Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program: Closing Long-Term CO2 Geological Storage Gaps Relevant to Regulatory and Policy Development Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MiamiImageURL&_cid=277910&_user=10&_ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-co2-capture-project-ph Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This paper describes results of Phase 2 of the Storage Program of the

2

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

3

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

4

NETL: Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0013687 GE global is constructing and operating a continuous, bench-scale CO2 capture system that employs a phase-changing silicone solvent . Experimental data obtained at the laboratory scale in a previous ARPA-E funded project, including mass transfer and kinetic information, is being used to determine process scalability and perform a techno-economic assessment of the commercial scale process. The manufacturability of the solvent is being examined to obtain the material needed for bench-scale testing. Data obtained from the bench-scale system will include mass transfer parameters, kinetic parameters, heat transfer parameters, solvent stability, effects of flue gas contaminants, and recommended operating conditions. Other data such as absorption/desorption isotherms and solvent regeneration energy will be determined in laboratory testing. The solvent manufacturing cost, the bench-scale engineering data, and the laboratory property data will be used to complete the techno-economic assessment and to develop a scale-up strategy for commercialization.

5

Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture: High Performance Metal Organic Frameworks/Polymer Composite Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: A team of six faculty members at Georgia Tech are developing an enhanced membrane by fitting metal organic frameworks, compounds that show great promise for improved carbon capture, into hollow fiber membranes. This new material would be highly efficient at removing CO2 from the flue gas produced at coal-fired power plants. The team is analyzing thousands of metal organic frameworks to identify those that are most suitable for carbon capture based both on their ability to allow coal exhaust to pass easily through them and their ability to select CO2 from that exhaust for capture and storage. The most suitable frameworks would be inserted into the walls of the hollow fiber membranes, making the technology readily scalable due to their high surface area. This composite membrane would be highly stable, withstanding the harsh gas environment found in coal exhaust.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bloomfield Avenue, University of Hartford, West Hartford, Connecticut 06117-1599 ABSTRACT Carbon Sequestration, the capturing and storing of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions...

7

9 - Oxyfuel combustion systems and technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Oxyfuel combustion uses pure oxygen instead of air to burn carbonaceous materials, resulting in a CO2 separation efficiency theoretically close to 100% should the fuel and oxygen be free of contaminants. This chapter examines several oxyfuel systems, considering two categories of power cycle those based on steam cycles and those based on gas cycles both of which generate oxygen using a cryogenic air separation unit. Also covered is the AZEP cycle, which belongs in the second category but which uses a ceramic membrane integrated into the system to separate oxygen from air. Oxy-combustion in IGCC plants and in gas turbine cycles integrating solid oxide fuel cells is also examined here as a low emission process. The technical issues and future potential for each option are discussed and reference is made to several pilot installations and ongoing R & D projects.

P. Mathieu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

9

Biominetic Membrane for Co2 Capture from Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomimetic Membrane for CO Biomimetic Membrane for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport, and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post

10

Carbon Capture and a Commercial Market for CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing evidence that the earth is warming at a faster rate than previously expected, there is pressure to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions on a large scale. Because carbon capture helps to internali...

Thomas R. Sadler

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005 are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2) price (baseline IGCC), and IGCC with pre-investments that make future retrofit for CO2 capture less expensive (pre

12

NETL: Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007553 Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) is developing a new type of membrane contactor (or mega-module) to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plant flue gas. This module's membrane area is 500 square meters, 20 to 25 times larger than that of current modules used for CO2 capture. A 500-MWe coal power plant requires 0.5 to 1 million square meters of membrane to achieve 90 percent CO2 capture. The new mega-modules can drastically reduce the cost, complexity, and footprint of commercial-scale membrane module integration. Energy savings due to low-pressure drops for gases circulated through the modules, as well as improved countercurrent flow, are additional benefits. The feasibility of using mega-modules in several different hybrid process designs is being evaluated for future development potential.

13

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Klaus S. Lackner (kl2010@columbia.edu; 212-854-0304) Columbia University 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 Patrick Grimes (pgrimes@worldnet.att.net; 908-232-1134) Grimes Associates Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 Hans-J. Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov; 505-667-7265) Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O.Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Abstract The goal of carbon sequestration is to take CO 2 that would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere and put it in safe and permanent storage. Most proposed methods would capture CO 2 from concentrated sources like power plants. Indeed, on-site capture is the most sensible approach for large sources and initially offers the most cost-effective avenue to sequestration. For distributed, mobile sources like cars, on-board capture at affordable cost would not be

14

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-action Solvents for Efficient CO 2 Capture Background Post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture presents technical challenges because the flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and the CO 2 concentration is 10 to 15 volume percent, resulting in a low CO 2 partial pressure and a large volume of gas that needs to be treated. In spite of this difficulty, post-combustion CO 2 capture offers the

15

Biomimetric Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomimetic memBrane for co Biomimetic memBrane for co 2 capture from flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post combustion applications - absorption, adsorption, reaction and membranes chemically facilitated absorption promises to be the most cost-effective membrane solution for post combustion application. The Carbozyme technology extracts CO 2 from low concentration, low pressure sources by means of chemical facilitation of a polymer membrane. The chemical

16

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902836  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902836 Highly Selective CO2 Capture in Flexible 3D Coordination Polymer Networks** Hye-Sun Choi and Myunghyun Paik Suh* Carbon dioxide capture has been warming, and the development of efficient methods for capturing CO2 from industrial flue gas has become

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

17

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the public concerns regarding the consequences of climate change from anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) is actively funding a CO2 management program to develop technologies capable of reducing the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants and other industrial facilities. Over the past decade, this program has focused on reducing the costs of carbon capture and storage technologies. Recently, DOE-NETL launched an alternative CO2 mitigation program focusing on beneficial CO2 reuse and supporting the development of technologies that mitigate emissions by converting CO2 to solid mineral form that can be utilized for enhanced oil recovery, in the manufacturing of concrete or as a benign landfill, in the production of valuable chemicals and/or fuels. This project was selected as a CO2 reuse activity which would conduct research and development (R&D) at the pilot scale via a cost-shared Cooperative Agreement number DE-FE0001099 with DOE-NETL and would utilize funds setaside by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration R&D,

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Novel Solvent System for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solvent System for CO Solvent System for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

20

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000431  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000431 Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New] Carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes embody a group of technologies for the capture of CO2 from power to the atmosphere could be reduced by 80­90% for a modern conventional power plant equipped with carbon capture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sorbents Carbon Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal re- serves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio of post- and oxy-combustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants in the event of carbon constraints. Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants are large, stationary sources of CO

22

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture Membrane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005313 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International is researching fluorinated polymer membranes for carbon dioxide capture. RTI's research effort includes membrane materials development, module design, and process design. RTI is pursuing the development of two hollow-fiber membrane materials. First, RTI is working with Generon to develop a membrane material constructed of polycarbonate-based polymers. Lab-scale membrane modules are being studied with simulated flue-gas mixtures with and without flue gas emission contaminants. Two larger-scale polycarbonate membrane module prototypes are being tested with a slipstream of actual flue gas from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Multipollutant

23

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO Membrane Process to Capture CO 2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

24

NETL: 2013 Conference Proceedings - 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Previous Proceedings 2012: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting Proceedings of the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, July 8 Opening/Overview Post-Combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Tuesday, July 9 Post-Combustion Solvent-Based Capture CO2 Compression Wednesday, July 10 Post-Combustion Membrane-Based Capture Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Thursday, July 11 ARPA-E Capture Projects System Studies and Modeling Oxy-Combustion and Chemical Looping Posters PRESENTATIONS Monday, July 8, 2013 Opening/Overview Introduction [PDF-MB]

25

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

26

Synthesis, characterization and performance of single-component CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOL) for post combustion CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission to the atmosphere will increase significantly with the shift to coal powered plants for energy generation. This increase in CO2 emission will contribute to climate change. There is need to capture and sequester large amounts of CO2 emitted from these coal power plants in order to mitigate the environmental effects. Here we report the synthesis, characterization and system performance of multiple third generation CO2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) as a solvent system for post combustion gas capture. Alkanolguanidines and alkanolamidines are single component CO2BOLs that reversibly bind CO2 chemically as liquid zwitterionic amidinium / guanidinium alkylcarbonates. Three different alkanolguanidines and alkanolamidines were synthesized and studied for CO2 capacity and binding energetics. Solvent performance of these three CO2BOLs was evaluated by batch-wise CO2 uptake and release over multiple cycles. Synthesis of CO2BOLs, characterization, CO2 uptake, selectivity towards CO2 as well as solvent tolerance to water will be discussed.

Koech, Phillip K.; Heldebrant, David J.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background Development of innovative environmental control technologies is key to maintaining coal as an affordable and environmentally sound energy source. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies, specifically post-combustion CO 2 capture, for coal- fired power plants is a major focus area in addressing climate change concerns. Post-

28

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress. #12;3 Abstract The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine

Rochelle, Gary T.

29

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress. #12;3 Abstract The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine

Rochelle, Gary T.

30

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous

Rochelle, Gary T.

31

Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRACE is a project consortium that aims to develop cost improving technologies for carbon capture and separation. References: Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project...

32

NETL: 2011 Conference Proceedings - 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting August 22 - 26, 2011 Previous Proceedings 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting 2010: 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Proceedings of the 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, August 22 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Post-combustion Membrane-Based Capture Tuesday, August 23 Post-combustion Solvent-Based Capture ARPA-E Capture Projects Wednesday, August 24 Oxy-Combustion and Oxygen Production Chemical Looping Process CO2 Compression Thursday, August 25 FutureGen 2.0, CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects System Studies and Modeling Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Friday, August 26 Pre-combustion Capture Projects Posters

33

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration 73: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

34

NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A process developed by researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) that improves the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants while reducing the cost has been selected to receive a 2011 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. The Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process separates CO2 from the flue or stack gas of power plants, preventing its release into the air. The captured CO2 can then be permanently stored in a carbon sequestration

35

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG's proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson

36

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

37

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

38

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

39

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO 2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Background Pulverized coal-fired power plants provide more than 50 percent of electricity needs while accounting for a third of the total carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States. However, capturing CO 2 from the flue gas stream in coal-fired power plants using current commercial CO 2 capture technology could consume up

40

NETL: 2010 Conference Proceedings - 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting September 13-17, 2010 Table of Contents Presentations Monday, September 13 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent Based Capture Post-combustion Solvent Based Capture Tuesday, September 14 Post-combustion Membrane Based Capture Pulverized Coal Oxy-combustion ARPA-E Projects Wednesday, September 15 National Carbon Capture Center Chemical Looping Processes Systems Studies and Modeling Efforts CO2 Compression New CO2 Capture Projects Thursday, September 16 New CO2 Capture Projects - Cont'd CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects Pre-combustion Capture Projects Friday, September 17 Pre-combustion Capture Projects - Cont'd Posters Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) NETL Office of Research and Development Research Projects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nanoclay-Based Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoclay-Based Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture ... As seen from the figure, the untreated nanoclay shows very little CO2 capture, while amine-treated nanoclays show considerably higher CO2 capture capacities, demonstrating the effectiveness of the amine treatment. ... The CO2 sorption capacity increases as the temperature is increased from 50 to 85 C, and it reaches as high as 7.5% at 85 C for the nanoclay treated with both APTMS and PEI, although the nanoclays treated with either APTMS or PEI show about 6% CO2 capture capacity. ...

Elliot A. Roth; Sushant Agarwal; Rakesh K. Gupta

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Second Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing for simultaneous removal of CO2 and SO2. Corrosion of carbon steel in uninhibited MEA solution is increased

Rochelle, Gary T.

43

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog MIT Global warming Carbon mitigation Low carbon energy technologies Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is the only technology that can reduce CO2 emissions

44

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog MIT warming Carbon mitigation Low carbon energy technologies Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) Carbon. Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a process consisting of the separation of CO2

45

NETL: 2009 Conference Proceedings - Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off Meetings Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Kick-off Meetings Pittsburgh, PA November 12-13, 2009 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations PRESENTATIONS Welcome/Sequestration Program Overview [PDF-842KB] Sean Plasynski, Sequestration Technology Manager Hydrogen Selective Ex-foliated Zeolite Membranes [PDF-3.4MB] University Of Minnesota Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods [PDF-746KB] Pall Corporation Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor [PDF-1.7MB] Arizona State University CO2 Capture from IGCC Gas Streams Using the AC-ABC Process [PDF-842KB] SRI International A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture [PDF-1.2MB]

46

Oxygen supply for oxyfuel CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study to develop Air Products air separation unit (ASU) offerings for oxyfuel coal CO2 capture projects. A scalable reference plant concept is described to match particular sizes of power generation equipment, taking into account factors such as safety, reliability, operating flexibility, efficiency, and low capital cost. We describe the selection of a process cycle to exploit the low purity requirements, as well as the options for compression machinery and drivers as the scale of the plant increases and the sizes of referenced equipment limit the possibilities. We also explore integration with other elements of the system, such as preheating condensate or heating and expanding pressurised nitrogen. In addition, we consider how the ASU affects the flexibility of the oxyfuel system and discuss how its power consumption can be reduced during periods of high power demand. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of different execution strategies for air separation unit projects are discussed, as well as alternative commercial models for the supply of oxygen.

Paul Higginbotham; Vince White; Kevin Fogash; Galip Guvelioglu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon dioxide capture under ambient conditions using 2-chloroethylamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the first case applying 2-haloethylamine to CO2 capture. The prospect of global warming and the urgent need to reduce atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has prompted actions at many levels. The c...

Junhua Wang; Xiqin Zhang; Yun Zhou

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes May 27, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the creation of a new National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to develop and test technologies to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-based power plants. Managed and operated by Southern Company Services Inc., the center is expected to focus national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation. Southern Company will establish and manage the NCCC at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Ala. The NCCC will meet a critical need of the Energy Department by serving as a test center for

49

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing% in the order: thiosulfatecarbonate is ineffective in the absence of oxygen

Rochelle, Gary T.

50

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2007 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing% to 160% in the order: thiosulfatecarbonate is ineffective

Rochelle, Gary T.

51

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 to 181 mpy in lean

Rochelle, Gary T.

52

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

53

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture and Compression  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vent Stream Vent Stream (out) CO 2 Product Stream (out) Flue Gas Stream (in) CO 2 CCU Skid Government of Canada Gouvernement du Canada An Integrated Approach for Oxy An Integrated Approach for Oxy- -fuel Combustion with CO fuel Combustion with CO 2 2 Capture and Capture and Compression Compression Kourosh Zanganeh, Ahmed Shafeen, and Carlos Salvador Zero-Emission Technologies Group, Clean Electric Power Generation CANMET CO 2 R&D Consortium CANMET Energy Technology Centre - Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a significant reduction in anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Fossil fuel combustion is expected to dominate the energy structure in at least the next few decades.

55

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

56

Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project November 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that combines the separation performance of inorganic membranes with the cost-effectiveness of polymer membranes. The breakthrough technology has vast commercial potential for use at coal-fired power plants with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), a key element in national efforts to mitigate climate change. Before the carbon dioxide (CO2) generated at a power plant can be securely

57

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio Second Phase of Innovative Technology Project to Capture CO2, Produce Biofuels Launched in Ohio August 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel method to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas and produce biofuels has been formally launched in the second phase of a Department of Energy (DOE) project at a nursery in Ohio. Successful application of the process could eventually help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide a source of liquid biofuels and biogas, reducing U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources. Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., successfully inoculated four biomass production ponds with algae at Cedar Lane Farms in

58

Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated environmental crises such as global warming and ocean acidication, efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) capture As CO2 capture mate- rials, numerous solid adsorbents such as silica5 and carbon materials,6 metal

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

59

Amine Scrubbing for CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distillation columns in the air separation unit...excess and leakage air along with the CO...will not provide solutions as energy-efficient...tf9363201291 2 National Air Pollution Control Administration...CO 2 Removal from Fossil-FuelFired Power Plants (IE-7365...

Gary T. Rochelle

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON Following the one year mark since the release of the Presidents Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - in partnership with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. today announced a major milestone, successfully capturing more than one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the hydrogen-production facility in Port Arthur, Texas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Novel regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbents for CO2 capture at warm gas temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel sorbent consisting of Mg(OH)2 was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture at 200-315 C suitable for CO2 capture applications such as coal gasification systems. Thermodynamic analysis conducted with the FactSage software package indicated that the Mg(OH)2 sorbent system is highly favorable for CO2 capture up to 400 C at 30 atm. MgCO3 formed during sorption decomposes to release CO2 at temperatures as low as 375 C up to 20 atm. MgO rehydroxylation to form Mg(OH)2 is possible at temperatures up to 300 C at 20 atm. The experimental data show that the sorbent is regenerable at 375 C at high pressure and that steam does not affect the sorbent performance. A multicycle test conducted in a high-pressure fixed-bed flow reactor at 200 C with 28% CO2 showed stable reactivity during the cyclic tests. The capture capacity also increased with increasing pressure. The sorbent is unique because it exhibits a high CO2 capture capacity of more than 3 mol/kg at 200 C and also is regenerable at a low temperature of 375 C and high pressure. High-pressure regeneration is advantageous because the CO2 compression costs required for sequestration can be reduced.

Siriwardane, R.; Stevens, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

64

NETL: Novel Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Project No.: DE-FE0001124 Membrane Technology Research (MTR) is developing a high-temperature stable polymer membrane to separate hydrogen from carbon dioxide (H2/CO2). MTR will investigate novel high-temperature-stable polymers identified by Tetramer for use in H2/CO2 selective membranes. They will also conduct bench-scale testing of optimized membranes and membrane modules with simulated syngas to evaluate the membrane performance and lifetime under expected operating conditions. The advantages of this technology are that the process can be done warm/hot to reduce the need for heat exchange and nitrogen sweep can be used to maintain permeate fuel gas at turbine pressure.

65

Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry: A Systematic Prioritization of Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry: A Systematic and Policy Program #12;- 2 - #12;Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology for the Coal-Powered Electricity Industry must be developed for capturing CO2 from power plants. Current CO2 capture technology is expensive

66

Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

Fischer, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Gas Separation on B80 Fullerene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Gas Separation on B80 Fullerene ... All other clusters show the optimized chemisorbed configurations of CO2 captured on B80. ... Although air capture will cost more than capture at power generating facilities when both are operated under the same economic conditions, air capture allows one to apply industrial economies of scale to small and mobile emission sources and enables a partial decoupling of C capture from the energy infrastructure; advantages which may compensate for the intrinsic difficulty of capturing C from air. ...

Qiao Sun; Meng Wang; Zhen Li; Aijun Du; Debra J. Searles

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture from Flue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption Project No.: FG26-05NT42488 Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Hampton University researched a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption concept, phase transitional absorption, that utilizes a two-part proprietary absorbent consisting of an activated agent dissolved in a solvent. Phase separation of the activated agent from the chemical solvent occurs during CO2 absorption and physical separation of the two phases exiting the absorber reduces the volume of process liquid requiring thermal regeneration. This unique aspect of phase transitional absorption also decreases the amount of energy (i.e., steam) required to liberate the CO2. If the proper liquid

69

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

70

Capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from ambient air could compensate for all carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Such capture would, for example, make it possible to use liquid, carbon-based fuels in cars or airplane...

K.S. Lackner

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio

72

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis Ram Chandra Sekar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture in Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2

73

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture and Sequestration of CO Capture and Sequestration of CO 2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae Takashi Nakamura (nakamura@psicorp.com; 925-743-1110) Constance Senior (senior@psicorp.com; 978-689-0003) Physical Sciences Inc Andover, MA 01810 Miguel Olaizola (molaizola@aquasearch.com; 808-326-9301 Michael Cushman (mcushman@aquasearch.com; 808-326-9301) Aquasearch Inc. Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Stephen Masutani (masutan@wiliki.eng.hawaii.edu; 808-956-7388) University of Hawaii Honolulu, HI 96822 Introduction Emissions of carbon dioxide are predicted to increase this century 1 leading to increases in the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. While there is still much debate on the effects of increased CO 2 levels on global climate, many scientists agree that the projected increases could have a

74

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

75

NETL: Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Project No.: DE-FE0013303 ION Engineering is conducting small pilot-scale (~ 0.7 MW) testing of an advanced CO2 capture solvent technology that has previously undergone bench-scale testing. The small pilot-scale testing will involve continuous long-term operation in order to gather the necessary data ultimately required for further scale-up. Activities will include the design and fabrication of the 0.5-0.7 MWe (equivalent) slipstream pilot plant; scale-up of solvent manufacturing; testing, data collection, and analysis of solvent performance; degradation and air emission analysis; modeling and simulation for the detailed preliminary and final techno-economic analyses; and decommissioning of pilot plant equipment upon completion of solvent testing. The advanced solvent is anticipated to have significant operating and capital cost advantages over other solvents currently in development. Advantages include significant reductions in parasitic load and liquid flow rates which directly translate to smaller more efficient CO2 capture processes. Make-up water and amine emissions rates will be examined during this project. There is the potential that additional solvent, system, and integration savings will be identified, which could result in further operating and capital cost reductions.

76

NETL: Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0000465 Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. URS and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are investigating a dry sorbent process configured to combine the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for coal gasification systems. A combination of process simulation modeling and sorbent molecular and thermodynamic analyses will be performed to predict optimal sorbent properties and identify optimal operating temperature and pressure ranges

77

Carbon dioxide capture: an assessment of plausible ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The projections of energy related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) serve as point of departure for an assessment of plausible ranges of CO2 emissions that could be avoided through CO2 capture and storage measures. Scenario and time dependent, sector and fuel specific capture factors are developed for eleven world regions to estimate the proportion of CO2 resulting from fossil fuel and biomass combustion/conversion that might be practical to capture and store. The capture factors are applied to the original CO2 emissions scenarios at a highly disaggregated level. The results are summed up and presented. The results indicate that it might be possible to capture and store a significant quantity of energy related CO2, especially in the second quarter of this century. Yet the amounts of CO2 still being emitted remain considerable, suggesting that other technologies will also be needed if the threat of climate change requires large reductions of CO2 emissions over the next few decades.

Ferenc L. Toth; Hans-Holger Rogner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluating metalorganic frameworks for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture via temperature swing adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating metal­organic frameworks for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture via temperature.1039/c1ee01720a Broader context The development of an effective carbon dioxide capture system is critical capture via temperature swing adsorption (TSA). Low-pressure single-component CO2 and N2 adsorption

79

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0009484 Alstom is advancing the development of Limestone Chemical Looping Combustion (LCL-C(tm)) technology. Chemical looping has no direct contact between air and fuel. The looping process usually utilizes oxygen from a metal carrier, but in this case, limestone is used. Economic evaluations will be made of four LCL-C plant configurations. The base configuration plant has already been completed and will be updated from previous reports. A second case will compare the effects of designing the reducer reactor using CFB sizing standards. A third case will investigate the effects of using a pressurized reducer reactor. Pressurizing the reducer reduces the reactor size and reduces the amount of compression required for the CO2 outlet gas stream. A fourth case will investigate the use of an advanced ultra-supercritical (USC) steam cycle. The advanced USC steam cycle should increase overall plant efficiency and lower the cost of electricity. Mass and energy balances will be done for each case. The four LCL-CTM cases will be compared against a supercritical pulverized coal-fired plant without CO2 capture.

80

Nanofiber Based Carbon Capture Technology to Reduce the CO2 Emissions at GSU Campus PI: Mujibur Rahman Khan, Co-PI: Spencer Harp, Mechanical Engineering Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ Nanofiber Based Carbon Capture Technology to Reduce the CO2 Emissions at GSU Campus PI: Mujibur. · Installation and performance testing of filters at the CO2 emission sites (automobile catalytic converters), particularly carbon dioxide (CO2), generated from various sources within the GSU campus. Reduction of man

Hutcheon, James M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of a Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent-Based Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO 2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants Background Currently available commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from flue gas streams are costly and energy intensive. RTI International is heading a research team to continue development and scale-up of an innovative process for CO 2 capture that has significant potential to be less expensive and less energy intensive than conventional technologies. The "Dry Carbonate Process" utilizes a dry,

82

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-fired Power Plants Background Retrofitting the current fleet of pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants for the separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one of the most significant challenges for effective, long-term carbon management. Post-combustion CO 2 capture using solid-sorbent based technologies is a potential resolution to this challenge that could be appropriate for both new and existing PC-fired power plant

83

Optimal synthesis of a pressure swing adsorption process for CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of carbon dioxide from cement industry and power plants that burn fossil fuels is the major cause for the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere, which causes long-range environmental problems. One option to mitigate the emission of CO2 is to capture it from the emission sources and store it to the ocean or depleted oil field or use it for enhanced oil recovery. CO2 recovery has been achieved by gas absorption employing solutions of carbonates and alkanolamines. However, this process is energy-intensive for the regeneration of solvent and also faces problems due to corrosion. Recently, the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process has been considered as an alternative to the absorption process. PSA processes have been widely applied for the removal of CO2 from various feed mixtures, such as CO2 in the steam reformer off gas, landfill gas and natural gas. In all these commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, for the capture of CO2 for sequestration, it is necessary to concentrate the CO2 to a high purity to reduce the compression and transportation cost. Thus, it is necessary to develop a PSA cycle by which a high-purity product for the strongly adsorbed component with a high recovery is obtained. A multitude of PSA cycles and adsorbents have been developed for producing highly pure heavy component (CO2) from feedstock with low CO2 concentration. Kikkinides et al. suggested a 4-bed 4-step process with activated carbon as the sorbent and could recover 68% of CO2 at 99.997% purity. Chue et al. compared activated carbon and zeolite 13X on a 3-bed 7-step process and concluded that the latter is better than the former for CO2 recovery. However, the CO2 recovery was low in their process due to the lack of a countercurrent step in the chosen cycle. Choi et al. reported more than 70% CO2 recovery at more than 90% purity for a modified 3-bed 7-step cycle. However, they solved a very small two variable optimization problem, thus being a specialized case. Zhang et al. have given justifications for using a specific cyclic component step in the adsorption cycle in the context of CO2 capture by using a simplistic mathematical model for the PSA process. Reynolds et al. have suggested a variety of stripping PSA cycles for CO2 recovery at high temperature using a hydrotalcite-like adsorbent. In this study, a two-bed superstructure of the PSA process has been developed to optimally synthesize an appropriate cycle for CO2 capture. The superstructure considers all the possible operating steps in a PSA cycle with two beds. An optimal control problem with a PDE-based model for PSA system has been formulated in which different steps within a cycle are realized with the help of control variables changing with time. The optimization problem has been solved for three different cases of maximizing CO2 recovery (for a given purity), maximizing feed throughput and minimizing specific power (for a given level of CO2 purity and recovery). Current results indicate the superstructure-based approach as a promising technique for deriving optimal PSA cycles. Different cases with different number of control variables indicate convergence to a particular kind of PSA cycle with over 99% purity and recovery of CO2. The results obtained from optimization problem will also be compared with the optimal PSA cycle simulated more accurately in a dynamic simulation environment.

Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture: A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATKs design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

1M. Panahi, S. Skogestad ' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disturbances: flue gas flowrate, CO2 composition in flue gas + active constraint values Step 4. Optimization 41M. Panahi, S. Skogestad ' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances' Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances Mehdi Panahi Sigurd

Skogestad, Sigurd

86

9780199573288 13-Helm-c13 Helm Hepburn (Typeset by SPi, Chennai) 263 of 283 June 21, 2009 12:8 Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:8 13 Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Howard Herzog I. INTRODUCTION Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is the capture and secure storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) that would otherwise be emitted 12:8 264 Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage discusses the future of CCS in the context of climate

87

The influence of polyethyleneimine type and molecular weight on the CO2 capture performance of PEI-nano silica adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aminesilica adsorbents are considered alternatives to aqueous solutions of amines, which have been traditionally used to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. Among aminesilica adsorbents, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-silica is particularly effective at capturing CO2 from flue gas due to its high thermal stability. In this study, we investigated the influence of PEI type (i.e. branched vs. linear) and molecular weight on the CO2 capture performance of PEI-silica adsorbents. PEI molecular weight influenced the thermal stability of PEI-silica adsorbents; however, when the molecular weight was ?1200Da the increase in stability was negligible in the temperature range of 25160C. Branched \\{PEIs\\} (BPEIs) achieved higher CO2 saturated sorption capacities compared to linear \\{PEIs\\} (LPEIs); however, \\{LPEIs\\} were more stable than \\{BPEIs\\} during CO2 sorptiondesorption cycling. PEI molecular weight also influenced the CO2 saturated sorption capacity; CO2 saturated sorption capacity decreased as PEI molecular weight increased, and among the adsorbents tested in this study BPEI/800-silica had the highest CO2 saturated sorption capacity (202mg CO2/g adsorbent). Both PEI type and molecular weight exhibited influence on the sorption or desorption heat of PEI-silica adsorbents. The CO2 regeneration heat was much lower than that of MEA solution for all PEI-silica adsorbents tested in this study.

Kaimin Li; Jianguo Jiang; Feng Yan; Sicong Tian; Xuejing Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project provided hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students in the area of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport, through fundamental research study focused on advanced separation methods that can be applied to the capture of CO2 resulting from the combustion of fossil-fuels for power generation . The project teams approach to achieve its objectives was to leverage existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) course materials and teaching methods to create and implement an annual CCS short course for the Tuskegee University community; conduct a survey of CO2 separation and capture methods; utilize data to verify and develop computer models for CO2 capture and build CCS networks and hands-on training experiences. The objectives accomplished as a result of this project were: (1) A comprehensive survey of CO2 capture methods was conducted and mathematical models were developed to compare the potential economics of the different methods based on the total cost per year per unit of CO2 avoidance; and (2) Training was provided to introduce the latest CO2 capture technologies and deployment issues to the university community.

Vahdat, Nader

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Computational investigation of thermal gas separation for CO2 capture.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 09-1351, 'Computational Investigation of Thermal Gas Separation for CO{sub 2} Capture'. Thermal gas separation for a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Molecular models for nitrogen and carbon dioxide are developed, implemented, compared to theoretical results, and compared to several experimental thermophysical properties. The molecular models include three translational modes, two fully excited rotational modes, and vibrational modes, whose degree of excitation depends on the temperature. Nitrogen has one vibrational mode, and carbon dioxide has four vibrational modes (two of which are degenerate). These models are used to perform a parameter study for mixtures of carbon dioxide and nitrogen confined between parallel walls over realistic ranges of gas temperatures and nominal concentrations of carbon dioxide. The degree of thermal separation predicted by DSMC is slightly higher than experimental values and is sensitive to the details of the molecular models.

Gallis, Michail A.; Bryan, Charles R.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Torczynski, John Robert; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 31 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepChapter 14 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in DeepSummary. Chapter 25 in Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chemical Looping for Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Performance and Cost Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper is to compare the two technologies chemical looping combustion (CLC) for inherent CO2-capture, and Calcium looping-based (CaL) CO2-capture when applied to a coal-based IGCC power plant, in terms of system efficiency, overall plant efficiency, CO2-capture percentage and cost. It was found that a CLC-based CO2 capture system is more efficient than a CaL-based CO2 capture system. However, both the chemical looping processes lead to higher efficiencies than a conventional solvent-based pre-combustion CO2 capture. The capital cost and cost of electricity of the CLC-based CO2- capture power plant were also found to be lower than a conventional pre-combustion CO2-capture for an IGCC power plant.

Hari C. Mantripragada; Edward S. Rubin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the CO 2 from a feed gas. After absorption...concentrated stream of CO 2 gas is produced, with the...purify CO 2 from coal-fired power plant flue gases, where the CO 2 concentration...capture using current-generation capture and compression...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trends for four types of electric power plants equipped with CO 2 capture systems: pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CO2 displacement mechanisms: phase equilibria effects and carbon dioxide sequestration studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Supercritical carbon dioxide is injected into underground formations to enhance oil recovery and for subsurface sequestration to minimize the impact of CO2 emissions due to (more)

Pasala, Sangeetha M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Commerical-Scale CO2 Capture and Sequestration for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 8, 2009, DOE issued Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number DE-FOA-000015 seeking proposals to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources. This FOA called for what was essentially a two-tier selection process. A number of projects would receive awards to conduct front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies as Phase I. Those project sponsors selected would be required to apply for Phase II, which would be the full design, construction, and operation of their proposed technology. Over forty proposals were received, and ten were awarded Phase I Cooperative Agreements. One of those proposers was CEMEX. CEMEX proposed to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from one of their existing cement plants and either sequester the CO2 in a geologic formation or use it for enhanced oil recovery. The project consisted of evaluating their plants to identify the plant best suited for the demonstration, identify the best available capture technology, and prepare a design basis. The project also included evaluation of the storage or sequestration options in the vicinity of the selected plant.

Adolfo Garza

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy and Economic Analysis of the CO2 Capture from Flue Gas of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage is considered as one of the key strategies for reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide from power generation facilities. Although post-combustion capture via chemical absorption is now a mature technology, the separation of CO2 from flue gases shows many issues, including the solvent degradation and the high regeneration energy requirement, that in turn reduces the power plant performances. Focusing on a triple pressure and reheat combined cycle with exhaust gas recirculation, this paper aims to evaluate the potential impacts of integrating a post-combustion capture system, based on an absorption process with monoethanolamine solvent. Energy and economic performances of the integrated system are evaluated varying the exhaust gas recirculation fraction and the CO2 capture ratio. The different configurations examined are then compared in terms of efficiency and rated capacity of the integrated system, as well as considering the cost of electricity generated and the cost of CO2 avoided.

Maura Vaccarelli; Roberto Carapellucci; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Development of a Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Process Using High  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Development of a Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Process Using High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow-Fiber Membrane Project No.: DE-FE0012965 SRI is conducting a slipstream-scale demonstration of a CO2 capture system using a high-temperature polymer-membrane-based gas separator. The system was developed at bench-scale as part of a previous project, and is being optimized for integration into an IGCC plant. Membrane modules of sufficient capacity will be fabricated to process a synthesis gas (syngas) stream of approximately 0.1 MWe equivalent from an operating, oxygen-blown, coal gasifier. Design and steady-state performance data will be obtained for membrane modules under relatively long duration conditions. The membrane fabrication technology will be transferred to an industrial firm that specializes in the manufacture of hollow fiber membranes for making the membrane modules. Polybenzimidazole (PBI) will be used as a membrane material to separate H2 and CO2 at elevated temperatures (200 to 250°C). PBI will be made into hollow fibers and the fibers will be assembled into bundles and cased as membrane modules for insertion into high-pressure chambers. These modules will be tested using the syngas slipstreams available at the National Carbon Capture Center at ~225°C and 30 bar.

98

Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology titled "Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which CO 2 is first separated / captured from gas streams followed by permanent storage. Carbon capture represents a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology including increased CO

99

NETL: Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Project No.: DE-FE0007634 FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed a novel system concept for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane. The proposed membrane has its genesis from the company's patented Direct FuelCell® (DFC®) technology. The prominent feature of the DFC membrane is its capability to produce power while capturing CO2 from the flue gas from a pulverized coal (PC) plant. The DFC membrane does not require flue gas compression as it operates on the principles of electrochemistry, resulting in net efficiency gains. The membrane utilizes a fuel (different from the plant flue gas, such as coal-derived syngas, natural gas, or a renewable resource) as the driver for the combined carbon capture and electric power generation. The electrochemical membrane consists of ceramic-based layers filled with carbonate salts, separating CO2 from the flue gas. Because of the electrode's high reaction rates, the membrane does not require a high CO2 concentration in its feed gas. The planar geometry of the membrane offers ease of scalability to large sizes suitable for deployment in PC plants, which is an important attribute in membrane design. The membrane has been tested at the laboratory scale, verifying the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. is advancing the technology to a maturity level suitable for adaption by industry for pilot-scale demonstration and subsequent commercial deployment.

100

Evaluation of cation-exchanged zeolite adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of cation-exchanged zeolite adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture Tae anthro- pogenic sources.1 Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been proposed as a means of limiting evaluated for potential application in post-combustion CO2 capture using a new high-throughput gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents requires drastic modifications to the current energy infrastructure. Thus, carbon capture and sequestration for use as carbon capture adsorbents. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) estimates of CO2 selectivity

Kamat, Vineet R.

102

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

Green, Donna

103

A dynamic model for optimally phasing in CO2 capture and storage infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO"2 capture and storage (CCS) is a climate-change mitigation strategy that requires an investment of many billions of dollars and tens of thousands of miles of dedicated CO"2 pipelines. To be effective, scientists, stakeholders, and policy makers will ... Keywords: CO2 capture and storage, Climate-change policy, Infrastructure modeling, Pipeline modeling, SimCCS, Spatiotemporal optimization

Richard S. Middleton; Michael J. Kuby; Ran Wei; Gordon N. Keating; Rajesh J. Pawar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assessment of CO2 capture options from various points in steam methane reforming for hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam methane reforming (SMR) is currently the main hydrogen production process in industry, but it has high emissions of CO2, at almost 7kg CO2/kg H2 on average, and is responsible for about 3% of global industrial sector CO2 emissions. Here, the results are reported of an investigation of the effect of steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C) on CO2 capture criteria from various locations in the process, i.e. synthesis gas stream (location 1), pressure swing adsorber (PSA) tail gas (location 2), and furnace flue gases (location 3). The CO2 capture criteria considered in this study are CO2 partial pressure, CO2 concentration, and CO2 mass ratio compared to the final exhaust stream, which is furnace flue gases. The CO2 capture number (Ncc) is proposed as measure of capture favourability, defined as the product of the three above capture criteria. A weighting of unity is used for each criterion. The best S/C ratio, in terms of providing better capture option, is determined. CO2 removal from synthesis gas after the shift unit is found to be the best location for CO2 capture due to its high partial pressure of CO2. However, furnace flue gases, containing almost 50% of the CO2 in produced in the process, are of great significance environmentally. Consequently, the effects of oxygen enrichment of the furnace feed are investigated, and it is found that this measure improves the CO2 capture conditions for lower S/C ratios. Consequently, for an S/C ratio of 2.5, CO2 capture from a flue gas stream is competitive with two other locations provided higher weighting factors are considered for the full presence of CO2 in the flue gases stream. Considering carbon removal from flue gases, the ratio of hydrogen production rate and Ncc increases with rising reformer temperature.

R. Soltani; M.A. Rosen; I. Dincer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas ... (1, 2) However, conventional coal combustion releases large amounts of the greenhouse gas CO2 into the atmosphere. ...

David J. Couling; Ujjal Das; William H. Green

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

NETL: Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor Project No.: DE-FE0000470 Arizona State University is developing a dual-phase, membrane-based separation device which will separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from typical water gas shift (WGS) mixture feeds and produce hydrogen, which can be introduced into the combustion turbines of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. The objectives of the project are experimental studies of the synthesis of a high-temperature, chemically and thermally stable and CO2 perm-selective dual-phase membrane and its use as a membrane reactor for WGS reaction to produce H2 and CO2 rich streams. Concept of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes for CO2 separation. Concept of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes for CO2 separation.

107

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capture of CO 2 from gasifier process producing electricalPlaquemine, Louisiana. The gasifier is a proprietary designGasifier .

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looping is selected as the model cycle because of its suitability for solar-driven carbon dioxide captureA Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture Lindsey Yue and Wojciech Lipi´nski, The Australian

109

Failing Drop CO2 Deposition (Desublimation) Heat Exchanger for the Cryogenic Carbon Capture Process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cryogenic carbon capture removes CO2 and other pollutants from flue and waste stream gases produced from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, natural (more)

James, David William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Techno-economic modelling of CO2 capture systems for Australian industrial sources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Australia is recognising that carbon capture and storage (CCS) may be a feasible pathway for addressing increasing levels of CO2 emissions. This thesis presents a (more)

Ho, Minh Trang Thi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Novel Processes for Power Plant with CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The purpose of this thesis was to examine different technologies, which enhances the CO2 partial pressure in the flue gas from the natural gas (more)

Ekre, Kjetil Vinjerui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it will provide $36 million for 15 projects aimed at furthering the development of new and cost-effective technologies for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. "Currently, the existing U.S. coal fleet accounts for over half of all electricity generated in this country," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The projects announced today will combat climate change and help meet current and future energy needs by curbing CO2 emissions from existing coal-fired plants."

113

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

membranes membranes B-370 Post-Combustion membranes u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 eleCtroChemiCal membrane for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture & Power generation primary project goals FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is developing an electrochemical membrane (ECM)-based Combined Electric Power and Carbon Dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture that also provides additional electrical power generation. The project includes bench-scale testing of an 11.7 m 2 -area ECM (molten carbonate fuel cell) system for CO 2 capture, purification, and compression. technical goals * Perform contaminant effect testing to establish maximum permissible concentrations of

114

Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels · H2 (and CO2) distribution · H2 utilization (e.g. fuel cells, combustion) · Princeton energy carriers are needed: electricity and hydrogen. · If CO2 sequestration is viable, fossil fuel1 Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture Princeton University: Tom

115

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) Project is one of the nation's largest carbon capture and storage endeavors. Part of the project includes the National...

116

Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing many currently active stations. Records since about 1960 (depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote stations, which represent changing global atmospheric concentrations rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A

117

Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate , Gary T. Rochelle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHGT-8 1 Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate Eric Chen1 , Gary pilot for CO2 capture was successfully operated using potassium carbonate promoted with piperazine, potassium carbonate, piperazine Introduction Several amine-promoted potassium carbonate solvents have been

Rochelle, Gary T.

118

APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS PRE-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES POST-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS POST-COMBUSTION SORBENTS POST-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES OXY-COMBUSTION OXYGEN PRODUCTION CHEMICAL LOOPING ADVANCED COMPRESSION R&D COLLABORATIONS B-1 APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS B-6 SRI International - CO 2 Capture Using AC-ABC Processt B-7 PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS B-14 TDA Research - CO 2 Capture for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems B-15 URS Group - Sorbent Development for WGS B-18 Air Products and Chemicals - Advanced Acid Gas Separation B-24 Ohio State University-Department of Chemical Engineering - Calcium Looping for Hydrogen Production B-33

119

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

120

The Role of CO2 Reduction Catalysis in Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to the algae-mediated process discussed in Chap.7, to generate hydrocarbon-based fuels and useful chemicals from CO2, it is also possible to use electrochemical and photocatalytic processes to carry ...

Prof. Jennifer Wilcox

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A techno-economic plant- and grid-level assessment of flexible CO2 capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon dioxide (CO?) capture and sequestration (CCS) at fossil-fueled power plants is a critical technology for CO? emissions mitigation during the transition to a sustainable (more)

Cohen, Stuart Michael, 1984-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Capture of carbon dioxide by solid amine sorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reaction of tetraethylorthrosilcate (TEOS) with y-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) has produced stable solid amine sorbents for the capture of carbon dioxide. The resulting amine-enriched silicon sorbent (SBA-15) has been proven to be competitive with existing environmental CO2 controlled life sorbents based on the immobilised amine technology. XPS analysis has indicated that the amine groups (N1s Peak) were incorporated onto the surfaces of this amine-based sorbent in the range of 7%. The performance of the SBA-15 was comparable to the commercially available immobilised amine sorbent (IAS).

M.L. Gray; Y. Soong; K.J. Champagne; H.W. Pennline; J. Baltrus; R.W. Stevens Jr.; R. Khatri; S.S.C. Chuang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NETL: A Low-Cost, High-Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0007580 TDA Research, Inc is developing a low cost, high capacity CO2 adsorbent and demonstrating its technical and economic viability for post-combustion CO2 capture for existing pulverized coal-fired power plants. TDA is using an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity to adsorb CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. The sorbent binds CO2 more strongly than common adsorbents, providing the chemical potential needed to remove the CO2, however, because CO2 does not form a true covalent bond with the surface sites, regeneration can be carried out with only a small energy input. The heat input to regenerate the sorbent is only 4.9 kcal per mol of CO2, which is much lower than that for chemical absorbents or amine based solvents.

124

LOW-PRESSURE MEMBRANE CONTACTORS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical progress report describes work conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of low-pressure membrane contactors for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from power plant flue gas (award number DE-FE0007553). The work was conducted from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2014. The overall goal of this three-year project was to build and operate a prototype 500 m2 low-pressure sweep membrane module specifically designed to separate CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. MTR was assisted in this project by a research group at the University of Toledo, which contributed to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of module design and process simulation. This report details the work conducted to develop a new type of membrane contactor specifically designed for the high-gas-flow, low-pressure, countercurrent sweep operation required for affordable membrane-based CO2 capture at coal power plants. Work for this project included module development and testing, design and assembly of a large membrane module test unit at MTR, CFD comparative analysis of cross-flow, countercurrent, and novel partial-countercurrent sweep membrane module designs, CFD analysis of membrane spacers, design and fabrication of a 500 m2 membrane module skid for field tests, a detailed performance and cost analysis of the MTR CO2 capture process with low-pressure sweep modules, and a process design analysis of a membrane-hybrid separation process for CO2 removal from coal-fired flue gas. Key results for each major task are discussed in the report.

Baker, Richard; Kniep, Jay; Hao, Pingjiao; Chan, Chi Cheng; Nguyen, Vincent; Huang, Ivy; Amo, Karl; Freeman, Brice; Fulton, Don; Ly, Jennifer; Lipscomb, Glenn; Lou, Yuecun; Gogar, Ravikumar

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA July 8 - 11, 2013 ION Novel Solvent System for CO 2 Capture FE0005799 Nathan Brown ION Engineering Presentation Outline 2  ION Advanced Solvent Background  Project Overview  Technology Fundamentals  Progress & Current Status  Plans for Future Commercialization  Acknowledgements ION Engineering Background 3 Mission Statement: Develop new solvents and processes for economic removal of CO 2 from industrial emissions. Markets:  Coal-fired flue gas  NGCC-fired flue gas  Sour gas processing 1 st & 2 nd Generation CO 2 Capture 4 Aqueous MEA Commercial Use Existing Commercial Technology Lateral Transfer of Existing Technology Aqueous MEA

126

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration by Adsorption on Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Activated Carbon (AC) materials was selected as suitable adsorbent for the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and a numerical analysis was carried out to study the rate of adsorption of the gas on ACs. A one dimensional mathematical model was proposed based on the Dubinin's Theory of Volume Filling of Micropores, and analyzed along with the unsteady heat transfer. A parametric analysis was carried out to study the effect of various crucial parameters like radius of bed, cooling fluid temperature, initial bed temperature and heat transfer coefficient on the adsorption amount. The results show that lower bed radius was ideal for obtaining high amount of CO2 adsorbed assuming constant packing density. Also, a high heat transfer coefficient up to 100 Wm-2K-1 and low cooling fluid temperature of 283K was necessary for speeding up the process. High initial bed temperature also supports greater adsorption amount under the same conditions.

Reema Saxena; Vinod Kumar Singh; E. Anil Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and liability for carbon capture and sequestration, Environ.Wilson and Gerard, editors, Carbon Capture and SequestrationSpecial Report on carbon dioxide capture and storage, ISBN

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal Management of Structured Adsorbents in CO2 Capture Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In our previous study,(8) we presented a new methodology to find the optimal adsorbent structure and showed that for dilute systems, parallel channel adsorbents in the form of laminate structures exhibit substantially better performance than other structures, but for the sake of computational simplicity we confined our study to the case of isothermal operation only. ... Heat capacities of bulk and adsorbed CO2 are assumed negligible. ...

Fateme Rezaei; Mattias Grahn

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Subsurface capture of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus of separating CO.sub.2 gas from industrial off-gas source in which the CO.sub.2 containing off-gas is introduced deep within an injection well. The CO.sub.2 gases are dissolved in the, liquid within the injection well while non-CO.sub.2 gases, typically being insoluble in water or brine, are returned to the surface. Once the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid is present within the injection well, the injection well may be used for long-term geologic storage of CO.sub.2 or the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid can be returned to the surface for capturing a purified CO.sub.2 gas.

Blount, Gerald; Siddal, Alvin A.; Falta, Ronald W.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture Dan Lia,b,c,1 , Hiroyasu demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence

131

Potential impact of CO2 leakage from Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) systems on growth and yield in maize  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic release of CO2...is an important factor in the continuing rise in mean global temperature. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) offers a promising technology to capture and sequester CO2 in deep geologi...

Manal Al-Traboulsi; Sofie Sjgersten; Jeremy Colls; Michael Steven

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products July 6, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects are located in North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and Quebec, Canada (through collaboration with a company based in Lexington, Ky.) and have a total value of approximately $5.9 million over two-to-three years, with $4.4 million of DOE funding and $1.5 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the

133

Carbon capture by biomass and soil are sound: CO2 burial wastes energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We suggest sound ways to improve the capture of CO2...including the conservation of U.S. crops, forests, grasses, and soil conservation. Currently, U.S. crops, forests, and grasses collect an estimated 9 billion ...

David Pimentel; Rattan Lal; James Singmaster

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Capture of CO2 from flue gas by vacuum pressure swing adsorption using activated carbon beads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) for CO2 capture has attracted much research effort with the...2...adsorbent materials. In this work, a new adsorbent, that is, pitch-based activated carbon bead (AC bead), ...

Chunzhi Shen; Jianguo Yu; Ping Li; Carlos A. Grande; Alirio E. Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capture from atmospheric airThermodynamic...thermal energy recovery from the...Not reported. Recovery cycle only...ion-exchange resin. Condensation of water and heat from...compression of CO2 to atmospheric pressure included...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...captured). When analyzing the economics of climate...9 Desalination, reverse osmosis...ethanol distillation and desalination...CO2; and 1.5% N2). Desalination, reverse osmosis. Description...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Political commitment to CO2 capture and storage: evidence from government RD&D budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For CO2 capture and storage (CCS) to succeed as a mitigation strategy, political commitment is one of several prerequisites. This article offers an appraisal of political commitment to a CCS strategy among high-i...

Andreas Tjernshaugen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Techno-economic assessment of pulverized coal boilers and IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current studies on power plant technologies suggest that Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an effective and economic CO2 capture technology pathway. In addition, the system in conventi...

Y. Huang; S. Rezvani; D. McIlveen-Wright

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hybrid Solvent-Membrane CO2 Capture: A Solvent/Membrane Hybrid Post-combustion CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: The University of Kentucky is developing a hybrid approach to capturing CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. In the first, CO2 is removed as flue gas is passed through an aqueous ammonium-based solvent. In the second, carbon-rich solution from the CO2 absorber is passed through a membrane that is designed to selectively transport the bound carbon, enhancing its concentration on the permeate side. The teams approach would combine the best of both membrane- and solventbased carbon capture technologies. Under the ARPA-E award, the team is enabling the membrane operation to be a drop-in solution.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Plant-Level Simulation Model for Evaluating CO2 Capture Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Resource use Environmental Emissions - Air, water, land Plant & Process Costs - Capital - O&M - COE #12;E · Subcritical · Supercritical · Ultra-supercritical Furnace Firing Types · Tangential · Wall · Cyclone Furnace: - Water gas shift + CO2 capture (pre-combustion) · CO2 Transport Options Pipelines (six U.S. regions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

142

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Irrigation, and Nitrogen (1992) (NDP-037) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp037 image Data image PDF file Investigators B. A. Kimball, J. R. Mauney, R. L. La Morte, G. Guinn, F. S. Nakayama, J. W. Radin, E. A. Lakatos, S. T. Michell, L. L. Parker, G. J. Peresta, P. E. Nixon III, B. Savoy, S. M. Harris, R. MacDonald, H. Pros, and J. Martinez This NDP presents data on the effects of continuous CO2 enrichment of cotton during five consecutive growing seasons, 1983 to 1987, under both optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior CO2-enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions with

143

COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solvents solvents B-6 Pre-Combustion solvents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 Co 2 CaPture from igCC gas streams using aC-abC ProCess primary project goals SRI International is developing, for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)-based power plants, a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture technology based on the use of a high-ca- pacity and low-cost aqueous ammoniated solution containing ammonium carbonate (AC), which reacts with CO 2 to form ammonium bicarbonate (ABC).

145

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solvents solvents B-198 Post-Combustion solvents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 DeveloPment anD Demonstration of Waste heat integration With solvent ProCess for more effiCient Co 2 removal from Coal-fireD flue gas primary project goals Southern Company Services is developing viable heat integration methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) produced from pulverized coal (PC) combustion. The project will quantify energy-efficiency improvements to the CO 2 capture process by utilizing a waste heat recovery technology, High-Efficiency System (HES). technical goals * Reduction of the amount of extraction steam required for sensible heat load in the

146

Advanced Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases by Shrikar Chakravarti (shrikar_chakravarti@praxair.com; 716-879-4760) Amitabh Gupta (ami_gupta@praxair.com; 716-879-2194) Balazs Hunek (balazs_hunek@praxair.com; 716-879-2250) Praxair, Inc. Process & Systems R&D, CO 2 Technology 175 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 44 Tonawanda, NY 14150 USA key words: flue gas, carbon dioxide, separation, amine absorption, oxygen tolerant process, amine blends First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 15-17, 2001 Copyright 2001, Praxair Technology, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1 Abstract Cost effective carbon sequestration schemes have been identified as a key need for dealing with carbon dioxide's (CO 2 ) impact on global climate change. Two main

147

Co-optimising CO2 storage and enhanced recovery in gas and gas condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Burning fossil fuels supply energy and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon capture and storage (CCS) can reduce CO2 emissions. However, CCS is an expensive process. (more)

Tan, Jo Ann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Electric Power (AEP): American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1) Background A need exists to further develop carbon management technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO

149

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-14 Pre-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture teChnology for low-rank Coal integrateD gasifiCation CombineD CyCle (igCC) systems primary project goals TDA will investigate the technical and economic advantages of using an integrated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbent and water-gas shift (WGS) catalyst system in an integrated gasifi- cation combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, fueled with low-rank coal, and designed to capture more than 90% of the CO 2 emissions. technical goals * TDA will evaluate the physical mix of the sorbent and catalyst pellets within the same

150

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration 46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas Overview DOE completed a final environmental assessment (EA) for a project under Area I of the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use . Based on the analyses in the EA DOE determined that its proposed action - awarding a grant to Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. to design and demonstrate a state-of-the-art system to concentrate carbon dioxide (CO,) from two steam

151

CO2 Capture Options for an Existing Coal Fired Power Plant: O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion vs. Amine Scrubbing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: O 2 /CO 2 RECYCLE COMBUSTION vs. AMINE SCRUBBING D. J. Singh (djsingh@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-496-2064) E. Croiset 1 (ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca;+001-519-888-4567x6472) P.L. Douglas (pdouglas@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-888-4567x2913) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1 M.A. Douglas (madougla@nrcan.gc.ca; +001-613 996-2761) CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Nepean, Ontario, Canada, K1A 1M1 Abstract The existing fleet of modern pulverized coal fired power plants represents an opportunity to achieve significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the coming years providing efficient and economical CO 2 capture technologies are available for retrofit.

152

A superstructure-based optimal synthesis of PSA cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments have shown pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PSA/VSA) to be a promising option to effectively capture CO2 from flue gas streams. In most commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product, and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. On the other hand, it is necessary to concentrate CO2 to high purity to reduce CO2 sequestration costs and minimize safety and environmental risks. Thus, it is necessary to develop PSA processes specifically targeted to obtain pure strongly adsorbed component. A multitude of PSA/VSA cycles have been developed in the literature for CO2 capture from feedstocks low in CO2 concentration. However, no systematic methodology has been suggested to develop, evaluate, and optimize PSA cycles for high purity CO2 capture. This study presents a systematic optimization-based formulation to synthesize novel PSA cycles for a given application. In particular, a novel PSA superstructure is presented to design optimal PSA cycle configurations and evaluate CO2 capture strategies. The superstructure is rich enough to predict a number of different PSA operating steps. The bed connections in the superstructure are governed by time-dependent control variables, which can be varied to realize most PSA operating steps. An optimal sequence of operating steps is achieved through the formulation of an optimal control problem with the partial differential and algebraic equations of the PSA system and the cyclic steady state condition. Large-scale optimization capabilities have enabled us to adopt a complete discretization methodology to solve the optimal control problem as a largescale nonlinear program, using the nonlinear optimization solver IPOPT. The superstructure approach is demonstrated for case studies related to post-combustion CO2 capture. In particular, optimal PSA cycles were synthesized, which maximize CO2 recovery for a given purity, and minimize overall power consumption. The results show the potential of the superstructure to predict PSA cycles with up to 98% purity and recovery of CO2. Moreover, for recovery of around 85% and purity of over 90%, these cycles can recover CO2 from atmospheric flue gas with a low power consumption of 465 kWh tonne#1;1 CO2. The approach presented is, therefore, very promising and quite useful for evaluating the suitability of different adsorbents, feedstocks, and operating strategies for PSA, and assessing its usefulness for CO2 capture.

Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

154

Technological, economic and financial prospects of carbon dioxide capture in the cement industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cement is the second largest anthropogenic emission source, contributing approximately 7% of global CO2 emissions. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology is considered by the International Energy Agency (IEA) as an essential technology capable of reducing CO2 emissions in the cement sector by 56% by 2050. The study compares CO2 capture technologies for the cement manufacturing process and analyses the economic and financial issues in deploying CO2 capture in the cement industry. Post-combustion capture with chemical absorption is regarded as a proven technology to capture CO2 from the calcination process. Oxyfuel is less mature but Oxyfuel partial capturewhich only recycles O2/CO2 gas in the precalcineris estimated to be more economic than post-combustion capture. Carbonate looping technologies are not yet commercial, but they have theoretical advantages in terms of energy consumption. In contrast with coal-fired power plants, CO2 capture in the cement industry benefits from a higher concentration of CO2 in the flue gas, but the benefit is offset by higher \\{SOx\\} and \\{NOx\\} levels and the smaller scale of emissions from each plant. Concerning the prospects for financing cement plant CO2 capture, large cement manufacturers on average have a higher ROE (return on equity) and lower debt ratio, thus a higher discount rate should be considered for the cost analysis than in power plants. IEA estimates that the incremental cost for deploying CCS to decarbonise the global cement sector is in the range US$350840 billion. The cost estimates for deploying state-of-the art post-combustion CO2 capture technologies in cement plants are above $60 to avoid each tonne of CO2 emissions. However, the expectation is that the current market can only provide a minority of financial support for CO2 capture in cement plants. Public financial support and/or CO2 utilisation will be essential to trigger large-scale CCS demonstration projects in the cement industry.

Jia Li; Pradeep Tharakan; Douglas Macdonald; Xi Liang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CO2 Capture and Regeneration at Low Temperatures: Novel Non-Aqueous CO2 Solvents and Capture Process with Substantially Reduced Energy Penalties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: RTI is developing a solvent and process that could significantly reduce the temperature associated with regenerating solvent and CO2 captured from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. Traditional CO2 removal processes using water-based solvents require significant amount of steam from power plants in order to regenerate the solvent so it can be reused after each reaction. RTIs solvents can be better at absorbing CO2 than many water-based solvents, and are regenerated at lower temperatures using less steam. Thus, industrial heat that is normally too cool to re-use can be deployed for regeneration, rather than using high-value steam. This saves the power plant money, which results in increased cost savings for consumers.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Modeling of stripper performance suggests that vacuum stripping may be an attractive configuration for all solvents. Flexipac 1Y structured packing performs in the absorber as expected. It provides twice as much mass transfer area as IMTP No.40 dumped packing. Independent measurements of CO{sub 2} solubility give a CO{sub 2} loading that is 20% lower than that Cullinane's values with 3.6 m PZ at 100-120 C. The effective mass transfer coefficient (K{sub G}) in the absorber with 5 m K/2.5 m PZ appears to be 0 to 30% greater than that of 30 wt% MEA.

Gary T. Rochelle; Marcus Hilliard; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Ross Dugas; John McLees; Andrew Sexton; Daniel Ellenberger

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced Amine Solvent Formulations and Process Integration for Near-Term CO2 Capture Success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase I SBIR project investigated the economic and technical feasibility of advanced amine scrubbing systems for post-combustion CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Numerous combinations of advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were screened for energy requirements, and three cases were selected for detailed analysis: a monoethanolamine (MEA) base case and two advanced cases: an MEA/Piperazine (PZ) case, and a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) / PZ case. The MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ cases employed an advanced double matrix stripper configuration. The basis for calculations was a model plant with a gross capacity of 500 MWe. Results indicated that CO2 capture increased the base cost of electricity from 5 cents/kWh to 10.7 c/kWh for the MEA base case, 10.1 c/kWh for the MEA / PZ double matrix, and 9.7 c/kWh for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. The corresponding cost per metric tonne CO2 avoided was 67.20 $/tonne CO2, 60.19 $/tonne CO2, and 55.05 $/tonne CO2, respectively. Derated capacities, including base plant auxiliary load of 29 MWe, were 339 MWe for the base case, 356 MWe for the MEA/PZ double matrix, and 378 MWe for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. When compared to the base case, systems employing advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were estimated to reduce reboiler steam requirements by 20 to 44%, to reduce derating due to CO2 capture by 13 to 30%, and to reduce the cost of CO2 avoided by 10 to 18%. These results demonstrate the potential for significant improvements in the overall economics of CO2 capture via advanced solvent formulations and process configurations.

Fisher, Kevin S.; Searcy, Katherine; Rochelle, Gary T.; Ziaii, Sepideh; Schubert, Craig

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Integration of the steam cycle and CO2 capture process in a decarbonization power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new integrated system with power generation and CO2 capture to achieve higher techno-economic performance is proposed in this study. In the new system, three measures are adopted to recover the surplus energy from the CO2 capture process. The three measures are as follows: (1) using a portion of low-pressure steam instead of high-pressure extracted steam by installing the steam ejector, (2) mixing a portion of flash-off water with the extracted steam to utilize the superheat degree of the extracted steam, and (3) recycling the low-temperature waste heat from the CO2 capture process to heat the condensed water. As a result, the power output of the new integrated system is 107.61MW higher than that of a decarbonization power plant without integration. The efficiency penalty of CO2 capture is expected to decrease by 4.91%-points. The increase in investment produced by the new system is 3.25M$, which is only 0.88% more than the total investment of a decarbonization power plant without integration. Lastly, the cost of electricity and CO2 avoided is 15.14% and 33.1% lower than that of a decarbonization power generation without integration, respectively. The promising results obtained in this study provide a new approach for large-scale CO2 removal with low energy penalty and economic cost.

Gang Xu; Yue Hu; Baoqiang Tang; Yongping Yang; Kai Zhang; Wenyi Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

NETL: IEP - Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone solvent to capture CO2 with a continuous bench-scale system. The project will utilize both computational and experimental methods. Previously measured experimental data from a continuous laboratory-scale CO2 capture system will be used to design this bench-scale system. Data from the bench-scale system, such as kinetics and mass transfer information, will be used to determine scale-up effects and needed design parameters to develop a scale-up strategy, update cost of electricity (COE) calculations and perform a technical and economic feasibility study. A manufacturing plan for the aminosilicone solvent and a price model will be used for optimization. The final objective of the program is to demonstrate, at the bench-scale, a process that achieves 90 percent CO2 capture efficiency with less than a 35 percent increase in the COE. Development of this scalable bench-scale process combined with a rigorous process model and thorough manufacturability analysis for the solvent, will enable a practical technology path to later development at larger scales and commercialization. The technology will eventually be retrofittable to coal-based power plants.

160

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005287 In this project, the Georgia Tech Research Corporation is using totally novel chemistryto engender the dramatic changes needed for widespread implementation of CO2 capture in a both environmentally benign and economical process. Current methods of CO2 post-combustion recovery from coal-fired power plants focus on such techniques as absorption in aqueous ethanolamine scrubbers - and this is now a mature technology unlikely to achieve a quantum change in either capacity or cost. The objective of this project is to develop a novel class of solvents for post-combustion recovery of CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants which will achieve a substantial increase in CO2 carrying capacity with a concomitant plummet in cost. The project team is a combination of chemical engineers and chemists with extensive experience in working with industrial partners to formulate novel solvents and to develop processes that are both environmentally benign and economically viable. Further, the team has already developed solvents called "reversible ionic liquids," essentially "smart" molecules which change properties abruptly in response to some stimulus, and these have quickly found a plethora of applications.

162

Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer model that supports prediction of heat transfer profiles for larger permeators Tasks 3. 4.1, 4.2--Temperature Range of Enzymes--The goal was to determine if the enzyme operating temperature would limit the range of thermal conditions available to the capture system. We demonstrated the ability of various isozymes (enzyme variants) to operate from 4-85 C. Consequently, the operating characteristics of the enzyme are not a controlling factor. Further, any isozyme whose upper temperature bound is at least 10 C greater than that of the planned inlet temperature will be stable under unanticipated, uncontrolled 'hiccups' in power plant operation. Task 4.4, 4.4--Examination of the Effects of SOx and NOx on Enzyme Activity (Development of Flue Gas Composition Acceptance Standards)--The purpose was to define the inlet gas profile boundaries. We examined the potential adverse effects of flue gas constituents including different acids from to develop an acceptance standard and compared these values to actual PC flue gas composition. Potential issues include changes in pH, accumulation of specific inhibitory anions and cations. A model was developed and validated by test with a SO{sub 2}-laden stream. The predicted and actual data very largely coincided. The model predicted feed stream requirements to allow continuous operation in excess of 2500 hours. We developed operational (physical and chemical) strategies to avoid or ameliorate these effects. Avoidance, the preferred strategy (noted above), is accomplished by more extensive cleanup of the flue gas stream. Task 5--Process Engineering Model--We developed a process-engineering model for two purposes. The first was to predict the physical and chemical status at each test point in the design as a basis for scale-up. The second was to model the capital and operating cost of the apparatus. These were accomplished and used to predict capex, opex and cost of energy. Task 6--Preliminary Commercialization Plan--We carried out analyses of the market and the competition by a variety of parameters. The conclusion was that there is a l

Michael C. Trachtenberg

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Capture of carbon dioxide by hybrid sorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition, process and system for capturing carbon dioxide from a combustion gas stream. The composition has a particulate porous support medium that has a high volume of pores, an alkaline component distributed within the pores and on the surface of the support medium, and water adsorbed on the alkaline component, wherein the proportion of water in the composition is between about 5% and about 35% by weight of the composition. The process and system contemplates contacting the sorbent and the flowing gas stream together at a temperature and for a time such that some water remains adsorbed in the alkaline component when the contact of the sorbent with the flowing gas ceases.

Srinivasachar, Srivats

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study by Anusha Kothandaraman Students #12;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study by Anusha with electricity generation accounting for 40% of the total1 . Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one

165

Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Topical Report Prepared Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Ross Edward Dugas, M capture using monoethanolamine (MEA). MEA is an appropriate choice for a baseline study since

Rochelle, Gary T.

166

Economically Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part I: Self-optimizing Procedure for Selecting the Best Controlled Variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the greenhouse gas CO2 that causes global warming. Due to the effect of CO2 emissions on global warming consider an absorption/stripping amine process to remove most of the CO2 from the combustion flue gas Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part I: Self-optimizing Procedure for Selecting the Best

Skogestad, Sigurd

167

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1.2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electricity generation from coal with CO2 capture by means of a novel power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate modelers have estimated that anthropogenic emissions of CO2 must be reduced substantially from the present rate to stabilize atmospheric concentration. To achieve this, electricity generation from fossil fuels with CO2 capture and direct sequestration may play an important role. If so, it will be worthwhile to consider power cycles that are designed to minimize atmospheric CO2 emissions and deliver CO2 ready for pipeline transport in addition to providing other desirable attributes of environmental performance and efficiency. One such novel approach, named the Matiant cycle, employs self generated CO2 as the working fluid with both Bryton and Rankine cycle turbines. Process modeling studies are being conducted at the NETL to investigate the promise of this cycle. In the work to be reported, synthesis gas is provided to the Matiant cycle by oxygen-blown dry coal entrained gasification. Oxygen for both the gasifier and the Matiant cycle is provided by use of an Ion Transport Membrane (ITM). ITM is a revolutionary approach for producing high purity oxygen from a high temperature pressurized air stream. ASPEC Plus is used as the simulation tool to compute energy balances and system performance. Two flowsheets are analyzed, the difference being the treatment of the low oxygen content raffinate stream from the ITM. Computed thermal efficiencies of the ITM/Matiant cycle are comparable to those of conventional IGCC without carbon capture. Specific carbon emissions per net MWh are many times lower for the new cycle than for other approaches being developed for power generation with CO2 capture, however. As much as 99.5% of the carbon in synthesis gas fed to the Matiant cycle could be recovered and removed in a pipeline as a high pressure liquid. Such high capture efficiencies at large central generating stations could allow use of fossil fuels without capture at smaller installations or by mobile sources, yielding a modest overall rate of CO2 emissions.

Ruether, J.; Le, P.; White, C.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

CO2-Binding Organic Liquids, an Integrated Acid Gas Capture System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amine systems are effective for CO2 capture, but they are still inefficient because the solvent regeneration energy is largely defined by the amount of water in the process. Most amines form heat-stable salts with SO2 and COS resulting in parasitic solvent loss and degradation. Stripping the CO2-rich solvent is energy intensive it requires temperatures above 100 ?C due to the high specific heat and heat of vaporization of water. CO2-capture processes could be much more energy efficient in a water free amine process. In addition, if the capture-material is chemically compatible with other acid gases, less solvent would be lost to heat-stable salts and the process economics would be further improved. One such system that can address these concerns is Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs), a class of switchable ionic liquids.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NETL: SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001780 DOE is partnering with the University of Akron (Akron) to conduct research and training to develop an effective solid amine sorbent for large scale post-combustion CO2 capture from power plant flue gas. Sorbent materials developed by Akron consist of immobilized carbon and hydrogen structures (paraffin) distributed inside of the amine pores and aromatic amines located on the external surface and the pore mouth of the sorbent. The immobilized paraffinic amines have been shown to display excellent CO2 capture capacity by adsorbing CO2 at temperatures below 55 °C and releasing it at temperatures between 80-120 °C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that generally have large pore space, high surface area, and/or high thermal conductivity.

172

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporations Econamine Plus carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOEs Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately funded projects studying CO2 sequestration in basalts will be heavily leveraged in developing a suitable site characterization program and system design for permanent sequestration of captured CO2. The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Key Policy Issues and Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key...

174

Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks Previous Next List Anh Phan, Christian J. Doonan, Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Carolyn B....

175

Current status of MHI CO2 capture plant technology, large scale demonstration project and road map to commercialization for coal fired flue gas application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) It is becoming increasingly evident that the prolonged utilization of fossil fuels for primary energy production, especially coal which is relatively cheap and abundant, is inevitable and that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from this sector thus allowing the continued environmentally sustainable use of this important energy commodity on a global basis. (2) MHI has co-developed the Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process (KM-CDR Process) and KS-1 absorbent, which has been deployed in seven CO2 capture plants, now under commercial operation operating at a CO2 capture capacity of 450 metric tons per day (tpd). In addition, a further two commercial plants are now under construction all of which capture CO2 from natural gas fired flue gas boilers and steam reformers. Accordingly this technology is now available for commercial scale CO2 capture for gas boiler and gas turbine application. (3) However before offering commercial CO2 capture plants for coal fired flue gas application, it is necessary to verify the influence of, and develop countermeasures for, related impurities contained in coal fired flue gas. This includes the influence on both the absorbent and the entire system of the CO2 capture plant to achieve high operational reliability and minimize maintenance requirements. (4) Preventing the accumulation of impurities, especially the build up of dust, is very important when treating coal fired flue gas and MHI has undertaken significant work to understand the impact of impurities in order to achieve reliable and stable operating conditions and to efficiently optimize integration between the CO2 capture plant, the coal fired power plant and the flue gas clean up equipment. (5) To achieve this purpose, MHI constructed a 10 tpd CO2 capture demonstration plant at the Matsushima 1000MW Power Station and confirmed successful, long term demonstration following ?5000hours of operation in 200607 with 50% financial support by RITE, as a joint program to promote technological development with the private sector, and cooperation from J-POWER. (6) Following successful demonstration testing at Matsushima, additional testing was undertaken in 2008 to examine the impact of entrainment of higher levels of flue gas impurities (primarily \\{SOx\\} and dust by bypassing the existing FGD) and to determine which components of the CO2 recovery process are responsible for the removal of these impurities. Following an additional 1000 demonstration hours, results indicated stable operational performance in relation to the following impurities; (1) SO2: Even at higher SO2 concentrations were almost completely removed from the flue gas before entering the CO2 absorber. (2) Dust: The accumulation of dust in the absorbent was higher, leading to an advanced understanding of the behavior of dust in the CO2 capture plant and the dust removal efficiency of each component within the CO2 recovery system. The data obtained is useful for the design of large-scale units and confirms the operating robustness of the CO2 capture plant accounting for wide fluctuations in impurity concentrations. (7) This important coal fired flue gas testing showed categorically that minimizing the accumulation of large concentrations of impurities, and to suppress dust concentrations below a prescribed level, is important to achieve long-term stable operation and to minimize maintenance work for the CO2 capture plant. To comply with the above requirement, various countermeasures have been developed which include the optimization of the impurity removal technology, flue gas pre treatment and improved optimization with the flue gas desulfurization facility. (8) In case of a commercial scale CO2 capture plant applied for coal fired flue gas, its respective size will be several thousand tpd which represents a considerable scale-up from the 10 tpd demonstration plant. In order to ensure the operational reliability and to accurately confirm the influence and the behavior of the impurities in coal fired fl

Takahiko Endo; Yoshinori Kajiya; Hiromitsu Nagayasu; Masaki Iijima; Tsuyoshi Ohishi; Hiroshi Tanaka; Ronald Mitchell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Slipstream Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO Testing of a Membrane CO 2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of

177

Low-Energy Solvents for CO2 Capture Enabled by a Combination fo Enzymes and Ultrasonics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Solvents for CO Energy Solvents for CO 2 Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of

178

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (? 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ? 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ? 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ? 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ? 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOEs benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97% CO2 product purity was achieved throughout the test. Membrane contactor modules have been scaled from bench scale 2-inch diameter by 12-inch long (20 ft2 membrane surface area) modules to 4-inch diameter by 60-inch long pilot scale modules (165 ft2 membrane surface area). Pilot scale modules were tested in an integrated absorption/regeneration system for CO2 capture field tests at a coal-fired power plant (Midwest Generations Will County Station located in Romeoville, IL). Absorption and regeneration contactors were constructed utilizing high performance super-hydrophobic, nano-porous PEEK membranes with CO2 gas permeance of 2,000 GPU and a 1,000 GPU, respectively. Field tests using aMDEA solvent achieved greater than 90% CO2 removal in a single stage. The absorption mass transfer coefficient was 1.2 (sec)-1, exceeding the initial target of 1.0 (sec)-1. This mass transfer coefficient is over one order of magnitude greater than that of conventional gas/liquid contacting equipment. The economic evaluation based on field tests data indicates that the CO2 capture cost associated with membrane contactor technology is $54.69 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured when using aMDEA as a solvent. It is projected that the DOEs 2025 cost goal of $40 (Yr 2011$)/tonne of CO2 captured can be met by decreasing membrane module cost and by utilizing advanced CO2 capture solvents. In the second stage of the field test, an advanced solvent, Hitachis H3-1 was utilized. The use of H3-1 solvent increased mass transfer coefficient by 17% as compared to aMDEA solvent. The high mass transfer coefficient of H3-1 solvent combined with much more favorable solvent regeneration requirements, indicate that the projected savings achievable with membrane contactor process can be further improved. H3-1 solvent will be used in the next pilot-scale development phase. The integrated absorption/regeneration process design and high performance membrane contactors developed in the current bench-scale program will be used as the base technology for future pilot-scale development.

Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

CO2 Capture by Aqueous Absorption/Stripping Opportunities for Better Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture Capture by Aqueous Absorption/Stripping Opportunities for Better Technology by Gary Rochelle Department of Chemical Engineering University of Texas CO 2 Emissions by Source (1998) C o a l E l e c G a s E l e c . P e t r o . E l e c . I n d . C o a l I n d . G a s I n d . P e t r o . T r a n s . O t h e r MMTCE 0 100 200 300 400 500 Comparison of Power Technologies (500 MW Power Plant) P F & F G D G T C C I G C C CO 2 Wet Vol. % 5 15 0 10 20 Flue Gas (scfm) 0.0 5.0e+5 1.0e+6 1.5e+6 2.0e+6 2.5e+6 The Plan * Base Case MEA * Thermodynamics: Solvents for Reduced Energy: * CO2 Kinetics: Solvents for Increased Rates * Energy Integration * Amine Makeup: Degradation, Corrosion * Contactor Innovations * Four Promising Solvent Systems Typical Absorber / Stripper Flue Gas 2-10% O 2 3-10% CO 2 Rich Amine HX Lean Amine AB SO RB ER STRIPPER 100-120 o C CO 2 H 2 O (O 2 ) CO 2 < 2% Reboiler 1-2 atm

180

Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

None

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Techno-economic assessment of CO2 capture at steam methane reforming facilities using commercially available technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed to identify the optimal techno-economic configuration of CO2 capture at steam methane reforming facilities using currently available technologies by means of process simulations. Results indicate that the optimal system is CO2 capture with ADIP-X located between the watergas shift and pressure swing adsorption units. Process simulations of this system configuration showed a CO2 emission reduction of 60% at 41/t CO2 avoidance. This is at the lower end of the range reported in open literature for CO2 capture at refineries (2682/t CO2) and below the avoidance costs for CO2 capture at natural gas-fired power plants (4493/t CO2). CO2 avoidance costs are dominated by the natural gas consumption, responsible for up to 66% of total costs. Using imported steam and electricity can reduce CO2 avoidance costs by 45%. Addition of small amounts of piperazine to aqueous MDEA solutions results in up to 70% smaller absorbers or 10% lower reboiler heat duty. Optimising the whole capture process instead of individual units resulted in lower piperazine concentrations than the common industrial practice (3mass% vs. 5mass%). Finally, keeping the solvent rate constant when operating the capture unit below its design load resulted in a lower specific energy for CO2 capture than when the solvent rate was downscaled with the syngas flow.

J.C. Meerman; E.S. Hamborg; T. van Keulen; A. Ramrez; W.C. Turkenburg; A.P.C. Faaij

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Benefits Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Market Analysis Website: energyenvironment.pnl.gov/news/pdf/PNNL-19112_Revision_1_Final.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/smart-grid-estimation-energy-and-carb Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: "Resource Integration Planning,Mandates/Targets,Enabling Legislation,Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

183

Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

None

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Economically Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part II: Control Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology(NTNU), 7491 Trondheim regions of a post-combustion CO2 capturing process using the top-down steady-state economic part regions without the need for switching the control loops. Keywords Plantwide control, stability

Skogestad, Sigurd

185

CMTC CMTC-151075-PP Dynamic Response of Monoethanolamine (MEA) CO2 Capture Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand on diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and yearly time scales. The scale and frequency of these responsesCMTC CMTC-151075-PP Dynamic Response of Monoethanolamine (MEA) CO2 Capture Units Robert Brasington and Howard Herzog, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Copyright 2012, Carbon Management Technology

186

CaO-based sorbents for CO2 capture prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of additives in the CaO matrix and the relatively high surface area materials obtained via USP explain are currently under investigation for CO2 capture, both for post- combustion (e.g., silica supported amines,2 of metal oxides, even on an industrial scale.18,19 We report here the rst use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

Suslick, Kenneth S.

187

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

188

Environmental impact and techno-economic analysis of the coal gasification process with/without CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal gasification, the technology for high-efficient utilization of coal, has been widely used in China. However, it suffers from high CO2 emissions problem due to the carbon-rich character of coal. To reduce CO2 emissions, different CO2 capture technologies are developed and integrated into the coal gasification based processes. However, involving CO2 capture would result in energetic and economic penalty. This paper analyses three cases of coal gasification processes from environmental, technical, and economical points of view. These processes are (1) a conventional coal gasification process; (2) a coal gasification process with CO2 capture and sequestration, in which CO2 is stored by mineral sequestration; (3) a coal gasification process with CO2 capture and utilization, in which CO2 is reused to produce syngas. The results show that the coal gasification process with CO2 capture and sequestration has advantage only in environmental aspect compared to the conventional process. The process with CO2 capture and utilization has advantages in both technical and environmental aspects while disadvantage in economic aspect. However, if the carbon tax higher than 15USD/t CO2 is introduced, this disadvantage will be negligible.

Yi Man; Siyu Yang; Dong Xiang; Xiuxi Li; Yu Qian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Temporary CO2 Capture Shut Down: Implications on Low Pressure Steam Turbine Design and Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Natural gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) with post combustion capture using liquid solvents may in some cases be of interest to design with a flexible steam bottoming cycle, so that it can operate both with and without CO2 capture. It is then important that the choice of the low pressure (LP) steam turbine exhaust size is made accordingly. The paper describes why a flexible NGCC requires a LP steam turbine with smaller exhaust than the corresponding NGCC without CO2 capture, and how this will affect the LP turbine exhaust loss and NGCC process efficiency. Handling large variations in LP steam flow is in fact well- known technology in combined heat and power (CHP) plants, and the use of 3D simulation tools can further help making the best LP steam turbine design choice.

Marcus Thern; Kristin Jordal; Magnus Genrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AdvAnced compression AdvAnced compression B-540 AdvAnced compression U.s. depArtment of energy AdvAnced cArbon dioxide cAptUre r&d progrAm: technology UpdAte, mAy 2013 novel concepts for the compression of lArge volUmes of co 2 primary project goals Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing novel compression technology concepts to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) compression power requirements by 10% compared to conventional compressor designs. The basic concept is a semi-isothermal compression pro- cess where the CO 2 is continually cooled using an internal cooling jacket rather than using conventional interstage cooling. The project has completed thermodynamic (Phase I) and prototype testing (Phase II). A full-scale demonstration of a multi-stage, internally cooled

191

Biomass combustion with CO2 capture by chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Economic benefits can be expected in the future if CO2 capture and storage are implemented in energy generation from biomass combustion. The aim of this work is to investigate the combustion of biomass in a chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) process with inherent CO2 separation. The performance of biomass combustion in a continuously operated 1.5kWth CLOU unit is presented. Particles prepared by spray drying containing 60wt.% CuO were used as an oxygen carrier. Milled pine wood chips were used as fuel. The work focused on the effect of fuel reactor temperature on the CO2 capture and the combustion efficiency of the CLOU process with biomass. Under CLOU operation, biomass combustion was complete to CO2 and H2O without the presence of any unburnt material, including tars. Moreover, high carbon capture efficiencies were achieved using very low oxygen carrier inventories and without a carbon separation unit. This is the first time that the CLOU concept has been demonstrated in a continuous CLC unit using biomass as fuel.

I. Adnez-Rubio; A. Abad; P. Gayn; L.F. de Diego; F. Garca-Labiano; J. Adnez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CO2 Capture Using Electrical Energy: Electrochemically Mediated Separation for Carbon Capture and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: MIT and Siemens Corporation are developing a process to separate CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants by using electrical energy to chemically activate and deactivate sorbents, or materials that absorb gases. The team found that certain sorbents bond to CO2 when they are activated by electrical energy and then transported through a specialized separator that deactivates the molecule and releases it for storage. This method directly uses the electricity from the power plant, which is a more efficient but more expensive form of energy than heat, though the ease and simplicity of integrating it into existing coal-fired power plants reduces the overall cost of the technology. This process could cost as low as $31 per ton of CO2 stored.

None

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects Sleipner, Snhvit, In Salah and Weyburn are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the publics willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earths climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport, injection, monitoring, management and verification for most large CO2 source types and in most CO2 storage formation types, exist.

Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Greenhouse gas emission reduction anticipating CO2 capture. How ready are you?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Dutch Ministry of Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) engaged Jacobs Consultancy to develop a definition and measuring tool aimed at quantifying the CO2 Capture Readiness of a combustion plant. The tool developed tests the level and completeness of pre-project execution information. The testing of pre-project information is a standard practice in the refining and petrochemical industry and Jacobs Consultancy has adapted and tailored these practices to develop the Capture Readiness tool. The tool was developed in 2008 and was pilot tested on two already permitted coal fired power plant projects in 2009. The Capture Readiness tool is similar in concept to the well known Project Definition Rating Index originally introduced by the Construction Industry Institute for Major Capital Projects. The tool quantifies the readiness of a project to accommodate future CO2 capture and parallels the phased approached to Major Capital Projects used by the Project Definition Rating Index. A short introduction to the application of the PDRI methodology to test the completeness of the project development informationoften also referred to as Front End Loading or FEL, is included in this paper to establish the parallel approach we have used in the development of the Capture Readiness tool. The Jacobs Consultancy Capture Readiness tool is then discussed in more detail.

F.P.J.M. (Bas) Kerkhof; G. van Birgelen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh Universitys approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Capturing and Sequestering CO2 from a Coal-Fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capturing and Sequestering CO Capturing and Sequestering CO 2 from a Coal-fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pamela L. Spath (pamela_spath @nrel.gov; (303) 275-4460) Margaret K. Mann (margaret_mann @nrel.gov; (303) 275-2921) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 INTRODUCTION It is technically feasible to capture CO 2 from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant and various researchers are working to understand the fate of sequestered CO 2 and its long term environmental effects. Sequestering CO 2 significantly reduces the CO 2 emissions from the power plant itself, but this is not the total picture. CO 2 capture and sequestration consumes additional energy, thus lowering the plant's fuel to electricity efficiency. To compensate for this, more fossil fuel must be

199

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

200

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Project No.: DE-FE0013118 Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is developing and evaluating a hybrid membrane-absorption CO2 capture system. This work builds on prior DOE-funded work and combines MTR's Polaris(tm) membrane, in a low-pressure-drop, large area, plate-and-frame module, with UT Austin's piperazine (PZ) solvent and advanced, high-temperature and pressure regeneration technology. Preliminary estimates indicate that this hybrid system could lower the regeneration energy by 30 percent compared to that required with 30 weight percent monoethanolamine (MEA). MTR is evaluating two variations of the hybrid design consisting of the cross-flow Polaris membrane, which enriches flue gas to approximately 20 percent CO2, and an advanced 5 molal PZ advanced flash stripper with cold-rich bypass. The flash stripper will be optimized to take advantage of the higher CO2 concentration. In the first variation, the two systems are operated in series; in the second, the flue gas flow is split and treated by each system in parallel. The first phase of this project will include an examination of both hybrid configurations, using an integrated process model and a preliminary techno-economic assessment. In the second phase, MTR will manufacture and test a low pressure drop, large-area membrane module and UT Austin will modify their 0.1 MWe pilot plant and operate it under simulated series and parallel configurations. Based on the model and test results, the most promising configuration will be identified. In the final stage of the project, the membrane module will be integrated into the pilot plant where the fully integrated hybrid system, in its most promising cost optimized configuration, will be tested on simulated flue gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimizing heat integration in a flexible coalnatural gas power station with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Computational optimization is used to simultaneously determine the design and planned operating profile of a flexible coalnatural gas power station with CO2 capture, under a CO2 emission performance standard. The facility consists of a coal-fired power station undergoing retrofit with CO2 capture. The CO2 capture energy demand is provided by a specially designed combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT). The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) component of the CCGT is modeled and optimized in detail, with explicit treatment of the discrete aspects of the HRSG configuration, including the number and sequential arrangement of HRSG internal components. Variable facility operations are represented by discrete operating modes selected based on the electricity priceduration curve. Two objectives, the minimization of capital requirement and the maximization of net present value, are considered in a bi-objective mixed-integer nonlinear programming formulation. Pareto frontiers, which define the optimal tradeoffs between these two objectives, are generated for six scenarios constructed from recent historical data from West Texas, the United Kingdom, and India. For a 440MW coal plant in a scenario based on 2011 West Texas data, the minimum effective net present cost required for the retrofit (which meets the CO2 emission performance standard) varies from $278 to 383million, and the minimum total capital investment requirement ranges from $346 to 517million. The variations in these optimized values correspond to the range of the Pareto frontier within the bounds of the problem. The net present cost of the retrofit is less than the present value of the existing coal plant, $476million, indicating that a retrofit is preferred over decommissioning. In the case of very low energy prices, however, decommissioning is shown to be the preferred option. The UK and India scenarios demonstrate that optimal designs can vary greatly depending upon location-specific economic conditions.

Charles A. Kang; Adam R. Brandt; Louis J. Durlofsky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Integration of H2 Separation Membranes with CO2 Capture and Compression  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integration of H Integration of H 2 Separation Membranes with CO 2 Capture and Compression November 30, 2009 DOE/NETL- 401/113009 INTEGRATION OF H 2 SEPARATION MEMBRANES WITH CO 2 CAPTURE AND COMPRESSION DOE/NETL-401/113009 FINAL REPORT November 30, 2009 NETL Contact: Eric Grol Chemical Engineer Office of Systems, Analysis, and Planning National Energy Technology Laboratory www.netl.doe.gov ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was prepared by JM Energy Consulting, Inc. for Technology & Management Services, Inc. (TMS), at the request of the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This study was conducted over a forty-three month period beginning in April 2006. Project Managers Mr. Eric Grol (Dec. 2008 - Nov. 2009) Mr. Steven Ostheim

203

Black liquor gasification combined cycle with Co2 capture Technical and economic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The pulp and paper sector is intensive in the use of energy, and presents a high participation in the industrial context, specially based in the black liquor, a renewable source generated in the pulp process. Black liquor gasification is not still completely dominated; however, it has the potential of becoming an important alternative for the pulp and paper sector. In this article, the traditional steam cycle based on chemical recovery and biomass boilers associated to backpressure/extraction turbine is compared to black liquor gasification combined cycle schemes, associated to biomass boiler, considering the technical and economic attractiveness of capturing and sequestering CO2. Results show that despite its interesting exergetic efficiency, the adoption CO2 capture system for BLGCC did not prove to be attractive under the prescribed conditions without major incentive.

Elzimar Tadeu de Freitas Ferreira; Jos Antonio Perrella Balestieri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optimale Energisystemer for LNG-anlegg med CO2-fangst; Optimal Energy Systems for LNG Plants with CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Produksjon av LNG er en energikrevende prosess, spesielt p grunn av hyt kraftbehov for gjre naturgassen flytende. Utfordringer knyttet til utslipp av CO2 (more)

Bratseth, Arne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

206

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/15536/carb Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-capture-and-storage-de Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This report discusses the value of carbon capture and storage (CCS)

207

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS R&D CollaboRations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D CollaboRations R&D CollaboRations B-556 R&D CollaboRations U.s. DepaRtment of eneRgy aDvanCeD CaRbon DioxiDe CaptURe R&D pRogRam: teChnology UpDate, may 2013 paRtneRship foR Co 2 CaptURe primary project goals The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) is conducting pilot-scale testing to demonstrate and evaluate a range of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture technologies to develop key technical and economic information that can be used to examine the feasibility of capture technologies as a function of fuel type and system configuration. technical goals * Integrate a high-efficiency flexible capture system with existing pilot-scale combustion

208

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

209

NETL: Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Project No.: DE-FE0012862 Akermin is conducting laboratory and integrated bench-scale pilot testing to validate the performance of their next generation Biocatalyst Delivery System (BDS). This effort builds upon work conducted under a previous project. The novel system enables on-stream replacement of the catalyst and enables integration with an advanced process flow scheme. Akermin is exploring an enzyme-enabled advanced process flow scheme with non-volatile capture solutions, AKM-24 and potassium carbonate. The advanced process flow scheme is projected to have lower parasitic energy requirements and lower capital costs resulting in greater than 30 percent reduction in the cost of capture. The novel flow sheet enabled by the biocatalyst permits regeneration at lower temperatures allowing heat integration with the lowest grade steam from the power plant and minimizing water consumption. The existing 500 standard liters per minute (SLPM) bench unit will be modified to incorporate the next-generation BDS, accommodate the new process flow scheme, and reduce heat loss for better quantification of energy performance. The modified bench unit will be operated at the National Carbon Capture Center on actual flue gas.

210

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Kenji Sumida , David L. Rogow , Jarad A. Mason , Thomas M. McDonald , Eric D. Bloch , Zoey R. Herm , Tae-Hyun...

211

A versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture and cooperative catalysis Previous Next List Jinhee Park, Jian-Rong Li, Ying-Pin Chen, Jiamei Yu, Andrey A. Yakovenko,...

212

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

213

Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials Previous Next List D. M. D'Alessandro, B. Smit, and J. R. Long, Angew. Chem.-Int. Edit. 49 (35), 6058 (2010) DOI: 10.1002...

214

Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon dioxide captured by a clean coal project in the state. The Bureau of Economic...

215

Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The likelihood of fossil fuel power plants being targeted for future CO2 emissions regulation creates a motivation for developing an alternative CO2 capture method that (more)

Tran, Trinh D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Carbon Dioxide-Free Power Stations/Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Achieving the so-called decarbonisation of fossil fuel fired power stations involves capturing the CO2 at some stage within the energy conversion process for which different technology concepts are presently bein...

Eberhard Jochem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL: Carbon Capture FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How is CO2 captured? How is CO2 captured? Chilled Ammonia CO2 Capture Process Facility at American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Plant Chilled Ammonia CO2 Capture Process Facility at American Electric Power's (AEP) Mountaineer Plant Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture involves separating CO2 from other gases generated by industrial processes or burning fossil fuels. CO2 capture can remove as much as 95% of the CO2 from these processes. There are two major types of anthropogenic CO2 sources: mobile and stationary. Mobile sources include things like cars, trucks, trains, boats, and aircrafts that burn fossil fuels and generate CO2. Capturing CO2 from mobile sources is currently impractical. Stationary sources include power plants and industrial facilities that burn fossil fuels, as

218

Carbon dioxide capture and separation techniques for advanced power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (postcombustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for hybrid membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic silanes incorporated into an alumina support or ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. An overview of two novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of each technology.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Jones, K.L.; Ilconich, J.B.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measurement, Standards, and Data Needs for CO2 Capture Materials: A Critical Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(45) Porous solids must also have large pore volumes with pore sizes big enough to allow the target CO2 molecules to enter,(36c, 65) which have a kinetic diameter of approximately 3.30 (0.33 nm). ... Electric Power Monthly with Data for December 2012. ... data show a decrease in parasitic energy loss from 30% to 18% when compared to the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process and a concomitant lowering of the cost of electricity (COE) from 74% to 44% increase vs. a plant without carbon capture. ...

Laura Espinal; Dianne L. Poster; Winnie Wong-Ng; Andrew J. Allen; Martin L. Green

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt executive summary Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) referS to the Set of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts of power stations and from other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Co-Location of Air Capture, Subseafloor CO2 Sequestration, and Energy Production on the Kerguelen Plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing atmospheric CO2 using a combination of air capture and offshore geological storage can address technical and policy concerns with climate mitigation. ... Our analysis suggests that Kerguelen offers a remote and environmentally secure location for CO2 sequestration using renewable energy. ...

David S. Goldberg; Klaus S. Lackner; Patrick Han; Angela L. Slagle; Tao Wang

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450C. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450C (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300C (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300C. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of a Dry Sorbent-based Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research and development (R&D) project was to further the development of a solid sorbent-based CO2 capture process based on sodium carbonate (i.e. the Dry Carbonate Process) that is capable of capturing>90% of the CO2 as a nearly pure stream from coal-fired power plant flue gas with <35% increase in the cost of electrictiy (ICOE).

Nelson, Thomas; Coleman, Luke; Anderson, Matthew; Gupta, Raghubir; Herr, Joshua; Kalluri, Ranjeeth; Pavani, Maruthi

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Regenerable MgO-based sorbent for high temperature CO2 removal from syngas: 3. CO2 capture and sorbent enhanced water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regenerable MgO-based sorbent, which was prepared and evaluated in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in part 1, was also evaluated in high-pressure packed-bed unit in CO2/N2/H2O mixture and simulated pre-combustion syngas environment. In CO2/N2/H2O environment, the CO2 absorption capacity of the sorbent increases with increasing temperatures from 6.7% at 350C to 9.5% 450C. The sorbent is capable of achieving over 95% CO2 capture and 40% conversion in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, which should be attributed to positive effect of WGS reaction in producing CO2 during the process. The sorbent reactivity and absorption capacity toward CO2, as well as its WGS catalytic activity decreases with increasing temperature. The maximum pre-breakthrough WGS conversion occurs at 350C, which diminishes as the sorbent is carbonated. The variable diffusivity shrinking core reaction model coupled with the two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was shown to accurately predict the break-through gas compositions at different operating conditions.

Emadoddin Abbasi; Armin Hassanzadeh; Shahin Zarghami; Hamid Arastoopour; Javad Abbasian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Accelerating progress toward operational excellence of fossil energy plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This paper will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Turton, R. Bhattacharyya, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Study on a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating molten carbonate fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating the MCFC (molten carbonate fuel cell). With the Aspen plus software, this paper builds the model of the overall MCFC-GT hybrid system with CO2 capture and analyzes the effects of the key parameters on the performances of the overall system. The result shows that compared with the gas-steam combined cycle system without CO2 capture, the efficiency of the new system with CO2 capture does not decrease obviously and keeps the same efficiency with the original gas steam combined cycle system when the carbon capture percentage is 45%. When the carbon capture percentage reaches up to 85%, the efficiency of the new system is about 54.96%, only 0.67 percent points lower than that of the original gas-steam combined cycle system. The results show that the new system has an obvious superiority of thermal performance. However, its technical economic performance needs be improved with the technical development of MCFC and ITM (oxygen ion transfer membrane). Achievements from this paper will provide the useful reference for CO2 capture with lower energy consumption from the traditional power generation system.

Liqiang Duan; Jingnan Zhu; Long Yue; Yongping Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ultra-high CO2 capture efficiency in CFB oxyfuel power plants by calcium looping process for CO2 recovery from purification units vent gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents a new option for the recovery of the CO2 losses from CO2 purification units in oxyfuel plants, by means of the Ca-looping process. The idea is to capture the CO2 in the vent stream from purification units by reaction with CaO sorbent in a carbonator reactor, where CaCO3 is formed. Sorbent is then regenerated in a calciner reactor by oxyfuel combustion of a fraction of the coal fed to the power plant. Since the Ca-looping process requires a continuous purge of exhaust sorbent and make-up of fresh limestone, the system is best coupled with a CFB boiler, where the exhausted Ca-rich sorbent can be used for in-furnace sulfur absorption. In this work, detailed mass and energy balances of the system proposed are reported, including a preliminary sizing of the reactors of the Ca-looping unit. A sensitivity analysis was also performed, by considering two types of coal as feed (mainly differing in sulfur content), two levels of non-condensable gases in the impure CO2 stream to be purified and different behaviors of the exhausted Ca-based sorbent injected in the CFB boiler, where it can experience different levels of recarbonation. Interesting results were obtained for this new system, which can capture about 90% of the CO2 vented from the purification unit in a reasonably compact reactors system, allowing an overall CO2 avoidance of the order of 99% with respect to conventional coal-fired steam plants without capture. As far as energy penalties are concerned, they were evaluated by the specific primary energy consumption for CO2 avoided index (SPECCA). Small differences with respect to reference oxyfuel plants without CO2 recovery were obtained, with either slightly better or slightly worse performances, depending on the sulfur content of the coal used. Penalties are associated to the export of CaO in the final exhausted sulfated sorbent from the CFB boiler, which increases when a higher sulfur coal is used. However, experimental analysis on the recarbonation level which can be attained by the CaL exhaust sorbent in the CFB boiler and further process optimization are needed to correctly account for these penalties and possibly minimize them.

Matteo C. Romano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Integration of Pipeline Operations Sourced with CO2 Captured at a Coal-fired Power Plant and Injected for Geologic Storage: SECARB Phase III CCS Demonstration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a case study of the design and operation of a fit-for-purpose pipeline sourced with anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) associated with a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) Research & Demonstration Program located in Alabama, USA. A 10.2 centimeter diameter pipeline stretches approximately 19 kilometers from the outlet of the CO2 capture facility, located at Alabama Power Company's James M. Barry 2,657 - megawatt coal-fired electric generating plant, to the point of injection into a saline reservoir within Citronelle Dome. The CO2 pipeline has a 6.5 meter wide easement that primarily parallels an existing high-voltage electric transmission line in undulating terrain with upland timber, stream crossings, and approximately 61,000 square meters of various wetland types. In addition to wetlands, the route transects protected habitat of the Gopher Tortoise. Construction methods included horizontal drilling under utilities, wetlands, and tortoise habitat and open cutting trenching where vegetation is removed and silt/storm-water management structures are employed to limit impacts to water quality and ecosystems. A total of 18 horizontal directional borings, approximately 8 kilometers, were used to avoid sensitive ecosystems, roads, and utilities. The project represents one of the first and the largest fully-integrated pulverized coal-fired CCS demonstration projects in the USA and provides a test bed of the operational reliability and risk management for future pipelines sourced with utility CO2 capture and compression operations sole-sourced to injection operations. An update on status of the project is presented, covering the permitting of the pipeline, risk analysis, design, construction, commissioning, and integration with compression at the capture plant and underground injection at the storage site.

R. Esposito; C. Harvick; R. Shaw; D. Mooneyhan; R. Trautz; G. Hill

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Abstract--Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused by an increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this project is to provide the airport manager at major airports, such as Dulles International Airport of emissions offset. The case study of this project will be Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD Abstract-- Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused

231

Assessment Hydrogen Production with CO2 Capture, Volume 1: Baseline State of the Art Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Production with CO 2 Capture Volume 1: Baseline State-of- the-Art Plants August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1434 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

232

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Carbon dioxide capture and storage: Seven years after the IPCC special report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) entails separating carbon dioxide from coal-, biomass- or gas ... or other large industrial sources, transporting the carbon dioxide by pipeline, injecting it deep undergr...

Haroon Kheshgi; Heleen de Coninck

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), serving to sequester CO 2allocation methods for EOR LCA, finding that the allocation

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Microsoft PowerPoint - 130709 DOE-NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Linde Presentation v1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Slipstream pilot plant demonstration of an amine- Slipstream pilot plant demonstration of an amine- based post-combustion capture technology for CO 2 capture from coal-fired power plant flue gas DOE funding award DE-FE0007453 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting Krish R. Krishnamurthy, Linde LLC July 8-11, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA 2 The Linde Group Overview and Carbon Capture Expertise 1 Linde Engineering Technology-focused Air Separation Global #1 Air Separation Global #1 Hydrogen/Syn Gas Global #2 Hydrogen/Syn Gas Global #2 Olefins Global #2 Olefins Global #2 Natural Gas Global #3 Natural Gas Global #3 HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants HyCO Tonnage Plants >70 plants ASU Tonnage Plants >300 plants ASU Tonnage Plants >300 plants ECOVAR Std Plants >1,000 plants ECOVAR Std Plants >1,000 plants

238

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CO2 could act as insurance against CO2 leaking...overcome socio-political obstacles related...thereby manage the risk of CO 2 leakage...could be an insurance policy against...would provide insurance to manage the risk of sampling-enhanced...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aaron DS, Williams KA. Is carbon capture and storage reallyal. Comparison of carbon capture and storage with renewablefuel power plants with carbon capture and storage. Energy

Sathre, Roger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage 07-003 April 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage by 07-003 April 2007 M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, P.L. Joskow, K.A. Oye, and D.M. Reiner #12;#12;Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage M.A. de to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy- ture,'' which refers to the direct removal of carbon dioxide from the ambient air. Air capture has to be changing (e.g., Jones, 2008). By contrast, the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from power plants has

Colorado at Boulder, University of

242

Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Carbon dioxide removal and capture for landfill gas up-grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the frame of an EC financially supported project - LIFE05 ENV/IT/000874 GHERL (Greenhouse Effect Reduction from Landfill)a pilot plant was set up in order to demonstrate the feasibility of applying chemical absorption to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas. After proper upgrading - basically removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and other trace gas compoundthe gas might be fed into the distribution grid for natural gas or used as vehicle fuel, replacing a fossil fuel thus saving natural resources and carbon dioxide emissions. Several experiences in Europe have been carried out concerning the landfill gas - and biogas from anaerobic digestion - quality up-grading through CO2 removal, but in all of them carbon dioxide was vented to the atmosphere after separation, without any direct benefit in terms of greenhouse gases reduction. With respect to those previous experiences, in this work the attention was focused on CO2 removal from landfill gas with an effective capture process, capable of removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere, through a globally carbon negative process. In particular, processes capable of producing final solid products were investigated, with the aim of obtaining as output solid compounds which can be either used in the chemical industry or disposed off. The adopted absorption process is based on using aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide, with the final aim of producing potassium carbonate. Potassium carbonate is a product which has several applications in the chemical industry if obtained with adequate quality. It can be sold as a pulverised solid, or in aqueous solution. Several tests were carried out at the pilot plant, which was located at a landfill site, in order to feed it with a fraction of the on-site collected landfill gas. The results of the experimental campaign are reported, explained and commented in the paper. Also a discussion on economic issues is presented.

Lidia Lombardia; Andrea Corti; Ennio Carnevale; Renato Baciocchi; Daniela Zingaretti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Activated Carbon Adsorbents for CO2 Capture in Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A linear relationship is also observed for the pore volume of the adsorbents (Figure 8b) when Vp and an estimation of the micropore volume (Vp ? Vmeso) of the adsorbents are plotted against the volume of adsorbed CO2 at 4.1 MPa. ... Modified HMS materials demonstrated to be reversibly adsorb substantially more CO2 than previously obsd. ... The anthracite with the highest CO2 adsorption capacity is the sample activated at 800 C for 2 h, whose surface area was only 540 m2/g, and the adsorbed amt. of CO2 was 65.7 mg-CO2/g-adsorbent. ...

Trevor C. Drage; James M. Blackman; Cova Pevida; Colin E. Snape

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rau et al., pg. 1 Rau et al., pg. 1 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington D.C., May 14-17, 2001 Enhanced Carbonate Dissolution as a Means of Capturing and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Greg H. Rau 1,2 , Ken Caldeira 2 , Kevin G. Knauss 2 , Bill Downs 3 , and Hamid Sarv 3 1 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (L-103, LLNL, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550; 925-423-7990, rau4@llnl.gov) 2 Energy and Environment Directorate, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550 3 McDermott Technology, Inc., 1562 Beeson Str., Alliance, OH 44601 Introduction Various methods have been proposed for mitigating anthropogenic CO 2 release to the atmos- phere, including storage via enhanced biological uptake on land or in the ocean and via sub- terranean or -marine injection of captured CO

246

Load-following control of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a decentralized control strategy is considered for load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture without flaring the syngas. The control strategy considered is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the power load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. However, the syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant timedelay. In this work, a modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is considered for syngas pressure control given that conventional PID controllers show poor control performance for integrating processes with large time delays. The conventional PID control is augmented with an internal feedback loop. The P-controller used in this internal loop converts the integrating process to an open-loop stable process. The resulting secondorder plus time delay model uses a PID controller where the tuning parameters are found by minimizing the integral time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) for disturbance rejection. A plant model with single integrator and time delay is identified by a P-control method. When a ramp change is introduced in the set-point of the load controller, the performance of both the load and pressure controllers with the modified PID control strategy is found to be superior to that using a traditional PID controller. Key

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture ... The buffered solution is then sent back to the top of the tower, where it is sprayed into the upflowing oxyfuel gas stream, condensing and cleaning the ash-laden gas. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen Gerdemann; John Clark; Cathy Summers

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Given the rapid increase in atmospheric concentration of CO2, the development of efficient CO2 capture technologies is critical for the future of carbon-based energy. Currently, (more)

Lin, Kun-Yi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Carbon capture and storageSolidification and storage of carbon dioxide captured on ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To meet the International Maritime Organization (IMO) target of 20% reduction of CO2 emissions from marine activities by 2020, application of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) on ships is considered as an effective way to mitigate CO2 emissions while other low carbon shipping technologies are being developed. Literature reviews on CCS methods for onshore applications indicate that the current CCS technologies could not be implemented on boards directly due to various limitations on ships. A novel chemical CO2 absorption and solidification method for CO2 storage on-board is proposed, presented and analyzed. Technical feasibility with explanation of principles and cost assessment are carried out for a case ship with a comparison to a conventional CCS method. The paper also presents results obtained from laboratory experiment including factors that affect the absorption. Theoretical study and laboratory experiment illustrate the proposed CO2 solidification method is a promising, cost effective and feasible method for CO2 emissions reduction on ships.

Peilin Zhou; Haibin Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

251

Heat Exchanger Network Design and Economic Analysis for Coal-fired Power Plant retrofitted with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Addition of CO2 capture unit to an existing power plant to satisfy environmental regulations has adverse effects on the energy efficiency of the power plant. Heat integration through proper design of heat exchanger network (HEN) remains the most effective way to reduce this energy penalty as well as reducing CO2 emission. Pinch technology remains the most widely used techniques due to its physical insight. This paper aims to present HEN design and economic analysis for power plant retrofitted with post-combustion CO2 capture. The benchmark presented is based on the recent work of Khalilpour and Abbas (2011) (i.e. Ref. [1]). Improvements to Khalilpour and Abbas (2011) include: (1) the use of cost and economic data to evaluate achievable trade-offs between energy, capital and utility cost. This is to determine the optimal minimum temperature difference; (2) redesigning of HEN with the newly determined minimum temperature difference and (3) its comparison with the HEN design presented in Ref. [1]. The results show that the energy penalty imposed on the power plant with CO2 capture plant can be reduced through heat integration of HEN, thus utility cost savings was maximized and the cost of addition of HEN was recovered within a short payback period of about 2.8 years.

Salihu Adamu Girei; Meihong Wang; Aminu Alhaji Hamisu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...because extracting steam from a turbine is a form of cogeneration...nuclear 110 0 CO 2 -free 286 715 Wind 142 0 CO 2 -free 369 923 Windoffshore...rate plus 4% annual rate for maintenance and capital investment. Pump...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Experimental study and kinetic model of monoethanolamine oxidative and thermal degradation for post-combustion CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present work, a kinetic model is proposed for the prediction of amine solvent degradation in the post-combustion CO2 capture process. Solvent degradation combined to the emission of degradation products represents one of the main operational drawbacks of this process. It induces additional costs and it impacts the process efficiency and its environmental balance. In the present work, degradation is studied under accelerated conditions for the case of monoethanolamine solvent (MEA). The influence of the temperature and of the O2 and CO2 concentrations in the gas feed are studied, and their effect on the MEA loss and the emission of degradation products is quantified. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model for both oxidative and thermal degradation of MEA is proposed and compared to previous attempts to model MEA degradation. The present kinetic model may be further used to develop a practical tool assessing solvent degradation in large-scale capture plants.

Grgoire Lonard; Dominique Toye; Georges Heyen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation of -dimethylethylenediamine in the metalorganic framework CuBTTri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation of N,N0 -dimethylethylenediamine in the metal-combustion carbon dioxide capture will be judged. The incorporation of N,N0 -dimethylethylenediamine (mmen) into H3-combustion carbon capture, has been exten- sively studied in porous solids.1 The majority of solid surfaces

257

ECONOMIC MODELING OF CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION Sean Biggs, Howard Herzog, John Reilly, Henry Jacoby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon capture and sequestration technologies using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. We model two of the most promising carbon capture and sequestration technologies, one, technological, and social issues of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. In 1997, the President

258

Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage of Captured Carbon Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands May 8, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1358 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

259

Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Aminosilane-Grafted Polymer/Silica Hollow Fiber Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this approach, polymeric hollow fibers similar to those already prepared on commercial scales for membrane gas separations are prepared and loaded with large volumes of solid CO2 adsorbing materials. ... In this regard, the hollow fiber RTSA process is ideally suited for application of typical silica amine adsorbents, as it (i) allows for effective heat integration,(11) (ii) gives fast cycle times (expected to be on the order of 24 min),(8) and (iii) minimizes contact of aminosilica-adsorbents with high-temperature steam, which can degrade the adsorbent. ... The moles of CO2 adsorbed were calculated by integration of the area bounded by the CO2 breakthrough front and the He breakthrough front from the initial concentration to the final equilibration concentration. ...

Fateme Rezaei; Ryan P. Lively; Ying Labreche; Grace Chen; Yanfang Fan; William J. Koros; Christopher W. Jones

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY FROM COAL WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification, quench cooled and shifted to (pri- marily) H2 and CO2 via sulfur-tolerant water-gas shift (WGS with sulfur-bearing waste gases, H2S and SO2. I. INTRODUCTION Carbon-free energy carriers, H2 and electricity relative abundance, high carbon intensity, and low cost. Coal-to-H2 plants based on gasification have been

263

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...large and thus rapidly overwhelm local markets for commercial CO 2 . The scale of CO...carriers such as methanol, synthetic diesel, or gasoline or more exotic alternatives...the first entry into a new electric car market. Therefore, it is not surprising that...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2007, Fourth Assessment Report, Synthesis...life support systems. Adsorption and Its...Utilization & Fuel Systems (Clearwater, FL), ed...Li W ( 2010 ) Steam-stripping for regeneration...Environmental Systems, Orlando, Florida...effective and cheap tool to sequester CO 2 . Clim...A Technology Assessment for the APS Panel...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...different design strategies that are...research and development (R&D...improvements in gas turbines have moved them...A robust strategy for sustainable energy...scrubber development . Ocean Eng 10...greenhouse gases. (US Department...Climate strategy with CO 2...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extracting steam from a turbine is a form...CO 2 from flue gas (amine...scatter in published reports, and lines indicate...2008) C. z, Progress in bioethanol processing. Progress in Energy and...and greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass...National Laboratories Report, SAND2003-0800...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center Launched in Decatur, Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the nations largest carbon capture and storage endeavors includes an education center for students and local residents.

268

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...million units. A production rate of just 1 million...total output. At a production rate of 10 million...None of these production rates would seriously...technology, the electricity demand of capturing...captured to the storage site. Building pipelines...or Hutchinson, Kansas in 2001 (68...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

EIA - Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? International Energy Outlook 2010 Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world'ss carbon dioxide emissions? The pursuit of greenhouse gas reductions has the potential to reduce global coal use significantly. Because coal is the most carbon-intensive of all fossil fuels, limitations on carbon dioxide emissions will raise the cost of coal relative to the costs of other fuels. Under such circumstances, the degree to which energy use shifts away from coal to other fuels will depend largely on the costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants relative to the costs of using other, low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources. The continued widespread use of coal could rely on the cost and availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies that capture carbon dioxide and store it in geologic formations.

270

Performance and Costs of CO2 Capture at Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarises the results from a study that assesses the performance and costs of natural gas fired combined cycle power plants with CCS. Information is provided on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Discussion and commentary on the key findings and recommendations is also included. The paper includes information on base load plant performance and costs, but part load performance and costs of operation at low annual capacity factors are also presented because operation at lower load factors may be necessary, particularly in future electricity systems that include high amounts of other low-CO2 generation plants.

Neil Smith; Geoff Miller; Indran Aandi; Richard Gadsden; John Davison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Process for CO2 Capture Using Ionic Liquid That Exhibits Phase Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An expander turbine powered by the CO2-lean flue gas leaving the absorber recovers 43% of the power expended by the flue gas compressor. ... The authors appreciate the close collaboration with faculty at the University of Notre Dame, including Professors Joan Brennecke, Mark McCready, Mark Stadtherr, Bill Schneider, and Ed Maginn. ... The heat transfer within the adsorbent beds can be managed in situ, using thermal energy storage material: a phase change materials (PCM) for example. ...

Ronald S. Eisinger; George E. Keller; II

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Supercritical CO2-Corrosion in Heat Treated Steel Pipes during Carbon Capture and Storage CCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat treatment of steels used for engineering a saline aquifer Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) site may become...2...) into deep geological rock formations. 13% Chromium steel injection pipes heat treated differ...

Anja Pfennig; Phillip Zastrow

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...technique than on experiments with more innovative concepts as seen in the car industry...air capture technology must be very innovative to succeed, but correlations between...Costs and Cost Analysis Environmental Remediation economics methods Supporting Information...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The urgency of the development of CO2 capture from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a new untested technology. This approach...untested high-technology innovations...to research and development (R&D) and has...to air capture technology. An accurate estimate...improvements in gas turbines have moved them...

Klaus S. Lackner; Sarah Brennan; Jrg M. Matter; A.-H. Alissa Park; Allen Wright; Bob van der Zwaan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energy and Climate Impacts of Producing Synthetic Hydrocarbon Fuels from CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These platforms make the case for (more) research on the conversion of CO2 into synthetic fuels as means to utilize CO2 and thereby mitigate its accumulation in the atmosphere. ... Stechel, E. B.; Miller, J. E.Re-energizing CO2 to fuels with the sun: Issues of efficiency, scale, and economics J. CO2 Util. ... Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per ton of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. ...

Coen van der Giesen; Ren Kleijn; Gert Jan Kramer

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Start | Grid View | Browse by Day OR Group/Topical | Author Index | Keyword Index | Personal Scheduler Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes are the dominant method in removing CO2 content from the combustion flue gas streams Scheduler Optimal Operation of a CO2 Capturing Plant for a Wide Range of Disturbances Tuesday, October 18 plants is one of the major sources of producing CO2. Amine-based absorption/stripping CO2 capturing

Skogestad, Sigurd

277

Thermal, Oxidative and CO2 Induced Degradation of Primary Amines Used for CO2 Capture: Effect of Alkyl Linker on Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Work by Danon et al. using FTIR spectroscopy to observe the nature of adsorbed CO2 on grafted aminosilicas suggests that aminesilanol interactions are another route for CO2 to adsorb onto the surface in dry conditions, as opposed to the more commonly discussed pathway of two amines adsorbing CO2 to form a carbamate. ... Danon, A.; Stair, P. C.; Weitz, E.FTIR Study of CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15: Elucidation of Adsorbed Species J. Phys. ... Danon, Alon; Stair, Peter C.; Weitz, Eric ...

Stephanie A. Didas; Rongshun Zhu; Nicholas A. Brunelli; David S. Sholl; Christopher W. Jones

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep, (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CANMET CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CANMET CO2 Consortium-O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion Project No.: IEA-CANMET-CO2 (International Agreement) Photograph of CANMET's Vertical Combustor Research Facility. Photograph of CANMET’s Vertical Combustor Research Facility. The CANMET carbon dioxide (CO2) consortium will conduct research to further the development of oxy-combustion for retrofit to coal-fired power plants. Research activities include: (1) modeling of an advanced, supercritical pressure oxy-coal plant, including an analysis of the impact of oxygen (O2) purity and O2 partial enrichment, overall process performance, and cost; (2) testing of pilot-scale CO2 capture and compression; (3) investigating CO2 phase change at liquid and supercritical states in gas mixtures

280

Highly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with open metal capture of CO2, which is essential for natural gas purifi- cation and CO2 sequestration, has been reported media. carbon dioxide capture dynamic adsorption reticular chemistry Selective removal of CO2 from

Yaghi, Omar M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy and Material Balance of CO2 Capture from Ambient Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purely renewable systems have been considered (8); cost and intermittency are the dominant concerns of these systems. ... Third, because it is weakly coupled to existing energy infrastructure, air capture may offer stronger economies of scale and smaller adjustment costs than the more conventional mitigation technologies. ... and to mitigate climate change is studied. ...

Frank Zeman

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

282

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with caustic soda in packed towers . Trans Inst Chem Eng 31 : 201...International , Warrendale, PA ) SAE Paper 2644 . 12 Spector...Stolaroff, 2008 (5) NaOH spray tower, proposal and protoype. Does...capture process. Proposed spray tower only: $53-127d Proposed...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Opportunities and barriers for implementing CO2 capture ready designs: A case study of stakeholder perceptions in Guangdong, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China has been building at least 50 gigawatt (GW) of new coal-fired power plants every year since 2004. In the absence of CO2 capture ready (CCR) designs, a large fraction of new coal power plants built in the next decade could face carbon lock-in. Building on the existing engineering and economic literature on CO2 capture ready, the aim of this study is to understand the opportunities and challenges in implementing CCR in China. In early 2010, opinion-leaders perceptions towards implementing CCR in Guangdong with two empirical phases are presented: an online consultation of 31 respondents (out of a sample of 82), three face-to-face focus group discussions including 16 officials from five power plants and two oil companies in the Guangdong province. A majority of respondents in the online survey were engineers. The survey results are compared with an earlier study of stakeholders views on demonstrating CCS in China, conducted in April 2009 as part of the EUUKChina Near Zero Emissions Coal initiative (NZEC) project.

Jia Li; Xi Liang; Tim Cockerill; Jon Gibbins; David Reiner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Feasibility Evaluation for East Texas Oil Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) has been undergoing for four decades and is now a proven technology. CO2-EOR increases oil recovery, and in the meantime reduces the greenhouse gas emissions by capture CO2 underground. The objectives...

Lu, Ping

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Capture of carbon dioxide over porous solid adsorbents lithium silicate, lithium aluminate and magnesium aluminate at pre-combustion temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capturing process for carbon dioxide over porous solid adsorbents such as ... resonance (NMR), and surface area. The capturing of carbon dioxide over lithium silicate, lithium aluminate, ... as exposure time,...

P. V. Korake; A. G. Gaikwad

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using SOlid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas Using Solid from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

287

Theoretical Predictions of the thermodynamic Properties of Solid Sorbents Capture CO2 Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promising CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.

Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan; Luebke David; Pennline, Henry

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Novel integration options of concentrating solar thermal technology with fossil-fuelled and CO2 capture processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating solar thermal (CST) technology has been commercially proven in utility-scale power plants that have been in operation since the 1980s. CST uses reflecting surfaces to focus solar energy onto collectors, generating extreme heat than can be used for a variety of purposes. The current focus of CST is large-scale electrical power generation. However, new applications, such as solar fuels, are quickly gaining momentum. One key shortcoming of CST technology is its sensitivity to disruptions in sunlight availability over time. CST systems require either thermal energy storage or backup systems to operate during heavy cloud periods or at night. On the other hand, fossil-based energy systems have high availability and reliability, but they generate substantial CO2 emissions compared to equivalent CST processes. A novel solution would combine the benefits of CST technology and of fossil-fueled energy systems. Such a solar-fossil hybrid system would guarantee energy availability in the absence of sunlight or stored solar energy. The addition of carbon capture to these systems could reduce their carbon intensity to almost zero. This paper introduces three important solar-fossil hybrid energy systems: (1) Integrated Solar Combined Cycle (ISCC), (2) Solar-assisted post-combustion capture (SAPCAP), and (3) Solar gasification with CO2 capture. These novel concepts have great potential to overcome the inherent limitations of their component technologies and to achieve superior greenhouse gas mitigation techno-economic performance in large-scale applications. The paper describes the features of the three solar-fossil hybrid systems described earlier, discusses its advantages and disadvantages, and provides examples of applications. The goal of this manuscript is to introduce experts in the CCS and CST fields to the opportunities of integration between these technologies and their potential benefits.

Guillermo Ordorica-Garcia; and Alfonso Vidal Delgado; Aranzazu Fernandez Garcia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The production of pure hydrogen with simultaneous capture of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The need to stabilise or even reduce the production of anthropogenic CO2 makes the capture of CO2 during energy generation from carbonaceous fuels, e.g. coal or biomass, necessary for the future. For hydrogen, an environmentally-benign energy vector...

Bohn, Christopher

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Better Enzymes for Carbon Capture: Low-Cost Biological Catalyst to Enable Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Codexis is developing new and efficient forms of enzymes known as carbonic anhydrases to absorb CO2 more rapidly and under challenging conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Carbonic anhydrases are common and are among the fastest enzymes, but they are not robust enough to withstand the harsh environment found in the power plant exhaust steams. In this project, Codexis will be using proprietary technology to improve the enzymes ability to withstand high temperatures and large swings in chemical composition. The project aims to develop a carbon-capture process that uses less energy and less equipment than existing approaches. This would reduce the cost of retrofitting todays coal-fired power plants.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

Provost, G,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Techno-economic evaluation of using biomass-fired auxiliary units for supplying energy requirements of CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Parasitically providing the energy required for CO2 capture from retrofitted coal power plants can lead to a significant loss in output of electricity. In this study, different configurations of auxiliary units are investigated to partially or totally meet the energy requirements for MEA post-combustion capture in a 500MW sub-critical coal-fired plant. The auxiliary unit is either a boiler, providing only the heat required for solvent regeneration in the capture process or a combined heat and power (CHP) unit, providing both heat and electricity. Using biomass in auxiliary units, the grid loss is reduced without increasing fossil fuel consumption. The results show that using a biomass CHP unit is more favourable than using a biomass boiler both in terms of CO2 emission reductions and power plant economic viability. By using an auxiliary biomass CHP unit, both the emission intensity and the cost of electricity would be marginally lower than for a coal plant with capture. Further emission reductions occur if CO2 is captured both from the coal plant and the auxiliary biomass CHP, resulting in negative emissions. However, high incentive schemes (a carbon price higher than 55 $/t CO2 or a combination of lower carbon price and renewable energy certificates) or a low biomass price (lower than 1 $/GJ) are required to make CO2 capture from both the coal plant and the auxiliary biomass CHP unit economically attractive. All cost comparisons are for CO2 capture only and CO2 transport and storage are not included in this study.

Zakieh Khorshidi; Minh T. Ho; Dianne E. Wiley

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

additives to control combustion, and capture gaseous or volatile pollutants, e.g. limestone for SO 2 removal,

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Engineering Feasibility of CO2 Capture on an Existing U.S. Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FEASIBILITY OF CO FEASIBILITY OF CO 2 CAPTURE ON AN EXISTING US COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT Nsakala ya Nsakala (nsakala.y.nsakala@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2018) John Marion (john.l.marion@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4539) Carl Bozzuto (carl.bozzuto@power.alstom.com; 860-285-5007) Gregory Liljedahl (greg.n.liljedahl@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4833) Mark Palkes (mark.palkes@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2676) ALSTOM Power Inc. US Power Plant Laboratories 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 David Vogel (david.c.vogel@us.abb.com; 713-821-4312) J.C. Gupta (jcgupta@us.abb.com; 713-821-5093) ABB Lummus Global Inc. 3010 Briarpark Houston, TX 77042 Manoj Guha (mkguha@aep.com; 614-223-1285) American Electric Power 1 Riverside Plaza Columbus, OH 43215 Howard Johnson (hjohnson@odod.state.oh.us; 614-644-8368)

298

Optimization and heat integration of hollow fiber based thermal swing adsorption process for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work studies the optimization of a hollow fiber contactor operated in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) mode for CO2 capture from flue gas. A hollow fiber contactor enables rapid heat and mass transfer and an efficient heat integration whereby parasitic loads on power plants can be reduced significantly compared to the traditional thermal swing adsorption processes. In this paper we employ a dynamic optimization strategy to predict the optimal operating conditions of a hollow fiber RTSA process for different process design objectives. The objective function considered was to maximize the feed throughput of the process with constraints for the required CO2 purity and recovery. Furthermore, the external heat and cold utilities must be minimized. The optimization requires a dynamic heat integration i.e. redistributing the hot and cold stream outlet between different parts of a cycle which is challenging and unconventional. This has been performed using a binary decision variable which switches the outlet water stream between hot and cold tanks. We also show that a multi- objective optimization approach can be employed to determine the optimal trade-off between heat duty and process throughput. Optimization was performed using a single discretization approach within gPROMS.

Subramanian Swernath; Fateme Rezaei; Jayashree Kalyanaraman; Ryan. P. Lively; Matthew J. Realff; Yoshiaki Kawajiri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the second year of the program, January-December 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes and confirmation of process economics, significant future progress is expected. Concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been investigated. OTM reactor combustion testing was delayed to insufficient reliability of the earlier OTM materials. Substantial improvements to reliability have been identified and testing will recommence early in 2004. Promising OTM material compositions and OTM architectures have been identified that improve the reliability of the ceramic elements. Economic evaluation continued. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton CO{sub 2}.

John Sirman; Leonard Switzer; Bart van Hassel

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air Using Amine-Grafted Porous Polymer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air Using Amine-Grafted Porous Polymer Networks Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Julian P. Sculley, Daqiang Yuan, Rajamani Krishna, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J....

302

Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation ofN,N'-dimethyleth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation of N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine in the metal-organic framework CuBTTri Previous Next List Thomas M. McDonald, Deanna M....

303

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metal-organic framework (Fe-BTT) discovered via high-throughput methods Previous Next List Kenji Sumida,...

304

Low-Energy Selective Capture of Carbon Dioxide by a Pre-designed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low-Energy Selective Capture of Carbon Dioxide by a Pre-designed Elastic Single-Molecule Trap Previous Next List Mario Wriedt, Julian P. Sculley, Andrey A. Yakovenko, Yuguang Ma,...

305

Carbon dioxide capture and utilization in petrochemical industry: potentials and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is an ever-increasing challenge for production units and power plants in view of the global warming concerns. Carbon dioxide capturing from petrochemical process streams ...

Maryam Takht Ravanchi; Saeed Sahebdelfar

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic Framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) Previous Next List Thomas M. McDonald, Woo Ram Lee, Jarad A....

307

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

309

Membrane Process to Sequester CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MeMbrane Process to sequester co MeMbrane Process to sequester co 2 froM Power Plant flue Gas Background Carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to contribute significantly to global warming climate change. The direct approach to address this problem is to capture the carbon dioxide in flue gas and sequester it underground. However, the high cost of separating and capturing CO 2 with conventional technologies prevents the adoption of this approach. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a new membrane process to capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. Description Direct CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas has been the subject of many studies. Currently, CO 2 capture with amine absorption seems to be the leading candidate technology-although membrane processes have been suggested. The principal

310

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel High Capacity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005310 GE Global Research is using both computational and laboratory methods to identify and produce novel oligomeric solvents for the post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). An oligomer is a polymer with relatively few structural units. Molecular and system modeling, advanced synthetic methods, and laboratory testing will be used to identify oligomeric solvents that have the potential for high CO2 capture capacity with corresponding low regeneration energy requirements. GE Global Test Equipment GE Global Test Equipment Related Papers and Publications: Aminosilicone Solvents for Low Cost CO2 Capture [PDF-2.0MB] (Sept 2010) Presentation given at the 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting

311

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Hot Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same

312

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

313

Numerical study of hydrogen production by the sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming process with online CO2 capture as operated in fluidized bed reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) Eulerian two-fluid model with an in-house code was developed to simulate the gas-particle two-phase flow in the fluidized bed reactors. The CO2 capture with Ca-based sorbents in the steam

Yuefa Wang; Zhongxi Chao; Hugo A. Jakobsen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A pilot scale study on co-capture of SO2 and NO x in O2/CO2 recycled coal combustion and techno-economic evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the study on co-capture of SO2 and NO x in O2/CO2 recycled coal combustion in a pilot scale facility with ... 0.3 MW by using high-sulphur lean coal. Detaile...

Chun Zou; ZhiJun Huang; Jie Xiong; Peng Guo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture preservation of the IRMOF structure. Carbon dioxide capture from combustion sources such as flue gas in power this carbon capture challenge. The preferred method for measuring the efficiency of a given material

Yaghi, Omar M.

316

Biomass combustion with in situ CO2 capture by CaO in a 300kWth circulating fluidized bed facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports experimental results from a new 300kWth calcium looping pilot plant designed to capture CO2 in situ during the combustion of biomass in a fluidized bed. This novel concept relies on the high reactivity of biomass as a fuel, which allows for effective combustion around 700C in air at atmospheric pressure. In these conditions, CaO particles fed into the fluidized bed combustor react with the CO2 generated during biomass combustion, allowing for an effective CO2 capture. A subsequent step of regeneration of CaCO3 in an oxy-fired calciner is also needed to release a concentrated stream of CO2. This regeneration step is assumed to be integrated in a large scale oxyfired power plant and/or a larger scale post-combustion calcium looping system. The combustor-carbonator is the key reactor in this novel concept, and this work presents experimental results from a 300kWth pilot to test such a reactor. The pilot involves two 12m height interconnected circulating fluidized bed reactors. Several series of experiments to investigate the combustor-carbonator reactor have been carried out achieving combustion efficiencies close to 100% and CO2 capture efficiencies between 70 and 95% in dynamic and stationary state conditions, using wood pellets as a fuel. Different superficial gas velocities, excess air ratios above stoichiometric requirements, and solid circulating rates between combustor-carbonator and combustor-calciner have been tested during the experiments. Closure of the carbon and oxygen balances during the combustion and carbonation trials has been successful. A simple reactor model for combustion and CO2 capture in the combustor-carbonator has been applied to aid in the interpretation of results, which should facilitate the future scaling up of this process concept.

M. Alonso; M.E. Diego; C. Prez; J.R. Chamberlain; J.C. Abanades

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products Background Many industrial processes contribute large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the earth's atmosphere. In an effort to reduce the amount of CO 2 released to the atmosphere, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding efforts to develop CO 2 capture and storage technologies. In addition to permanent storage of CO 2 in underground reservoirs, some

318

CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was demonstrated on the bench cart No measurable solvent degradation was observed over 4 months of testing even with 5 wt% water present

Heldebrant, David J

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding using micro-CT (micro-computed tomography) images of Berea sandstone core using finite element simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study reports a numerical investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding at the pore scale of a porous medium. We use high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of Berea sandstone core to obtain the pore geometry. The numerical solution used for the simulation was carried out by a finite element based software package. Level Set method is used to determine the position of the interface between two immiscible fluids when oil is displaced by water and CO2, respectively. The present formulation is validated against single-phase flow through the porous structure. It is found that, fluid flow inside the pore space takes place through preferential inlet and outlet pores. For two-phase flow, it is observed that continuous displacement of oil occurs during water flooding but CO2 is able to displace oil at certain locations in the pores. Also, the separation of flow front is observed in the case of CO2 flooding. A quantitative comparison of the results obtained in two types of flooding simulations suggests that water displaces a higher volume of oil than CO2 in the time period for which the simulations are performed.

Akshay C. Gunde; Bijoyendra Bera; Sushanta K. Mitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modeling the Water Scrubbing Process and Energy Requirements for CO2 Capture to Upgrade Biogas to Biomethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water scrubbing is the most widely used technology for removing CO2 from biogas and landfill gas. This work developed a rate-based mass transfer model of the CO2water system for upgrading biogas in a packed bed absorption column. The simulated results ...

William J. Nock; Mark Walker; Rimika Kapoor; Sonia Heaven

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Techno-economic performance and cost reduction potential for the substitute/synthetic natural gas and power cogeneration plant with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cogeneration of substitute/synthetic natural gas (SNG) and power from coal based plants with CO2 capture is an effective way to improve energy efficiency and to reduce CO2 emissions. In this paper, we evaluate the techno-economic performance of a SNG and power cogeneration technology with CO2 capture. Current localization level (the cost difference of a technology in different nations and districts) of each subunit of this technology is analyzed. The cost reduction potential of this technology is also predicted, and the role of technology localization and efficiency upgrade in cost reduction is investigated based on a range of learning rates and different coal prices from 90$/t to 150$/t. Results show that the unit investment of this cogeneration technology presented in our previous paper is around 1700$/kW currently and the investment of SNG synthesis, coal gasification and combined cycle unit comprises over 60% of the total investment. The equivalent SNG production cost is quite sensitive to coal prices and ranges from 0.15 to 0.50$/Nm3. Through localization, the unit investment of this technology can be decreased by 30% currently. The key technologies including coal gasification, SNG synthesis and high performance gas turbine need further localization because of their relatively low current localization levels and big localization potential. Through cost learning, the future investment of the technology can be decreased to 7001100$/kW, which may be competitive with the unit investment of IGCC technology with CO2 capture and even may be lower than that of the pulverized coal power plant with CO2 capture. Technology localization and efficiency upgrade will play important roles in cost reduction, which can contribute 300500$/kW and 125225$/kW to cost reduction, respectively. The results presented in this paper indicate that the coal to SNG and power technology with CO2 capture is a promising and competitive option for energy saving and CO2 abatement, and can be a support for policy making, technology options etc.

Sheng Li; Hongguang Jin; Lin Gao; Xiaosong Zhang; Xiaozhou Ji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on capture of CO{sub 2} from ambient air (air capture). If this process is technically and economically feasible, it could potentially contribute to net reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in ways that are complementary to better developed techniques for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources. We focused on cyclic adsorption processes for CO{sub 2} capture from air in which the entire cycle is performed at moderate temperatures. The project involved both experimental studies of sorbent materials and process level modeling of cyclic air capture processes. In our experimental work, a series of amine-functionalized silica adsorbents were prepared and characterized to determine the impact of molecular architecture on CO{sub 2} capture. Some key findings were: Amine functionalized silicas can be prepared with high enough CO{sub 2} capacities under ambient conditions to merit consideration for use in air capture processes. Primary amines are better candidates for CO{sub 2} capture than secondary or tertiary amines, both in terms of amine efficiency for CO{sub 2} adsorption and enhanced water affinity. Mechanistic understanding of degradation of these materials can enable control of molecular architecture to significantly improve material stability. Our process modeling work provided the first publically available cost and energy estimates for cyclic adsorption processes for air capture of CO{sub 2}. Some key findings were: Cycles based on diurnal ambient heating and cooling cannot yield useful purities or amounts of captured CO{sub 2}. Cycles based on steam desorption at 110 oC can yield CO{sub 2} purities of ~88%. The energy requirements for cycles using steam desorption are dominated by needs for thermal input, which results in lower costs than energy input in the form of electricity. Cyclic processes with operational costs of less than $100 tCO{sub 2}-net were described, and these results point to process and material improvements that could substantially reduce these costs. The most critical conclusions from our work are that (i) CO{sub 2} capture from ambient air using moderate temperature cyclic adsorption processes is technically feasible and (ii) the operational costs of realistic versions of these processes are moderate enough to encourage future development of this technology. Because of the very modest net investment that has been made in R&D associated with this approach from all sources worldwide (relative to the massive public and private investment that has been made in technologies for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources), our results strongly suggest that continued development of air capture is justified.

Sholl, David; Jones, Christopher

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite. Abstract: The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto...

324

Regenerable immobilized aminosilane sorbents for carbon dioxide capture applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the separation of carbon dioxide from ambient air and flue gases is provided wherein a phase separating moiety with a second moiety are simultaneously coupled and bonded onto an inert substrate to create a mixture which is subsequently contacted with flue gases or ambient air. The phase-separating moiety is an amine whereas the second moiety is an aminosilane, or a Group 4 propoxide such as titanium (IV) propoxide (tetrapropyl orthotitanate, C.sub.12H.sub.28O.sub.4Ti). The second moiety makes the phase-separating moiety insoluble in the pores of the inert substrate. The new sorbents have a high carbon dioxide loading capacity and considerable stability over hundreds of cycles. The synthesis method is readily scalable for commercial and industrial production.

Gay, McMahan; Choi, Sunho; Jones, Christopher W

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

326

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Sorption Behavior in Confined Coal Cores for Enhanced Coalbed Methane and CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of sorption isotherms and transport properties of CO2 in coal cores are important for designing enhanced coalbed methane/CO2 sequestration field projects. Sorption isotherms measured in the lab can provide the upper limit on the amount of CO2 that might be sorbed in these projects. Because sequestration sites will most likely be in unmineable coals, many of the coals will be deep and under considerable lithostatic and hydrostatic pressures. These lithostatic pressures may significantly reduce the sorption capacities and/or transport rates. Consequently, we have studied apparent sorption and diffusion in a coal core under confining pressure. A core from the important bituminous coal Pittsburgh #8 was kept under a constant, three-dimensional external stress; the sample was scanned by X-ray computer tomography (CT) before, then while it sorbed, CO2. Increases in sample density due to sorption were calculated from the CT images. Moreover, density distributions for small volume elements inside the core were calculated and analyzed. Qualitatively, the computerized tomography showed that gas sorption advanced at different rates in different regions of the core, and that diffusion and sorption progressed slowly. The amounts of CO2 sorbed were plotted vs. position (at fixed times) and vs. time (for various locations in the sample). The resulting sorption isotherms were compared to isotherms obtained from powdered coal from the same Pittsburgh #8 extended sample. The results showed that for this single coal at specified times, the apparent sorption isotherms were dependent on position of the volume element in the core and the distance from the CO2 source. Also, the calculated isotherms showed that less CO2 was sorbed than by a powdered (and unconfined) sample of the coal. Changes in density distributions during the experiment were also observed. After desorption, the density distribution of calculated volume elements differed from the initial distribution, suggesting hysteresis and a possible rearrangement of coal structure due to CO2 sorption.

Jikich, S.A.; McLendon, T.R.; Seshadri, K.S.; Irdi, G.A.; Smith, D.H.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

W.A. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary February 2013 DOE/EIS-0473 Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (304) 285-4145 or Mark.Lusk@netl.doe.gov

328

Simulation, Design and Optimization of Membrane Gas Separation, Chemical Absorption and Hybrid Processes for CO2 Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coal-fired power plants are the largest anthropogenic point sources of CO2 emissions worldwide. About 40% of the world's electricity comes from coal. Approximately 49% of (more)

Chowdhury, Mohammad Hassan Murad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The modifications of the existing bench scale reactor were completed in order to use it in the next phase of the project. In Phase II, the optimum looping medium was selected, and bench scale demonstrations were completed using them. Different types of coal char such as those obtained from bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite were tested. Modifications were made on the existing sub-pilot scale unit for coal injection. Phase III focused on integrated CDCL demonstration in the sub-pilot scale unit. A comprehensive ASPEN simulations and economic analysis was completed by CONSOL t is expected that the CDCL process will be ready for further demonstrations in a scale up unit upon completion of the proposed project.

Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jerry Y.S. Lin Jerry Y.S. Lin Chemical Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287 Jerry.lin@asu.edu Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor 2 Background 3 CO 2 Capture Methods and Efficiency Improvement Coal, Natural gas, Biomass CO 2 separation Power plant CO 2 compression, conditioning for sequestration Gasification Reforming Shift CO 2 Separation Power plant Power plant Air separation N 2 /O 2 CO 2 Post- combustion H 2 /CO H 2 /CO H 2 CO 2 H 2 O/N 2 /O 2 CO 2 H 2 Pre- combustion Air N 2 O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 CO 2 Oxyfuel Combustion Air separation Air Air separation Air Air separation Air Air Air Air Air separation Air Air separation Air N 2 Air separation Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air separation Air N 2 Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air Air separation N 2 Air 4 Water-Gas-Shift Reaction and Membrane Reactor Reforming

331

NETL: IEP-In-House Post Combustion CO2 Emissions Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture Chemical Sorbents Chemical Solvents Membranes Miscellaneous The objective of this National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development (ORD) multi-faceted project is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for coal-based power plants that lower the costs and energy penalty associated with those systems. Research and development in the capture area is aimed at developing systems that are low in capital cost, have low parasitic load, can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and can be integrated within the power generation system. A majority of the research will occur on laboratory- and bench-scale reactors. Further information on ORD's CO2 capture projects can be found by using the links found in the adjacent blue box.

332

Novel Carbon Capture Solvent Begins Pilot-Scale Testing for Emissions Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Pilot-scale testing of an advanced technology for economically capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas has begun at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, Ala.

333

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT APPENDIX H BEG MODELING REPORT DOE/EIS-0473 NRG W.A. PARISH PCCS PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT APPENDIX H. BEG MODELING REPORT INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 Reservoir modeling and simulation for estimating migration extents of injectate-CO 2 in support of West Ranch oilfield NEPA/EIS Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin May 4, 2012 Summary It is anticipated that anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2-A) will be injected into the deep (5,000-6,000 ft below sea level) subsurface for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) at the West Ranch oilfield beginning in early 2015. The purpose of this report is to present reservoir modeling and simulation

334

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Performance of an IGCC Plant with Carbon Capture and Coal-CO2-Slurry Feed: Impact of Coal Rank, Slurry Loading, and Syngas Cooling Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The significant performance improvement reported by Dooher et al. for a plant with CO2 slurry feed reveals its potential and the need to develop a more fundamental understanding of the differences between water and liquid carbon dioxide as slurrying media and how these may affect individual process units for coals of different rank. ... It corresponds to the arrangement proposed by Dooher et al.,(19) in which the slurry transport medium is directly injected into the gasifier with the solid feedstock and O2. ...

Cristina Botero; Randall P. Field; Robert D. Brasington; Howard J. Herzog; Ahmed F. Ghoniem

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Exergy analysis and the energy saving mechanism for coal to synthetic/substitute natural gas and power cogeneration system without and with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energy saving mechanism and the potential of efficiency improvement for coal to synthetic/substitute natural gas and power plant with different schemes and CO2 capture is disclosed through exergy analysis, and the effects of key parameters on exergy losses and system performance are investigated. Scheme A represents the system without CO2 capture but with a full syngas component adjustment and partial recycle of the chemical unconverted gas, Scheme B represents the system without CO2 capture and syngas component adjustment but with partial recycle of the chemical unconverted gas, and Scheme C represents the SNG and power cogeneration with CO2 capture and partial recycle of the chemical unconverted gas but without syngas component adjustment. Results show that the exergy efficiencies of Scheme A, B and C range from 56% to 62%, 57% to 67%, 52% to 62%, respectively. Coal gasification, watergas-shift process, SNG methanation, and fuel combustion in combined cycle are identified as the main sources of exergy losses. Compared with Scheme A, the exergy efficiency of Scheme B is higher due to the avoidance of exergy losses from syngas adjustment. Scheme C is less energy efficient than Scheme B because of the CO2 capture. Compared with single product systems, the total exergy input of Scheme A, B and C can be reduced by 7.011.0%, 14.019.0%, 15.021.0%, respectively assuming the same product output. The chemical to power output ratio (CPOR) will impact the exergy losses of the whole plant greatly. For all schemes, with the increasing CPOR, the exergy losses for chemical synthesis island will increase whereas the exergy losses for power island will decrease. Especially high CPOR will cause sharp exergy losses of chemical synthesis island. The coupling between exergy losses for chemical synthesis and power islands leads to an optimal CPOR making the total exergy losses of the plant minimal and the system efficiency maximized. The results presented in this paper can help to confirm the potential of system integration and can be a guide for system integration.

Sheng Li; Hongguang Jin; Lin Gao; Xiaosong Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carbon dioxide capture from power or process plant gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention are methods for removing preselected substances from a mixed flue gas stream characterized by cooling said mixed flue gas by direct contact with a quench liquid to condense at least one preselected substance and form a cooled flue gas without substantial ice formation on a heat exchanger. After cooling additional process methods utilizing a cryogenic approach and physical concentration and separation or pressurization and sorbent capture may be utilized to selectively remove these materials from the mixed flue gas resulting in a clean flue gas.

Bearden, Mark D; Humble, Paul H

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low-Energy Solvents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charles Freeman, Kayte Denslow, Joseph Charles Freeman, Kayte Denslow, Joseph Remias, Balraj Ambedkar, David Fitzgerald, Scott Hume, Alan House, Sonja Salmon Low-Energy Solvents for CO 2 Capture Enabled by a Combination of Enzymes and Ultrasonics NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 9, 2013  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT SUPPORT. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0007741.  DISCLAIMER. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

340

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

N-nitrosamine and N-nitramine Formation from NOx Reactions with Amines during Amine-Based CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capture for Post-combustion Carbon Sequestration Background! Generation of electricity and heat from power- combustion carbon sequestration, the capture and underground storage of CO2 from the exhaust gases of power formation from NOx reactions with amines during amine-based carbon dioxide capture for postcombustion carbon

Mitch, William A.

342

Modelling and simulation of CO2 (carbon dioxide) bottoming cycles for offshore oil and gas installations at design and off-design conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improved energy efficiency is an issue of increasing importance in offshore oil and gas installations. The power on offshore installations is generated by gas turbines operating in a simple cycle. There is an obvious possibility for heat recovery for further power generation from the exhaust heat. However, the limited space and weight available makes the inclusion of bottoming cycles challenging. Due to its high working pressure and thereby compact components CO2 (carbon dioxide) could be a viable solution, combining compactness and efficiency. An in-house simulation tool is used to evaluate the performance of CO2 bottoming cycles at design and off-design conditions. Both a simple recuperated single stage cycle and a more advanced dual stage system are modelled. Results from simulations show a potential for 1011%-points increase in net plant efficiency at 100% gas turbine load. Also off-design simulations taking the variation in heat exchanger performance into account are performed showing that the bottoming cycle improves the off-design performance compared to the standard gas turbine solution. Even at 60% GT (gas turbine) load, the combined cycle with CO2 bottoming cycle can achieve up to 45% net plant efficiency, compared to 31% for only the gas turbine.

Harald Taxt Walnum; Petter Neks; Lars O. Nord; Trond Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Integrating solar Organic Rankine Cycle into a coal-fired power plant with amine-based chemical absorption for CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel system integrating solar Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) into a power plant with amine-based chemical absorption for CO2 capture is proposed. The condensation heat of ORC provides the required heat for solvent regeneration, which avoids the energy penalty caused by the steam extraction traditionally. The cascade utilization of solar energy is realized through a combined supply of power generation and condensation heat. From the aspects of technology and economics, a performance analysis is presented to compare the proposed system and three other systems based on a 300MWe power plant. The proposed system shows better performance than that of reference systems in the power generation and emission reductions. Economic evaluation was conducted in terms of levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) and cost of CO2 removed (COR). In order to achieve lower LCOE and COR compared to the power plant integrated with solar assisted post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC), the price of ORC has to be lower than 1284.46USD/kW under the conditions that the price of the solar field is 120USD/m2. It is believed that the proposed system has a satisfied potential to meet the thermal demand for the solvent regeneration in the power plant with PCC.

Li Zhao; Ruikai Zhao; Shuai Deng; Yuting Tan; Yinan Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

How the choice of multi-gas equivalency metrics affects mitigation options: The case of CO2 capture in a Brazilian coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study shows how the assessment of emissions reductions from CO2 capture is critically dependent on the choice of multi-gas equivalency metric and climate impact time horizon. This has implications for time-sensitive mitigation policies, in particular when considering relative impact of short-lifetime gases. CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from a coal-fired power plant in Brazil are used to estimate and compare the CO2-equivalent emissions based on standard practice global warming potentials GWP-100 with the less common GWP-50 and variable GWP for impact target years 2050 and 2100. Emission reductions appear lower for the variable metric, when the choice of target year is critical: 73% in 2100 and 60% in 2050. Reductions appear more favorable using a metric with a fixed time horizon, where the choice of time horizon is important: 77% for GWP-100 and 71% for GWP-50. Since CH4 emissions from mining have a larger contribution in the total emission of a plant with capture compared to one without, different perspectives on the impact of CH4 are analyzed. Use of variable GWP implies that CH4 emissions appear 39% greater in 2100 than with use of fixed GWP and 91% greater in 2050.

Maria Cecilia P. Moura; David A. Castelo Branco; Glen P. Peters; Alexandre Salem Szklo; Roberto Schaeffer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

High pressure conversion of \\{NOx\\} and Hg and their capture as aqueous condensates in a laboratory piston-compressor simulating oxy-fuel CO2 compression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oxy-fuel technology for CO2 capture has largely focused on combustion characteristics as a driver towards demonstration. Impurity removal studies typically centre on the how current environmental control units (FGD, SCR, activated carbon beds) operate in oxy-fuel firing. However, it is expected that some removal of \\{NOx\\} and \\{SOx\\} may occur during compression of flue gas through the lead chamber process. Some commercial systems link the capture of mercury to the formation of acid condensates (as a soluble mercury salt). Mercury in compressed flue gas represents a potential corrosion risk in the processing of CO2 from oxy-fuel combustion processes. Gas phase elemental mercury (Hg0) is difficult to remove from the flue gas and the level of cleaning required to prevent corrosion of cryogenic brazed aluminium heat exchangers is uncertain. This work has investigated the behaviour of gaseous Hg0 in pressurised oxy-fuel systems in terms of the potential capture in acidic condensates, interaction with \\{NOx\\} gases and liquid stability on de-pressurisation. The work was undertaken on an adapted laboratory scale three stage axial-piston compressor with gas and liquid sampling at pressures up to 30bar. The main finding was that gaseous Hg0 reacts readily with NO2 formed from NO oxidation at high pressure. This reaction occurred without the presence of water, either water vapour or liquid water, contrary to speculation in the literature. Without NO2, no capture of Hg0 was observed in the compression system. Overall, the capture of mercury during compression occurred as a consequence of high pressure, longer residence time and concentration of NO2. Capture rates of 100% Hg and 7583% \\{NOx\\} were measured from the compressor exit at 30barg.

Rohan Stanger; Timothy Ting; Terry Wall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Amino Acid-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Solid Sorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amino Acid-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Solid Sorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture ... Amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) are potential green substitutes of aqueous amine solutions for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. ... However, the viscous nature of AAILs greatly hinders their further development in CO2 capture applications. ...

Xianfeng Wang; Novruz G. Akhmedov; Yuhua Duan; David Luebke; David Hopkinson; Bingyun Li

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Examination of the effect of system pressure ratio and heat recuperation on the efficiency of a coal based gas turbine fuel cell hybrid power generation system with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines two coal-based hybrid configurations that employ separated anode and cathode streams for the capture and compression of CO2. One configuration uses a standard Brayton cycle, and the other adds heat recuperation ahead of the fuel cell. Results show that peak efficiencies near 55% are possible, regardless of cycle configuration, including the cost in terms of energy production of CO2 capture and compression. The power that is required to capture and compress the CO2 is shown to be approximately 15% of the total plant power.

VanOsdol, J.G.; Gemmen, R.S.; Liese, E.A

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Economic evaluations of coal-based combustion and gasification power plants with post-combustion CO2 capture using calcium looping cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal-based power generation sector is facing important changes to implement energy efficient carbon capture technologies to comply with emission reduction targets for transition to low carbon economy. This paper assesses CaL (Calcium Looping) as one of the innovative carbon capture options able to deliver low energy and cost penalties. The work evaluates how the integration of post-combustion calcium looping influences the economics of power plants providing up-dated techno-economic indicators. Coal-based combustion plants operated in both sub- and super-critical steam conditions were evaluated, as well as coal gasification plant using an oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. As benchmark options used to quantify the carbon capture energy and cost penalties, the same power generation technologies were evaluated without CCS (Carbon capture and storage). The power plant concepts investigated in the paper generates around 545560MW net power with at least 90% carbon capture rate. Introduction of CaL technology for CO2 capture results in a 2442% increase of specific capital investment, the O&M costs are increasing with 2430% and the electricity cost with 3948% (all compared to non-CCS cases). As the techno-economic results suggest, CaL has good application potential in combustion-based power generation.

Calin-Cristian Cormos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modeling Energy Flow in an Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) System with CO2 Capture Integrated with Oxy-fuel Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-coal combustion is one of the technical solutions for mitigating CO2 in thermal power plants. ... Currently, more than 85% of the energy that drives modern economies comes from fossil fuels, and this has stimulated research and development into more sustainable alternative energy sources. ... Other species, such as SO2, various nitrogen compounds, HCl, and Hg, are also present in quantities dependent upon the fossil fuel composition and the amount of air that leaks into the boiler. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshcyhn; Stephen Gerdemann; Thomas Ochs; John Clark

2012-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCTs 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies, the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... The clean syngas is diluted with N2 from the ASU and enters the gas turbine burner. ... The amount of N2 diluent to be added is determined by the requirement of maintaining the appropriate lower heating value of the syngas feeding into the gas turbine burner to achieve sufficiently low NOx emissions (1535 ppmv at 15% O2)(36) and to keep the temperature of the gas low enough to avoid blade failure. ...

David J. Couling; Kshitij Prakash; William H. Green

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

Sequential SO2/CO2 Capture of Calcium-Based Solid Waste from the Paper Industry in the Calcium Looping Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequential SO2/CO2 Capture of Calcium-Based Solid Waste from the Paper Industry in the Calcium Looping Process ... School of Energy and Power Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Coal-Burning Pollutants Emission Reduction, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China ... Every year, large amounts of calcium-based solid wastes such as carbide slag (from the chlor-alkali industry), red mud (from the aluminum industry), and lime mud (from the paper industry) containing Ca(OH)2 or CaCO3 are produced. ...

Yingjie Li; Changtian Liu; Rongyue Sun; Hongling Liu; Shuimu Wu; Chunmei Lu

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-302 Post-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 benCh-sCale DeveloPment anD testing of raPiD Pressure swing absorPtion for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture primary project goals WR Grace and the University of South Carolina are developing a rapid pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process to evaluate concept cost and performance benefits by testing a bench-scale system using a low-cost, structured adsorbent with low-pressure drop, high mass-transfer rates, high capacity, and high availability that will enable large feed through- puts. technical goals * Develop an attrition-resistant and low-pressure drop structured adsorbent based on a

354

Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production via chemical looping steam methane reforming coupled with in situ CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the sorption enhanced chemical looping reforming of methane (SE-CL-SMR), using CaO and NiO as CO2 sorbent and oxygen transfer material respectively, was conducted. The effect of different parameters, such as reactor temperature, pressure, H2O/CH4 ratio, CaO/CH4 ratio and CaO/NiO ratio was investigated. Moreover, the use of different sweep gases and oxidants for the re-oxidation/calcination cycle, like pure oxygen, air, steam and CO2, was specifically addressed. Conventional steam reforming (SMR) and sorption enhanced steam reforming (SE-SMR) were also investigated for comparison reasons. The results of thermodynamic analysis show that there are significant advantages of both sorption enhanced processes compared to conventional steam reforming. Presence of CaO sorbent in the reformer leads to higher methane conversion, hydrogen purity and yield at low temperatures (?650C). Addition of the oxygen carrier, in the chemical looping reforming concept, minimizes thermal requirements of the process, and results in superior performance compared to SE-SMR and SMR processes. A negative effect from NiO addition is reduction in hydrogen production (due to the reaction of part of methane with NiO to form CO/CO2). Hydrogen yield is up to 11% lower compared to SE-SMR for a NiO/CaO ratio of 0.7. It was found that only pure O2 can be used for re-oxidation/regeneration in order to reduce the energy requirements of the SE-CL-SMR process up to 26% compared to SE-SMR and up to 55% compared to conventional SMR.

A. Antzara; E. Heracleous; D.B. Bukur; A.A. Lemonidou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemical-Looping Gasification of Biomass for Hydrogen-Enriched Gas Production with In-Process Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This may help to increase the carbon dioxide capture on one hand but, on other hand, also increases the size of the gasifier and regenerator and the heat requirement of the regenerator. ... Steam was used as the fluidizing medium. ...

Bishnu Acharya; Animesh Dutta; Prabir Basu

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

358

NETL: CO2 Compression  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Compression CO2 Compression The CO2 captured from a power plant will need to be compressed from near atmospheric pressure to a pressure between 1,500 and 2,200 psi in order to be transported via pipeline and then injected into an underground sequestration site. Read More! CO2 Compression The compression of CO2 represents a potentially large auxiliary power load on the overall power plant system. For example, in an August 2007 study conducted for DOE/NETL, CO2 compression was accomplished using a six-stage centrifugal compressor with interstage cooling that required an auxiliary load of approximately 7.5 percent of the gross power output of a subcritical pressure, coal-fired power plant. As a result, DOE/NETL is sponsoring R&D to develop novel methods that can significantly decrease the

359

Real-world fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions by driving conditions for light-duty passenger vehicles in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The increasing discrepancy between on-road and type-approval fuel consumption for \\{LDPVs\\} (light-duty passenger vehicles) has attracted tremendous attention. We measured on-road emissions for 60 \\{LDPVs\\} in three China's cities and calculated their fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. We further evaluated the impacts of variations in area-averaged speed on relative fuel consumption of gasoline \\{LDPVs\\} for the UAB (urban area of Beijing). On-road fuel consumption under the average driving pattern is 102% higher than that normalized to the NEDC (new European driving cycle) cycle for all tested vehicles, and the on-road NEDC-normalized fuel consumption is higher by 3012% compared to type-approval values for gasoline vehicles. We observed very strong correlations between relative fuel consumption and average speed. Traffic control applied to \\{LDPVs\\} driving within the UAB during weekdays can substantially reduce total fleet fuel consumption by 235% during restriction hours by limiting vehicle use and improving driving conditions. Our results confirmed that a new cycle for the type approval test for \\{LDPVs\\} with more real-world driving features is of great necessity. Furthermore, enhanced traffic control measures could play an important role in mitigating real-world fuel consumption and CO2 emissions for \\{LDPVs\\} in China.

Shaojun Zhang; Ye Wu; Huan Liu; Ruikun Huang; Puikei Un; Yu Zhou; Lixin Fu; Jiming Hao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-combustion CO2 control systems separate CO2 from the flue gas produced by conventional coal combustion in air. The flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and has a CO2 concentration of 10-15 volume percent. Read More! Capturing CO2 under these conditions is challenging because: (1) the low pressure and dilute concentration dictate a high total volume of gas to be treated; (2) trace impurities in the flue gas tend to reduce the effectiveness of the CO2 separation processes; and (3) compressing captured CO2 from atmospheric pressure to pipeline pressure (1,200 - 2,200 pounds per square inch) represents a large parasitic energy load. Plant Picture DOE/NETL's post-combustion CO2 control technology R&D program includes

362

FEs Advanced Combustion R&D Seeks Innovative Ways to Lower Cost of Capturing Carbon Emissions from Coal Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Youve probably heard about carbon capture and storage (CCS), a suite of technologies designed to capture and store carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plants and industrial sources. Because CCS can...

363

ARM - Instrument - co2flx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsco2flx govInstrumentsco2flx Documentation CO2FLX : Handbook CO2FLX : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports CO2FLX : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Carbon General Overview The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind

364

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700C) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Complete Transport Validated Model on a Zeolite Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Permeance and Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CO2 emissions from major industries cause serious global environment problems and their mitigation is urgently needed. The use of zeolite membranes is a very efficient way in order to capture CO2 from some flue gases. The dominant transport mechanism at low temperature andor high pressure is the diffusion through the membrane. This procedure can be divided in three steps: Adsorption of the molecules of the species in the surface of the membrane, then a driving force gives a path where the species follow inside the membrane and finally the species desorbed from the surface of the membrane. The current work is aimed at developing a simulation model for the CO2 transport through a zeolite membrane and estimate the diffusion phenomenon through a very thin membrane of 150 nm in a Wicke-Kallenbach cell. The cell is cylindrical in shape with diameter of 19 mm and consists of a retentate gas chamber, a permeate gas chamber which are separated by a cylindrical zeolite membrane. This apparatus have been modeled wit...

Gkanas, Evangelos I; Stubos, Athanasios K; Makridis, Sofoklis S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon Capture Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This information is taken from DOE's information on Carbon Capture Carbon Capture Research Before carbon dioxide (CO2) gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured as a relatively pure gas. On a mass basis, CO2 is the 19th largest commodity chemical in the United States, and CO2 is routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H2 production, and limestone calcination. Existing capture technologies, however, are not cost-effective when considered in the context of sequestering CO2 from power plants. Most power plants and other large point sources use air-fired combustors, a process that exhausts CO2 diluted with nitrogen. Flue gas from coal-fired power

367

Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in Illinois. Led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project is the first demonstration-scale project in the United States to use CO2 from an industrial source and inject it into a saline reservoir. The CO2 is being captured from an ethanol production facility operated by the Archer Daniels Midland Company in Decatur, Ill., and is being injected

368

DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone October 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest. Preliminary results indicate that the formation has good CO2 storage potential and could possibly serve as a repository for CO2 emissions captured from stationary sources in the region. Carbon capture and storage

369

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Metal Monolithic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO2 Capture Project No.: FC26-07NT43086 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE CO2 capture unit with metal monolithic amine-grafted zeolites. The University of Akron is investigating a new sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture that involves the novel integration of metallic monolith structures coated with amine-grafted zeolites. This sorbent would eliminate the use of corrosive liquid amine and decrease the energy required for sorbent regeneration. The metal monoliths consist of straight channels: one row of channels coated with amine-grated zeolite and one used for heat transfer media for either cooling for adsorption or heating for regeneration. In combination with the innovative applications of metal monoliths as an

370

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Geologic CO2 sequestration inhibits microbial growth | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

community and could improve overall efficiency of CO2 sequestration. The Science Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep subsurface environments has received...

372

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

373

Interim report Assessment of Baseline and Advanced Hydrogen Production Plants Case 1-1 Baseline Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) Hydrogen Plant With CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 CAPTURE READY COAL POWER PLANTS DOE/NETL-2007/1301 Final Report April 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

374

DOE/NETL ADVANCED CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE R&D PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY UPDATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CARBON CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE R&D PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY UPDATE MAY 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or useful- ness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommenda-

375

8, 73737389, 2008 Scientists' CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 7373­7389, 2008 Scientists' CO2 emissions A. Stohl Title Page Abstract Introduction substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this pa- per, the CO2 emissions of the employees working, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

CO2 please | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 please CO2 please ORNL researchers look to carbon dioxide as a more environmentally friendly refrigerant gas In an indoor research area, Brian Fricke preps display cases for...

377

Reversible zwitterionic liquids, the reaction of alkanol guanidines, alkanol amidines, and diamines with CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide chemistry is increasingly relevant to real-world issues, thanks to global warming. Key chemistry issues currently being studied are the capture, storage, and utilization of CO2. While the relevance of capture and storage are obvious, the relevance of CO2 utilization is less clear. Although CO2 utilization is unlikely to consume significant quantities of CO2, it can be an significant strategy for the development of sustainable processes. As part of our research efforts towards CO2 utilization, some of us invented switchable solvents, meaning solvents that can switch reversibly from one version to another.1Our original version was a mixture of an amidine and an alcohol (equation 1, where B is a liquid amidine), but since then we and others have developed others such as guanidine/alcohol mixtures (equation 1, where B is a liquid guanidine),2 amidine/primary amine mixtures,3 and secondary amines (equation 2).4Switchable solvents of these types all convert from a low-polarity to a high-polarity ionic liquid form upon exposure to an atmosphere of CO2 and revert back to the low polarity form when the CO2 is removed by heat or flushing with inert gas. We also demonstrated that these switchable solvents can be used as reversible CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) for CO2 capture, and are more energy-efficient in that role than aqueous solutions of ethanolamine.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Ang, Trisha; Liang, Chen; Rainbolt, James E.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CO2 Utilization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon dioxide (CO2) use and reuse efforts focus on the conversion of CO2 to useable products and fuels that will reduce CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. These include: Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery - Injecting CO2 into depleting oil or gas bearing fields to maximize the amount of CO2 that could be stored as well as maximize hydrocarbon production. CO2 as Feedstock - Use CO2 as a feedstock to produce chemicals (including fuels and polymers) and find applications for the end products. Non-Geologic Storage of CO2 - Use CO2 from an effluent stream to immobilize the CO2 permanently by producing stable solid material that are either useful products with economic value or a low cost produced material.

379

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Development Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development Phase Development Phase Background As part of a comprehensive effort to assess options for sustainable energy systems, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected seven regional partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The partnerships are

380

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation Phase Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Economic analysis of amine based carbon dioxide capture system with bi-pressure stripper in supercritical coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-combustion CO2 capture and storage is among the most mature technologies to capture, compress, transport and store CO2 from flue gas in coal-fired power plant. This paper presents the simulation of monoethanolamine (MEA) based CO2 capture and compression process integrated within a 600MWe supercritical coal-fired power plant using chemical process simulators. Comparison between bi-pressure stripper and single-pressure stripper reveals that improved CO2 capture system with bi-pressure stripper minimizes energy penalty of CO2 capture and compression by up to 6.3% at full unit load. The study also explores optimization of some important process parameters affecting the performance of coal-fired power plant by taking into account both CO2 capture process and CO2 compression at full unit load. These parameters include operating stripper pressure, CO2 capture efficiency and steam extraction location. Results show that the optimal stripper pressure is within the range of 1.92.1bar and feasible CO2 capture efficiency is between 60% and 90%. Results also show that low-pressure steam extraction reduces energy penalty. Evaluation of improved CO2 capture system is also performed at part flue gas load ranging from 40% to 90%. The study reveals that operating at part flue gas load, as compared with full load, increases energy penalty of carbon capture. Not only energy penalty but also lean solution flow rate and plant efficiency are studied at different flue load levels in this paper. In addition, results show that bi-pressure stripper configuration is also effective in reducing energy penalty at part unit load.

Haiwen Liang; Zhigao Xu; Fengqi Si

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

383

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

384

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

385

Study of Gas-steam Combined Cycle Power Plants Integrated with MCFC for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the field of fossil-fuel based technologies, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants are currently the best option for electricity generation, having an efficiency close to 60%. However, they produce significant CO2 emissions, amounting to around 0.4 tonne/MWh for new installations. Among the carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, the process based on chemical absorption is a well-established technology, but markedly reduces the NGCC performances. On the other side, the integration of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) is recognized as an attractive option to overcome the main drawbacks of traditional CCS technologies. If the cathode side is fed by NGCC exhaust gases, the MCFC operates as a CO2 concentrator, beside providing an additional generating capacity. In this paper the integration of MCFC into a two pressure levels combined cycle is investigated through an energy analysis. To improve the efficiency of MCFC and its integration within the NGCC, plant configurations based on two different gas recirculation options are analyzed. The first is a traditional recirculation of exhaust gases at the compressor inlet; the second, mainly involving the MCFC stack, is based on recirculating a fraction of anode exhaust gases at the cathode inlet. Effects of MCFC operating conditions on energy and environmental performances of the integrated system are evaluated.

Roberto Carapellucci; Roberto Saia; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

New Membrane Technology for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Begins Pilot-Scale Test  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A promising new technology sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for economically capturing 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from a coal-burning power plant has begun pilot-scale testing.

387

Applications of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies in reducing emissions from fossil-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to investigate the global contribution of carbon capture and storage technologies to mitigating climate change. Carbon capture and storage is a technology that comprises the separation of from carbon dioxide industrial- and energy-related sources, transport to a storage location (e.g., saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields), and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. The carbon dioxides emitted directly at the power stations are reduced by 80 to 90%. In contrast, the life cycle assessment shows substantially lower reductions of greenhouse gases in total (minus 65 to 79%).

Balat, M.; Balat, H.; Oz, C. [University of Mahallesi, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

390

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

391

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxygen-Based PC Boiler Project No.: FC26-04NT42207 & FC26-03NT41736 Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Foster Wheeler North America Corporation will conduct to two projects to improve carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology by developing a conceptual pulverized coal-fired boiler system design using oxygen as the combustion medium. Using oxygen instead of air produces a flue gas with a high CO2 concentration, which will facilitate CO2 capture for subsequent sequestration. The first project will develop modeling simulations that will lead to a conceptual design that addresses costs, performance, and emissions, and

392

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Project Summary Full Title: Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity Project ID: 195 Principal Investigator: David McCollum Brief Description: This project addresses several components of carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs, provides technical models for determining the engineering and infrastructure requirements of CCS, and describes some correlations for estimating CO2 density and viscosity. Keywords: Pipeline, transportation, greenhouse gases (GHG), costs, technoeconomic analysis Purpose Estimate costs of carbon dioxide capture, compression, transport, storage, etc., and provide some technical models for determining the engineering and

393

A Vehicular Wireless Sensor Network for CO2 Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas in areas of interest. The reported data are sent to a server, which the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas in areas of interest. CO2 gas is a critical index of air qualityA Vehicular Wireless Sensor Network for CO2 Monitoring Shu-Chiung Hu1, You-Chiun Wang1, Chiuan

Tseng, Yu-Chee

394

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Membrane Process to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005312 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE MTR membrane test skid. Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) Inc. is preparing commercial-scale membrane modules that meet low pressure-drop and high packing-density performance targets using carbon dioxide (CO2) capture membranes developed under FC26-07NT43085, a previous MTR project with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. These thin-film membranes utilize Pebax® polyether-polyamide copolymers. The new research will involve the construction of an approximately 1 ton of CO2 per day capacity membrane skid for use in a six-month pilot-scale field test using a slip-stream of flue gas from a coal-fired power plant.

395

Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this final report, we describe research results from Phase 2 of a technical/economic study of fossil hydrogen energy systems with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and storage (CCS). CO{sub 2} capture and storage, or alternatively, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, involves capturing CO{sub 2} from large point sources and then injecting it into deep underground reservoirs for long-term storage. By preventing CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, this technology has significant potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil-based facilities in the power and industrial sectors. Furthermore, the application of CCS to power plants and hydrogen production facilities can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions associated with electric vehicles (EVs) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) and, thus, can also improve GHG emissions in the transportation sector. This research specifically examines strategies for transitioning to large-scale coal-derived energy systems with CCS for both hydrogen fuel production and electricity generation. A particular emphasis is on the development of spatially-explicit modeling tools for examining how these energy systems might develop in real geographic regions. We employ an integrated modeling approach that addresses all infrastructure components involved in the transition to these energy systems. The overall objective is to better understand the system design issues and economics associated with the widespread deployment of hydrogen and CCS infrastructure in real regions. Specific objectives of this research are to: Develop improved techno-economic models for all components required for the deployment of both hydrogen and CCS infrastructure, Develop novel modeling methods that combine detailed spatial data with optimization tools to explore spatially-explicit transition strategies, Conduct regional case studies to explore how these energy systems might develop in different regions of the United States, and Examine how the design and cost of coal-based H{sub 2} and CCS infrastructure depend on geography and location.

Nils Johnson; Joan Ogden

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Capturing CO2 from air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the next decades ii) Energy efficiency iii) Emission...China, India, and Brazil) want to develop their...to abundant and cheap energy. They want to realize...emission reduction and renewable energy. The emerging economies...

Roelof D. Schuiling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Anthropogenic Perturbation of Atmospheric CO2 and the Climate System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon dioxide (CO2), a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG), are redistributed within the climate system

Fortunat, Joos

398

The response of soil CO2 ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three major anthropogenic global changes: atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, nitrogen (N atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentra- tions, increasing rates of nitrogen (N) deposition, and decliningThe response of soil CO2 ¯ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity J O

Minnesota, University of

399

Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Funding for 12 projects to test innovative concepts for the beneficial use of carbon dioxide (CO2) was announced by the U.S. Department of Energy. The awards are part of $1.4 billion in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for projects that will capture carbon dioxide from industrial sources. These 12 projects will engage in a first phase feasibility study that will examine beneficial uses in a variety of ways, including mineralization to carbonates directly through conversion of CO2 in flue gas; the use of CO2 from power plants or industrial applications to grow algae/biomass; and conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. Each project will be subject to

400

DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage January 5, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic storage sites - a crucial component of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology - is the focus of the latest in a series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CCS "best practices" manuals. Developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the manual - Site Screening, Site Selection and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations - is a resource for future project developers and CO2 producers and transporters. It can also be used to apprise government agencies of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage January 5, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic storage sites - a crucial component of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology - is the focus of the latest in a series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CCS "best practices" manuals. Developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the manual - Site Screening, Site Selection and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations - is a resource for future project developers and CO2 producers and transporters. It can also be used to apprise government agencies of the

402

CO2 maritime transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to describe the complete transport chain of CO2 between capture and storage including a ship transport. This last one is composed by the following steps: Shore terminal including the liquefaction, temporary storage and CO2 loading. Ship with a capacity of 30,000m3. On or off shore terminal including an unloading system, temporary storage and export towards the final storage. Between all the possible thermodynamic states, the liquid one is most relevant two options are compared in the study (?50C, 7bar) and (?30C, 15bar). The ship has an autonomy of 6 days, is able to cover 1000km with a cargo of 2.5Mt/year. Several scenarios are studied varying the geographical position of the CO2 source, the number of harbours and the way the CO2 is finally stored. Depending on the option, the transport cost varies from 24 to 32/tCO2. This study confirms the conclusion of a previous study supported by ADEME, the cost transport is not negligible regarding the capture one when ships are considered. Transport by ship becomes a more economical option compared with an off shore pipeline when the distance exceeds 350km and with an onshore pipeline when it exceeds 1100km.

Sandrine Decarre; Julien Berthiaud; Nicolas Butin; Jean-Louis Guillaume-Combecave

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Combined Experimental-Computational Investigation of Carbon Dioxide Capture in a Series of Isoreticular Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their carbon dioxide capture and gas separation properties.2 However, little is known about the factors). This simplifies the task of relating gas uptake properties to the nature of the functional group in ZIF structures Charles E. Young DriVe East, Los Angeles, California 90095, Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of Kansas

Yaghi, Omar M.

404

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many analysts identify carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Programme cited separation costs from $35 to $264 per tonne of CO2 avoided for a conventional coal fired power plant utilizing existing capture technologies. Because these costs equate to a greater than 40% increase in current power generation rates, it appears obvious that a significant improvement in CO2 separation technology is required if a negative impact on the world economy is to be avoided.

Raterman, Kevin Thomas; Mc Kellar, Michael George; Turner, Terry Donald; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Stacey, Douglas Edwin; Stokes, B.; Vranicar, J.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2: Biofuels from CO2 Using Ammonia or Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: Electrofuels Project: Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammoniaan abundant and affordable chemical, and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the systemcreating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the bacteria A. ferrooxidans to capture and use energy from ferrous iron to produce liquid fuels from CO2.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2 Captured from Coal-Fired Power Plant Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2 Captured from Coal-Fired Power Plant July 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Southern Company and the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, have announced plans to store carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from an existing coal-fired power plant. The project represents a major step toward demonstrating the viability of integrating carbon capture and storage to mitigate climate change. This storage project, located in the Citronelle Oil Field north of Mobile,

407

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Award Number: DE-FE0007395 DOE Project Manager: José D. Figueroa  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Heat Integrated Post- a Heat Integrated Post- combustion CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy NETL Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities Electric Power Research Institute (with WorleyParsons) Hitachi Power Systems America Smith Management Group July 9, 2013 Goals and Objectives * Objectives 1) To demonstrate a heat-integrated post-combustion CO 2 capture system with an advanced solvent; 2) To collect information/data on material corrosion and identify appropriate materials of construction for a 550 MWe commercial-scale carbon capture plant.  To gather data on solvent degradation kinetics, water management, system dynamic control as well as other information during the long-term

408

Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, a biologically catalysed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was ...

Barbero, Roberto Juan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10. Shah, Minish. Capturing CO2 from Oxy-Fuel Combustion Flue Gas. Cottbus, Germany : Praxair Inc., 2005. 11. Spitznogle, Gary O. CO2 Impurity Specification at AEP Mountaineer....

410

Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquids (CTL) plants with carbon capture and sequestration.RW, Hufton JR, Wright A. Carbon capture by sorption-enhanceden.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_capture_and_storage 5. Johnson

Liu, Zhongzhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Greening Coal: Breakthroughs and Challenges in Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) This plan requires that globally, billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide (GtCO2) each year must be captured, concentrated, and stored to keep it out of the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. ... Ciferno, J. P.; Fout, T. E.; Jones, A. P.; Murphy, J. T.Capturing carbon from existing coal-fired power plants Chem. ... Nelson, T.; Coleman, L.; Anderson, M.; Herr, J.; Pavani, M.The dry carbonate process: Carbon dioxide recovery from power plant flue gas, In CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants, NETL R&D Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, 2009. ...

Philip H. Stauffer; Gordon N. Keating; Richard S. Middleton; Hari S. Viswanathan; Kathryn A. Berchtold; Rajinder P. Singh; Rajesh J. Pawar; Anthony Mancino

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

The performance of the Norwegian carbon dioxide, capture and storage innovation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to take up Norway's twin challenge of reducing CO2 emissions, while meeting its growing energy demand with domestic resources, the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) plays an important role in Norwegian energy policies. This study uses the Functions of Innovation Systems approach to identify key policy issues that need to be addressed in order to prolong Norway's international leadership position in the development of CCS. The analysis shows that Norway has been successful in building an innovation system around CCS technology. The key determinants for this achievement are pinpointed in this article. However, the evolution of the innovation system seems to have entered a critical phase that is decisive for a further thriving development of CCS in Norway. The results provide a clear understanding of the current impediments in the CCS innovation system and stress the need to direct policy initiatives at the identified weak system functionsi.e. entrepreneurial activity and market formationto improve the performance of the system. We discuss how policymakers can use these insights to develop a coherent set of policy instruments that would foster the deployment of CCS concepts related to power production and enhanced oil recovery in Norway.

Klaas van Alphen; Jochem van Ruijven; Sjur Kasa; Marko Hekkert; Wim Turkenburg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Biomass torrefaction and CO2 capture using mining wastes A new approach for reducing greenhouse gas emissions of co-firing plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an efficient biomass/coal co-firing could thus be further enhanced by curbing the overall process CO2 emissions as well as using ionic-liquid-impregnated torrefac- tion to increase birch wood constituents' torrefaction saturation, and carbon monoxide and methane concen- trations on mining residues CO2 uptake was studied

Devernal, Anne

414

NETL: IEP – CO2 Compression - Novel Concepts for the Compression of Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Concepts for the Compression of Large Volumes of Carbon Dioxide Novel Concepts for the Compression of Large Volumes of Carbon Dioxide Project No.: FC26-05NT42650 The Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) will design an efficient and cost-effective compression system to reduce the overall cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage for coal-based power plants. SwRI will develop two novel concepts that have the potential to reduce CO2 compression power requirements by 35 percent compared to conventional compressor designs. The first concept is a semi-isothermal compression process where the CO2 is continually cooled using an internal cooling jacket rather than using conventional interstage cooling. This concept can potentially reduce power requirements because less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cool gas. The second concept involves the use of refrigeration to liquefy the CO2 so that its pressure can be increased using a pump, rather than a compressor. The primary power requirements are the initial compression required to boost the CO2 to approximately 250 pounds per square inch absolute and the refrigeration power required to liquefy the gaseous CO2. Once the CO2 is liquefied, the pumping power to boost the pressure to pipeline supply pressure is minimal. Prototype testing of each concept will be conducted.

415

Combining geothermal energy with CO2 storage Feasibility study of low temperature geothermal electricity production using carbon dioxide as working and storage fluid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract One of the emerging solutions for todays excess of carbon dioxide emissions, which is one of the major causes of global warming, is the (more)

Janse, D.H.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Distributed Optical Sensor for CO2 Leak Detection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Sensor for CO Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection Opportunity Research is active on the technology "Distributed Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection," for which a Patent Application has been filed. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview The availability of fossil fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, there are concerns over the impacts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere-particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations is a promising technology to reduce the impact of CO

417

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic Framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine- Appended Metal-Organic Framework, stationary sources like coal-fired power plants, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been proposed.4 viable absorbents for carbon capture under the aforementioned conditions, and they are presently used

418

CO2.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Objective R MOTC can play a signifi cant role in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage and enhanced oil recovery technology development and fi eld demonstra- tions. RMOTC completed a scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) CO 2 enhanced oil recovery potential. More recent character- ization studies indicate geologic carbon storage would also be an excellent use of NPR-3 resources beyond their economic life in conventional production. Geologic Storage Fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of energy production well into the 21st century. Availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is es- sential for the prosperity and security of the United States. However, increased atmospheric concentrations

419

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Ionic Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ionic Liquids Ionic Liquids Project No.: FC26-07NT43091 Model of CO2 absorption by an ionic liquid. Model of CO2 absorption by an IL. The model shows that the anions are controlling absorption in ILs. The green units represent anions and the grey units represent cations. The University of Notre Dame is conducting the Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture project (FC26-07NT43091), that builds on the work of its earlier project (FG26-04NT42122), to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the feasibility of using a novel class of compounds - ionic liquids (ILs) - for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Initial efforts focused on "proof-of-concept" exploration, followed by a laboratory-/bench-scale effort. ILs include a broad category

420

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Dry Regenerable  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dry Regenerable Sorbents Dry Regenerable Sorbents Project No.: FC26-07NT43089 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Schematic of RTI’s Dry Carbonate Process Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International completed two projects, NT43089 and NT40923, to investigate the use of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 or soda ash) as an inexpensive, dry, and regenerable sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in the Dry Carbonate Process. In this process, Na2CO3 reacts with CO2 and water to form sodium bicarbonate at the temperature of the flue gas exhaust; the sorbent is then regenerated at modest temperatures (~120°C) to yield a concentrated stream of CO2 for sequestration or other use. The regenerated sorbent is recycled to the absorption step for subsequent CO2 capture. See schematic of RTI's Dry Carbonate Process.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide co2 capture" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Different types of gasifiers and their integration withCO 2 in a pressurized-gasifier-based process. Energ Fuel.fluidized bed biomass steam gasifier-bed material and fuel

Liu, Zhongzhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Amine-Tethered Adsorbents Based on Three-Dimensional Macroporous Silica for CO2 Capture from Simulated Flue Gas and Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Danon, A.; Stair, P. C.; Weitz, E.FTIR Study of CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15: Elucidation of Adsorbed Species J. Phys. ... Danon, Alon; Stair, Peter C.; Weitz, Eric ...

Fa-Qian Liu; Lei Wang; Zhao-Ge Huang; Chao-Qin Li; Wei Li; Rong-Xun Li; Wei-Hua Li

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites May 3, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Evaluation-related test drilling at geologic sites in three states that could store a combined 64 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions - an important component of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology development - has been completed in projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. If the potential of the sites is eventually fulfilled, they could safely and permanently store combined CO2 emissions equivalent to that produced by more than 11 million passenger vehicles annually or from the electricity use of more than 7 million homes for one year, according to Environmental

424

First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles September 18, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In support of large-scale carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) projects, a collaboration of five U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories has completed first-generation risk profiles that, for the first time, offer a means to predict the probability of complications that could arise from specific carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites. With their detailed methodology for quantifying risk potential at underground carbon storage sites, the profiles will help support safe, large-scale CCUS projects, an important option in the effort to reduce human-generated CO2 emissions linked by many experts to global climate

425

DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites DOE-Sponsored Drilling Projects Demonstrate Significant CO2 Storage at Three Sites May 3, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Evaluation-related test drilling at geologic sites in three states that could store a combined 64 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions - an important component of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology development - has been completed in projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. If the potential of the sites is eventually fulfilled, they could safely and permanently store combined CO2 emissions equivalent to that produced by more than 11 million passenger vehicles annually or from the electricity use of more than 7 million homes for one year, according to Environmental

426

Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward March 15, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The recent completion of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey at a large Illinois carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test site is an important step forward for the carbon capture and storage (CCS) project's planned early 2011 startup. The survey - essential to determine the geometry and internal structures of the deep underground saline reservoir where CO2 will be injected - was completed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance CCS technologies nationwide. CCS is seen by many experts as a

427

Comprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metalorganic frameworks M2(dobdc)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are historically slow, the need for mitigation of current CO2 emissions using carbon capture and sequestration (CCSComprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metal­organic frameworks M2(dobdc) (M ¼ Mg of adsorption in the M2(dobdc)­CO2 adducts. Introduction Currently, 80% of global energy is supplied by carbon

428

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Low Cost Sorbent for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005497 TDA sorbent test equipment TDA sorbent test equipment. TDA Research Inc. will produce and evaluate a low-cost solid sorbent developed in prior laboratory testing. The process uses an alkalized alumina adsorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) at intermediate temperature and near ambient pressure. The physical adsorbent is regenerated with low-pressure steam. Although the regeneration is primarily by concentration swing, the adsorption of steam on the sorbent during regeneration also provides approximately 8°C to 10°C of temperature swing, further enhancing the regeneration rate. The sorbent is transferred between two moving bed reactors. Cycling results in gas

429

Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fossil Hydrogen Energy Systems with Carbon Capture andThe Implications Of New Carbon Capture And SequestrationW H SAMMIS WILLOW ISLAND TOTAL Carbon capture In the plant

Ogden, Joan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Vehicular Sensing System for CO2 Monitoring Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--We are interested in monitoring the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas in a large field such as an urban area sensor, vehicular sensing system, wireless sensor network. I. INTRODUCTION Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has1 Vehicular Sensing System for CO2 Monitoring Applications Shu-Chiung Hu, You-Chiun Wang, Chiuan

Tseng, Yu-Chee

431

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects:? A Life Cycle Assessment Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects:? A Life Cycle Assessment Approach ... This capacity corresponds approximately to storing the emissions of a 5 MW power plant emitting 65 tons of CO2 per day for almost 1800 years27 or 14 years from a 300 MW coal power plant where 8000 tons of CO2 is captured per day. ... To overcome this CO2 emission problem, there is great interest, esp. in Canada, to capture carbon dioxide and utilize it as a flooding agent for the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) process. ...

Anne-Christine Aycaguer; Miriam Lev-On; Arthur M. Winer

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z