCTs 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies, the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit to Bay Shore Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized bed (CFB) power plants for five different host participants. The project is applying the knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical PCC design studies to specific site conditions, plant designs, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This project aims to highlight the technic...

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit to Midwest Generation's Coal Fired Powerto n Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post combustion capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power plants for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet Ultra Super Critical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. The project aims to highlight the technical and economic issues associated w...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

393

Toward a Common Method of Cost Estimation for CO2 Capture and Storage at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant differences in the methods employed by various organizations to estimate the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems for fossil fuel power plants. Such differences often are not readily apparent in publicly reported CCS cost estimates. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of misunderstanding, confusion, and mis-representation of CCS cost information, especially among audiences not familiar with the details of CCS costing. Given the international importance ...

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

The production of pure hydrogen with simultaneous capture of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide is the combustion of carbona- ceous fuels. Currently, the combustion of oil, natural gas and coal accounts for 88 % of the worlds supply of primary energy, as seen in Table 1.1. While combustible renewables, such as wood, peat and animal waste... . For hydrogen, an environmentally-benign energy vector whose sole combustion product is water, to become a major energy source, it must be produced in an efficient, CO2- neutral manner. A process, which uses a packed bed of iron and its oxides, viz. Fe, Fe0.947O...

Bohn, Christopher

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carbon Dioxide Compression and Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of the art regarding carbon dioxide CO2 compression and transportation in the United States and Canada. The primary focus of the report was on CO2 compression because it is a significant cost and energy penalty in carbon capture and storage CCS. The secondary focus of the report was to document the state of the art of CO2 pipeline transportation in the United States and Canada.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-302 Post-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 benCh-sCale DeveloPment anD testing of raPiD Pressure swing absorPtion for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture primary project goals WR Grace and the University of South Carolina are developing a rapid pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process to evaluate concept cost and performance benefits by testing a bench-scale system using a low-cost, structured adsorbent with low-pressure drop, high mass-transfer rates, high capacity, and high availability that will enable large feed through- puts. technical goals * Develop an attrition-resistant and low-pressure drop structured adsorbent based on a

397

Novel Sorption/Desorption Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture (Feasibility Study)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Western Research Institute and the University of Wyoming Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute have tested a novel approach to carbon dioxide capture in power plants and industrial operations. This approach is expected to provide considerable cost savings, in terms of regeneration of the sorbent. It is proposed that low molecular weight, low volatility liquid fluorocarbons be utilized to absorb CO{sub 2} due to their unusual affinity for the gas. The energy savings would be realized by cooling the fluorocarbon liquids below their melting point where the CO{sub 2} would be released even at elevated pressure. Thus, the expense of heating currently used sorbents, saturated with CO{sub 2}, under low pressure conditions and then having to compress the released gas would not be realized. However, these fluorinated materials have been shown to be poor carbon dioxide absorbers under conditions currently required for carbon capture. The project was terminated.

William Tuminello; Maciej Radosz; Youqing Shen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microsoft Word - NEMS CO2 MARKET MODEL FINAL REPORT - APPENDICES...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2CCCST(MNUMNR,MJUMPYR) 87metric ton CO2 co2mminc Regional CO2 capture and compression costs EORRESMAX(MNUMNR) Million bbls oil co2mminc Regional Gross EOR reserve limit based...

400

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: CO2 Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Compression CO2 Compression The CO2 captured from a power plant will need to be compressed from near atmospheric pressure to a pressure between 1,500 and 2,200 psi in order to be transported via pipeline and then injected into an underground sequestration site. Read More! CO2 Compression The compression of CO2 represents a potentially large auxiliary power load on the overall power plant system. For example, in an August 2007 study conducted for DOE/NETL, CO2 compression was accomplished using a six-stage centrifugal compressor with interstage cooling that required an auxiliary load of approximately 7.5 percent of the gross power output of a subcritical pressure, coal-fired power plant. As a result, DOE/NETL is sponsoring R&D to develop novel methods that can significantly decrease the

402

Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-combustion CO2 control systems separate CO2 from the flue gas produced by conventional coal combustion in air. The flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and has a CO2 concentration of 10-15 volume percent. Read More! Capturing CO2 under these conditions is challenging because: (1) the low pressure and dilute concentration dictate a high total volume of gas to be treated; (2) trace impurities in the flue gas tend to reduce the effectiveness of the CO2 separation processes; and (3) compressing captured CO2 from atmospheric pressure to pipeline pressure (1,200 - 2,200 pounds per square inch) represents a large parasitic energy load. Plant Picture DOE/NETL's post-combustion CO2 control technology R&D program includes

405

Interim report Assessment of Baseline and Advanced Hydrogen Production Plants Case 1-1 Baseline Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) Hydrogen Plant With CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 CAPTURE READY COAL POWER PLANTS DOE/NETL-2007/1301 Final Report April 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

406

State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be achieved by using the adaptive KF.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Investigation of transport and mechnical properties for hollow fibers containing ionic liquids for pre-combustion CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Currently available techniques for CO{sub 2} separation from flue or fuel gas cannot economically capture CO{sub 2} for sequestration. Membranes offer several advantages in CO{sub 2} separation such as simple operation, low water consumption, and in some cases higher energy efficiency. However, traditional polymer membranes are limited by the separation characteristics of the polymer and often suffer from low permeability and selectivity. Several research groups have attempted to overcome these limitations by using supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) in which an ionic liquid (IL) is suspended within the pores of a membrane support and serves as the active gas separation component of the membrane. For industrial applications, hollow fibers are preferred over flat membranes due to their smaller footprint, ease of high efficiency module design and low fabrication cost. In an attempt to investigate and address these issues, polymeric hollow fiber-based ionic liquid membranes were fabricated. Matrimid and [hmim][Tf{sub 2}N] (1-hexyl-3-methylimidalzolium bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl) imide) were selected as the polymeric and ionic liquid materials, and the fibers were fabricated via nonsolvent-induced phase separation/extraction, employing a single layer spinneret extrusion system. The system takes advantage of the fiber morphology to enable more efficient mass transfer than traditional membranes geometries. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} transport properties will be reported for the Matrimid hollow fibers from 37 to 150 {degrees}C. Also, several mechanical properties such as tensile strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature have been measured for the fiber using dynamic mechanical analysis.

Hopkinson, D., Wickramanayake, S., Myers, C., Sui, L., Nicola, M., Luebke, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EVALUATION OF SOLID SORBENTS AS A RETROFIT TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) has begun evaluating the use of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The project objective was to address the viability and accelerate development of a solid-based CO{sub 2} capture technology. To meet this objective, initial evaluations of sorbents and the process/equipment were completed. First the sorbents were evaluated using a temperature swing adsorption process at the laboratory scale in a fixed-bed apparatus. A slipstream reactor designed to treat flue gas produced by coal-fired generation of nominally 1 kWe was designed and constructed, which was used to evaluate the most promising materials on a more meaningful scale using actual flue gas. In a concurrent effort, commercial-scale processes and equipment options were also evaluated for their applicability to sorbent-based CO{sub 2} capture. A cost analysis was completed that can be used to direct future technology development efforts. ADA completed an extensive sorbent screening program funded primarily through this project, DOE NETL cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649, with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and other industry participants. Laboratory screening tests were completed on simulated and actual flue gas using simulated flue gas and an automated fixed bed system. The following types and quantities of sorbents were evaluated: 87 supported amines; 31 carbon based materials; 6 zeolites; 7 supported carbonates (evaluated under separate funding); and 10 hydrotalcites. Sorbent evaluations were conducted to characterize materials and down-select promising candidates for further testing at the slipstream scale. More than half of the materials evaluated during this program were supported amines. Based on the laboratory screening four supported amine sorbents were selected for evaluation at the 1 kW scale at two different field sites. ADA designed and fabricated a slipstream pilot to allow an evaluation of the kinetic behavior of sorbents and provide some flexibility for the physical characteristics of the materials. The design incorporated a transport reactor for the adsorber (co-current reactor) and a fluidized-bed in the regenerator. This combination achieved the sorbent characterization goals and provided an opportunity to evaluate whether the potential cost savings associated with a relatively simple process design could overcome the sacrifices inherent in a co-current separation process. The system was installed at two field sites during the project, Luminant's Martin Lake Steam Electric Station and Xcel Energy's Sherburne County Generating Station (Sherco). Although the system could not maintain continuous 90% CO{sub 2} removal with the sorbents evaluated under this program, it was useful to compare the CO{sub 2} removal properties of several different sorbents on actual flue gas. One of the supported amine materials, sorbent R, was evaluated at both Martin Lake and Sherco. The 1 kWe pilot was operated in continuous mode as well as batch mode. In continuous mode, the sorbent performance could not overcome the limitations of the cocurrent adsorbent design. In batch mode, sorbent R was able to remove up to 90% CO{sub 2} for several cycles. Approximately 50% of the total removal occurred in the first three feet of the adsorption reactor, which was a transport reactor. During continuous testing at Sherco, CO{sub 2} removal decreased to approximately 20% at steady state. The lack of continuous removal was due primarily to the combination of a co-current adsorption system with a fluidized bed for regeneration, a combination which did not provide an adequate driving force to maintain an acceptable working CO{sub 2} capacity. In addition, because sorbent R consisted of a polymeric amine coated on a silica substrate, it was believed that the 50% amine loaded resulted in mass diffusion limitations related to the CO{sub 2} uptake rate. Three additional supported amine materials, so

Holly Krutka; Sharon Sjostrom

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

410

ARM - Instrument - co2flx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsco2flx govInstrumentsco2flx Documentation CO2FLX : Handbook CO2FLX : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports CO2FLX : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Carbon General Overview The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind

411

The Value of Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in a World with Uncertain Greenhouse Gas Emissions Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing how the largest CO2 emitting electricity generating region in the United States, the East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR), responds to hypothetical constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, the authors demonstrate that there is an enduring role for post combustion CO2 capture technologies. The utilization of pulverized coal with carbon dioxide capture and storage (PC+CCS) technologies is particularly significant in a world where there is significant uncertainty about the future evolution of climate policy and in particular uncertainty about the rate at which the climate policy will become more stringent. The papers analysis shows that within this one large, heavily coal-dominated electricity generating region, as much as 20-40 GW of PC+CCS could be in operation before the middle of this century. Depending upon the state of PC+CCS technology development and the evolution of future climate policy, the analysis shows that these CCS systems could be mated to either already existing PC units or PC units that are currently under construction, announced and planned units, as well as PC units that could continue to be built for a number of decades even in the face of a climate policy. In nearly all the cases analyzed here, these PC+CCS generation units are compliments to a much larger deployment of CCS-enabled coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The analysis presented here shows that the combined deployment of PC+CCS and IGCC+CCS units within this one region of the U.S. could result in the potential capture and storage of between 3.2 and 4.9 billion tones of CO2 before the middle of this century in the regions deep geologic storage formations.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Complete Transport Validated Model on a Zeolite Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Permeance and Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CO2 emissions from major industries cause serious global environment problems and their mitigation is urgently needed. The use of zeolite membranes is a very efficient way in order to capture CO2 from some flue gases. The dominant transport mechanism at low temperature andor high pressure is the diffusion through the membrane. This procedure can be divided in three steps: Adsorption of the molecules of the species in the surface of the membrane, then a driving force gives a path where the species follow inside the membrane and finally the species desorbed from the surface of the membrane. The current work is aimed at developing a simulation model for the CO2 transport through a zeolite membrane and estimate the diffusion phenomenon through a very thin membrane of 150 nm in a Wicke-Kallenbach cell. The cell is cylindrical in shape with diameter of 19 mm and consists of a retentate gas chamber, a permeate gas chamber which are separated by a cylindrical zeolite membrane. This apparatus have been modeled wit...

Gkanas, Evangelos I; Stubos, Athanasios K; Makridis, Sofoklis S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Carbon Capture Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This information is taken from DOE's information on Carbon Capture Carbon Capture Research Before carbon dioxide (CO2) gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured as a relatively pure gas. On a mass basis, CO2 is the 19th largest commodity chemical in the United States, and CO2 is routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H2 production, and limestone calcination. Existing capture technologies, however, are not cost-effective when considered in the context of sequestering CO2 from power plants. Most power plants and other large point sources use air-fired combustors, a process that exhausts CO2 diluted with nitrogen. Flue gas from coal-fired power

414

DOE/NETL ADVANCED CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE R&D PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY UPDATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE R&D PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY UPDATE MAY 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or useful- ness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommenda-

415

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Metal Monolithic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO2 Capture Project No.: FC26-07NT43086 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE CO2 capture unit with metal monolithic amine-grafted zeolites. The University of Akron is investigating a new sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture that involves the novel integration of metallic monolith structures coated with amine-grafted zeolites. This sorbent would eliminate the use of corrosive liquid amine and decrease the energy required for sorbent regeneration. The metal monoliths consist of straight channels: one row of channels coated with amine-grated zeolite and one used for heat transfer media for either cooling for adsorption or heating for regeneration. In combination with the innovative applications of metal monoliths as an

416

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

417

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone October 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. Preliminary results indicate that the formation has good CO2 storage potential and could possibly serve as a repository for CO2 emissions captured from stationary sources in the region. Carbon capture and storage

418

Table H.1co2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... Table H.1co2 World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption and Flaring of Fossil ...

419

Visualizing the Surface Infrastructure Used to Move 2 MtCO2/year from the Dakota Gasification Company to the Weyburn CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Project: Version of July 1, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Google Earth Pro has been employed to create an interactive flyover of the worlds largest operational carbon dioxide capture and storage project. The visualization focuses on the transport and storage of 2 MtCO2/year which is captured from the Dakota Gasification Facility (Beula, North Dakota) and transported 205 miles and injected into the Weyburn oil field in Southeastern Saskatchewan.

Dooley, James J.

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H2S/SO2 ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both H2S/SO2 ratio and adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO2 capture. Impact of CO2 capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For the geologic and ocean storage options, CO2 capture costs from another project were added to the costs of CO2 storage estimated in this project to provide combined costs of CO2 capture and storage. Combined costs) cases were used as the basis for the capture component of this project. Costs of CO2 capture were based

422

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change DR N FloRiN aND DR P FeNNell executive summary What is carbon capture and storage? Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) refers to the set of technologies devel- oped to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from the exhausts

423

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation Phase Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

424

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Development Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Phase Development Phase Background As part of a comprehensive effort to assess options for sustainable energy systems, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected seven regional partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The partnerships are

425

CO2 Utilization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon dioxide (CO2) use and reuse efforts focus on the conversion of CO2 to useable products and fuels that will reduce CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. These include: Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery - Injecting CO2 into depleting oil or gas bearing fields to maximize the amount of CO2 that could be stored as well as maximize hydrocarbon production. CO2 as Feedstock - Use CO2 as a feedstock to produce chemicals (including fuels and polymers) and find applications for the end products. Non-Geologic Storage of CO2 - Use CO2 from an effluent stream to immobilize the CO2 permanently by producing stable solid material that are either useful products with economic value or a low cost produced material.

426

Reversible zwitterionic liquids, the reaction of alkanol guanidines, alkanol amidines, and diamines with CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide chemistry is increasingly relevant to real-world issues, thanks to global warming. Key chemistry issues currently being studied are the capture, storage, and utilization of CO2. While the relevance of capture and storage are obvious, the relevance of CO2 utilization is less clear. Although CO2