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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

LED lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

Driver Circuit for White LED Lamps with TRIAC Dimming Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamp driver circuit is proposed for retrofitting the conventionally used incandescent lamps with existing TRIAC dimmer. The dimming feature… (more)

Weng, Szu-Jung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The CALiPER program performed a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Each report in the series covers the performance of up to 31 linear LED lamps, which were purchased in late 2012 or 2013. The first report focuses on bare lamp performance of LED T8 replacement lamps and subsequent reports examine performance in various troffers, as well as cost-effectiveness. There is also a concise guidance document that describes the findings of the Series 21 studies and provides practical advice to manufacturers, specifiers, and consumers (Report 21.4: Summary of Linear (T8) LED Lamp Testing , 5 pages, June 2014).

4

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

Miller, Naomi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

LED lamp power management system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

6

LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting...

7

LED lamp color control system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

General Service LED Lamps | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for naturalGeneral Service LED Lamps General

9

Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the "LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps" webcast, held June 20, 2011.

10

A projective LED dental lamp design.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Halogen lamps are mostly applied as a light source to the traditional lamp for medical treatment due to its proper color temperature, but it has… (more)

Chung, Yu-Lin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Laboratory Evaluation of LED T8 Replacement Lamp Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report on a lab setting analysis involving LED lamps intended to directly replace T8 fluorescent lamps (4') showing light output, power, and economic comparisons with other fluorescent options.

Richman, Eric E.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Miller, Naomi J.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

2011-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps CALiPER Benchmark Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting (CALiPER) Program was established in 2006 to investigate the performance of light-emitting diode (LED) based luminaires and replacement lamps. To help users better compare LED products with conventional lighting technologies, CALiPER has also performed benchmark research and testing of traditional (i.e., non-LED) lamps and fixtures. This benchmark report addresses standard 4-foot fluorescent lamps (i.e., T12 and T8) and the 2-foot by 4-foot recessed troffers in which they are commonly used. This report also examines available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps, and their application in fluorescent troffers. The construction and operation of linear fluorescent lamps and troffers are discussed, as well as fluorescent lamp and fixture performance, based on manufacturer data and CALiPER benchmark testing. In addition, the report describes LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, and compares their bare lamp and in situ performance with fluorescent benchmarks on a range of standard lighting measures, including power usage, light output and distribution, efficacy, correlated color temperature, and the color rendering index. Potential performance and application issues indicated by CALiPER testing results are also examined.

Myer, Michael; Paget, Maria L.; Lingard, Robert D.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Application Summary Report 22: LED MR16 Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the independently tested photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps. It describes initial performance based on light output, efficacy, distribution, color quality, electrical characteristics, and form factor, with comparisons to a selection of benchmark halogen MR16s and ENERGY STAR qualification thresholds. Three types of products were targeted. First, CALiPER sought 3000 K lamps with the highest rated lumen output (i.e., at least 500 lm) or a claim of equivalency to a 50 W halogen MR16 or higher. The test results indicate that while the initial performance of LED MR16s has improved across the board, market-available products still do not produce the lumen output and center beam intensity of typical 50 W halogen MR16 lamps. In fact, most of the 18 lamps in this category had lower lumen output and center beam intensity than a typical 35 W halogen MR16 lamp. Second, CALiPER sought lamps with a CRI of 90 or greater. Only four manufacturers were identified with a product in this category. CALiPER testing confirmed the performance of these lamps, which are a good option for applications where high color fidelity is needed. A vast majority of the LED MR16 lamps have a CRI in the low 80s; this is generally acceptable for ambient lighting, but may not always be acceptable for focal lighting. For typical LED packages, there is a fundamental tradeoff between CRI and efficacy, but the lamps in the high-CRI group in this report still offer comparable performance to the rest of the Series 22 products in other performance areas. Finally, CALiPER sought lamps with a narrow distribution, denoted as a beam angle less than 15°. Five such lamps were purchased. Notably, no lamp was identified as having high lumen output (500 lumens or greater), high CRI (90 or greater), a narrow distribution (15° or less), and an efficacy greater than 60 lm/W. This would be an important achievement for LED MR16s especially if output could reach approximately 700 800 lumens, or the approximate equivalent of a 50 W halogen MR16 lamp. Many factors beyond photometric performance should be considered during specification. For example, performance over time, transformer and dimmer compatibility, and total system performance are all critical to a successful installation. Subsequent CALiPER reports will investigate more complex issues.

Royer, Michael P.

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

Miller, Naomi J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency, solid-state lamps based on gallium nitride/silicon carbide light-emitting diodes. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described for a new type of nitride light-emitting diode with the potential for very high efficiency. This work resulted in the demonstration of blue light-emitting diodes in the one watt class that achieved up to 495 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 51% and 45%, respectively. When combined with a phosphor in Cree's 7090 XLamp package, these advanced blue-emitting devices resulted in white light-emitting diodes whose efficacy exceeded 85 lumens per watt. In addition, up to 1040 lumens at greater than 85 lumens per watt was achieved by combining multiple devices to make a compact white lamp module with high optical efficiency.

James Ibbetson

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting This document is a report...

19

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report This...

20

LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR®  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This May 19, 2009 webcast summarized CALiPER's recent benchmark testing of common omnidirectional incandescent lamps (e.g., A-lamps), and provided an update on ENERGY STAR criteria for LED integral...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting: CALiPER Report Series 21  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Video about CALiPER Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting, featuring interviews with Tracy Beeson and Naomi Miller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Beeson, Tracy; Miller, Naomi

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting: CALiPER Report Series 21  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Video about CALiPER Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting, featuring interviews with Tracy Beeson and Naomi Miller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Beeson, Tracy; Miller, Naomi

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR®  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® webcast.

24

Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Following is a text version of a video about CALiPER Application Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting.

25

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode… (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Program at the Smithsonain American Art Museum in Washington, DC. LED Lamp samples were tested in the museum workshop, temporarily installed in a gallery for feedback, and ultimately replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery of modernist art at the American Art Museum and partially replacing lamps in two galleries at the Musesum's Renwick Gallery. This report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of usign LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

Miller, Naomi J.; Rosenfeld, Scott M.

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps LED T8 Replacement Lamps 2014-05-16 Issuance: Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

29

Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lumen depreciation and color shift of 38 different lamps (32 LED, 2 CFL, 1 ceramic metal halide [CMH], 3 halogen) were monitored in a specially developed automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA2) for nearly 14,000 hours. Five samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at a target ambient temperature between 44°C and 45°C.

Royer, Michael P.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting: CALiPER Report Series 21  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about CALiPER Report Series 21 on LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting, featuring interviews with Tracy Beeson and Naomi Miller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

32

Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER Report Series 20 on LED PAR38 Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michael Royer, Lighting Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: The CALiPER program looks at typical LED lamp performance attributes. As we've gone through the progression of reports, we...

33

CALiPER Report 20.3: Robustness of LED PAR38 Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three samples of 40 of the Series 20 PAR38 lamps underwent multi-stress testing, whereby samples were subjected to increasing levels of simultaneous thermal, humidity, electrical, and vibrational stress. The results do not explicitly predict expected lifetime or reliability, but they can be compared with one another, as well as with benchmark conventional products, to assess the relative robustness of the product designs. On average, the 32 LED lamp models tested were substantially more robust than the conventional benchmark lamps. As with other performance attributes, however, there was great variability in the robustness and design maturity of the LED lamps. Several LED lamp samples failed within the first one or two levels of the ten-level stress plan, while all three samples of some lamp models completed all ten levels. One potential area of improvement is design maturity, given that more than 25% of the lamp models demonstrated a difference in failure level for the three samples that was greater than or equal to the maximum for the benchmarks. At the same time, the fact that nearly 75% of the lamp models exhibited better design maturity than the benchmarks is noteworthy, given the relative stage of development for the technology.

Poplawski, Michael E.; Royer, Michael P.; Brown, Charles C.

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Issues, Models and Solutions for Triac Modulated Phase Dimming of LED Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greater than incandescent lamps [1,2]. In fact, recent technological breakthroughs [3-7] in the high of LED lighting: An incandescent source produces 10 ­ 20 lumens/watt, while several manufacturers have? Incandescent bulbs primarily utilize phase modulating dimming through triac switches to control the power sent

Lehman, Brad

36

Efficient Driver for Dimmable White LED Lighting.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A high efficiency driver circuit is proposed for Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps with dimming feature. The current regulation is accomplished by processing partial power… (more)

Yang, Wen-ching

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CALiPER Retail Lamps Study RRL3.2 Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lumen depreciation and color shift of 17 different A lamps (15 LED, 1 CFL, 1 halogen) was monitored in the automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA) for more than 7,500 hours. Ten samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at an ambient temperature of 45°C (-1°C). Importantly, the steady-state test conditions were not optimized for inducing catastrophic failure for any of the lamp technologies—to which thermal cycling is a strong contributor— and are not typical of normal use patterns—which usually include off periods where the lamp cools down. Further, the test conditions differ from those used in standardized long-term test methods (i.e., IES LM-80, IES LM-84), so the results should not be directly compared. On the other hand, the test conditions are similar to those used by ENERGY STAR (when elevated temperature testing is called for). Likewise, the conditions and assumptions used by manufacturers to generated lifetime claims may vary; the CALiPER long-term data is informative, but cannot necessarily be used to discredit manufacturer claims. The test method used for this investigation should be interpreted as one more focused on the long-term effects of elevated temperature operation, at an ambient temperature that is not uncommon in luminaires. On average, the lumen maintenance of the LED lamps monitored in the ALTA was better than benchmark lamps, but there was considerable variation from lamp model to lamp model. While three lamp models had average lumen maintenance above 99% at the end of the study period, two products had average lumen maintenance below 65%, constituting a parametric failure. These two products, along with a third, also exhibited substantial color shift, another form of parametric failure. While none of the LED lamps exhibited catastrophic failure—and all of the benchmarks did—the early degradation of performance is concerning, especially with a new technology trying to build a reputation with consumers. Beyond the observed parametric failures nearly half of the products failed to meet early-life thresholds for lumen maintenance, which were borrowed from ENERGY STAR specifications. That is, the lumen maintenance was sufficiently low at 6,000 hours that seven of the products are unlikely to have lumen maintenance above 70% at their rated lifetime (which was usually 25,000 hours). Given the methods used for this investigation—most notably continuous operation—the results should not be interpreted as indicative of a lamp’s performance in a typical environment. Likewise, these results are not directly relatable to manufacturer lifetime claims. This report is best used to understand the variation in LED product performance, compare the robustness of LED lamps and benchmark conventional lamps, and understand the characteristics of lumen and chromaticity change. A key takeaway is that the long-term performance of LED lamps can vary greatly from model to model (i.e., the technology is not homogenous), although the lamp-to-lamp consistency within a given model is relatively good. Further, operation of LED lamps in an enclosed luminaire (or otherwise in high ambient temperatures), can induce parametric failure of LEDs much earlier than their rated lifetime; manufacturer warnings about such conditions should be followed if performance degradation is unacceptable.

Royer, Michael P.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Tucker, Joseph C.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

CALiPER Report 20.1: Quality of Beam, Shadow, and Color in LED PAR38 Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about CALiPER Report 20.1 which focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality in LED PAR38 lamps.

40

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

Ashworth, Stephen H.

42

Color stable phosphors for LED lamps and methods for preparing them  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED lamp includes a light source configured to emit radiation with a peak intensity at a wavelength between about 250 nm and about 550 nm; and a phosphor composition configured to be radiationally coupled to the light source. The phosphor composition includes particles of a phosphor of formula I, said particles having a coating composition disposed on surfaces thereof; ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.sub.y-)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) I wherein the coating composition comprises a material selected from aluminum oxide, magnesium oxide, calcium oxide, barium oxide, strontium oxide, zinc oxide, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide, barium hydroxide, strontium hydroxide, zinc hydroxide, aluminum phosphate, magnesium phosphate, calcium phosphate, barium phosphate, strontium phosphate, and combinations thereof; and A is Li, NA, K, or Rb, or a combination thereof; M is Ca, Ba, Mg, Zn, or a combination thereof; and 0

Murphy, James Edward; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Camardello, Samuel Joseph

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Vehicle Traffic Control Signal Heads— Light Emitting Diode Circular Signal Supplement (VTCSH-LED). This replaced the so-called Interim LED Purchase Specifications,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineers ’ (ITE) specification for light-emitting diode (LED) circular traffic signals recently was updated (June 27, 2005) and published under the name

S. Behura

46

DOE CALiPER Program, Report 21.2: Linear (T8) LED Lamp Performance in Five Types of Recessed Troffers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although lensed troffers are numerous, there are many other types of optical systems as well. This report looked at the performance of three linear (T8) LED lamps chosen primarily based on their luminous intensity distributions (narrow, medium, and wide beam angles) as well as a benchmark fluorescent lamp in five different troffer types. Also included are the results of a subjective evaluation. Results show that linear (T8) LED lamps can improve luminaire efficiency in K12-lensed and parabolic-louvered troffers, effect little change in volumetric and high-performance diffuse-lensed type luminaires, but reduce efficiency in recessed indirect troffers. These changes can be accompanied by visual appearance and visual comfort consequences, especially when LED lamps with clear lenses and narrow distributions are installed. Linear (T8) LED lamps with diffuse apertures exhibited wider beam angles, performed more similarly to fluorescent lamps, and received better ratings from observers. Guidance is provided on which luminaires are the best candidates for retrofitting with linear (T8) LED lamps.

Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Beeson, Tracy A.

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

CALiPER Report 20.1: Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This December 3, 2013 webinar explored the findings of CALiPER 20.1: Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps and discussed what attributes to...

48

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business use by night market vendors and shopkeepers. OurThreshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LEDthreshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting

Johnstone, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

2014-06-18 Issuance: Test Procedure for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Test Procedures for Integrated Light-Emitting Diode Lamps, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on June 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

51

Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at an Exhibit of 19th Century Photography at the Getty Museum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program may have been prescreened for performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products. This report reviews the installation and use of LED PAR38 lamps to light a collection of toned albument photographic prints at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. Research results provided by the Getty Conservation Institute are incorporated and discussed.

Miller, Naomi J.; Druzik, Jim

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent Lighting at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews a demonstration of light-emitting diode (LED) accent lighting compared to halogen (typical) accent lighting in a gallery of the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Phosphors for LED lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phosphor, a phosphor blend including the phosphor, a phosphor prepared by a process, and a lighting apparatus including the phosphor blend are disclosed. The phosphor has the formula (Ca.sub.1-p-qCe.sub.pK.sub.q).sub.xSc.sub.y(Si.sub.1-rGa.sub.r).sub.zO.su- b.12+.delta. or derived from a process followed using disclosed amounts of reactants. In the formula, (0

Murphy, James Edward; Manepalli, Satya Kishore; Kumar, Prasanth Nammalwar

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE CALiPER Program, Report 20.1 Subjective Evaluation of Beam Quality, Shadow Quality, and Color Quality for LED PAR38 Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on human-evaluated characteristics, including beam quality, shadow quality, and color quality. Using a questionnaire that included rank ordering, opinions on 27 of the Report 20 PAR38 lamps were gathered during a demonstration event for members of the local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) chapter. This was not a rigorous scientific experiment, and the data should not be extrapolated beyond the scope of the demonstration. The results suggest that many of the LED products compared favorably to halogen PAR38 benchmarks in all attributes considered. LED lamps using a single-emitter design were generally preferred for their beam quality and shadow quality, and the IES members ranking of color quality did not always match the rank according to the color rendering index (CRI).

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Miller, Naomi J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Development of substrate-removal-free vertical ultraviolet light-emitting diode (RefV-LED)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vertical ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) that does not require substrate removal is developed. Spontaneous via holes are formed in n-AlN layer epitaxially grown on a high conductive n+Si substrate and the injected current flows directly from the p-electrode to high doped n{sup +} Si substrate through p-AlGaN, multi-quantum wells, n-AlGaN and spontaneous via holes in n-AlN. The spontaneous via holes were formed by controlling feeding-sequence of metal-organic gas sources and NH{sub 3} and growth temperature in MOCVD. The via holes make insulating n-AlN to be conductive. We measured the current-voltage, current-light intensity and emission characteristics of this device. It exhibited a built-in voltage of 3.8 V and emission was stated at 350 nm from quantum wells with successive emission centered at 400?nm. This UV LED can be produced, including formation of n and p electrodes, without any resist process.

Kurose, N., E-mail: kurose@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp; Aoyagi, Y. [The Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [The Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Shibano, K.; Araki, T. [Department of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [Department of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology conducted in 2009 at the recently reconstructed I-35W bridge in Minneapolis, MN. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY Technology Demonstration Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT), Federal Highways Administration (FHWA), and BetaLED™ (a division of Ruud Lighting). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. DOE has implemented a three-year evaluation of the LED luminaires in this installation in order to develop new longitudinal field data on LED performance in a challenging, real-world environment. This document provides information through the initial phase of the I-35W bridge project, up to and including the opening of the bridge to the public and the initial feedback received on the LED lighting installation from bridge users. Initial findings of the evaluation are favorable, with minimum energy savings level of 13% for the LED installation relative to the simulated base case using 250W high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures. The LEDs had an average illuminance level of 0.91 foot candles compared to 1.29 fc for the HPS lamps. The LED luminaires cost $38,000 more than HPS lamps, yielding a lengthy payback period, however the bridge contractor had offered to include the LED luminaires as part of the construction package at no additional cost. One potentially significant benefit of the LEDs in this installation is avoiding rolling lane closures on the heavily-traveled interstate bridge for the purpose of relamping the HPS fixtures. Rolling lane closures involve multiple crew members and various maintenance and safety vehicles, diversion of traffic, as well as related administrative tasks (e.g., approvals, scheduling, etc.). Mn/DOT records show an average cost of relamping fixtures along interstate roadways of between $130-150 per pole. The previous bridge saw a lamp mortality rate of approximately 50% every two years, though the new bridge was designed to minimize many of the vibration issues. A voluntary Web-based feedback survey of nearly 500 self-described bridge users showed strong preference for the LED lighting - positive comments outnumbered negative ones by about five-to-one.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Efficiency of LEDs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency of LEDs The energy efficiency of LEDs has increased substantially since the first general illumination products came to market, with currently available lamps and...

59

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at Intercontinental Hotel in San Francisco, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program have been prescreened and tested to verify their actual performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products.

Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku'Uipo J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Potential Environmental Impacts from the Metals in Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lighting products are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing U.S. federal and California state in lighting products without compromising their performance and useful lifespan. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Energy to increase energy efficiency for general lighting. Therefore, consumers are replacing incandescent light

Short, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Light-Emitting Diodes in the Solid-State Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red and green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) had been produced for several decades before blue emitting diodes, suitable for lighting applications, were widely available. Today, we have the possibility of combining the three fundamental colours to have a bright white light. And therefore, a new form of lighting, the solid-state lighting, has now become a reality. Here we discuss LEDs and some of their applications in displays and lamps.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Jade Sky Technologies Partners with CLTC on LED Replacement Lamp Upgrade Project UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur adoption of cost-effective, easy-to-use LED lighting solutions Milpitas, Calif. ­ October 15, 2013 ­ Jade Sky Technologies (JST), a clean-tech start-up manufacturer of driver ICs for LED lighting applications, announces

California at Davis, University of

65

LED Lamp Project Lights the Way to Flicker-Free Replacement Jade Sky Technologies and UC Davis's California Lighting Technology Center demonstrate the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2014 ­ Jade Sky Technologies ("JST"), a clean-tech start-up manufacturer of LED Technologies and UC Davis's California Lighting Technology Center demonstrate the lighting Specification. JST collaborated with UC Davis's California Lighting Technology Center

California at Davis, University of

66

LED traffic lights: New technology signals major energy savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using light-emitting diode technology to replace incandescent lamps in traffic signals promises energy savings upwards of 60 percent for each of the estimated quarter of a million controlled intersections in the United States. LED units use only 9 to 25 watts instead of the 67 to 150 watts used by each incandescent lamp. Though their first cost is relatively high, energy savings result in paybacks of 1 to 5 years. LED retrofit kits are available for red signal disks and arrows, and installations in several states have proven successful, although minor improvements are addressing concerns about varying light output and controller circuitry. Retrofitting green lamps is not yet feasible, because color standards of the Institute of Traffic Engineers cannot be met with existing LED technology. Yellow lamps have such low duty factors (they`re on only 3 percent of the time) that retrofitting with LED signals is not cost-effective. LEDs last much longer than incandescents, allowing municipalities to not only reduce their electricity bills, but to save on maintenance costs as well. As further incentive, some utilities are beginning to implement rebate programs for LED traffic signal retrofits. Full approval of LED units is still awaited from the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE), the standard-setting body for traffic safety devices. Local and state governments ultimately decide what specifications to require for traffic lights, and the growing body of successful field experience with LEDs appears to be raising their comfort level with the technology. The California Department of Transportation is developing an LED traffic light specification, and two California utilities, Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric, have provided rebates for some pilot installations.

Houghton, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting on Residential and Commercial Streets in Palo Alto, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a GATEWAY demonstration that replaced existing HPS streetlights with two different types of LED products and one induction product. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 44%.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Tam, Christine

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

LED Chips and Packaging for 120 LPW SSL Component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cree has developed a new, high-efficiency, low-cost, light emitting diode (LED) lamp module that should be capable of replacing standard, halogen, fluorescent and metal halide lamps based on the total cost of ownership. White LEDs are produced by combining one or more saturated color LEDs with a phosphor or other light down-converting media to achieve white broad-band illumination. This two year project addressed LED chip and package efficiency improvements to establish a technology platform suitable for low-cost, high-efficiency commercial luminaires. Novel photonic-crystal LEDs were developed to improve the light extraction efficiency of blue GaN-based LEDs compared to the baseline technology. Improved packaging designs that reduced down-conversion and absorption related light losses, led to a higher overall LED efficiency. Specifically, blue LEDs were demonstrated with light output nearing 600 mW and an external quantum efficiency greater than 60 percent (using 1 mm2 chips at an operating current of 350 mA). The results were achieved using a novel, production capable photonic-crystal LED fabrication process. These LEDs formed the basis for a multi-chip white lamp module prototype, which provided 510 lumens light output at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3875 K and an operating current of 350 mA per 1mm2 chip. The overall conversion efficiency at 4100 K improved to ~ 65%. The resulting efficacy is 112 lumens per watt (LPW) â?? a 33% improvement over the start of the project. In addition, a proof-of-concept luminaire was demonstrated that provided a flux of 1700 lumens at a 3842 K CCT.

James Ibbetson

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

LED MR16 Lamps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartmentJuneWhen IAjani Stewartand Usage ofJ.All of

71

LED PAR38 Lamps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartmentJuneWhen IAjani Stewartand Usage ofJ.All ofreports

72

Aperture lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

LED Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article, which will appear in RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING MAGAZINE, interviews PNNL's Kelly Gordon and presents the interview in question and answer format. The topic is a light emitting diode (LED) lighting also known as solid state lighting. Solid state lighting will be a new category in an energy efficient lighting fixture design competition called Lighting for Tomorrow sponsored by the US Department of Energy Emerging Technologies Office, the American Institute for Lighting, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. LED technology has been around since the ’60s, but it has been used mostly for indicator lights on electronics equipment. The big breakthrough was the development in the 1990s of blue LEDs which can be combined with the red and green LEDs that already existed to make white light. LEDs produce 25 to 40 lumens of light per watt of energy used, almost as much as a CFL (50 lumens per watt) and much more efficient than incandescent sources, which are around 15 lumens per watt. They are much longer lived and practical in harsh environments unsuitable for incandescent lighting. They are ready for niche applications now, like under-counter lighting and may be practical for additional applications as technological challenges are worked out and the technology is advancing in leaps and bounds.

Johnson, Mark L.; Gordon, Kelly L.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Highly Efficient Silicon Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap

Leminh Holleman Wallinga; P. Leminh; J. Holleman; H. Wallinga

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

LED Retrofit Project in TSH Basement On July 14 2014, McMaster Facilities Services completed an energy conservation lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

replaced with the new LED (light emitting diode) tubes. LEDs have better lighting quality, lower energy

Haykin, Simon

76

Dual LED/incandescent security fixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual LED and incandescent security lighting system uses a hybrid approach to LED illumination. It combines an ambient LED illuminator with a standard incandescent lamp on a motion control sensor. The LED illuminator will activate with the onset of darkness (daylight control) and typically remain on during the course of the night ("always on"). The LED illumination, typically amber, is sufficient to provide low to moderate level lighting coverage to the wall and ground area adjacent to and under the fixture. The incandescent lamp is integrated with a motion control circuit and sensor. When movement in the field of view is detected (after darkness), the incandescent lamp is switched on, providing an increased level of illumination to the area. Instead of an "always on" LED illuminator, the LEDs may also be switched off when the incandescent lamp is switched on.

Gauna, Kevin Wayne

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Series Input Modular Architecture for Driving Multiple LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, where each cell drives four 700 mA LEDs. Keywords ­ solid-state lighting, light emitting diodes, LED have been achieved over the past decade in solid state light emitting diodes (LEDs), leading to high

78

CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Understanding Drooping Light Emitting Diodes CEEM | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Impact Understanding "droop" may result in cheaper, more efficient LEDs; LEDs are more energy efficient, smaller, and longer-lived than incandescent lamps or fluorescent...

80

Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions of the Philips L Prize entry.

Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

White Light Emitting Diode Development for General Illumination Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a 3-year project aimed at developing the chip and packaging technology necessary to demonstrate efficient, high flux light-emitting diode (LED) arrays using Cree's gallium nitride/silicon carbide (GaN/SiC) LED technology as the starting point. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described that led to high power blue LEDs that achieved 310 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 32.5% and 26.5%, respectively. When combined with phosphor, high power white LEDs with luminous output of 67 lumens and efficacy of 57 lumens per watt were also demonstrated. Advances in packaging technology are described that enabled compact, multi-chip white LED lamp modules with 800-1000 lumens output at efficacies of up to 55 lumens per watt. Lamp modules with junction-to-ambient thermal resistance as low as 1.7 C/watt have also been demonstrated.

James Ibbetson

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Investigation on Operating Characteristics of RGB LEDs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis seeks to gain a better understanding on operating characteristics of the three primary color light emitting diode (LED). By applying direct, pulse and… (more)

Liao, Chi-nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mid-ultraviolet light-emitting diode detects dipicolinic acid.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dipicolinic acid (DPA, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) is a substance uniquely present in bacterial spores such as that from anthrax (B. anthracis). It is known that DPA can be detected by the long-lived fluorescence of its terbium chelate; the best limit of detection (LOD) reported thus far using a large benchtop gated fluorescence instrument using a pulsed Xe lamp is 2 nM. We use a novel AlGaN light-emitting diode (LED) fabricated on a sapphire substrate that has peak emission at 291 nm. Although the overlap of the emission band of this LED with the absorption band of Tb-DPA ({lambda}{sub max} doublet: 273, 279 nm) is not ideal, we demonstrate that a compact detector based on this LED and an off-the-shelf gated photodetection module can provide an LOD of 0.4 nM, thus providing a basis for convenient early warning detectors.

Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Lee, Stephen Roger; Temkin, Henryk (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Dasgupta, Purnendu K. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Li, Qingyang (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Jacketed lamp bulb envelope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Gaithersburg, MD); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Smith, Malcolm (Alexandria, VA); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fluorescent Tube Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

86

Turning on LAMP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

Bostedt, Christoph

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Turning on LAMP  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

Bostedt, Christoph

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Performance of "Ultra-High" Efficient Electronic Ballast for HID Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms--Electronic ballast, HID lamps, resonant inverter, power loss modeling, Silicon Carbide (Si of >95% for the ballast. Diode bridge rectifier EMI filter Resonant Inverter Power Factor Correction 75423, USA Abstract--A new electronic ballast circuit for High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps

Tolbert, Leon M.

89

LOW-COST LED LUMINAIRE FOR GENERAL ILLUMINATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this two-year Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Manufacturing R&D project Cree developed novel light emitting diode (LED) technologies contributing to a cost-optimized, efficient LED troffer luminaire platform emitting at ~3500K correlated color temperature (CCT) at a color rendering index (CRI) of >90. To successfully achieve program goals, Cree used a comprehensive approach to address cost reduction of the various optical, thermal and electrical subsystems in the luminaire without impacting performance. These developments built on Cree’s high- brightness, low-cost LED platforms to design a novel LED component architecture that will enable low-cost troffer luminaire designs with high total system efficacy. The project scope included cost reductions to nearly all major troffer subsystems as well as assembly costs. For example, no thermal management components were included in the troffer, owing to the optimized distribution of compact low- to mid-power LEDs. It is estimated that a significant manufacturing cost savings will result relative to Cree’s conventional troffers at the start of the project. A chief project accomplishment was the successful development of a new compact, high-efficacy LED component geometry with a broad far-field intensity distribution and even color point vs. emission angle. After further optimization and testing for production, the Cree XQ series of LEDs resulted. XQ LEDs are currently utilized in Cree’s AR series troffers, and they are being considered for use in other platforms. The XQ lens geometry influenced the independent development of Cree’s XB-E and XB-G high-voltage LEDs, which also have a broad intensity distribution at high efficacy, and are finding wide implementation in Cree’s omnidirectional A-lamps.

Lowes, Ted

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Photonic crystal light emitting diode.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This master's thesis describe electromagnetic simulations of a gallium antimonide (GaSb) light emitting diode, LED. A problem for such devices is that most of… (more)

Leirset, Erlend

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Magnetic fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

An Brief Overview Of Using LEDs In Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diodes · A Light-Emitting Diode (LED) is a special type of diode that emits photons (light) when current ­ Forward biased Diode Operation 0 V 5 V Current ~0 high (too high)5 V 0 V I anode cathode #12;3 Light-Emitting

Baas, Bevan

95

Energy-efficient incandescent lamp: Final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy Conserving Incandescent Lamps", J . Brett, R.July 1981. "Filaments for Incandescent Lamps with Radiation20-22 "Energy Saving Incandescent Lamps with Infrared

Verderber, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

LED exit signs: Improved technology leads the way to energy savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent innovations in light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs may make LED signs the best choice among the energy efficient options available. In the past, LED signs have offered low power consumption, projected long lamp life, and low maintenance requirements. Now, the best of the LED signs also offer improved optical designs that reduce their already low power consumption while improving visibility and appearance, and even reduce their cost. LED exit signs are gaining market share, and E Source expects this technology to eventually dominate over incandescent, compact fluorescent, and electroluminescent signs. More research is needed, however, to confirm manufacturers` claims of 20-year operating lives for LED signs. Conservative estimates place the number of exit signs in US buildings at about 40 million. Although each sign represents a very small part of a building`s load, exit signs are ready targets for energy efficiency upgrades -- they operate continuously and most use inefficient incandescent sources. With an LED sign, annual energy and maintenance costs can be reduced by more than 90 percent compared to a typical incandescent sign. Low annual costs help to offset the LED sign`s relatively high first cost. More than 25 utilities offer DSM incentives for energy efficient exit signs, and efficient alternatives are becoming more readily available. Recent improvements in optical designs enable many LED signs to visually out perform other sources. In addition to these benefits, LED exit signs have lower life cycle cost than most other options. The biggest barrier to their success, however, is that their first cost has been considerably higher than competing technologies. LED sign prices are falling rapidly, though, because manufacturers are continually improving optical designs of the fixtures to use fewer LEDs and thus even less energy while providing better performance.

Sardinsky, R.; Hawthorne, S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effect of mechanical vibrations on light emitting diode luminaires.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work, a LED and two types of Compact fluorescent lamps were investigated for the intensity variation due to mechanical vibrations in the range… (more)

Paladugu, Jayalakshmi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Series Resonant Inverter with Contactless Transformers for Multiple LED Lamps.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A half-bridge series-resonant inverter adopted to realize the quasi current source and the constant current source with a number of contactless transformers in series for… (more)

Cheng, Shuen-Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Henrik Pedersen and Paul Michael Petersen Risø DTU, Optics and Plasma Research Department, DK-4000

100

LED Performance Specification Series: T8 Replacement Lamps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLEDLights

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

LED T8 Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer SomersKnown Challenges AssociatedLANLLEDT8

102

LED- ja loisteputkivalon vaikutus maitotaloustuotteiden ja perunan laatuun.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tutkielman kirjallisuuskatsauksessa tarkasteltiin valoa, erilaisia valonlähteitä ja niiden ominaisuuksia. Erityisesti keskityttiin LED (Light Emitting Diode) valoon ja sen ominaisuuksiin, koska sen käyttö myös yleisessä valaistuksessa… (more)

Solala, Kari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Lot...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - af led lyskilder Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Birgitte Thestrup... Roskilde, Denmark Abstract Research and development within Light Emitting Diode or LED Source: Ris National Laboratory Collection: Multidisciplinary...

105

TESLA-FEL 2007-03 Application of low cost GaAs LED as neutron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Light Emitting Diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction Keywords: COTS components, Displacement damage, Electron Linear Accelerator, GaAs Light emitting diode (LED) Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diode (LED) for the assessment of integrated neutron fluence

106

Power Quality Improvements in Lighting Systems Mr. Ashish Shrivastava  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from early incandescent lamps to present generation light emitting diodes (LEDs). Incandescent light

Kumar, M. Jagadesh

107

LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

Light emitting diode color rendition properties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper discusses the color rendition capabilities of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and their relationship with the current standard for color rendition quality. The current… (more)

Hood, Sean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |Regulation Services System:Affairs,HowReporting and

110

LED Manufacturing Process Modifications Will Boost Quality and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 The Issue Highly energyefficient LightEmitting Diode (LED) lighting products have made great process that will enable LED manufacturers to produce higher quality, energyefficient products at lower

111

High brightness microwave lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Finalmany end- use applications. Incandescent Outdoor Stationaryof color compared with the incandescent reference source is

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

LED Watch: The Outlook for LEDs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for LEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

117

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Srensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Sørensen Department of Energy Technology and product lifetime. The high power Light Emitting Diodes (LED) belongs to the group of electronics

Berning, Torsten

118

High pressure neon arc lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Health Implications of New Lamp Technology Progress with Lamp Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ ACGIH Threshold Limit Values, UV, lasers, etc. ­ ANSI Z136.1 for lasers with MPEs 0.1 ps -30 ks ­ ANSI RP 27.1 to ANSI RP 27.3 Lamp Safety · Internationally: ­ International Commission on Non

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, LBNL-4998E. General Electric Lamp and BallastEuropean Union General Electric High Intensity DischargeEnergy Saver”; and General Electric has a 26 watt T5 lamp (

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Capacitive sensing with a fluorescent lamp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work presents a modified fluorescent lamp that can be used as a capacitive sensing system. The lamp sensor measures changes in the electric fields emitted from the fluorescent bulbs in order to deduce the presence and ...

Cooley, John Jacob

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Slutrapport for PSO 337-068 Udvikling af LED lyskilder og lamper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and RGB Lamps. The objective of this project was to pave the way for replacement of incandescent LED light source with an efficacy of 51 lm/W and a CRI index of 92 that can replace an incandescent

124

MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous...

125

Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Lighting in Commissary Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers goals of the project and applications for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and fiber optic lighting.

126

Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches Echelle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches Echelle ECH60S5.1 La Serena, December 09, 2009 #12)...............................................................................12 CTIO 60 inches Echelle / Comparison lamps automation, ECH60S5.1 2 #12;Introduction The present document is just a brief summary of the work done automating the 60 inches echelle comparison lamps

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

127

Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches CHIRON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison lamps automation CTIO 60 inches CHIRON CHI60HF5.2 La Serena, March 16, 2011 #12;Table)...............................................................................12 CTIO 60 inches Chiron / Comparison lamps automation, CHI60HF5.2 2 #12;Introduction The present document is just a brief summary of the work done automating the 60 inches chiron comparison lamps

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

128

Researchers Say They've Solved the Mystery of LED Lighting "Droop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sciences Team. Despite being cool, ultra-efficient and long lasting, the light-emitting diode (LED) faces a problem called "efficiency droop." New findings from simulations...

129

White light emitting diode as liquid crystal display backlight ; High brightness light emitting diode as liquid crystal display backlight .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The discovery of high brightness (white) light emitting diode (LED) is considered as a real threat to the current lighting industry in various applications. One… (more)

Soon, Chian Myau

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Atomic flux measurement by diode-laser-based atomic absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic flux measurement by diode-laser-based atomic absorption spectroscopy Weizhi Wang,a) R. H, California 94305 Received 5 May 1999; accepted 6 June 1999 Diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA sensors- quirements, and only the QCM measures the flux. Lamp- based atomic absorption AA sensors have been success

Fejer, Martin M.

131

LED Traffic Light as a Communications Device Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Chi-Ho Chan, Hugh Liu.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:http://www.eee.hku.hk/~gpang Abstract The visible light from an LED (light emitting diode) traffic light can be modulated and encoded on the description of an audio information system made up of high brightness, visible light emitting diodes (LEDs messages 1. Introduction Recently, high intensity light emitting diodes for traffic signals are available

Pang, Grantham

132

Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of light output (in lumen-hours) provided by each lamp type. "Other" includes light-emitting diode (LED) lamps as well as other lamps such as fiber optic lights, induction lamps,...

133

Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal pumping of light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work presented here is a study of thermally enhanced injection in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This effect, which we refer to as "thermal pumping", results from Peltier energy exchange from the lattice to charge ...

Gray, Dodd (Dodd J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

White light emitting diode as liquid crystal display backlight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of high brightness (white) light emitting diode (LED) is considered as a real threat to the current lighting industry in various applications. One of the most promising sectors would be using white LED to ...

Soon, Chian Myau

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An Investigation into the Perception of Color under LED White Composite Spectra with Modulated Color Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitting diodes, LEDs. We examined seven LED white composite spectra with different color rendering of a pilot study that evaluates the perceptual impact of modulation of color rendering using multi-chip light

O'Reilly, Una-May

138

Fabrication of InGaP LEDs on a graded buffer substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: Computer display panels create a vast color palette by combining color from three light emitting diodes (LEDs), each producing red, green, or blue light. The light from these three LEDs is chosen so that the ...

Martínez, Josué F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Have You Used LED Lighting? Tell Us About It. | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

It. May 7, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis This week, John shared his experiences with light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. In a future blog, he'll share more about LED lighting. Have you...

140

Ruofan Wu, Hieu Pham Trung Nguyen and Zetian Mi INTRODUCTION TO LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in-a-Wire Light Emitting Diodes and Prevention Method Nano-electronic Devices and Materials, Electrical Computer., Efficiency droop in nitride-based light-emitting diodes. Physica Status Solidi a-Applications and Materials history. Nature Photonics 2007, 1 (4), 189-192. [4] Holonyak, N., Is the light emitting diode (LED

Barthelat, Francois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coupled optical and electronic simulations of electrically pumped photonic-crystal-based LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate design tradeoffs in electrically pumped photonic crystal light emitting diodes. A finite. Keywords: Photonic crystal light emitting diode, electrically pumped device 1. INTRODUCTION Recently optoelectronic devices, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. It has been suggested that a thin slab

Dutton, Robert W.

142

An LED pulser for measuring photomultiplier linearity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A light-emitting diode (LED) pulser for testing the low-rate response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to scintillator-like pulses has been designed, developed, and implemented. This pulser is intended to simulate 80 ns full width at half maximum photon pulses over the dynamic range of the PMT, in order to precisely determine PMT linearity. This particular design has the advantage that, unlike many LED test rigs, it does not require the use of multiple calibrated LEDs, making it insensitive to LED gain drifts. Instead, a finite-difference measurement is made using two LEDs which need not be calibrated with respect to one another. These measurements give a better than 1% mapping of the response function, allowing for the testing and development of particularly linear PMT bases.

Friend, M; Quinn, B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

A SPICE Compatible Model of High Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the arc's * Corresponding author behavior of HID lamps. This model are derived from the arc-linear resistance of the lamp, is the global specific conductance of the plasma, V is the volume of the plasma, L is the length of plasma and S is the cross section. ~ Vin G1 Lamp Model Ballast v(lamp) i(lamp) Analytical

145

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

146

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer SAFWAN only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed emitting diodes; LEDs; Animal forage; Excitation-emission matrices; EEM. INTRODUCTION Movement of chemical

147

A strategy for the use of light emitting diodes by autonomous underwater vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology has advanced dramatically in a few short years. An expensive and difficult to manufacture LED array containing nearly 100 individual LEDs and measuring at least 5 cm˛ can now be replaced ...

Curran, Joseph R. (Joseph Robinson)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lamp bulb with integral reflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Sumner, Thomas L. (Wheaton, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m2, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

Keith Kahen

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m{sup 2}, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

Kahen, Keith

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

LED ProspectsLED Prospects photometric units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/5/8 #12;16 Light bulb comparisonLight bulb comparison W lumens khours CRI $US Incandescent (long life) 75-life incandescent with LED. · 10 light fixtures/home, lights on for 6h/day, 333 days/yr. · Electricity 0.12 $/kWh. W khours $US Incandescent (long life) 100 10 2 LED (PAR38, warm, dimmable) 11 40 90 · What is the lifetime

Pulfrey, David L.

152

Discharge lamp with reflective jacket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DuraLamp USA: Order (2010-CE-0912)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered DuraLamp USA, Inc. to pay a $2,500 civil penalty after finding DuraLamp USA had failed to certify that model PAR 30, an incandescent reflector lamp, complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

154

COST EFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGY BUTTONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as any 1ong-li incandescent lamp or system evaluated in thisEFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGYEFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGY

Verderber, Rudy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Novel Applications of LEDs for Energy Savings A Systems Level View  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

product (3 production lines @ 24x5) Hg Arc Lamp (300 W/in) 65% of energy in IR UV LED Array (150 WNovel Applications of LEDs for Energy Savings A Systems Level View Santa Barbara Summit on Energy in a Round Lighting Hole? · DC device in an AC Powered World · Cool light source with thermal management

Salama, Khaled

156

General service incandescent lamp with improved efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high efficiency general service incandescent lamp is disclosed. The disclosed improved general service incandescent lamp has an outer and an inner envelope. The inner envelope has a relatively small housing containing a halogen gas and a relatively high pressure efficient fill-gas and in which a low voltage filament is spatially disposed therein.

Berlec, I.

1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Power factor and harmonic distortion characteristics of energy efficient lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the performance of a new class of lamps which are generally classified as the energy-saving lamps. It is shown that, when compared with the incandescent lamps, these lamps indeed consume less real power and have higher relative illumination. However, the energy-saving lamps operate at a low power factor and produce current distortion which are much higher than the distortion produced by the traditional incandescent lamps.

Etezadi-Amoli, M.; Florence, T.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - algainp light-emitting diodes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by sequentially adding components of different types. Six hundred AlGaInP GaAs light- emitting diode segments... of 600 AlGaInP GaAs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) onto device...

160

Multispectral imaging of the ocular fundus using light emitting diode illumination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multispectral imaging of the ocular fundus using light emitting diode illumination N. L. Everdell,1 on light emitting diode LED illumination that produces multispectral optical images of the human ocular

Claridge, Ela

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramicâ?˘ and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumiledsâ?? LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

Decai Sun

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. (General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cost effectiveness of long life incandescent lamps and energy buttons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen hours are determined for each lamp system. It is found that the most important component lighting cost is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial unit cost of $20.00, is the most cost-effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Lamp system for uniform semiconductor wafer heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Compact fluorescent lamp applications in luxury hotels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, consumers, lighting designers, and energy conservationists have paid increasing attention to the special characteristics of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). CFLs can typically be used to replace incandescent lamps of three to four times their own wattage, and their color rendering indices (CRIs)-80 to 85-make them virtually indistinguishable from incandescents. The typical 10,0000-hour life of a CFL often makes savings in labor its most desirable feature when compared to a shorter-lived incandescent lamp.

Gilleskie, R.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

LED Lighting Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Municipal Street Lighting Consortium ? American Public Power Association (APPA) ? Demonstration in Energy Efficiency Development (DEED) ? Source of funding and database of completed LED roadway projects 6 Rules of the Road ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011..., 2011 ? 9 Solar-Assisted LED Case Study LaQuinta Hotel, Cedar Park, Texas ? Utilizes 18 - ActiveLED Solar-Assisted Parking Lot Lights ? Utilizes ?power management? to extend battery life while handling light output ? Reduces load which reduces PV...

Shaw-Meadow, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Pousset, Obein, Razet, LED lighting quality with CQS samples CIE 2010 : Lighting Quality and Energy Efficiency, 14-17 March 2010, Vienna, Austria 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A psychophysical experiment developed to evaluate light quality of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) is described. Keywords: Light Emitting Diode, quality of light, Color Rendering Index, Color Quality Scale, visual

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

168

The Elusive “Life” of LEDs: How TM-21 Contributes to the Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This magazine article discusses the issue of LED 'lifetime' and explains where TM-21 plays as part of the solution to this issue. In August 2011, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) published the TM-21 document entitled 'Lumen degradation lifetime estimation method for LED light sources.' TM-21 is the IES-recommended method for projecting lumen degradation of an LED package, array or module based on data collected according to LM-80. The lighting community expects TM-21 to become the standard method for projecting useful LED lighting product life at realistic operating temperature. This article presents the development process behind TM-21, and clarifies how and when to apply the lifetime extrapolation method to arrive at reasonable and useful estimations. Why TM-21 and why now? We are all familiar with the very real but sometimes exaggerated long-life attributes of LED technology. Not the least of these is the potential for very long life that helps make it an attractive design choice. The trick has been and continues to be how to measure or estimate this longevity to provide assurance to users of this technology's reliability (life) compared to other options. We also understand that the overall reliability of a complete LED lighting fixture can be affected by the reliability of individual product components (driver, lens, etc.) and should be accounted for in lifetime estimations. The useful life of standard lighting technologies is defined as the time to filament or cathode failure. For most of these lamps, the time period prior to failure exhibits acceptable levels of light output, as shown with the solid lines in Fig. 1. This makes it easy to determine when to replace the lamp. However, LEDs do not have filament burn-out that conveniently announces the end of life (dashed line in Fig. 1). Further, the rapid development of the technology and the desire to bring products to market in a timely manner does not allow for actual testing verification of the long lives claimed (100,000 or even 35,000 hours). As a result, the industry has come to accept a definition of the end of the useful life of an LED as the point when it no longer provides a specified level of light output. And finally, the life and performance of LED lighting products depends greatly on excess heat retained at the diode. This is why LEDs require testing at multiple temperatures such that when a source is installed in a luminaire, its actual operating temperature can be measured and lumen depreciation of the product can be derived. Therefore, to serve the solid-state lighting industry, the Technical Procedures Committee (TPC) of the IES proceeded to develop appropriate tests for use in rating LED product longevity. The initial need was a measure of the basic lumen degradation of LED source components identified by a module, package, or array of diodes and this came in the form of LM-80. Importantly, LM-80 only specifies how to measure lumen depreciation to a minimum of 6000 hours (but recommends testing to 10,000 hours or longer). LM-80 stops short of using that data to estimate any depreciation after that, which is where TM-21 comes in. The TM-21 working group (WG) as part of the IES TPC was formed to develop the lumen depreciation projection method and spent over three years exploring many options. The WG evaluated various projection options starting with an analysis of various mathematical, engineering-based models to provide effective depreciation fit and a useful projection method. Next, the WG analyzed LED lumen maintenance behavior using over 40 sets of LM-80-08 test data (20 sets with 10,000 hours or more) collected from four major LED manufacturers. The working group also examined the accuracy of proposed projections using various proposed models and LM-80 data that extended up to 15,000 hours.

Richman, Eric E.

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract--Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract-- Semiconductor nanocrystal convertors integrated on light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The use of nonradiative energy transfer, also known-LEDs for lighting applications. Index Terms-- Förster resonance energy transfer, light emitting diode, nanocrystal

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

170

Integral CFLs performance in table lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on performance variations associated with lamp geometry and distribution in portable table luminaires. If correctly retrofit with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), these high use fixtures produce significant energy savings, but if misused, these products could instead generate consumer dissatisfaction with CFLs. It is the authors assertion that the lumen distribution of the light source within the luminaires plays a critical role in total light output, fixture efficiency and efficacy, and, perhaps most importantly, perceived brightness. The authors studied nearly 30 different integral (screw-based) CFLs available on the market today in search of a lamp, or group of lamps, which work best in portable table luminaires. The findings conclusively indicate that horizontally oriented CFLs outperform all other types of CFLs in nearly every aspect.

Page, E.; Driscoll, D.; Siminovitch, M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The LAndscape Management Policy Simulator (LAMPS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considerations Riparian Management Choices Leave Tree Strategies Transition Probabilities Stochastic EventsThe LAndscape Management Policy Simulator (LAMPS) Pete Bettinger Department of Forest Resources Management intentions Prices and costs GIS databases Land use pattern Land use change Stand structure

172

Wire-shaped semiconductor light-emitting diodes for general-purpose lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The object of this work is to develop and optimize a new type of light-emitting diode (LED) with a wire-shaped, cylindrical geometry.

Mauk, Michael G.

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Shelf life of five meat products displayed under light emitting diode or fluorescent lighting.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Light emitting diode (LED) and fluorescent (FLS) lighting effects on enhanced pork loin chops, beef longissimus dorsi and semimembranosus steaks, ground beef, and ground turkey… (more)

Steele, Kyle Stover

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) TRAFFIC SIGNAL SURVEY RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bernardino County Roseville Sebastopol West Covina San Diego County Ross Shasta Lake West Hollywood San

176

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department1 Prepared1217 Release NotesFinal Report | Department of

177

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing With the Issues of NuclearHighStatement| Department

178

6035 Hg(Ar) Lamp in 6058 Fiber Optic Accessory. Pencil Style Calibration Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to that of the Hg(Ar) Lamp, which is the characteristic mercury line spectrum. Forced air-cooling (i.e. from of the handle for connection to the power supply. Table 1 Usable Wavelengths of Spectral Calibration Lamps (in.2 1079.8 1084.5 1114.3 Power Supplies; AC versus DC We offer different power supplies for different needs

Woodall, Jerry M.

179

Webinar: The L Prize-Winning LED A19 Replacement—What Commercial Building Owners/Operators Can Expect in 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This January 18, 2012 webinar presented an update on the status of LED A19 lamp options for commercial businesses, with an overview of DOE's L Prize competition and the rigorous lab, lifetime, and...

180

Comparison of technologies for new energy-efficient lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy-efficient light bulbs are being developed to replace the incandescent lamp where they can satisfy the design criteria and be used in sockets that have long hours of annual use. The four technologies discussed here include the compact fluorescent lamp, coated-filament lamp, electrodeless fluorescent lamp, and compact high-intensity discharge lamp. The systems demonstrate efficacy improvements of two to four times that of their incandescent counterparts. These new lamps have required considerable advances in lamp technology. They offer the potential for achieving efficacies close to 80 lumens per watt. These new lamps will reduce the energy used annually by incandescent lamps (190 BkWh) by more than 50% in the 1990s, at which times they will be commonly employed.

Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of technologies for new energy-efficient lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy-efficient light bulbs are being developed to replace the incandescent lamp where they can satisfy the design criteria and be used in sockets that have long hours of annual use. The four technologies discussed include the compact fluorescent lamp, coated-filament lamp, electrodeless fluorescent lamp, and compact high-intensity discharge lamp. The systems demonstrate efficacy improvements of two to four times that of their incandescent counterparts. These new lamps have required considerable advances in lamp technology. They offer the potential for achieving efficacies close to 80 lm/W. These new lamps will reduce the energy used annually by incandescent lamps (190 billion kWh) by more than 50 percent in the 1990's, at which times they will be commonly employed.

Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - ave lamp margareete Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1.1 A-lamps... Problems Are you using incandescent A-lamps? Incandescent lamps are one of the most inefficient lighting... sources...

183

The impact of modern headlamps on the design of sag vertical curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the lens. The housing serves as a reflector and lens, and is made of plastic. These lamps may be comprised of different light emitting diode?s (LEDs), high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and halogen lamps. Halogen headlamps are further comprised... on. HID lamps produce more light compared to halogen lamps (22). Also, HID lamps have a sharper horizontal cut-off beam pattern further reducing the portion of lighted highway on sag curves (25). Light emitting diode is another headlamp...

Gogula, Madhuri

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermo-electrically pumped semiconductor light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermo-electric heat exchange in semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs) allows these devices to emit optical power in excess of the electrical power used to drive them, with the remaining power drawn from ambient heat. ...

Santhanam, Parthiban

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Dymond, Jr., Lauren E. (North Potomac, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD); Grimm, William G. (Silver Spring, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Ola, Samuel A. (Silver Spring, MD); Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Digital Architecture for Driving Large LED Arrays with Dynamic Bus Voltage Regulation and Phase Shifted PWM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emitting Diodes (HB-LEDs) with improved system efficiency and reduced EMI. Key advantages are achieved - This paper introduces a digital architecture suitable for driving a large number of High Brightness Light

187

Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

188

Deposition of colloidal quantum dots by microcontact printing for LED display technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis demonstrates a new deposition method of colloidal quantum dots within a quantum dot organic light-emitting diode (QD-LED). A monolayer of quantum dots is microcontact printed as small as 20 ,Lm lines as well ...

Kim, LeeAnn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Psychophysical evaluations of modulated color rendering for energy performance of LED-based architectural lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is focused on the visual perception evaluation of colors within an environment of a highly automated lighting control strategy. Digitally controlled lighting systems equipped with light emitting diodes, LEDs, ...

Thompson, Maria do Rosário

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tomorrow's cities -the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the city council is looking to upgrade its23 streetlights to more energy-efficient LED lights - likely in the area. The pilot project will be integrated with the newly built City Operations Centre, where CCTVTomorrow's cities - the lamp-posts watching every move1 by Jane Wakefield for BBC News2 3 Imagine

South Bohemia, University of

191

Space charge spectroscopy of integrated quantum well infrared photodetectorlight emitting diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space charge spectroscopy of integrated quantum well infrared photodetector±light emitting diode M ± light emitting diode (QWIP-LED). Quasistatic capacitance±voltage (C±V ) characteristics under reverse.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Quantum-well infrared photodetector; Light-emitting diode; Space charge

Perera, A. G. Unil

192

Vertical Pillar-Superlattice Array and Graphene Hybrid Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical Pillar-Superlattice Array and Graphene Hybrid Light Emitting Diodes Jung Min Lee, Jae a class of light emitting diode (LED) with interesting mechanical, optical, and electrical characteristics, light-emitting diodes, 3D architectures, transparent electrodes V ertical arrays of one-dimensional (1D

Rogers, John A.

193

Electrodeless lamp energized by microwave energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an electrodeless lamp. It comprises: a microwave cavity; a source of microwaves in communication with the cavity; a lamp envelope containing a plasma-forming medium mounted within the microwave cavity; a gas manifold for feeding gas to at least one gas passageway for directing a stream of gas to the outer surface of the envelope; a gas leak passageway leading from the gas manifold; a conductive mesh assembly for retaining microwaves within the cavity and permitting light to be emitted from the cavity. The assembly including gas flow blocking means for preventing the flow of gas through the gas leak passageway when the screen is in place in the lamp; and means for shutting off the source of microwaves when the gas pressure in the manifold drops below a predetermined value.

Ervin, R.M.; Perret, J.

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Broadband light-emitting diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Hafich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Broadband light-emitting diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce...

197

DuraLamp USA: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-0912)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that DuraLamp USA, Inc. failed to certify a variety of general service fluorescent lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

198

White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Global LED Manufacturing  

Energy Savers [EERE]

0.20.5W 5630 PPA 0.51.0W 7030 PCT XVGA HDMI UHD 4K2K UHD 8K4K 0.81.2W 3030 EMC 1.22.0W 3535 EMC w Flip-Chip 0.50.8W 2835 PCT ? 1.01.5 W ???? Revolution of LED...

200

LED Lighting Flicker and Potential Health Concerns: IEEE Standard PAR1789 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for mitigating health risks to viewers" has been formed to advise the lighting industry, ANSI/NEMA, IEC, Energy. The effects of flicker can range from decreased visual performance to non-specific malaise to the onset and decisions to be made on development of future LED lamps as the market continues to have explosive growth

Lehman, Brad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

D-Term Series E User Guide Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................... 13 #12;2 Keys and Lamps LED Some of the keys listed below have a built-in Light Emitting Diode (LED

Bordenstein, Seth

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced uv light Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vapour lamp. We propose and demonstrate charge management using a deep UV light emitting diode (LED... sufficient for LISA applications. We have directly observed the LED ......

203

DTerm IP-6 User Guide Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................... 12 #12;2 Keys and Lamps LED Some of the keys listed below have a built-in Light Emitting Diode (LED

Bordenstein, Seth

204

DOE Publishes CALiPER Application Summary Report on LED MR16 Lamps |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at MultipleorderNuclearThisProgram to

205

Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegionalReliabilityRenewable EnergyRenieDepartment

206

DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Department ofTheforThe||

207

DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Department ofTheforThe|||

208

DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on LED T8 Lamps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Department ofTheforThe|||an

209

DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in Recessed Troffers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Department ofTheforThe|||an|

210

DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on LED A Lamps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Departmenta Snapshot Report

211

DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on LED MR16 Lamps | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Departmenta Snapshot

212

Report 20.3: Stress Testing of LED PAR38 Lamps | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashesEnergy by BrianVerizon andReport 20.3:

213

Microcavity enhanced vertical-cavity light-emitting diodes U. Keller, G. R. Jacobovitz-Veselka, J. E. Cunningham, W. Y. Jan, B. Tell,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microcavity enhanced vertical-cavity light-emitting diodes U. Keller, G. R. Jacobovitz-Veselka, J-cavity light-emitting diode (LED) by continuously changing the microcavity resonance with respect for optical interconnects seems to be the light emitting diode (LED), or better yet, the microcavity en

Keller, Ursula

214

Conference 5739, SPIE International Symposium Integrated Optoelectronic Devices, 22-27 Jan 2005, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric Ga in green light emitting diodes is one of the big challenges towards all-solid- state lighting. The prime,3], and commercialization [4,5] of high brightness light emitting diodes LEDs has led to a 1.82 Billion-$/year world market

Wetzel, Christian M.

215

Modeling of highly loaded fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of the positive column of fluorescent lamps under conditions of high current density are of current interest, particularly in view of recent developments in electrodeless lamps. Current models tend to overestimate radiation output, and consequently the maintenance electric field in these discharges. Under highly loaded conditions, mercury-rare gas fluorescent lamps exhibit strong mercury depletion on axis (cataphoresis), and an understanding of resonance radiation transport under these conditions is therefore vital to the development of models with a predictive capability. The authors have explored the effect of radial cataphoresis on resonance radiation trapping for situations in which the radiation transport is dominated by foreign gas broadening, Doppler broadening, or resonance collisional broadening of the spectral line. Several different production rates per unit volume of resonance (excited) atoms have also been studied. It is advantageous in many cases to parameterize the trapped decay rate in terms of the total number of ground state atoms in the positive column independent of their radial distribution. The results of this work have been included in a numerical model of the positive column and the predicted influence on discharge parameters will be presented for cases of interest to highly loaded lamps.

Lister, G.G.; Lawler, J.E.; Curry, J.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Effect of Light Emitting Diode Phototherapy on the Rate of Orthodontic Tooth Movement - A Clinical Study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Increasing the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) can reduce risks such as periodontal disease and caries. This study investigated whether light emitting diode (LED)… (more)

Chung, Sean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps and all other mercury containing labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re

Baker, Chris I.

218

LED Frequently Asked Questions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC Model Development andLED

219

DUAL USE OF LEDS: SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN ITS Grantham Pang, Chi-ho Chan, Hugh Liu, Thomas Kwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over incandescent lights is well-supported. This is due to their high shown that the high brightness LEDs are significantly brighter than the incandescent lights lights with LEDs is a reduction in power consumption [7]. In addition, incandescent traffic signals burn

Pang, Grantham

220

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrodeless lamp using a single magnetron and improved lamp envelope therefor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave generated electrodeless lamp using a single magnetron, and an improved lamp envelope therefor. An elongated lamp envelope containing a plasma forming medium is disposed in a microwave chamber comprised of a reflector and mesh. The reflector includes a pair of coupling slots, each of which is disposed equidistant from the ends of the lamp envelope. A waveguide means is provided which has a wall which is comprised of a portion of the reflector which includes the slots, and has means for introducing microwave energy thereto at an area equidistant from the two slots so that the energy couples equally to the slots. When the frequency of the microwave energy and chamber dimensions are arranged so that a symmetrical standing wave exists in the chamber, a balanced system results wherein after a short start-up period, approximately equal light output is obtained from the respective ends of the lamp envelop. In order to prevent recondensation of the envelope fill during operation at areas of low temperature, and improved envelope is provided in which such areas are severly tapered to cause hotter operation thereat.

Ury, M. G.; Ryan, P. J.; Wood, Ch. H.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

High output lamp with high brightness  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Efficiency enhancement in a light-emitting diode with a two-dimensional surface grating photonic crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency enhancement in a light-emitting diode with a two-dimensional surface grating photonic 21 November 2003 We demonstrate a light-emitting diode exhibiting 1.7­2.7-fold enhancement in light light emitting diode LED , the ef- ficiency is limited to several percents by a low light extrac- tion

Baba, Toshihiko

225

An LED-based Flasher System for VERITAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a flasher system designed for use in monitoring the gains of the photomultiplier tubes used in the VERITAS gamma-ray telescopes. This system uses blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) so it can be operated at much higher rates than a traditional laser-based system. Calibration information can be obtained with better statistical precision with reduced loss of observing time. The LEDs are also much less expensive than a laser. The design features of the new system are presented, along with measurements made with a prototype mounted on one of the VERITAS telescopes.

Hanna, D; McCutcheon, M; Nikkinen, L; 10.1016/j.nima.2009.10.107

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Design and fabrication of high-index-contrast self-assembled texture for light extraction enhancement in LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed a high-index-contrast photonic structure for improving the light extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by a self-assembly approach. In this approach, a two-dimensional grating can be ...

Sheng, Xing

227

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The National Energy Policy Act and lamp replacement options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Policy Act of 1992 involves the creation of energy efficiency standards for a wide range of products including fluorescent and incandescent lamps. Minimum efficacy (lumens per watt) and color rendering index (CRI) standards are mandated for the popular fluorescent lamps: four-foot medium bi-pin, two-foot U-bent, eight-foot slimline and eight-foot high output. Minimum efficacies are mandated for specific incandescent R and PAR reflector lamps. These standards will affect selected colors and designs of fluorescent lamps, the most significant being the standard lamps in the cool white and warm white colors. The incandescent reflector lamps will include the R-30, R-40, PAR-38 lamps above 40 watts, excluding the halogen types. These efficiency and color rendering standards will require end-users and specifiers to select replacement fluorescent lamps from a range of performance characteristics (lumen output, efficacy, CRI and price). The choice of replacement for the R and PAR incandescent lamps will include the halogen designs and compact fluorescent designs. In this paper, replacement options will be analyzed and discussed and the effect of these options on the performance of the lighting system will be explored in detail.

Ryerson, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of color compared with the incandescent reference source isin this report. Standard Incandescent Halogen Low-Pressure:value equivalent to an incandescent filament lamp. Taking

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

LED Record Efficacy and Brightness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp® power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright™ LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

233

Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal7.pdfFlash_2010_-24.pdfOverview Flow Cells forFluorescent Lamp

234

Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending therethrough and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lamp for generating high power ultraviolet radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus is a gas filled ultraviolet generating lamp for use as a liquid purifier. The lamp is powred by high voltage AC, but has no metallic electrodes within or in contact with the gas enclosure which is constructed as two concentric quartz cylinders sealed together at their ends with the gas fill between the cylinders. Cooling liquid is pumped through the volume inside the inner quartz cylinder where an electrically conductive pipe spaced from the inner cylinder is used to supply the cooling liquid and act as the high voltage electrode. The gas enclosure is enclosed within but spaced from a metal housing which is connected to operate as the ground electrode of the circuit and through which the treated fluid flows. Thus, the electrical circuit is from the central pipe, and through the cooling liquid, the gas enclosure, the treated liquid on the outside of the outer quartz cylinder, and to the housing. The high voltage electrode is electrically isolated from the source of cooling liquid by a length of insulated hose which also supplies the cooling liquid.

Morgan, Gary L. (Elkridge, MD); Potter, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

237

Emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless indium halide lamp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrodeless HID lamp excited by microwave has been intensively investigated because of its long life, high efficacy and environmental aspect. This study reports excellent emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless HID lamp containing indium halides. The authors investigate InI and InBr as ingredients, and measure the microwave excited spectra and luminous intensities of lamps which are made from spherical silica glass in 10--40 mm outer diameter and with various amounts of halides. It is well known that such indium halides in the usual metal-halide lamps have strong blue line emission at 410 and 451nm. But, in the authors` microwave excited lamps, continuous spectrum can be observed in addition in the visible region. Increasing input of power of microwave makes this continuous spectrum stronger. Below 1kW microwave input power, the spectrum of InBr lamp almost resembled the CIE standard illuminant D65. As a consequence of the spectrum, they found that the color rendering and the duv of InBr lamp were excellent as high as 95 and smaller than 0.002, respectively, in the region of 400--800W input power. The efficacy higher than 100 lm/W was further achieved at 400W. The authors confirm that the microwave excited indium halides lamps can be applicable to many fields of lighting.

Takeda, M.; Hochi, A.; Horii, S.; Matsuoka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Poly (p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.; Barton, T.J.; Vardeny, Z.V.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acetylene-containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA)-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Poly (p-phenyleneneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA); Swanson, Leland S. (Ames, IA); Lu, Feng (Ames, IA); Ding, Yiwei (Ames, IA); Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Vardeny, Zeev V. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as A1 or A1/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA); Swanson, Leland S. (Ames, IA); Lu, Feng (Ames, IA); Ding, Yiwei (Ames, IA)

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc lamp heal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particularly... sources and mechanical wafer transport; or electrical lamps, either incandescent or arc, with programmed... in lamp FIG. 1. Temperature sensor signal vs time for...

246

Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Tests gauge LED sensors for fuel-dye measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to develop a low cost, robust sensor to allow direct measurement of Solvent Red 164 dye concentration in off-road fuel at refineries and fuel terminals. Optical absorption sensors based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) are rugged, low-cost, have low power consumption, and can be designed to be intrinsically safe.LED-based systems have been used in a variety of chemical detection applications including heavy metals, pH, CO2, and O2. The approach for this work was to develop a sensor that could be mounted on a pipeline sight glass, precluding the need for direct contact of the sensor with the fuel. Below is described the design and testing of three different LED/photodiode sensors utilizing reflectance spectrometry for the measurement of dye concentration.

Ozanich, Richard M.; Lucke, Richard B.; Melville, Angela M.; Wright, Bob W.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vortex diode jet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coupled optical and electronic simulations of electrically pumped photonic-crystal-based light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trade-offs in electrically pumped photonic-crystal-based light-emitting diodes. A finite- toelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes LEDs and lasers. It has been suggested that a thin slabCoupled optical and electronic simulations of electrically pumped photonic-crystal-based light-emitting

Dutton, Robert W.

251

Genetic algorithms used for the optimization of light-emitting diodes and solar thermal collectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic algorithms used for the optimization of light-emitting diodes and solar thermal collectors developed for the optimization of light-emitting diodes (LED) and solar thermal collectors. The surface a light-extraction efficiency of only 3.7%). The solar thermal collector we considered consists

Mayer, Alexandre

252

Room-temperature direct bandgap electroluminesence from Ge-on-Si light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of direct bandgap electroluminescence (EL) from Ge/Si heterojunction light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at room temperature. In-plane biaxial tensile strain is used to ...

Sun, Xiaochen

253

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals as nanoscale emissive probes in light emitting diodes and cell biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis employs colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as nanoscale emissive probes to investigate the physics of light emitting diodes (LEDs), as well as to unveil properties of cells that conventional imaging ...

Huang, Hao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Efficiency loss mechanisms in colloidal quantum-dot light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saturated and tunable emission colors make colloidal quantum-dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) interesting for the next generation of display and lighting technologies. However, there still remain various hurdles to the ...

Shirasaki, Yasuhiro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

C. Wetzel et al MRS Internet J. Nitride Semicond. Res. 10, 2 (2005) 1 Development of High Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips C. Wetzel and T. Detchprohm Future Chips Constellation Abstract The development of high emission power green light emitting diodes chips using GaInN/GaN multi production-scale implementation of this green LED die process. Keywords: nitrides, light emitting diode

Wetzel, Christian M.

256

OWNER'S MANUAL IPS LED MONITOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.lg.com OWNER'S MANUAL IPS LED MONITOR (LED LCD MONITOR) 27EA83 27EA83R Please read the safety different licenses. Visit www.lg.com for more information on the license. VESA, VESA logo, Display Port of the Video Electronics Standards Association. The terms HDMI and HDMI High-Definition Multimedia Interface

Ott, Albrecht

257

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A light-emitting diode (LED) is a solid-state lighting source that switches on instantly, is readilyLED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis light fixtures in existing or new buildings across campus. Scope of Work On August 27, 2012, the six

Johnston, Daniel

258

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ballasts can reduce lighting energy by 20 to 30 percent. * ENERGY STAR light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs can last 25 years without lamp replacement. Compact...

259

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

displays capture a growing share of the market and overall stock efficiency improves as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) displace cold cathode fluorescent lamps as a major...

260

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

replacement of incandescent bulbs with more efficient compact fluorescent lighting and light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. Among electric end-use services in the residential...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Chapter 6, Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

STAR lighting fixtures. More recently, programs are introducing solid-state light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. The future of savings claims from residential lighting programs is...

262

Commercialization and Licensing | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exclusive Patent License for ORNL Graphite Foam Technology January 28, 2010 - Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps are increasingly in demand in industrial and commercial...

263

CX-000110: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

replace existing public lighting using sodium vapor lamp technology with LED (light-emitting diode) technology. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000110.pdf More Documents &...

264

Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging technology, also called "solid state lighting" as it is...

265

Ongoing LED RD Challenges (LED droop still challenge)  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and Nonpolar GaN Semi polar GaN SOLUTION New GaN Crystal Planes * Semipolar planes for blue, green and yellow LEDs A. Romanov et al. : J. Appl. Phys. 100 (2006) 023533. (1122)...

266

CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy- Mixed HumidBingThis documentDOEDOE F Direct

267

Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

None

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard for linear fluorescent lamps Length (mm) Minimum efficacy (lm/W) Efficacy for energy conservation

Lin, Jiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design of Resonant Inverters for Optimal Efficiency over Lamp Life in Electronic Ballast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a typical increase in an HID lamp equivalent resistance RI,, ovet its lifetime of more than 100 controlled resonant inverters to drive HID lamps. Considering the variation of the lamp resistance over its the lamp resistance during its Iifetime and system frequency range limitations. Design constraints have

271

Maintenance Practices for LED Streetlights  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This April 14, 2014 webinar answered important questions about the maintenance and reliability of LED streetlights, and how to take these issues into account when planning and preparing for a...

272

High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and a tuning circuit connected to the input of the amplifier, wherein the tuning circuit is continuously variable and consists of solid state electrical components with no mechanically adjustable devices including a pair of diodes connected to each other at their respective cathodes with a control voltage connected at the junction of the diodes. Another oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and transmission lines connected to the input of the amplifier with an input pad and a perpendicular transmission line extending from the input pad and forming a leg of a resonant "T", and wherein the feedback network is coupled to the leg of the resonant "T".

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 TWh, 10% of which was for incandescent lighting (Fig. 3).The electricity consumed in incandescent lighting can be300 and 400 million incandescent lamps in the country. Let

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optimized Magnetic Components Improve Efficiency of Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xtures (designed for incandescent bulbs) has allowed residential and small commercial electric customers of incandescent lamps and last 10 times longer [1]. High-frequency electronic ballasts are used to power CFLs

278

Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers: The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps that the dimmers were historically designed to control, and how these differences can lead to complications when trying to dim LEDs. Compatibility between a specific LED source and a specific phase-cut dimmer is often unknown and difficult to assess, and ensuring compatibility adds complexity to the design, specification, bidding, and construction observation phases for new buildings and major remodel projects. To maximize project success, this report provides both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects, as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures.

Miller, Naomi J.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury

George, Steven C.

280

Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Richardson, Robert W. (Pelham, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Perceptions of compact fluorescent lamps in the residential market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact fluorescent lamps offer significant energy savings over other forms of residential lighting and last up to 10 times longer than conventional incandescent bulbs. In order to better understand existing barriers to acceptance and future opportunities for growth of compact fluorescent lighting in the residential retrofit sector, a three stage research project was designed and conducted by MACRO Consulting, Inc. Assessment of whether or not the benefits of compact fluorescent lamps are sufficient to overcome price resistance was one of the major purposes of this project. Residential customers were interviewed in focus group sessions to help determine key issues and motivating forces in the lighting/energy saving/cost saving equation. Residential customers in 5 major market areas were contacted by telephone, and data about their awareness, knowledge and use of compact fluorescent lighting were collected. These customers also participated in an attribute rating exercise in which compact fluorescent lamps were compared with fluorescent tubes and incandescent bulbs on a series of product attributes. A price elasticity exercise was also conducted. Teleconferences with retailers of compact fluorescent lamps were conducted in order to explore their knowledge of and attitudes towards compact fluorescent lamps. Customers agree that energy savings and longer life are both positive attributes for residential lighting products, but they are not yet ready to make the switch away from inexpensive, versatile and readily available incandescent bulbs to compact fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent lamps are rated poorly (even by satisfied'' users) on each of seven positive attributes of home lighting. Major barriers to increased use of compact fluorescent lamps include price, convenience, and performance. Prices above $10 are considered outrageous''. Product improvements are needed for appearance, light output and versatility.

Weiner, J.; Campbell, C.J. (Macro Consulting, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Highly Efficient Silicon Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a local strain field that is formed by dislocation loop arrays. The dependence of device electroluminescent properties on the annealing conditions is carefully examined as a high temperature process has profound influence on these dislocations. Increased luminescent intensity at higher device temperature, together with pure diffusion current conduction mechanism evidently shows the influence of the dislocation loops. The electrical properties of the diode are reasonable with low leakage reverse current.

Leminh Holleman Wallinga; P. Leminh; J. Holleman; H. Wallinga

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Heidi Borchers University of New Hampshire, Environmental Ultraviolet (UV) lamps generate ultraviolet light through the vaporization of elemental mercury, by using

285

LED Lightbulbs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLED Lightbulbs LED

286

LED Lighting Facts®  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLED LightbulbsLED

287

Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.; Fischer, Arthur J.

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

Carter, Sue

290

Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

Wetzel, Christian M.

291

Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

Thomas Yuan

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Red phosphors for use in high CRI fluorescent lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel red emitting phosphors for use in fluorescent lamps resulting in superior color rendering index values compared to conventional red phosphors. Also disclosed is a fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer comprising blends of one or more of a blue phosphor, a blue-green phosphor, a green phosphor and a red a phosphor selected from the group consisting of SrY.sub.2 O.sub.4 :Eu.sup.3+, (Y,Gd)Al.sub.3 B.sub.4 O.sub.12 :Eu.sup.3+, and [(Y.sub.1-x-y-m La.sub.y)Gd.sub.x ]BO.sub.3 :Eu.sub.m wherein y<0.50 and m=0.001-0.3. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of the disclosed red phosphors in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over the course of the lamp life.

Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Vankatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Matrix-addressable III-nitride light emitting diode arrays on silicon substrates by flip-chip technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Matrix-addressable light emitting diode (LED) micro-arrays on sapphire substrates have been reported. In the fabrication process, complicated chemical-mechanical polishing after planarization with oxides, or conformal… (more)

Keung, Chi Wing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are ...

Naeser, Margaret A.

295

LED Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange Visitors HistoryHybridInspectorInvestingJobsLED Lighting

296

Microwave generated electrodeless lamp for producing bright output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave generated electrodeless light source for producing a bright output comprising a lamp structure including a microwave chamber and a plasma medium-containing lamp envelope having a maximum dimension which is substantially less than a wavelength disposed therein. To provide the desired radiation output the interior of the chamber is coated with a UV-reflective material and the chamber has an opening for allowing UV radiation to exit, which is covered with a metallic mesh. The chamber is arranged to be near-resonant at a single wavelength, and the lamp envelope has a fill including mercury at an operating pressure of 1-2 atmospheres, while a power density of at least 250-300 (watts/cm/sup 3/) is coupled to the envelope to result in a relatively high deep UV output at a relatively high brightness.

Wood, Ch. H.; Ury, M. G.

1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

297

Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. It isEnergy Information LED Lighting

298

Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical and industrial applications · Thumbnail Image Gallery -- Allows quick search of stored images Marker Function · Auto Hot/Cold spot marker function shows a spot within the area that automatically% of reading Image Storage (1GB micro SD card) 1000 Images 1000 Images 1000 Images Emissivity Table 0.1 to 1

Short, Daniel

299

DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at MultipleorderNuclearThisProgram toCharacteristics of

300

Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an electrodeless arc lamp for forming a ring shaped plasma in a region therein during operation comprising a tube having a raised bottom center section, and an optically transparent outer jacket hermetically sealing the tube to protect the tube from cooling by convection. The raised center section rises centrally to form a ring shaped reservoir below the region in which the rig shaped plasma is formed to minimize wall cooling during operation of the lamp so that there is enhanced excitation near the center of the tube.

Johnson, P.D.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

Johnson, P.D.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Practical features of illumination with high pressure sodium lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of concerns raised about the health effects of high pressure sodium lamps (HPS) are discussed. The notion of a ''natural'' human photic environment based on sunlight is disputed. Humans are better adapted to the ''greenish'' spectral composition of forest light than to direct sunlight. It is ironic that the artificial light source which has received the most disapproval, cool white flourescent lamp, has a spectral composition similar to that of forest light. HPS is also available in a full range of colors. Some successful examples of HPS--from North Division High School, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to museum exhibits at National Geographic in Washington--are listed.

Corth, R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

Johnson, Peter D. (Schenectady, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Practical Primer to LED Technology  

Energy Savers [EERE]

due to die size * As LED efficacy improves, applications will expand Source: Kelly Gordon, PNNL 2011 LED Transformations, LLC 58 Final Thoughts * Think of how the...

305

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

306

Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical,...

307

Study of high frequency & low frequency electronic ballasts for HID lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamp electronic ballasting is receiving increasing attention in the recent years as low wattage HID lighting systems are finding indoor applications. Advantages of high frequency electronic ballast for HID lamps...

Peng, Hua

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

April 2002, L. Henn-Lecordier LAMP general operating procedures 1 Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

written request ­ Receive safety training from DES ­ Lab orientation with the lab manager ­ Equipment training and qualification #12;April 2002, L. Henn-Lecordier LAMP general operating procedures 9 LAMP "10

Rubloff, Gary W.

309

Sandia National Laboratories: white LED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systems Scaled Windwhite LED Brief History of

310

Semiconductor Nanocrystals-Based White Light Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid state lighting, such as white light emitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement could cut the ever-increasing energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in semiconductor nanocrystals-based WLEDs, compare different approaches for generating white light, and discuss the benefits and challenges of the solid state lighting technology.

Dai, Quanqin [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Semiconductor-Nanocrystals-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid-state lighting, such as white lightemitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement can cut the ever-increasing level of energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, the recent progress in semiconductor-nanocrystals-based WLEDs is highlighted, the different approaches for generating white light are compared, and the benefits and challenges of the solid-state lighting technology are discussed.

Dai, Quanqin [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Behavioral SPICE Compatible Model of an Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp Sam Ben-Yaakov*1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the plasma. In the case of the lamp with electrodes, coupling is via wires. In the case of the electrodelessA Behavioral SPICE Compatible Model of an Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp Sam Ben-Yaakov*1 , Moshe, SPICE compatible, model was developed for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp (OSRAM SYLVANIA ICETRON

314

Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps a poly-diagnostic study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ spectroscopie. Subject headings: gas discharges / metal-halide lamps / plasma diagnostics / plasma properties-halide arc lamps . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Scope of ThesisTransport phenomena in metal-halide lamps a poly-diagnostic study Tanya Nimalasuriya #12;Copyright

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

315

Thermal element for maintaining minimum lamp wall temperature in fluorescent fixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, an improvement is disclosed for maintaining a lamp envelope area at a cooler, reduced temperature relative to the enclosed housing ambient. The improvement comprises a thermal element in thermal communication with the housing extending to and springably urging thermal communication with a predetermined area of the lamp envelope surface. 12 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Basics of lava-lamp convection Balzs Gyre1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketed only since the sixties 1 . The most essential ingredients are two immis- cible fluids of densities function, the lava lamp has been used also as visual aid in geoscience courses 2 demonstrat- ing phenomena such as the transformation of energy, force and motion, adiabatic circulations in the atmosphere and oceans, or magma

Jánosi, Imre M.

317

Laser Diode Setup and Operation Eric Lochbrunner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Diode Setup and Operation Eric Lochbrunner Diodes are a very important electrical of current. Laser diodes are complex semiconductors similar to regular diodes that convert an electrical of the diode to create laser activity. Light emitters are a key element in any fiber optic system

La Rosa, Andres H.

318

Organic LEDs for optoelectronic neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I investigate the characteristics of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and assess their suitability for use in the Compact Optoelectronic Integrated Neural (COIN) coprocessor. The COIN coprocessor, a ...

Mars, Risha R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Laser DiodeThe Laser Diode Jason HillJason Hill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Laser Diode Works Edge Emitting Laser Diode Operates similar to a Light Emitting DiodeOperates similar to a Light Emitting Diode Active medium is a semiconductor pActive medium is a semiconductor p--n junctionn Operates similar to a Light Emitting DiodeOperates similar to a Light Emitting Diode Active medium

La Rosa, Andres H.

320

Diamond Schottky barrier diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, to Suat for showing La Dolce vita, to Mash-hud and the right to ask questions, to Marina Antoniou and her future Romanian villa, to Zeeshan and our twin PhD-routes, to Hatice and her heinous Bukowskian nights To Alex and our Internautian nights... ....................... .. . .............. ....... ..... ......... 20 2.4.1 Introduction. . .. . .. . . . . .. . ...... ... . .. . .. . ... ..... . .. . .. . .............. 20 2.4.2 Schottky diodes...... ............ .................................... 20 2.4.3 Field effect transistors...

Brezeanu, Mihai

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

Riuttanen, L., E-mail: lauri.riuttanen@aalto.fi; Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M. [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Zinc Oxide and Nitride Nanowire Based Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of incandescent light bulb, fluorescent lamp, and blue lightof incandescent light bulb, fluorescent lamp, and blue lightincandescent bulb and is on the same order as fluorescent

Lai, Elaine Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Off-grid energy services for the poor: Introducing LED lighting in the Millennium Villages Project in Malawi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) powered by batteries, which are in turn charged by grid electricity or small solar panels, have emerged 2009 Keywords: Solar Lighting Development a b s t r a c t Lanterns that use light-emitting diodes (LEDs as a cost-competitive alternative to kerosene and other fuel-based lighting technologies, offering brighter

Modi, Vijay

325

LASER DIODE TECHNOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS Submitted to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a normal diode and a light emitting diode. I will also define the terms homojunction and heterojunction, and is the main source of light in a light-emitting diode. Under suitable conditions, the electron and the hole

La Rosa, Andres H.

326

Energy-efficient compact screw-in fluorescent lamp. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact fluorescent lamp has been designed and constructed which can replace an incandescent lamp. The lamp is slightly larger than a standard lamp (8 3/4 in. x 3 1/4 in.), but is designed to fit a majority of portable lamp applications. This version, with a core-coil ballast, results in a system efficacy of 54 lumens per watt, with a light output of more than 1800 lumens. This compares favorably with a 100-watt incandescent (17.5 lumens per watt and 1750 lumens light output). The color temperature of 3000/sup 0/K is compatible with an incandescent lamp (2800/sup 0/K). The color rendition index (CRI) is 84. With a solid-state ballast, the efficacy and light output could be increased by 20% (65 l/w, 2200 lumens) and could provide a direct replacement for a three-way, 150-watt incandescent lamp (15 l/w, 2200 lumens).

Morton, E.W.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The electrical and lumen output characteristics of an RF lamp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low pressure rf discharges have been studied for over a century. Their first practical application for lighting was proposed by Tesla in 1891. Since then hundreds of patents have been published attempting to implement rf lighting. However, progress in understanding rf discharge phenomena (mostly driven by plasma processing needs) and dramatic improvement in the performance/cost ratio of rf power sources have recently opened the door for development of rf light sources. Today commercial inductively coupled electrodeless lamps are offered by Matsuhita, Philips and GE. In this work the authors present measurements of the electrical characteristics and lumen output from a 2.65 MHz driven inductively coupled light source. Measurements were made on a spherical lamp of 3.125 inch diameter with a re-entrant cavity that houses a cylindrical ferrite core around which is wrapped the primary coil.

Alexandrovich, B.M.; Godyak, V.A.; Piejak, R.B. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Beverly, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

329

Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LED's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synopsis: Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also influence energy use. As the light sources currently being specified continue to evolve, it is necessary to reevaluate the methods used in calculating light loss factors, as well as carefully consider the consequences of different product performance attributes. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating—as well as the problematic relationship between lifetime and lumen maintenance—determining an appropriate lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) factor for LED products is difficult. As a result, a unique solution has been advocated: when quantity of light is an important design consideration, the IES recommends using an LLD of not greater than 0.70. This method deviates from the typical practice for conventional sources of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output, and can misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products. This paper discusses the complications related to LLD and LEDs, compares the performance of conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to a maximum LLD of 0.70 for LEDs.

Royer, Michael P.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflectors lamps, as issued by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on April 11, 2014.

331

Power Capture (PowCap) Board for Non Intrusive Load Monitoring and Power Line Communication Exploration and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including a) LED lamp, b) incandescent lamp, c) Macbook Pro,W) a LED Lamp 15W b Incandescent Lamp 25W c Macbook 200W dLED lamp (LED) from the incandescent lamp (Lamp) and the Fan

Balakrishnan, Vikram

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance variations. Incandescent and fluorescent lightbetter than the common incandescent lamp. Off-grid lighting

Mills, Evan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three undergraduates participated in this work. Two of the undergraduate students are now in graduate school. The results were widely disseminated – 20 archival journal publications (published, accepted or in preparation) and three conference proceedings resulted. The students presented their work at 11 different national/international conferences (32 oral or poster presentations) and the PI’s delivered 12 invited, keynote or plenary lectures.

McKittrick, Joanna

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

SciTech Connect: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controllerAdditiveBetatronAerogel Deep Bed AdsorptionPost-Top

335

DOE Science Showcase - Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research | OSTI,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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336

Feedback-Controlled LED Photobioreactor for Photophysiological Studies of Cyanobacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A custom photobioreactor (PBR) was designed to enable automatic light adjustments using computerized feedback control. A black anodized aluminum enclosure, constructed to surround the borosilicate reactor vessel, prevents the transmission of ambient light and serves as a mount for arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The high-output LEDs provide narrow-band light of either 630 or 680 nm for preferential excitation of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting pigments, phycobilin or chlorophyll a, respectively. Custom developed software BioLume provides automatic control of optical properties and a computer feedback loop can automatically adjust the incident irradiance as necessary to maintain a fixed transmitted light through the culture, based on user-determined set points. This feedback control serves to compensate for culture dynamics which have optical effects, (e.g., changing cell density, pigment adaptations) and thus can determine the appropriate light conditions for physiological comparisons or to cultivate light-sensitive strains, without prior analyses. The LED PBR may also be controlled as a turbidostat, using a feedback loop to continuously adjust the rate of media-dilution based on the transmitted light measurements, with a fast and precise response. This cultivation system gains further merit as a high-performance analytical device, using non-invasive tools (e.g., dissolved gas sensors, online mass spectrometry) to automate real-time measurements, thus permitting unsupervised experiments to search for optimal growth conditions, to monitor physiological responses to perturbations, as well as to quantitate photophysiological parameters using an in situ light-saturation response routine.

Melnicki, Matthew R.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Stolyar, Sergey; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Emitron: microwave diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microwave power spectral density and its effects on exciting electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of a microwave source generating a spectrally dense power spectrum on the operation of an electrodeless high intensity discharge lamp were measured. Spectrally pure sources operating within ISM bands at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz produce stable capacitively coupled discharges useful for producing flicker-free light for numerous applications. The internal plasma temperature distribution and lamp geometry define acoustic resonance modes within the lamp which can be excited with power sidebands. The operation of lamps with commercially available power sources and custom built generators are discussed. Estimates of the spectral purity required for stable operation are provided.

Butler, S.J.; Goss, H.H.; Lapatovich, W.P. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts.

342

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

EA-1911: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps.

344

Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

LED-Induced Fluorescence System for Tea Classification and Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fluorescence system is developed by using several light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different wavelengths as excitation light sources. The fluorescence detection head consists of multi LED light sources and a multimode fiber for fluorescence collection, where the LEDs and the corresponding filters can be easily chosen to get appropriate excitation wavelengths for different applications. By analyzing fluorescence spectra with the principal component analysis method, the system is utilized in the classification of four types of green tea beverages and two types of black tea beverages. Qualities of the Xihu Longjing tea leaves of different grades, as well as the corresponding liquid tea samples, are studied to further investigate the ability and application of the system in the evaluation of classification/quality of tea and other foods.

Dong, Yongjiang; Mei, Liang; Feng, Chao; Yan, Chunsheng; He, Sailing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Challenges in LED Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about LED lighting technology, where it is headed, and the DOE’s role in its continued R&D.

347

Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Controls Norma Isahakian, City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting San Jose's "Smart" LED Streetlights: Controlled Amy Olay, City of San Jose Adaptive Lighting Controls...

348

Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This November 15, 2011 webcast presented information about the Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires developed by DOE's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. During the webcast...

349

LED Street Lighting Conversion Workshop Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides links to the presentations given at the National League of Cities Mobile Workshop, LED Street Lighting Conversion: Saving Your Community Money, While Improving Public Safety,...

350

Development of ZnO Based Light Emitting Diodes and Laser Diodes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ZnO based homojunction light emitting diode, double heterojunction light emitting diode, embedded heterojunction random laser diode and Fabry-Perot nanowire laser devices were fabricated and characterized.… (more)

Kong, Jieying

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps in India and Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluate the conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for managing the rapidly increasing electrical energy and peak demand in India and Brazil. Using very conservative assumptions, we find that the cost of conserved energy using 16 W CFLs is 4 and 6 times less than the long range marginal cost of electricity for the two countries. The cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 times less than the cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. The analysis is undertaken from the three separate perspectives of the national economies, the consumers, and the utilities. We find that because residential electricity is subsidized, the consumers have little or no incentive to purchase and install the CFLs, unless they too are subsidized. However, the benefits of CFL installation to the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility in almost all cases. As an illustration of a gradual introduction strategy for CFLs, we calculate a scenario where national savings of the order of US $1.2 million per day for India and US $2.5 million per day for Brazil are reached in 10 years by a small and gradual transfer of subsidy from residential electricity to CFLs. We then explore the barriers to immediate large scale introduction of these lamps in the two countries. Specific technical and marketing problems are identified and discussed, which would require solution before such an introduction can be attempted. Lastly, we discuss the range of policy instruments, in addition to a subsidy scheme, that can be used for promoting the diffusion of these lamps in the domestic and commercial sector. 47 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Gadgil, A.; Martino Jannuzzi, G. de (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

White emitting polyfluorene functionalized with azide hybridized on near-UV light emitting diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White emitting polyfluorene functionalized with azide hybridized on near-UV light emitting diode@fen.bilkent.edu.tr Abstract: We develop and demonstrate high-quality white light generation that relies on the use of a single-UV LED platform. The high-quality white emission from the polyfluorene is achieved by using the azide

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

353

Enhanced vbasis laser diode package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

355

Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

Ury, Michael G. (Bethesda, MD); Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Wooten, Robert D. (Rockville, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- SUSPENDED LAMPS ~Pa e 10 11 12 16 18 18 20 29 Type lA- Type 18- Type 1C- Type 1D- Type 1E- Type 1F- Type 1G- Type 1H? The Standard Straight Stemmed Inverted Cup Base Double Pinched Stem Triple Pinched Stem Short Stem No Stem Solid...:1) ? Suspended Lamp without Stem (1:1) - Suspended Lamp with Solid Stem (1:1) of Type Two - Kickbase Standing Lamps (1:1) - Ringbase Standing Lamp (1:1) 37 38 39 40 41 43 44 Illustration LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Cont. ) Pacae 23. Type 3 - Mosque Lamp...

Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Solving the 'Green Gap' in LED Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One long-standing high-priority research area for DOE is to increase the efficiency of deep green LEDs. Although most products today use phosphor conversion (PC) to produce white light from a blue LED, having a good green source could lead to color-mixed white sources that would avoid the losses associated with the PC approach.

358

Light emitting diode package element with internal meniscus for bubble free lens placement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating a light emitting diode (LED) package comprising providing an LED chip and covering at least part of the LED chip with a liquid encapsulant having a radius of curvature. An optical element is provided having a bottom surface with at least a portion having a radius of curvature larger than the liquid encapsulant. The larger radius of curvature portion of the optical element is brought into contact with the liquid encapsulant. The optical element is then moved closer to the LED chip, growing the contact area between said optical element and said liquid encapsulant. The liquid encapsulant is then cured. A light emitting diode comprising a substrate with an LED chip mounted to it. A meniscus ring is on the substrate around the LED chip with the meniscus ring having a meniscus holding feature. An inner encapsulant is provided over the LED chip with the inner encapsulant having a contacting surface on the substrate, with the meniscus holding feature which defines the edge of the contacting surface. An optical element is included having a bottom surface with at least a portion that is concave. The optical element is arranged on the substrate with the concave portion over the LED chip. A contacting encapsulant is included between the inner encapsulant and optical element.

Tarsa, Eric; Yuan, Thomas C.; Becerra, Maryanne; Yadev, Praveen

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

J.-A. FLEMING. 2014 On the characteristic curves and surfaces of incandescence lamps (Courbes caractristiques des lampes incandescence) ; Phil. Mag.,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

80 J.-A. FLEMING. 2014 On the characteristic curves and surfaces of incandescence lamps (Courbes caractéristiques des lampes à incandescence) ; Phil. Mag., 5e série, t. XIX, p. 368; I885. L'auteur étudie les résistance correspondant à la force électromotrice vo à laquelle l'incandescence commence à se produire, et r

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and time-dependent distribution of plasma parameters in the metal-halide arc lamp. A. Khakhaev, L. Luizova, K. Ekimov and A. Soloviev Petrozavodsk State University, Russia The metal-halide arc lamp is an effective light source and its investigation has a long history, but even at present some

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

Lin, Jiang

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Data Collection and Comparison with Forecasted Unit Sales for Five Lamp Types, Notice of Data Availability

365

Amber-green light-emitting diodes using order-disorder Al[subscript x]In[subscript 1?x]P heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate amber-green emission from Al[subscript x]In[subscript 1– x]P light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with luminescence peaked at 566?nm and 600?nm. The LEDs are metamorphically grown on GaAs substrates via a graded ...

Christian, Theresa M.

366

All inorganic colloidal quantum dot LEDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the first colloidal quantum dot light emitting devices (QD-LEDs) with metal oxide charge transport layers. Colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have shown promise as the active material in ...

Wood, Vanessa Claire

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

LED Essentials- Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On October 11, 2007, Kevin Dowling, VP of Innovation for Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, presented a broad introduction to LED technology, and discussed the technology status, advantages...

368

Sandia National Laboratories: warm white LED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

warm white LED Sandia Develops a Synthesis of Quantum Dots that Increases the Quantum Yield to 95.5% On May 23, 2013, in Energy, Energy Efficiency, Materials Science, News, News &...

369

LED Color Stability: 10 Important Questions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This April 15, 2014 webinar examined the causes of color shift, and took a look at existing metrics used to describe color shift/color stability in LED lighting. The lumen maintenance lifetime of...

370

190 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 30, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2002 Gap Closure in a Cold Metal Halide Lamp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lamp has been investigated using a two-dimensional, plasma transport model. Im- ages are presented- charge devices, lighting, plasma applications. METAL halide high-intensity-discharge (HID) lamps op- erate as high-pressure thermal arcs [1]. The cold fills of HID lamps are typically 50­100 torr of a rare

Kushner, Mark

371

LEDS GP Success Story: Fostering Coordinated LEDS Support in Kenya (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) strives to advance climate-resilient, low-emission development through catalyzing collaboration, information exchange, and action on the ground. The Government of Kenya is a key LEDS GP member and offers an inspiring example of how LEDS GP is having an impact globally. The 2012 LEDS Collaboration in Action workshop in London provided an interactive space for members to share experiences on cross-ministerial LEDS leadership and to learn about concrete development impacts of LEDS around the world. Inspired by these stories, the Kenya's Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 (MPND) began to collaborate closely with the Ministry of Environment and Mineral Resources to create strong links between climate change action and development in the country, culminating in the integration of Kenya's National Climate Change Action Plan and the country's Medium Term Development Plan.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

City of Phildelphia: Light emitting diodes for traffic signal displays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project investigated the feasibility of using light emitting diodes (LEDs) for red traffic signals in a demonstration program at 27 signalized intersections in the City of Philadelphia. LED traffic signals have the potential to achieve significant savings over standard incandescent signals in terms of energy usage and costs, signal relamping costs, signal system maintenance costs, tort liability, and environmental impact. Based on successful experience with the demonstration program, the City of Philadelphia is currently developing funding for the conversion of all existing red incandescent traffic signals at approximately 2,700 intersections to LED signals. This program is expected to cost approximately $4.0 million and save about $850,000 annually in energy costs. During late 1993 and early 1994, 212 red LED traffic signals (134 8-inch signals and 78 12-inch signals) were installed at 27 intersections in Philadelphia. The first group of 93 signals were installed at 13 prototypical intersections throughout the City. The remaining group of signals were installed on a contiguous route in West Philadelphia consisting of standard incandescent signals and LED signals interspersed in a random pattern.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Long-term Testing Results for the 2008 Installation of LED Luminaires at the I-35 West Bridge in Minneapolis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the long-term testing results from an extended GATEWAY project that was first reported in “Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, in Minneapolis, MN,” August 2009. That original report presented the results of lighting the newly reconstructed I 35W Bridge using LEDs in place of conventional high-pressure sodium (HPS) roadway luminaires, comparing energy use and illuminance levels with a simulated baseline condition. That installation was an early stage implementation of LED lighting and remains one of the oldest installations in continued operation today. This document provides an update of the LED system’s performance since its installation in September 2008.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Davis, Robert G.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project Performance Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project document on Technical and Aesthetic Performance for Business District LED Lighting.

375

High Efficiency m-plane LEDs on Low Defect Density Bulk GaN Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state lighting is a key technology for reduction of energy consumption in the US and worldwide. In principle, by replacing standard incandescent bulbs and other light sources with sources based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs), ultimate energy efficiency can be achieved. The efficiency of LEDs has improved tremendously over the past two decades, however further progress is required for solid- state lighting to reach its full potential. The ability of an LED at converting electricity to light is quantified by its internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The material of choice for visible LEDs is Gallium Nitride (GaN), which is at the basis of blue-emitting LEDs. A key factor limiting the performance of GaN LEDs is the so-called efficiency droop, whereby the IQE of the LED decreases significantly at high current density. Despite decades of research, efficiency droop remains a major issue. Since high-current operation is necessary for practical lighting applications, reducing droop is a major challenge for the scientific community and the LED industry. Our approach to solving the droop issue is the use of newly available low-defect-density bulk GaN non-polar substrates. In contrast to the standard foreign substrates (sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon) used in the industry, we have employed native bulk GaN substrates with very low defect density, thus ensuring exquisite material quality and high IQE. Whereas all commercial LEDs are grown along the c-plane crystal direction of GaN, we have used m-plane non-polar substrates; these drastically modify the physical properties of the LED and enable a reduction of droop. With this approach, we have demonstrated very high IQE performance and low droop. Our results focused on violet and blue LEDs. For these, we have demonstrated very high peak IQEs and current droops of 6% and 10% respectively (up to a high current density of 200A.cm-2). All these results were obtained under electrical operation. These high IQE and low droop values are in line with the program’s milestones. They demonstrate that bulk non-polar GaN substrates represent a disruptive technology for LED performance. Application of this technology to real-world products is feasible, provided that the cost of GaN substrates is compatible with the market’s requirement.

David, Aurelien

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

Innocenzi, V., E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it; De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliň, F.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced method for increasing the efficiency of white light quantum dot LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Covering a light-emitting diode (LED) with quantum dots (QDs) can produce a broad spectrum of white light. However, current techniques for applying QDs to LEDs suffer from a high density of defects and a non-uniform distribution of QDs, which, respectively, diminish the efficiency and quality of emitted light. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has the unique capability to thermally anneal QD structures at extremely high power densities for very short durations. This process, called pulse thermal processing (PTP), reduces the number of point defects while maintaining the size and shape of the original QD nanostructure. Therefore, the efficiency of the QD wavelength conversion layer is improved without altering the emission spectrum defined by the size distribution of theQD nanoparticles. The current research uses a thermal model to predict annealing temperatures during PTP and demonstrates up to a 300% increase in photoluminescence for QDs on passive substrates.

Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Walker, Steven C [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermal And Mechanical Analysis of High-power Light-emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages. Transient thermal measurements and thermo-mechanical simulation were performed to study the thermal and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient was decreased from 76.1 oC/W to 45.3 oC/W by replacing plastic mould to ceramic mould for LED packages. Higher level of thermo-mechanical stresses in the chip were found for LEDs with ceramic packages despite of less mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion comparing with plastic packages. The results suggest that the thermal performance of LEDs can be improved by using ceramic packages, but the mounting process of the high power LEDs with ceramic packages is critically important and should be in charge of delaminating interface layers in the packages.

J. Hu; L. Yang; M. -W. Shin

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 ?M. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D., E-mail: salthouse@ecs.umass.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J. [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States) [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

ISSUANCE 2015-01-26: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

385

LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc discharge lamp Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Digital Control of a Low-Frequency Square-Wave Summary: of the arc tube, gas pressure, and its composition, and they may vary with the lamp aging. The...

388

Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparison of different light lamps for collecting diptera associated with livestock concentration areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF' DIFFERENT LIGHT LAMPS FOR COLLECTING DIPTERA ASSOCIATED WITH LIVESTOCK CONCENTRATION AREAS A Thesis by CHARLES WAYNE NEEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1971 Major Subject: Entomology COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT LIGHT LAMPS FOR COLLECTING DIPTERA ASSOCIATED WITH LIVESTOCK CONCENTRATION AREAS A Thesis by CHARLES WAYNE NEEB Approved as to style and content by...

Neeb, Charles W

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

MISSION CATHODIQUE A L'INTRIEUR DES LAMPES A INCANDESCENCE ; par M. L. HOULLEVIGUE (1).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

523 �MISSION CATHODIQUE A L'INT�RIEUR DES LAMPES A INCANDESCENCE ; par M. L. HOULLEVIGUE (1). I. Lorsqu'on survolte fortement une lampe à incandescence à filament de charbon, par exemple en mettant sous incandescent. ' , Fic.. 1. Tous ces effets peuvent être attribués, en première analyse, aux électrons émanés du

Boyer, Edmond

391

High-power LEDs based on InGaAsP/InP heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with mesa diameters of 100, 200, and 300 ?m are developed on the basis of InGaAsP/InP heterostructures. The mesas are close in shape to a truncated cone with a generatrix inclination angle of ?45° in the vicinity of the active region of the LED, with a ring etched around the mesa serving as a reflector. The emission spectra and directivity patterns of these LEDs are studied in a wide range of current densities and it is shown that radiative recombination is dominant to a current density of ?5000 A/cm{sup 2}, which makes these structures promising for the development of high-power LEDs. An emission power of ?14 mW is obtained in the continuous-wave mode (I = 0.2 A, ? = 1.1 ?m), and that of 77 mW, in the pulsed mode (I = 2 A, ? = 1.1 ?m), which corresponds to external quantum efficiencies of 6.2 and 3.4%, respectively.

Rakovics, V. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences (Hungary); Imenkov, A. N.; Sherstnev, V. V.; Serebrennikova, O. Yu.; Il’inskaya, N. D.; Yakovlev, Yu. P., E-mail: Yak@iropt1.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For more information on lighting...

393

Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

about 1.50 to light the same space with a compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) or light emitting diode (LED). That's 4.50 in savings each year per bulb. Over their lifetime,...

394

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Megahertz organic/polymer diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Featured is an organic/polymer diode having a first layer composed essentially of one of an organic semiconductor material or a polymeric semiconductor material and a second layer formed on the first layer and being electrically coupled to the first layer such that current flows through the layers in one direction when a voltage is applied in one direction. The second layer is essentially composed of a material whose characteristics and properties are such that when formed on the first layer, the diode is capable of high frequency rectifications on the order of megahertz rectifications such as for example rectifications at one of above 100KHz, 500KhZ, IMHz, or 10 MHz. In further embodiments, the layers are arranged so as to be exposed to atmosphere.

Katz, Howard Edan; Sun, Jia; Pal, Nath Bhola

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

LIFE CYCLE SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT An agent based approach to the potential for rebound resulting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficient lighting options, such as com- pact fluorescent bulbs and light emitting diodes are predicted . Light emitting diode . Lighting . Rebound effect . Residential consumption 1 Introduction Light (US EIA 2011). Light emitting diode (LED) lamps1 represent an evolution in how residential 1 Light

Illinois at Chicago, University of

398

Amorphous silicon as electron transport layer for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the fabrication of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) made from all-inorganic colloidal semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). The diode utilizes a sandwich structure formed by placing CdSe/CdS NCs between two layers of Si and Ag{sub x}O, which act as electron- and hole-transporting materials, respectively. The photoluminescence properties of NCs are rendered less dependent upon surface chemistry and chemical environment by growing a thick CdS shell. It also enhances stability of the NCs during the process of magnetron sputtering for silicon deposition. The resulting LED device exhibits a low turn-on voltage of 2.5 V and the maximum external quantum efficiency of nearly 0.08%.

Song Tao; Shen Xiaojuan; Sun Baoquan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang Fute [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang Xiaohong [Nano-Organic Photoelectronic Laboratory and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronic Functional Materials and Molecular Engineering, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu Xiulin [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

LED Lighting Facts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLED Lightbulbs

400

LED Lighting Forecast | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV HVAC ModelLED

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE Lighting Program Update: LED Validation Activities  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartnersDepartmentforDOE Lighting Program Update LED

402

To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small Nanostructures Half a DNA Strand-Wide Show Promise for Efficient LEDs April 4,...

403

Design and Predictive Control of a Net Zero Energy Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same amount of light as traditional incandescent bulbs with less energy. Incandescent bulbs are inherently inefficient as most of the energy they consume goes towards heat generation. Compact fluorescent (CFL) and light emitting diode (LED) bulbs... as heat [1]. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) were analyzed in comparison with incandescent lamps. To determine the most energy efficient bulb, energy consumption for each type of bulb is needed. To do this, the amount...

Morelli, F.; Abbarno, N.; Boese, E.; Bullock, J.; Carter, B.; Edwards, R.; Lapite, O.; Mann, D.; Mulvihill, C.; Purcell, E.; Stein, M. IV; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Internal efficiency of InGaN light-emitting diodes: Beyond a quasiequilibrium model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a model to better investigate InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) internal efficiency by extending beyond the usual total carrier density rate equation approach. To illustrate its capability, the model is applied to study intrinsic performance differences between violet and green LEDs. The simulations show performance differences, at different current densities and temperatures, arising from variations in spontaneous emission and heat loss rates. By tracking the momentum-resolved carrier populations, these rate changes are, in turn, traced to differences in bandstructure and plasma heating. The latter leads to carrier distributions that deviate from the quasiequilibrium ones at lattice temperature.

Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kneissl, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

(Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC Units: February 11, 2010 (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC...

406

Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient, Lower Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient,...

407

Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind Turbine Performance Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind...

408

Light-emitting diode spherical packages: an equation for the light transmission efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtually all light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are encapsulated with a transparent epoxy or silicone-gel. In this paper we analyze the optical efficiency of spherical encapsulants. We develop a quasi-radiometric equation for the light transmission efficiency, which incorporates some ideas of Monte-Carlo ray tracing into the context of radiometry. The approach includes the extended source nature of the LED chip, and the chip radiance distribution. The equation is an explicit function of the size and the refractive index of the package, and also of several chip parameters such as shape, size, radiance, and location inside the package. To illustrate the use of this equation, we analyze several packaging configurations of practical interest; for example, a hemispherical dome with multiple chips, a flat encapsulation as a special case of the spherical package, and approximate calculations of an encapsulant with a photonic crystal LED or with a photonic quasi crystal LED. These calculations are compared with Monte-Carl...

Moreno, Ivan; Avendano-Alejo, Maximino; 10.1364/AO.49.000012

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

Optical Semiconductor DevicesOptical Semiconductor Devices The Foundations of the Laser Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glowing DiodeThe Glowing Diode ·· ""LuminousLuminous carborundum [siliconcarborundum [silicon carbide

La Rosa, Andres H.

411

A Statistical Method Analyzing LED Lumen Depreciation and Projecting LED Life  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a strong need for a method to represent the potential life of LED products as a critical part of design decisions including cost-effectiveness analysis. The IES LM-80 test method is in place to collect lumen depreciation data but it does not provide for estimation of future long term depreciation. Separate estimation methods are being considered (TM-21) and this paper describes the analysis of a series of LED degradation models and subsequent development of an estimation method. The work involves analysis of a set of engineering models to determine their applicability and define a structure for their use in LED lumen output life based on a lumen output level such as the L70 metric. The analysis has provided valuable information on methods effectively estimating LED life time, and impacts of measurement uncertainties, test duration, interval and other test conditions on selecting degradation models and LED life time projection. A set of guidelines are recommended to estimate LED life from data obtained using the current LM-80 test method.

Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Hathaway, John E.; Richman, Eric E.; Radkov, Emil

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Practical Primer to LED Technology  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionof Energy 5ofA2011 LED Transformations,

413

Decisions that led to Y-12  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data Files 1B&W Y-12 Tymes &Decisions that led

414

Sandia National Laboratories: efficient LED lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NRELdeep-waterbiofuels economicallyefficient LED lighting

415

Recessed LED Downlights | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department ofAdministration| DepartmentRecessed LED

416

Fundamental Studies and Development of III-N Visible LEDs for High-Power Solid-State Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to understand in a fundamental way the impact of strain, defects, polarization, and Stokes loss in relation to unique device structures upon the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and efficiency droop (ED) of III-nitride (III-N) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs capable of highly-reliable, high-current, high-power operation. This knowledge will be the basis for our advanced device epitaxial designs that lead to improved device performance. The primary approach we will employ is to exploit new scientific and engineering knowledge generated through the application of a set of unique advanced growth and characterization tools to develop new concepts in strain-, polarization-, and carrier dynamics-engineered and low-defect materials and device designs having reduced dislocations and improved carrier collection followed by efficient photon generation. We studied the effects of crystalline defect, polarizations, hole transport, electron-spillover, electron blocking layer, underlying layer below the multiplequantum- well active region, and developed high-efficiency and efficiency-droop-mitigated blue LEDs with a new LED epitaxial structures. We believe new LEDs developed in this program will make a breakthrough in the development of high-efficiency high-power visible III-N LEDs from violet to green spectral region.

Dupuis, Russell

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

SciTech Connect: Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen...

418

CALiPER Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prevBuildingBusinessC/OSection I Direct20.4:

419

Text-Alternative Version: LED Essentials- Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages webcast.

420

New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

An In-Situ Photometric and Energy Analysis of a Sulfur LampLighting System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a photometric and energy analysis that was conducted on a new light guide and sulfur lamp system recently installed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal Building. This novel system couples two high lumen output, high efficiency sulfur lamps to a single 73 m (240 ft.) hollow light guide lined with a reflective prismatic film. The system lights a large roadway and plaza area that lies beneath a section of the building. It has been designed to completely replace the grid of 280 mercury vapor lamps formerly used to light the space. This paper details the results of a field study that characterizes the significant energy savings and increased illumination levels that have been achieved. Comparisons to modeled HID lighting scenarios are also included.

Crawford, Doug; Gould, Carl; Packer, Michael; Rubinstein,Francis; Siminovitch, Michael

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Plasma spectroscopic study of an electrodeless HID lamp containing Tl and Zn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the electrodeless HID lamps excited by microwaves have been studied intensively. Tl is well known as a material having strong green emission lines. In this study, Tl spectra excited by microwaves were reported in the cases of Tl only and Tl + Zn. Using the Elenbaas`s method of high pressure Hg lamp, the cause of Tl continuous spectrum was examined. From the ratio of radiative intensities of two lines, an average arc temperature in the bulb was estimated. Then excitation level of the continuous emission spectrum near the 600nm wavelength was calculated from the dependence of the radiative intensities on these arc temperatures.

Takeda, Mamoru; Horii, Shigeru; Hochi, Akira [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lighting using incandescent lights and fluorescent lamps, asenergy used for the incandescent lamp is wasted as infraredsource to replace incandescent and fluorescent lighting [2].

Han, Jinkyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped phosphor particles are used. This spherical morphology will result in better light extraction and so an improvement of efficiency in the overall device. Cabot is a 2.5 billion dollar company that makes specialized materials using propriety spray based technologies. It is a core competency of Cabot's to exploit the spray based technology and resulting material/morphology advantages. Once a business opportunity is clearly identified, Cabot is positioned to increase the scale of the production to meet opportunity's need. Cabot has demonstrated the capability to make spherical morphology micron-sized phosphor powders by spray based routes for PDP and CRT applications, but the value proposition is still unproven for LED applications. Cabot believes that the improvements in phosphor powders yielded by their process will result in a commercial advantage over existing technologies. Through the SSL project, Cabot has produced a number of different compositions in a spherical morphology that may be useful for solid state lights, as well as demonstrated processes that are able to produce particles from 10 nanometers to 3 micrometers. Towards the end of the project we demonstrated that our process produces YAG:Ce powder that has both higher internal quantum efficiency (0.6 compared to 0.45) and external quantum efficiency (0.85 compared to 0.6) than the commercial standard (see section 3.4.4.3). We, however, only produced these highly bright materials in research and development quantities, and were never able to produce high quantum efficiency materials in a reproducible manner at a commercial scale.

Cabot Corporation

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Electrical, optical, and material characterizations of blue InGaN light emitting diodes submitted to reverse-bias stress in water vapor condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate degradation of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) under reverse-bias operations in water vapor and dry air. To examine failure origins, electrical characterizations including current-voltage, breakdown current profiles, optical measurement, and multiple material analyses were performed. Our findings indicate that the diffusion of indium atoms in water vapor can expedite degradation. Investigation of reverse-bias stress can help provide insight into the effects of water vapor on LEDs.

Chen, Hsiang, E-mail: hchen@ncnu.edu.tw; Chu, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Yun-Ti; Chen, Chian-You [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University, No. 1, University Road, Puli, Nantou County 54561, Taiwan (China); Shei, Shih-Chang [Department of Electrical Engineering, National University of Tainan, No.33, Sec. 2, Shulin St., West Central Dist., Tainan City 70005, Taiwan (China)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

A spin light emitting diode incorporating ability of electrical helicity switching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication and optical characteristics of a spin light-emitting-diode (spin-LED) having dual spin-injection electrodes with anti-parallel magnetization configuration are reported. Alternating a current between the two electrodes using a computer-driven current source has led us to the observation of helicity switching of circular polarization at the frequency of 1 kHz. Neither external magnetic fields nor optical delay modulators were used. Sending dc-currents to both electrodes with appropriate ratio has resulted in continuous variation of circular polarization between the two opposite helicity, including the null polarization. These results suggest that the tested spin-LED has the feasibility of a monolithic light source whose circular polarization can be switched or continuously tuned all electrically.

Nishizawa, N., E-mail: nishizawa@isl.titech.ac.jp; Nishibayashi, K.; Munekata, H. [Imaging Science and Engineering Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J3-15 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, PESC-97, 39-45, St. Louis, 1997. A MHz Electronic Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ballast for Automotive-Type HID Lamps Michael Gulko and Sam Ben-Yaakov* Power Electronics Laboratory-Resonance Inverter (CS-PPRI) topology [2] as a ballast for low wattage HID lamps designated as automotive headlights lamp option to replace the conventional 'halogen' type headlights. Unfortunately, application of HID

433

Regenerative braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work develops a method for capturing some of the kinetic energy ordinarily lost during braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers. The system is designed to eliminate: (a) battery changing in popular LED flashers, ...

Collier, Ian M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EECBG Success Story: Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates the Way in Alabama EECBG Success Story: Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates the Way in Alabama September 12, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis...

435

LEDs Go Ivy League: Princeton’s Dillon Gymnasium  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about LED lighting in Dillon Gymnasium, a focal point of sports and recreation at Princeton since 1947. William Evans discusses measurable benefits of LED lighting in the gym and...

436

Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in LED Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Narrator: LEDs have made remarkable progress in the past decade and gained a strong foothold in the US marketplace. In 2012, LED lighting saved an estimated 71 trillion BTUs, equivalent to annual...

437

Issues In the Design and Specification of Class Libraries Gregor Kiczales and John Lamping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Object-oriented programming has been praised for many virtues, of which we believe code reuse that require their sort of functionality, we can reuse the library rather than having to code again from; Gregor@parc.xerox.com, Lamping@parc.xerox.com. c 1992 Association of Computing Machinery. Permission

438

RG: A Case-Study for Aspect-Oriented Programming Anurag Mendhekar, Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be sprinkled throughout the code, resulting in code that tangled the various performance issues along 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. {anurag,gregor,lamping}@parc.xerox.com #12;22 Aspect-cutting issues. In AOP, code relating to cross-cutting issues, called aspects, can be written in a way that need

439

What A Metaobject Protocol Based Compiler Can Do For Lisp Gregor Kiczales, John Lamping, Anurag Mendhekar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mendhekar Xerox PARC Internal Report, December 1993. © Copyright 1993 Xerox Corporation. All rights reserved allows programmers to cleanly, concisely and portably code the following examples, and have them work Hill Rd., Palo Alto, CA 94304; (415)812-4888; Gregor--Lamping@parc.xerox.com. 1 #12;Internal Memo -- c

440

Predicted Pulsed-Power/Flash-Lamp Performance of the NIF Main Amplifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The laser glass for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Main Amplifier system is pumped by a system of 192 pulsed power/flash lamp assemblies. Each of these 192 assemblies consists of a 1.6 MJ (nominal) capacitor bank working with a Pre-Ionization/Lamp Check (PILC) pulser to drive an array of 40 flash lamps. This paper describes the predicted performance of these Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules in concert with flashlamp assemblies in NIF. Each flashlamp assembly consists of 20 parallel sets of lamps in series pairs. The sensitivity of system performance to various design parameters of the PILC pulser and the main capacitor bank is described. Results of circuit models are compared to sub-scale flashlamp tests and to measurements taken in tests of a PCS module driving a flashlamp assembly in the First Article NIF Test Module facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Also included are predictions from a physics-based, semi-empirical amplifier gain code.

Fulkerson, E. Steven; Hammond, Jud; Harjes, Henry C.; Moore, William B.S.; Smith, David L.; Wilson, J. Michael

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method and apparatus for powering an electrodeless lamp with reduced radio frequency interference  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless lamp waveguide structure includes tuned absorbers for spurious RF signals. A lamp waveguide with an integral frequency selective attenuation includes resonant absorbers positioned within the waveguide to absorb spurious out-of-band RF energy. The absorbers have a negligible effect on energy at the selected frequency used to excite plasma in the lamp. In a first embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are affixed to the sidewalls of the waveguide at approximately one quarter wavelength of the spurious signal from an end wall of the waveguide. The positioning of the lossy material optimizes absorption of power from the spurious signal. In a second embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are used in conjunction with band rejection waveguide filter elements. In a third embodiment, one or more microstrip filter elements are tuned to the frequency of the spurious signal and positioned within the waveguide to couple and absorb the spurious signal's energy. All three embodiments absorb negligible energy at the selected frequency and so do not significantly diminish the energy efficiency of the lamp.

Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method and apparatus for powering an electrodeless lamp with reduced radio frequency interference  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrodeless lamp waveguide structure includes tuned absorbers for spurious RF signals. A lamp waveguide with an integral frequency selective attenuation includes resonant absorbers positioned within the waveguide to absorb spurious out-of-band RF energy. The absorbers have a negligible effect on energy at the selected frequency used to excite plasma in the lamp. In a first embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are affixed to the sidewalls of the waveguide at approximately one quarter wavelength of the spurious signal from an end wall of the waveguide. The positioning of the lossy material optimizes absorption of power from the spurious signal. In a second embodiment, one or more thin slabs of lossy magnetic material are used in conjunction with band rejection waveguide filter elements. In a third embodiment, one or more microstrip filter elements are tuned to the frequency of the spurious signal and positioned within the waveguide to couple and absorb the spurious signal's energy. All three embodiments absorb negligible energy at the selected frequency and so do not significantly diminish the energy efficiency of the lamp. 18 figs.

Simpson, J.E.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

443

15 KJ FLASH LAMP, POWER CONDITIONING UNIT DESIGNED FOR SAFTY, RELIABILITY & MANUFACTURABILITY*  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 15kJoule, Flash Lamp Power Conditioning Unit has been successfully designed, developed, and deployed in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Preamplifier Modules (PAM). The primary design philosophy of this power conditioning unit (PCU) is safety, reliability, and manufacturability. Cost reduction over commercially equivalent systems was also achieved through an easily manufactured packaging design optimized to meet NIF requirements. While still maintaining low cost, the PCU design includes a robust control system, fault diagnostic system, and safety features. The pulsed power design includes 6 PFN modules, each including a dual series injection trigger transformer, that drive a total of 12 flash lamp loads. The lamps are individually triggered via a 20kV pulse produced by a 1kV, MCT switched capacitive discharge unit on the primary side of the trigger transformer. The remote control interface includes an embedded controller that captures flash lamp current wave forms and fault status for each shot. The embedded controller provides the flexibility of remotely adjusting both the main drive voltage from 1.6 to 2.5 kV and the trigger voltage from 0 to 20 kV.

James, G; Merritt, B; Dreifuerst, G; Strickland, S

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Demonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sources of consumption. Automated monitoring of the electricity consumption in a house is quite a recent or numbers, but simply alert residents that something relevant to their electricity consumption is chang- ingDemonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses Christophe Gisler1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Photocatalytic reactions in a microwave field using an electrodeless discharge lamp Abstract SHIMADZU 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assist photochemical and photocatalytic reactions for degradation of organic pollutants [1]. As a source. The absorption edge of TiO2 was detected by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Specific surface area was determined from was evaluated by degradation of mono-chloroacetic acid using Hg-EDL. Spectral measurements of prepared lamps

Cirkva, Vladimir

446

The Electrodeless Discharge Lamps Coated with the Titania Thin Film for Photocatalysis in a Microwave Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photochemical and photocatalytic reactions for degradation of organic pollutants. The electrodeless discharge lamp (EDL) generates UV/VIS radiation when placed into the microwave field and is connected to the objective of microwave photochemistry [1]. The degradation of mono-chloroacetic acid (MCAA) by microwave

Cirkva, Vladimir

447

Method for removal of phosgene from boron trichloride. [DOE patent application; mercury arc lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Selective ultraviolet photolysis using an unfiltered mercury arc lamp has been used to substantially reduce the phosgene impurity in a mixture of boron trichloride and phosgene. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the sample before and after irradiation shows that it is possible to highly purify commercially available boron trichloride with this method.

Freund, S.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes which face each other  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance. 17 figs.

Gabor, G.; Orr, T.R.; Greene, C.M.; Crawford, D.G.; Berman, S.M.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Plate Tectonics and Lava Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and geological events?" Answer = heat from radioactive decay · Compare the light bulb in lava to Earth's internal in the lava lamp. · Plot recent earthquakes and volcanic activity on a world map and compare to the location.education.noaa.gov/Ocean_and_Coasts/Ocean_Floor_Features.html USGS Earthquake Hazards - http

450

Correlation of Beam Electron and LED Signal Losses under Irradiation and Long-term Recovery of Lead Tungstate Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals reduces their transparency. The calibration that relates the amount of light detected in such crystals to incident energy of photons or electrons is of paramount importance to maintaining the energy resolution the detection system. We report on tests of lead tungstate crystals, read out by photomultiplier tubes, exposed to irradiation by monoenergetic electron or pion beams. The beam electrons themselves were used to measure the scintillation light output, and a blue light emitting diode (LED) was used to track variations of crystals transparency. We report on the correlation of the LED measurement with radiation damage by the beams and also show that it can accurately monitor the crystals recovery from such damage.

V. A. Batarin; J. Butler; A. M. Davidenko; A. A. Derevschikov; Y. M. Goncharenko; V. N. Grishin; V. A. Kachanov; A. S. Konstantinov; V. I. Kravtsov; Y. Kubota; V. S. Lukanin; Y. A. Matulenko; Y. M. Melnick; A. P. Meschanin; N. E. Mikhalin; N. G. Minaev; V. V. Mochalov; D. A. Morozov; L. V. Nogach; A. V. Ryazantsev; P. A. Semenov; V. K. Semenov; K. E. Shestermanov; L. F. Soloviev; S. Stone; A. V. Uzunian; A. N. Vasiliev; A. E. Yakutin; J. Yarba

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Text-Alternative Version: Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions webcast, held July 20, 2010.

453

Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the LEDs for Interior Office Applications webcast, held March 18, 2010.

454

Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The light-emitting diode (LED) is an fairly new kind of light source found currently in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this technology an ideal replacement for less efficient incandescent light sources, particularly in applications elevator lighting has the potential to achieve 25 percent greater efficiency than current incandescent ILLUMINATION LEVELS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF INCANDESCENT FIXTURES WHILE CUTTING ENERGY USE 45 PERCENT. ELEVATOR

456

Application of vane-type resonator to microwave powered electrodeless HID lamp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cavity resonator has been generally used as microwave applicator for an electrodeless high intensity discharge (HID) lamp. The size of a cavity resonator is determined by the wavelength of a microwave applied. For example, for a microwave of 2.45 GHz, an inner diameter of more than about 76 mm is necessary for obtaining a microwave resonant field, and then the size of a plasma arc capable of maintaining a stable discharge is experimentally limited at about 15 mm and above. Accordingly the microwave powered electrodeless HID lamp device using cavity resonator is inappropriate in applications where a point light source is required. A vane-type resonator is generally known as an anode of a magnetron, which decides the oscillation frequency of the magnetron. The authors used 3-D finite element method simulation for a design of a vane-type resonator with parabolic reflector to obtain a desired resonant frequency. According to the results of the simulation, the sizes of a 4-vanes resonator with the parabolic reflector were decided, and the resonator made of aluminum and copper was prepared. An electrodeless lamp with InBr and Ar gas enclosed in a spherical quartz glass tube having an inner diameter of about 4 mm was also prepared, and was set at center portion of the resonator. The total luminous flux was about 2,150 lm at microwave input of 27 W. Incidentally, the CRI and Tc for this lamp were 93 and 10,200 K, respectively. Thus, it becomes possible to efficiently couple microwave energy with a smaller-sized electrodeless HID lamp than conventional.

Hochi, Akira; Takeda, Mamoru

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Bypass diode for a solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

Rim, Seung Bum (Palo Alto, CA); Kim, Taeseok (San Jose, CA); Smith, David D. (Campbell, CA); Cousins, Peter J. (Menlo Park, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

Revolutionary Method for Increasing the Efficiency of White Light Quantum Dot LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Covering a light-emitting diode (LED) with quantum dots (QDs) can produce a broad spectrum of white light. However, current techniques for applying QDs to LEDs suffer from a high density of defects and a non-uniform distribution of QDs, which respec-tively diminish the efficiency and quality of emitted light. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has the unique capability to thermally anneal QD structures at extremely high power densities for very short durations. This process, called pulse thermal proc-essing (PTP), reduces the number of point defects while main-taining the size and shape of the original QD nanostructure. Therefore, the efficiency of the QD wavelength conversion layer is improved without altering the emission spectrum defined by the size distribution of the quantum dot nanoparticles. The cur-rent research uses a thermal model to predict annealing tempera-tures during PTP and demonstrates up to a 300% increase in pho-toluminescence for QDs on passive substrates

Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Walker, Steven C [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cree Sets New Benchmarks for LED Efficacy and Brightness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cree has successfully created a cool white LED prototype that delivers 107 lm/W at 350mA. This achievement builds on the Cree EZBright® LED chip platform, developed in part with prior funding support from DOE. Cree made the prototype LED under their DOE project focused on developing LED chips incorporating photonic crystal elements for improved light extraction and novel package technology for higher down-conversion efficiency compared to conventional LEDs. Based on a 1 millimeter-square chip, the new prototype LED produces white light with a CCT of 5500K and a CRI of 73. Integration of four of these prototype LEDs can produce luminous flux of more than 450 lumens.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Savings and NOx Emissions Reduction Potential from the 2012 Federal Legislation to Phase Out Incandescent Lamps in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lamps in Texas Description Value Reference Total Housing Units in Texas in 2013: 10,204,056 Real Estate Center, Texas A&M University3, U.S. Census Bureau4 5 Average Lighting Electricity Usage per House: 1,946 kWh/yr NREL Building America Program6... Savings in Texas: 10,424,973 MWh/yr OSD CFL Savings in Texas: 28,562 MWh/day By 2013, it is estimated that total savings of 10,424,973 MWh/yr would be achieved from replacing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) in residential...

Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Soman, Rohit

462

Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D., E-mail: dipankarsaha@iitb.ac.in [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); IITB-Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A. [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)] [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

A low-cost optical sensing device based on paired emitter-detector light emitting diodes. Analytica Chimica Acta 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low power, high sensitivity, very low cost light emitting diode (LED) based device for intensity based light measurements is described. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode, is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in us) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from logic 1(+5 V) to logic 0 (+1.7 V). The entire instrument provides an inherently digital output of light intensity measurements for a few cents. this light intensity dependent discharge process has been applied to measuring concentrations of coloured solutions and a mathematical model developed based on the Beer-Lambert Law.

King-tong Lau; Susan Baldwin; Roderick Shepherd; William J. Yerazunis; Shinichi Izuo; Satoshi Ueyama; Dermont Diamond; Emitter-detector Leds; King-tong Lau; Susan Baldwin; Roderick Shepherd; William J; Shinichi Izuo; Satoshi Ueyama; Dermot Diamond

464

Ultraviolet emission from a multi-layer graphene/MgZnO/ZnO light-emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on ultraviolet emission from a multi-layer graphene (MLG)/MgZnO/ZnO light-emitting diodes (LED). The p-type MLG and MgZnO in the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED are used as transparent hole injection and electron blocking layers, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics of the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED show that current transport is dominated by tunneling processes in the MgZnO barrier layer under forward bias conditions. The holes injected from p-type MLG recombine efficiently with the electrons accumulated in ZnO, and the MLG/MgZnO/ZnO LED shows strong ultraviolet emission from the band edge of ZnO and weak red-orange emission from the deep levels of ZnO.

Kang, Jang-Won; Choi, Yong-Seok; Goo Kang, Chang; Hun Lee, Byoung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byeong-Hyeok [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); Park, Seong-Ju, E-mail: sjpark@gist.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a silicon nanocrystal light-emitting diode by indium tin oxide nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a Si nanocrystal (NC) light-emitting diode (LED) by employing indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs). The formed ITO NWs (diameter?LED were significantly improved, which was attributed to an enhancement in the current spreading property due to densely interconnecting ITO NWs. In addition, light output power and wall-plug efficiency from the Si NC LED were enhanced by 45% and 38%, respectively. This was originated from an enhancement in the escape probability of the photons generated in the Si NCs due to multiple scatterings at the surface of ITO NWs acting as a light waveguide. We show here that the use of the ITO NWs can be very useful for realizing a highly efficient Si NC LED.

Huh, Chul, E-mail: chuh@etri.re.kr; Kim, Bong Kyu; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob [IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chel-Jong [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Treatability study for removal of leachable mercury in crushed fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonserviceable fluorescent lamps removed from radiological control areas at the Oak Ridge Department of Energy facilities have been crushed and are currently managed as mixed waste (hazardous and radiologically contaminated). We present proposed treatment flowsheets and supporting treatability study data for conditioning this solid waste residue so that it can qualify for disposal in a sanitary landfill. Mercury in spent fluorescent lamps occurs primarily as condensate on high-surface-area phosphor material. It can be solubilized with excess oxidants (e.g., hypochlorite solution) and stabilized by complexation with halide ions. Soluble mercury in dechlorinated saline solution is effectively removed by cementation with zero-valent iron in the form of steel wool. In packed column dynamic flow testing, soluble mercury was reduced to mercury metal and insoluble calomel, loading > 1.2 g of mercury per grain of steel wool before an appreciable breakthrough of soluble mercury in the effluent.

Bostick, W.D.; Beck, D.E.; Bowser, K.T. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The City of Los Angeles LED Streetlight Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about the Los Angeles LED streetlight program, featuring an interview with City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting Director, Ed Ebrahimian.

468

ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communications 865.576.6448 ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene membrane Researchers created nanopores in graphene (red, and enlarged in the circle...

469

Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document describes the presentation slides for the "Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know" webinar that took place on September 11, 2014.

470

Deputy Secretary Poneman Announces Team led by Oak Ridge National...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Deputy Secretary Poneman Announces Team led by Oak Ridge National Lab Selected to Receive up to 122 Million for Nuclear Energy Innovation Hub Deputy Secretary Poneman Announces...

471

Article Published on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of a comprehensive lifetime rating - as well as the problematic relationship between SSL lifetime and lumen maintenance - determining an appropriate LLD factor for LED products...

472

LEDs Go Ivy League: Princeton University and DOE GATEWAY Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View the video about LED lighting at Princeton University, which has dramatically reduced energy costs in a number of installations around campus. William Evans, electrical engineer, describes the...

473

2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

474

High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO Anodes Grown on Plastic by Room,* Mark E. Madsen, Antonio DiVenere, and Seng-Tiong Ho Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated

Ho, Seng-Tiong

475

Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Germicidal ultraviolet (UVGI) lamps have a long history of use for inactivating microbial aerosols. Most reports have focused on the control of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), in the occupied spaces of medical facilities. Ventilation duct use of UVGI has been increasing. In-duct applications are generally more concerned with controlling environmental organisms than with controlling infections agents. This document reports the results of a project to investigate the ability of UVGI lamps to inactivate representative environmental microbial aerosols in ventilation ducts. During this research, UVGI lamps were experimentally demonstrated to inactivate bioaerosols composed of vegetative bacteria, bacteria spores, or fungal spores to a reproducible degree under conditions of fixed dose. Vegetative bacteria were most susceptible to UVGI, with bacteria and fungal spores being substantially more resistant. The performance equation commonly cited in the literature for UVGI inactivation was found to generally apply, provided its parameters were known. Revision of final report DOE/OR22674/610-40030-01. Revised table 5 on page 33.

Douglas VanOsdell; Karin Foarde

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Creating markets for new products to replace incandescent lamps: The international experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the summer of 1995, several organizations have been in pursuit of what many consider the Holy Grail of lighting technology--a low-cost, drop-in, energy-efficient replacement for the incandescent lamp. This paper summarizes the international experience in attempting to catalyze the commercialization of a mass-market, replacement product that could have major impact on residential lighting energy consumption in US and EU homes. The technology procurement effort was originally spearheaded by US Federal Government through a loose collaboration between the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The DoD agreed to serve as the anchor buyer for a low-cost, drop-in replacement product for standard-sized light bulbs that provide at least 30 percent energy savings compared to traditional incandescent lamps. In parallel to the US effort, the International Energy Agency launched a co-operative technology procurement effort by assembling large buyers' groups in Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to pull a similar efficient lighting product into the European market. The lukewarm response from lamp manufacturers to these two technology procurement efforts illustrates the challenges of transforming residential lighting from incandescent to efficient lighting.

Rubinstein, F.; Borg, N.; Horowitz, N.; Narel, T.; Morehouse, E.T. Jr.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Deterministic polarization chaos from a laser diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifty years after the invention of the laser diode and fourty years after the report of the butterfly effect - i.e. the unpredictability of deterministic chaos, it is said that a laser diode behaves like a damped nonlinear oscillator. Hence no chaos can be generated unless with additional forcing or parameter modulation. Here we report the first counter-example of a free-running laser diode generating chaos. The underlying physics is a nonlinear coupling between two elliptically polarized modes in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. We identify chaos in experimental time-series and show theoretically the bifurcations leading to single- and double-scroll attractors with characteristics similar to Lorenz chaos. The reported polarization chaos resembles at first sight a noise-driven mode hopping but shows opposite statistical properties. Our findings open up new research areas that combine the high speed performances of microcavity lasers with controllable and integrated sources of optical chaos.

Martin Virte; Krassimir Panajotov; Hugo Thienpont; Marc Sciamanna

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

A New Rb Lamp Exciter Circuit for Rb atomic clocks and Studies on Transition from Ring to Red mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we describe the development of novel RF exciter circuit for electrode less Rb lamp. The lamp exciter circuit is a RF oscillator with a a new configuration operating at 60 to 65 MHz frequency with 3 to 4 watt power. The Rb lamp is used in exciting the ground state hyperfine transitions in Rb atom in a glass cell placed inside a tuned microwave cavity, As the frequency of these hyperfine transitions is very stable it is used in the development of Rb atomic clock by phase locking the oven controlled crystal oscillator (OCXO) to this atomic transition frequency. The details of the Rb lamp exciter are presented in the paper.The Lamp is ideally operated in ring mode as in this mode the linewidth is narrow and there is no self reversal. However, high temperature and RF excitation power may drive the Rb lamp to red mode which gives rise to line broadening and self reversal. It is the experience that mode change from ring to red deteriorates the atomic signal strength and S/N. In this paper the reasons of mode change are also discussed.

Savita Singh; Bikash Ghosal; G M Saxena

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

479

Impending U.S. lighting standards will boost market for halogen-infrared lamps: New product line expanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the incandescent floodlights and spotlights manufactured today will not meet lighting efficiency standards taking effect in the US in 1995. As these models cease production, demand will grow for higher efficiency units to fill this huge market, which now totals about 100 million lamps per year. One prime contender is a new class of halogen lamps that use a spectrally selective coating to reflect heat back onto the filament, reducing the amount of electricity needed to generate light. GE Lighting`s Halogen-IR line is the only series of such lamps currently available to replace the conventional floodlights and spotlights that will be banned by the new standards. Other manufacturers may adopt the technology, however, and the Japanese producer Ushio already sells in the US a line of smaller halogen lamps with a similar heat-reflective coating. In terms of efficacy and lifetime, Halogen-IR lamps out perform standard incandescents and standard halogens, but fall far short of fluorescent, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium sources. These other lighting systems are more appropriate and cost-effective than incandescents for many ambient lighting applications. For accent lighting and other tasks that are best suited to incandescent lighting, however, the Halogen-IR lamp is often a superior choice.

Sardinsky, R.; Shepard, M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diode led lamps" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

Floreano, Dario

482

Synthesis and optical properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots for white light-emitting diode application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Stable CdSe QDs were synthesized by the one-step and two-level process respectively. ? The fabricated white LEDs show good white balance. ? CdSe QDs present well green to yellow band luminescence. ? CdSe QDs displayed a broad excitation band. - Abstract: Yellow light-emitting cadmium selenide quantum dots were synthesized using one-step and two-step methods in an aqueous medium. The structural luminescent properties of these quantum dots were investigated. The obtained cadmium selenide quantum dots displayed a broad excitation band suitable for blue or near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode applications. White light-emitting diodes were fabricated by coating the cadmium selenide samples onto a 460 nm-emitting indium gallium nitrite chip. Both samples exhibited good white balance. Under a 20 mA working current, the white light-emitting diode fabricated via the one-step and two-step methods showed Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage coordinates at (0.27, 0.23) and (0.27, 0.33), respectively, and a color rendering index equal to 41 and 37, respectively. The one-step approach was simpler, greener, and more effective than the two-step approach. The one-step approach can be enhanced by combining cadmium selenide quantum dots with proper phosphors.

Xu, Xianmei; Wang, Yilin; Gule, Teri; Luo, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China); Zhou, Liya, E-mail: zhouliyatf@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China); Gong, Fuzhong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 53000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

First Assemblies Using Deep Trench Termination Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First Assemblies Using Deep Trench Termination Diodes F. Baccar, L. Théolier, S. Azzopardi, F. Le Trench Termination (DT2 ), are analyzed in a reliability purpose. For the first time, assemblies are made. As a consequence, to improve the breakdown voltage, it is necessary to create an adequate edge termination

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

484

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Entangled Light Emission From a Diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrically-driven entangled photon generation is demonstrated for the first time using a single semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a light emitting diode structure. The entanglement fidelity is shown to be of sufficient quality for applications such as quantum key distribution.

Stevenson, R. M.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Salter, C. L. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Nicoll, C. A.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

486

The photocatalysis of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} under the irradiation of blue LED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ·OH trap and hole sink were involved to investigate the active radicals. • Holes play a more important role in the degradation of RhB. • The ·OH were related to the decomposition of phenol. • The ·O{sub 2}-played a leading role in the photodegradation of phenol. • Blue LED is competitive and promising alternative for the future application. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been reported as a promising photocatalyst in wastewater treatment. The active radicals generated over the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} during the photocatalytic process were thought to be hydroxyl radical (·OH) but have not been proved. Herein, Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} with nanoplate like morphology was synthesized and its photocatalytic performances in the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol as colored and colorless model pollutants respectively were evaluated under the irradiation of blue light emitting diode (LED). The tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as a ·OH trap and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a hole sink were involved to investigate the main active groups that are generated on Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and function during the photodegradation of RhB and phenol. In addition, it is a competitive and promising alternative plan to use blue LED as light source for the future practical application in environmental remediation.

Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Songmei

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Pierce-diode approximation to the single-emitter plasma diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of modeling fast processes in the collisionless single-emitter plasma diode (Knudsen diode with surface ionization, KDSI) by means of the Pierce-diode is studied. The KDSI is of practical importance in that it is an almost exact model of thermionic energy converters (TICs) in the collisionless regime and can also be used to model low-density Q-machines. At high temperatures, the Knudsen TIC comes close to the efficiency of the Carnot cycle and hence is the most promising converter of thermal to electric energy. TICs can be applied as component parts in high-temperature electronics. It is shown that normalizations must be chosen appropriately in order to compare the plasma characteristics of the two models: the KDSI and the Pierce-diode. A linear eigenmode theory of the KDSI is developed. For both nonlinear time-independent states and linear eigenmodes without electron reflection, excellent agreement is found between the analytical potential distributions for the Pierce-diode and the corresponding numerical ones for the KDSI. For the states with electron reflection, the agreement is satisfactory in a qualitative sense. A full classification of states of both diodes for the regimes with and without electron reflection is presented. The effect of the thermal spread in electron velocities on the potential distributions and the ({epsilon},{eta}) diagrams is analyzed. Generally speaking, the methodology developed is usefully applicable to a variety of systems in which the electrons have beam-like distributions.

Ender, A. Ya.; Kuhn, S.; Kuznetsov, V. I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg.sup.196 enrichment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg.sup.196 isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg[sup 196] enrichment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg[sup 196] isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

Grossman, M.W.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500?nm, depth of 50?nm, and a periodicity of 1??m were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Liu, Jianping [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China); Asadirad, Mojtaba [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Kwon, Min-Ki [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Das, Suman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

492

Interplay between multiple scattering, emission, and absorption of light in the phosphor of a white light-emitting diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study light transport in phosphor plates of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We measure the broadband diffuse transmission through phosphor plates of varying YAG:Ce$^{3+}$ density. We distinguish the spectral ranges where absorption, scattering, and re-emission dominate. Using diffusion theory, we derive the transport and absorption mean free paths from first principles. We find that both transport and absorption mean free paths are on the order of the plate thickness. This means that phosphors in commercial LEDs operate well within an intriguing albedo range around 0.7. We discuss how salient parameters that can be derived from first principles control the optical properties of a white LED.

Leung, V Y F; Tukker, T W; Mosk, A P; IJzerman, W L; Vos, W L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Differential spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors with a light-emitting-diode-based integrating sphere source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an experimental realization of differential spectral responsivity measurement by using a light-emitting diode (LED)-based integrating sphere source. The spectral irradiance responsivity is measured by a Lambertian-like radiation field with a diameter of 40mm at the peak wavelengths of the 35 selectable LEDs covering a range from 280 to 1550nm. The systematic errors and uncertainties due to lock-in detection, spatial irradiance distribution, and reflection from the test detector are experimentally corrected or considered. In addition, we implemented a numerical procedure to correct the error due to the broad spectral bandwidth of the LEDs. The overall uncertainty of the DSR measurement is evaluated to be 2.2% (k=2) for Si detectors. To demonstrate its application, we present the measurement results of two Si photovoltaic detectors at different bias irradiance levels up to 120mW/cm{sup 2}.

Zaid, Ghufron; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

494

EECBG Success Story: Small Nebraska Town Welcomes LEDs and Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nebraska Town Welcomes LEDs and Energy Savings EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs EECBG Success Story: Out with the Old, In with the New:...

495

Implementing and Sustaining Operator Led Energy Efficiency Improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to significantly reduce energy consumption, the site must focus on a strategic approach which involves developing, implementing and sustaining a client specific program of energy optimization. We discuss ways of sustaining energy performance through operator led...

Hoyle, A.; Knight, N.; Rutkowski, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

LED Traffic Lights Get Buy American Stamp | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Traffic Lights Get Buy American Stamp November 30, 2010 - 10:19am Addthis Red. Yellow. Green. What LED traffic signals don't say: Made in USA. That is changing. Dialight...

497

WEBINAR: LED LIGHTING IN A PERFORMING ARTS BUILDING  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Can LEDs render skin tones and makeup accurately in a dressing room? Can they provide the vertical footcandles in a studio to make dancers' bodies visible, or deliver acting studio lighting to...

498

Advances in Chip Technology, Packaging Enable White LED Breakthroughs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Significant advances in chip technology have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with record efficacies as high as 74 lumens per watt - on par with...

499

Have You Used LED Light Strings? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

read about LED holiday light strings, which can use 90% less energy than regular incandescent light strings. You may even be able to save on the initial costs with rebates from...

500

Better than CFL? Dimmable LED Downlights in Hospitality Facilities Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LEDs represent less than 1% of the installed base of U.S. downlights, which in 2012 numbered about 700 million. In hospitality facilities, past efforts to reduce lighting energy use have mainly...