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1

Cellulase Accessibility of Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The dilute-acid pretreatment reduces xylan content in corn stover. This reduction in xylan content appears to render the substrate less recalcitrant. Below {approx}8%, xylan content is no longer the dominant factor in biomass recalcitrance. (2) Decreasing xylan content of corn stover also created more binding sites for Cel7A, but no strong correlation with actual xylan content. (3) We found no correlation between bound Cel7A concentration and lignin content. Maybe lignin is blocking the way for Cel7A? The contribution of lignin to biomass recalcitrance requires further investigation.

Jeoh, T.; Johnson, D. K.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Changes in lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lignocellulosic lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass Marcus Foston, Art J. Ragauskas* BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 23 March 2009 Received in revised form 17 July 2010 Accepted 23 July 2010 Available online xxx Keywords: Dilute acid pretreatment Cellulose Supramolecular structure Populus Switchgrass a b s t r a c t Dilute acid pretreatment (DAP) is commonly employed prior to enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose to increase overall sugar and subsequent ethanol yields from downstream bioconversion processes. Typically optimization of pretreatment is evaluated by deter- mining hemicellulose removal, subsequent reactivity towards

3

High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Impacts of Deacetylation Prior to Dilute Acid Pretreatment on the Bioethanol Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: (1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and (2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results: In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions: Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield.

Chen, X.; Shekiro, J.; Franden, M. A.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D. K.; Zhang, M.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M. P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant poten- tial as a feedstock for conversion to liquid fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel (Kadam to be limited. However, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment has proven to be a very effective in recov- ering most of these pretreatments to corn stover include dilute-sulfuric acid in a high-solids percola- tion reactor (Zhu et al

California at Riverside, University of

9

Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion of Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover D. Humbird, R. Davis, L. Tao, C. Kinchin, D. Hsu, and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Schoen, J. Lukas, B. Olthof, M. Worley, D. Sexton, and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Seattle, Washington and Atlanta, Georgia Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-47764 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

12

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

13

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils�¢���� physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cost and Energy Savings Using an Optimal Design of Reverse Osmosis Membrane Pretreatment for Dilute Bioethanol Purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost and Energy Savings Using an Optimal Design of Reverse Osmosis Membrane Pretreatment for Dilute Bioethanol Purification ... All equipment costs and sizing are modeled using the correlations from Seider et al.(52) while the RO membrane cost is from Baker and Lokhandwala. ...

Pakkapol Kanchanalai; Ryan P. Lively; Matthew J. Realff; Yoshiaki Kawajiri

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT: In dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, lignin has been shown formed by hydrothermal pretreatment of a mixture of Avicel cellulose and poplar wood showed that lignin

California at Riverside, University of

18

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of biological conversion of lingnocellulosic-dervied sugars. The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, using dilute-acid pretreatement, enzymatic saccharification, and bioconversion. Ancillary areas--feed handling, hydrolysate conditioning, product recovery and upgrading (hydrotreating) to a final blendstock material, wastewater treatment, lignin combusion, and utilities--are also included in the design.

19

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes one potential conversion process to hydrocarbon products by way of biological conversion of lingnocellulosic-dervied sugars. The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, using dilute-acid pretreatement, enzymatic saccharification, and bioconversion. Ancillary areas--feed handling, hydrolysate conditioning, product recovery and upgrading (hydrotreating) to a final blendstock material, wastewater treatment, lignin combusion, and utilities--are also included in the design.

Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Tan, E. C. D.; Biddy, M. J.; Beckham, G. T.; Scarlata, C.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.; Ross, J.; Lukas, J.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Production of levulinic acid from glucosamine by dilute-acid catalyzed hydrothermal process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Glucosamine is a basic unit of the chitin/chitosan structure, which is derived from crustacean (e.g. crab, shrimp) and insect shells. In this study, the production of levulinic acid (LA) from glucosamine via dilute-acid-catalyzed hydrothermal hydrolysis was investigated. Among the reaction conditions, reaction temperature, reaction time, and substrate concentration were more effective than catalyst concentration. The optimal conditions for LA production, as determined by the response-surface methodology (RSM), were as follows: 188 °C reaction temperature, 4 wt% catalyst concentration, 49 min reaction time, 120 g/L substrate concentration. Under these conditions, the LA yield was 30.3 g/L (25.3 wt%), while the 5-HMF concentration was zero. These results might provide basic knowledge essential to the production of valuable chemicals derivable from renewable marine resources and utilizable as fuel additives and polymer building blocks.

Gwi-Taek Jeong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lignocellulosic biomass, in Enzymatic Conversion of Biomassfor biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass toand expensive steps in conversion of biomass into fuels, and

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Stagewise Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Distillers’ Grains and Corn Fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distillers’ grains and corn fiber are the coproducts of the corn dry grind and wet milling industries, respectively. Availability of distillers’ grains and corn fiber at the ethanol plant and their ... three-stag...

Hossein Noureddini; Jongwon Byun; Ta-Jen Yu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 Figure 2.4 Structure and composition of lignin (Adler,References Adler E. 1977. Lignin chemistry - past, presentRalph J, Baucher M. 2003. Lignin biosynthesis. Annual Review

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Klass DL. 1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, andNational Renewable Energy Laboratory.2003, Biomass feedstockKlass DL. 1998. Biomass for Renewable Energy, Fuels and

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 37: 43-52. Saha B.production. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 48:Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 37: 43-52. Saulnier L,

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Recycling Stillage on Conversion of Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreated Corn Stover to Ethanol (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A description of methods and results from an experiment designed to assess the impact of process water recycle on corn stover-to-ethanol conversion process performance.

Mohagheghi, A.; Schell, D. J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. 2007. Ethanol for a sustainable energy future. ScienceA. 2006. Ethanol can contribute to energy and environmentalof ethanol is captured when growing new energy crops to

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide emission. Ethanol converted from celluloses andin cellulose and hemicellulose and ferment them to ethanol,cellulose fiber into glucose by enzyme and ferment the xylose and glucose to ethanol

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat and electricity used by conversion process or exported to the grid.heat and power to the production facility with excess left to export to the power grid.

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

Oji, L.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVEHIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned.

Ketusky, E

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

Optimization of nano TiO2 pretreatment on free acid dyeing of wool using central composite design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of the research is to investigate nano technique of wool acid dyeing without the presence of acid auxiliary agent at temperatures lower than the boiling. The wool fabrics are first pretreated with nano TiO2 and BTCA at different concentrations. The dyeing process is then carried out on the pretreated fabrics with C. I. Acid Blue 113 and C. I. Acid Black 3 dyes. Also, the central composite design analysis is applied to design the relation between nano TiO2 and BTCA concentrations, and dye exhaustion. The response surface methodology is also applied to find the optimum conditions for the wool fabric pretreatment. The scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are employed to indicate the presence, crystal type and size of TiO2 nanoparticles on the wool surface. The pretreatment optimization on the wool surfaces considerably enhances the absorption of acid dyes. The suggested method demonstrates the improvement of fastness properties than control dyeing and could be introduced as a new route, disclosing various desirable multi-functional characteristics, to wool fabric. This technique is also free from some of the disadvantages of acid chemical involved in dyeing such as damage to wool fabrics than wool conventional dyeing.

Ali Nazari; Mohammad Mirjalili; Navid Nasirizadeh; Shahab Torabian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Evaluation of pretreatment methods for lignocellulosic ethanol production from energy cane variety L 79-1002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Approximately half of the 80 billion tons of crop produced annually around the world remains as residue that could serve as a renewable resource to produce valuable products such as ethanol and butanol. Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising renewable alternative to diminishing oil and gas liquid fuels. Sugarcane is an important industry in Louisiana. The recently released variety of “energy cane” has great potential to sustain a competitive sugarcane industry. It has been demonstrated that fuel-grade ethanol can be produced from post harvest sugarcane residue in the past, but optimized ethanol production was not achieved. Optimization of the fermentation process requires efficient pretreatment to release cellulose and hemicellulose from lignocellulosic complex of plant fiber. Determining optimal pretreatment techniques for fermentation is essential for the success of lignocellulosic ethanol production process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three pretreatment methods for the energy cane variety L 79-1002 for maximum lignocellulosic ethanol production. The pretreatments include alkaline pretreatment, dilute acid hydrolysis, and solid-state fungal pretreatment process using brown rot and white rot fungi. Pretreated biomass was enzymatically saccharified and subjected to fermentation using a recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5. The results revealed that all pretreatment processes produced ethanol. However, the best result was observed in dilute acid hydrolysis followed by alkaline pretreatment and solid-state fungal pretreatment.

V. Sri Harjati Suhardi; Bijeta Prasai; David Samaha; Raj Boopathy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reversion and dehydration reactions of glucose during the dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inaccessibility of all glycosidic bonds necessitates industrial conversion schemes which employ a dilute acid catalyst at high temperatures. Process conditions also promote further reactions of glucose via the reversion and dehydration pathways. Quantitative determination of the yields of the major reversion and dehydration products is important for understanding and predicting the amounts of these materials expected under envisioned industrial operating conditions. Microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) was hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid (0.0-1.25 wt.%), at high temperatures (160-250/sup 0/C), and at a 3:1 liquid-to-solid ratio. The hydrolysis was monitored by evaluating the amount of cellulose remaining and the yields of glucose, solid humin, levulinic acid, formic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and reversion products as a function of the aforementioned reaction conditions. Analysis of the reversion products required the development of a technique for the quantitation of trace carbohydrates in complex mixtures and led to the development of a reduction/permethylation gas chromatographic procedure. Cellulose hydrolysis followed pseudo-homogeneous first-order kinetics. Glucose yield was adequately described as consecutive first-order reactions. Anhydrosugars formed via reversion followed equilibrium reaction kinetics whereas the disaccharides did not. Total reversion product yields approached 10% at 250/sup 0/C. Quantitative determination of the major dehydration products provided important information concerning the destruction of glucose. HMF was produced in up to 12% yields based on the theoretical amount of glucose available, and furfural was detected in up to 5% yields. A carbon mass balance based on the determined product yields revealed that approximately 90% of all carbon was accounted for at maximum glucose yields.

Helm, R.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from Corn Stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from mass, xylan, and lignin and increases cellulose digestibility compared to batch operations at otherwise in corn stover at 180 °C. A flow rate of 10 mL/min in a 3.8-mL reactor enhanced xylan removal by about 25

California at Riverside, University of

37

Comparison of energy potentials from combined ethanol and methane production using steam-pretreated corn stover impregnated with acetic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Acetic acid was investigated as a catalyst in steam pretreatment of corn stover. The purpose was to study ethanol production using either baker's yeast or a genetically modified pentose-fermenting version of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KE6-12. Biogas production was investigated as an alternative for utilization of xylose. The high levels of acetic acid was found to be toxic using KE6-12. Some pentose fermentation was achieved, but the ethanol end concentration was almost the same as using baker's yeast (28 g L?1 compared to 27 g L?1). Using xylose for biogas production resulted in a high total energy recovery. The highest total energy recovery in the products, i.e. ethanol, methane and solids, obtained was 88% compared with the energy in ingoing raw material. This result was achieved when the solids and the liquid was separated after pretreatment.

Pia-Maria Bondesson; Mats Galbe; Guido Zacchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Improved volatile fatty acid and biomethane production from lipid removed microalgal residue (LR?AR) through pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Renewable energy from lipid removed microalgal residues (LR?ARs) serves as a promising tool for sustainable development of the microalgal biodiesel industry. Hence, in this study, LR?AR from Ettlia sp. was characterized for its physico-biochemical parameters, and applied to various pretreatment to increase the biodegradability and used in batch experiments for the production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and biomethane. After various pretreatments, the soluble organic matters were increased at a maximum of 82% in total organic matters in alkali-autoclaved sample. In addition, VFA and methane production was enhanced by 30% and 40% in alkali-sonicated and alkali-autoclaved samples, respectively. Methane heating value was recovered at maximum of 6.6 MJ kg?1 VS in alkali-autoclaved conditions with comparison to non-pretreated samples. The pretreatment remarkably improved LR?AR solubilization and enhanced VFA and biomethane production, which holds immense potential to eventually reduce the cost of algal biodiesel.

Arumuganainar Suresh; Charles Seo; Ho Nam Chang; Yeu-Chun Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Optimizing Ethanol and Methane Production from Steam-pretreated, Phosphoric Acid-impregnated Corn Stover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition of raw corn stover and the WIS after pretreatment was...27] from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). All measurements were performed in duplicate. The starch content of corn stover an...

Pia-Maria Bondesson; Aurélie Dupuy; Mats Galbe…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In-cylinder fuel injection to produce rich exhaust for regeneration of lean NOx trap catalyst and diesel particulate filter results in substantial fuel dilution of lubricating oil cause changes of lubricating oil properties and scuffing of engine components.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - ascorbic acid pre-treated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was to examine whether glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid, two reac- tive... groups: acrolein, acroleinGSH and acroleinascorbic ... Source: Shi, Riyi - Weldon School of...

42

Amphiphilic Maleic Acid-Containing Alternating Copolymers--2. Dilute Solution Characterization by Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polyelectrolyte. The copolymer of maleic acid­sodium salt and di-isobutylene (DIBMA-Na) has a similar salting

Colby, Ralph H.

43

Biomass pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pretreatment to enhance biomass conversion to ethanol. Appl.pretreatment to enhance biomass conversion to ethanol. Appl.earliest use of acid in biomass conversion that provided a

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation energy efficiency of bioconversion knot rejects to ethanol in comparison to other thermochemically pretreated biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rejects from sulfite pulp mill that otherwise would be disposed of by incineration were converted to ethanol by a combined physical–biological process that was comprised of physical refining and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The energy efficiency was evaluated with comparison to thermochemically pretreated biomass, such as those pretreated by dilute acid (DA) and sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL). It was observed that the structure deconstruction of rejects by physical refining was indispensable to effective bioconversion but more energy intensive than that of thermochemically pretreated biomass. Fortunately, the energy consumption was compensated by the reduced enzyme dosage and the elevated ethanol yield. Furthermore, adjustment of disk-plates gap led to reduction in energy consumption with negligible influence on ethanol yield. In this context, energy efficiency up to 717.7% was achieved for rejects, much higher than that of SPORL sample (283.7%) and DA sample (152.8%).

Zhaojiang Wang; Menghua Qin; J.Y. Zhu; Guoyu Tian; Zongquan Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pretreatment Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology plan presents a strategy for the identification, evaluation, and development of technologies for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This strategy includes deployment of facilities and process development schedules to support the other program elements. This document also presents schedule information for alternative pretreatment systems: (1) the reference pretreatment technology development system, (2) an enhanced pretreatment technology development system, and (3) alternative pretreatment technology development systems.

Barker, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Thornhill, C.K.; Holton, L.K. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

Nguyen, D.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Neptunium (IV) Ions between Nitric Acid and Diluted 30% Tri-butyl Phosphate in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping tetravalent actinide ions such as Np(IV) and Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Np(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have now been accumulated and trends established. Stability constants for aceto-hydroxamate complexes of Np(IV) and Np(V) ions have also been determined in a perchlorate medium, and these reaffirm the affinity of hydroxamate ligands for actinide (IV) ions over actinyl (V,VI) ions.

Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.; May, Iain

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

Dowe, N.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Summary - WTP Pretreatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Block Block D DOE is Immob site's t facilitie purpos techno Facility to be i The as CTEs, Readin * C * C * W * Tr * U * Pu * W * H * Pl The as require The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Wast Why DOE Diagram of Cesiu s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a P se of this asses ology elements y and determin ncorporated in What th ssessment team along with eac ness Level (TR s Nitric Acid Re s Ion Exchang Waste Feed Eva reated LAW Ev ltrafiltration Pro ulse Jet Mixer Waste Feed Rec LW Lag Storag lant Wash and ssessment team ed maturity prio To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen te Treatm E-EM Did This um Nitric Acid R a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com Pretreatment F ssment was to s (CTEs) in the

51

Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec ay of plutonium-241) in the dissolved precipitate, a value consistent with the recovery of europium, the americium surrogate.In a subsequent experiment, the plutonium solubility following an oxalate precipitation to simulate the preparation of a slurry feed for a batch melter was 21 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. The increase in solubility compared to the value measured during the pretreatment experiment was attributed to the increased nitrate concentration and ensuing increase in plutonium complexation. The solubility of the plutonium following a precipitant wash with 0.1M oxalic acid was unchanged. The recovery of plutonium from the precipitate slurry was greater than 97 percent allowing an estimation that approximately 92 percent of the plutonium in Tank 17.1 will report to the glass. The behavior of the lanthanides and soluble metal impurities was consistent with the behavior seen during the pretreatment experiment. A trace level material balance showed that 99.9 percent of the americium w as recovered from the precipitate slurry. The overall recovery of americium from the pretreatment and feed preparation processes was greater than 97 percent, which was consistent with the measured recovery of the europium surrogate.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermodynamics of dilute solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of dilute solutions ... The development of the necessary thermodynamic equations directly in terms of molality is not common ... ...

Gabor Jancso; David V. Fenby

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

Francis, Raymond

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Design and Economics Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons R. Davis, L. Tao, E.C.D. Tan, M.J. Biddy, G.T. Beckham, and C. Scarlata National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Jacobson and K. Cafferty Idaho National Laboratory J. Ross, J. Lukas, D. Knorr, and P. Schoen Harris Group Inc. Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-60223 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications.

57

Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by ?-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 ?M) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 ?M ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

Hata, Kuniki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan) [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)] [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan) [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diff Diff erent pretreatment chemistry/ residence time combinations are possible using these multiple horizontal-tube reactors * Each tube is indirectly and directly steam heated to temperatures of 150 0 C to 210 0 C * Residence time is varied by changing the speed of the auger that moves the biomass through each tube reactor * Tubes are used individually or in combination to achieve diff erent pretreatment residence times * Smaller tubes made from Hastelloy, an acid-resistant material, are used with more corrosive chemicals and residence times from 3 to 20 minutes * Larger tubes made from 316 stainless steel are used for residence times from 20 to 120 minutes Horizontal Pretreatment Reactor System Versatile pretreatment system for a wide range of pretreatment chemistries

59

Biomass shock pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Diluted Graphene Antiferromagnet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study RKKY interactions between local magnetic moments for both doped and undoped graphene. In the former case interactions for moments located on definite sublattices fall off as 1/R2, whereas for those placed at interstitial sites they decay as 1/R3. The interactions are primarily (anti)ferromagnetic for moments on (opposite) equivalent sublattices, suggesting that at low temperature dilute magnetic moments embedded in graphene can order into a state analogous to that of a dilute antiferromagnet. In the undoped case we find no net magnetic moment in the ground state, and demonstrate numerically this effect for ribbons, suggesting the possibility of an unusual spin-transfer device.

L. Brey; H. A. Fertig; S. Das Sarma

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Helium dilution refrigeration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

Roach, Patrick R. (Darien, IL); Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment of biomass solids at different temperatures.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Helium dilution refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1875" OD exchanger Qu ID copper cap Fig. 6. Assembled view of 3He - He dilution refrigerator. 26 The joint thru the tubing wall and the joining of the two sizes of capillary were silver soldered (35/ silver content). A 0. 250" OD tube... the inert atmosphere inside the refrigerator. After removal from the nitrogen atmosphere the graphite support, was 'attached to the still and mixing chamber using Stycast 2850 GT with catalyst g9 ). The mass of the graphite 26 support 1s 11. 62 grams...

McKee, Thomas Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download...

65

Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x giganteus using the ethanol organosolv process for ethanolpretreatment [14], etha- nol organosolv processing [17],at 70°C for 4 h ethanol organosolv process diluted acid

Zhang, Taiying; Wyman, Charles E; Jakob, Katrin; Yang, Bin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

McMillan, J.D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Calcium hydroxide pretreatment of biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROXIDE RECOVERY DATA. . . . . . 135 138 142 . . . . . 148 . . . . . 150 . . . . . 153 156 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Methods used for pretreatment of lignocellulosics. . . . . . . . 15 2. Ammoniation conditions used by previous workers...C-pH diagram for a carbonate solution. 32 12. Flow diagram for continuous calcium hydroxide recovery. . . 13. A tree of possible experimental conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. Sugar yields obtained from ammoniated bagasse...

Nagwani, Murlidhar

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

acid  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is located near the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe and 60 miles north-northeast of Albuquerque. The site is accessible from Canyon Road, which runs just south of the former waste treatment plant. The plant was situated on a mesa that forms the south rim of Acid Canyon. Acid Canyon is a small tributary near the head

69

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal of hydrophobic compounds (Escalante et al. , 2005), which makes surfactants good candidates as pretreatment additives.

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Extrusion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for enzymatic hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cellulose more susceptible to enzyma- tic hydrolysis have been tested. These methods include both chemical and physical pretreatments which act to separate one or more components of the lignocellulosic complex and/or to increase the surface area... depolymerization of hemicellulose with over 75% of the xylan reported to be solubilized within 3 minutes. The main advantages of steaming are the autocatalytic nature of the process, through release of acetal groups to form organic acids, and the short reaction...

Ocana Camacho, Ronay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

acid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site. Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is located near the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe and 60 miles north-northeast of Albuquerque. The site is accessible from Canyon Road, which runs just south

72

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis. Abstract: Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining...

73

A method of cobalt ion concentration from dilute aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid membrane technique is very useful for metal ions recovery from dilute solutions. Co{sup 2+} ions can be removed and concentrated from wastewaters with an emulsion liquid membrane. The paper describes the permeation of Co{sup 2+} using naphthenic acids as the carrier and kerosene as the membrane material. The inner phase is a HCl 3.162 x 10{sup -4} solution. The extraction yield is more than 96%.

Amanatidou, E. [Technological Education Inst., Kila Kozanis (Greece); Stefanut, M.N.; Grozav, A. [Institute for Chemical and Technological Sciences, Timisoara (Romania)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale...

75

Thermal Pretreatment For TRU Waste Sorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a study on thermal treatment of TRU waste to develop a removal technology for materials that are forbidden for disposal. The thermal pretreatment in which hot nitrogen and/or air is introduced to the waste is a process of removing combustibles, liquids, and low melting point metals from PVC wrapped TRU waste. In this study, thermal pretreatment of simulated waste was conducted using a desktop thermal treatment vessel and a laboratory scale thermal pretreatment system. Combustibles and low melting point metals are effectively separated from wastes by choosing appropriate temperature of flowing gases. Combustibles such as papers, PVC, oil, etc. were removed and low melting point metals such as zinc, lead, and aluminum were separated from the simulated waste by the thermal pretreatment. (authors)

Sasaki, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Structural carbohydrate availability with electrochemical ozonation and ammonia pressurization / depressurization pre-treatment technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass into available and /or soluble sugars and organic acids (i. e. uronic acid esters etc. ). The chemical linkages between hemicellulose and lignin may be affected by ammoniation pre-treatment. The significance of this fact is that heavily cross... by Turner et al (1995) demonstrated a significant increase in the available energy and crude protein of NH3 treated maize. Ammoniation of rice straw (Pradhan et al, 1997) bound residual ammonia to fiber and yielded an increase in the level of crude...

Williams, James Jason

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pre-treatment for molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy articles to be plated  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for etching a molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy surface to promote the formation of an adherent bond with a subsequently deposited metallic plating. In a typical application, the method is used as a pre-treatment for surfaces to be electrolessly plated with nickel. The pre-treatment comprises exposing the crystal boundaries of the surface by (a) anodizing the surface in acidic solution to form a continuous film of gray molybdenum oxide thereon and (b) removing the film.

Wright, Ralph R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) Pretreatment Rules (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This law lists state requirements and standards regulating the introduction of pollutants into Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) by industrial users. The following substances shall not be introduced into a POTW: (1) Pollutants that create a fire or explosion hazard in the POTW including, but not limited to, wastestreams with a closed cup flashpoint of less than 140 degrees Fahrenheit or 60 degrees; (2) Pollutants that will cause corrosive structural damage to the POTW, but in no case discharges with pH lower than 5.0, unless the POTW is

79

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High Efficiency While Avoiding Control Problems of HCCI Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

82

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print Wednesday, 29 November 2006 00:00...

83

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Heavy-duty engine and light-duty vehicle experiments were conducted to investigate the...

84

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Xin He, Aaron M. Williams, Earl D. Christensen, Jonathan L. Burton, Robert L. McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 5, 2011...

85

Effects of different pretreatment methods on anaerobic mixed microflora for hydrogen production and COD reduction from palm oil mill effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of different pretreatment methods on sludge inocula were evaluated with respect to hydrogen (H2) production enhancement using palm oil mill effluent (POME) in a batch system. The experimental results showed that the pretreatment methods (chemical, acid, heat-shock, freezing and thawing, and base) at 35 °C and initial pH 5.5 had a positive influence on H2 production yield and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency during the fermentative H2 production as compared to the control experiments (without pretreatment). Heat-shock pretreatment method was shown to be a simple and useful method for enhancing both H2 producing and COD removal processes from POME with highest H2 yield and COD removal efficiency at 0.41 mmol H2/g COD and 86%, respectively.

Parviz Mohammadi; Shaliza Ibrahim; Mohamad Suffian Mohamad Annuar; Sean Law

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Lignin removal and benzene–alcohol extraction effects on lignin measurements of the hydrothermal pretreated bamboo substrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignin content of hydrothermal pretreated bamboo chips was determined by the two methods: TAPPI standard method (222om-06) and TAPPI standard method without benzene–alcohol extraction (BAE). The results showed that including BAE resulted in lower Klason lignin (KL) and acid soluble lignin (ASL) measurements in the prehydrolyzed substrate, that is to say, BAE removed parts of KL and ASL. Therefore, the TAPPI standard method should be modified by omitting the BAE for lignin measurements of pretreated substrate. The following lignin removal analysis suggested that lignin was removed from the bamboo substrate during pretreatment by a combination of degradation reaction and deconstruction; thereafter the pseudo lignin generated in the hydrothermal pretreatment and condensation reaction between the lignin fragments accounted for the later KL increase.

X.J. Ma; S.L. Cao; X.F. Yang; L. Lin; L.H. Chen; L.L. Huang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chain elongation with reactor microbiomes: upgrading dilute ethanol to medium-chain carboxylates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through a reversed b-oxidation pathway.6­8 This bacterium uses ethanol as a source of carbon, energy for elongation by C. kluyveri, one molecule of ethanol is oxidized to acetic acid for metabolic energy.6 OpenChain elongation with reactor microbiomes: upgrading dilute ethanol to medium-chain carboxylates

Angenent, Lars T.

88

Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment.

Rudisill, T.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Chemical pre-treatment of waste water from the Morcinek Mine in Poland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a treatment strategy for brine that is recovered from the Morcinek mine near the city of Kartowice in Upper Silesia, Poland. The purpose of the study is to provide sufficient chemical composition and solubility data to permit selection of equipment for a pilot scale waste water processing plant. The report delineates: (1) the pre-treatment steps necessary before the brine is delivered to a reverse osmosis unit; (2) the composition of the brine solution at various stages in the pretreatment process and during the reverse osmosis step; (3) the types and amounts of chemicals that need to be added to the brine during pre-treatment. Analysis of the composition of the brine slurry from the submerged combustion evaporator that follows the reverse osmosis unit and the composition of brine elements that might be carried into the exhaust stack of the evaporator will be dealt with later. The pretreatment process will consist of four steps: (1) aeration and addition of sodium carbonate, (2) multimedia filtration, (3) addition of hydrochloric acid, and (4) ultrafiltration. On the basis of one m{sup 3} of the brine that has a density of 1.03 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately 800 grams (1.7 lbs.) of sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) and 60 grams (0.12 lbs.) of concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCI) will need to be added to the brine during pre-treatment. The goal of the pre-treatment is to produce a fluid that is always undersaturated with respect to all mineral phases. However, only the minimum amount of pre-treatment chemicals should be added in order to minimize costs. Therefore the overall goal is to generate a fluid that approaches but does not exceed saturation at the end of the reverse osmosis process. The suggested amounts of chemicals reported here are therefore the minimum amounts that need to be added during pre-treatment to keep all salts in solution during the reverse osmosis process.

Bourcier, W.; Jackson, K.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime...

Meysing, Daniel

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Reconstitution of a Thermostable Xylan-Degrading Enzyme Mixture from the Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chains, such as arabinose, glucuronic acid, acetate, and ferulic acid (8). Current methods for pretreatment of biomass feedstocks include dilute acid pretreatment, which destroys much of the hemicellulose (9), and ammonia fiber explosion...

Xiaoyun Su; Yejun Han; Dylan Dodd; Young Hwan Moon; Shosuke Yoshida; Roderick I. Mackie; Isaac K. O. Cann

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

94

Phase boundary detection for dilution refrigerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a device to conveniently measure the positions of the phase boundaries in a dilution refrigerator. We show how a simple modification of a standard capacitive level gauge (segmentation of one of the electrodes) permits a direct calibration of the capacitance versus phase boundary position. We compare this direct calibration with the indirect procedure that must be adopted for a conventional capacitive level gauge. The device facilitates the correct adjustment of the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He fraction in the dilution refrigerator.

Haar, E. ter; Martin, R.V. [DFMT, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66.318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Viscosity Oscillations and Hysteresis in Dilute Emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the viscosity of a dilute emulsion exhibits oscillations and hysteresis as a function of the shear rate. This results from breaking up of droplets in response to the shear flow. The new phenomena we describe are generic and do not depend on a specific choice of model. The interesting dependence of the basic properties of a dilute emulsion on the shear rate results from the fact that the immersed droplets must break when the shear rate applied to the system is large enough.

Yiftah Navot and Moshe Schwartz

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); Choi, Heonjin (Seoul, KR); Lee, Sangkwon (Daejeon, KR); He, Rongrui (Albany, CA); Zhang, Yanfeng (El Cerrito, CA); Kuykendal, Tevye (Berkeley, CA); Pauzauskie, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-047 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facilities L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-047 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery has completed a Technology Readiness

98

Kinetic evaluation of the esterification of fatty acids to biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The free fatty acids of cotton seed oil were processed with methanol and ethanol into the corresponding alkyl fatty esters in the presence of diluted sulfuric acid. The products characterized as biodiesels pre...

Frederico A. D. Araújo; Sonia V. Pereira…

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Infinitely Dilute Partial Molar Properties of Proteins from Computer Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of temperature and pressure effects on an infinitely dilute protein’s conformational equilibrium requires knowledge of the corresponding infinitely dilute partial molar properties. Established molecular dynamics methodologies ...

Elizabeth A. Ploetz; Paul E. Smith

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Determination of Insoluble Solids in Pretreated Biomass Material...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of Insoluble NRELTP-510-42627 Solids in Pretreated Biomass March 2008 Material Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 03212008 A. Sluiter, D. Hyman, C....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment by Fractionation Poulomi Sannigrahi 1,2 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA 10.1 Introduction With the rise in global energy demand and environmental concerns about the use of fossil fuels, the need for rapid development of alternative fuels from sustainable, non-food sources is now well acknowledged. The effective utilization of low-cost high-volume agricultural and forest biomass for the production of transporta- tion fuels and bio-based materials will play a vital role in addressing this concern [1]. The processing of lignocellulosic biomass, especially from mixed agricultural and forest sources with varying composition,

102

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

103

Optimization of steam explosion pretreatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different operating conditions are required to optimize the yield from each of the various fractions in the substrate. Xylose recovery is maximized at short cooking times whereas maximum lignin recovery requires much longer cooking times. Peak glucose yield and rumen digestibility occur at intermediate times. If process conditions are set for maximum glucose yield we have achieved a yield of 68% of the theoretical, based on an average of a dozen substrates tested. Individual results ranged from 46 to 87%. If the process is optimized for maximum total sugars (i.e. glucose plus xylose) we have obtained an average yield of 60%, with a range of 31 to 75%. With rumen microflora, the average value of the in-vitro cellulose digestibility was 82%, with a range of 41 to 90%. The optimum operating conditions for total sugars are a pressure of 500 to 550 psig with a cooking time of 40 to 50 seconds and 35% starting moisture content. Particle size is not a significant factor, nor is pre-steaming or use of a constricting die in the gun nozzle. High quality lignin can be extracted with 80% yield. The Iotech lignin is very soluble, has a low molecular weight and is reactive. The unique properties of the lignin derive from the explosion at the end of the pretreatment. A lignin formaldehyde resin has been successfully formulated and tested. It represents a high value utilization of the lignin byproduct with immediate market potential. A detailed engineering design of the process gives an estimated operating cost of $7.50/OD ton of biomass. At this low cost, the Iotech process achieves many important pretreatment goals in a single step. The substrate has been sterilized; it has been pulverized into a powder; the cellulose has been accessible; and a highly reactive lignin fraction can be recovered and utilized.

Foody, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, Michael F.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic...

108

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process...

109

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process Design and Economics for Biochemical...

110

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment at diff erent temperatures * Biomass is heated by steam injection to temperatures of 120°C to 210°C in the pressurized mixing tube * Preheated, premixed biomass is retained for specified residence time in vertical holding vessel; material continuously moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is adjusted by changing amount of material held in vertical vessel relative to continuous fl ow of material entering and exiting vessel * Optional additional reactor vessel allows for secondary pretreatment at lower temperatures-120°C to 180°C-with potential to add other chemical catalysts * First vessel can operate at residence

111

Optimization study on sample pretreatment of spent fuel storage rack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to evaluate radionuclide inventories as an essential item for the permanent disposal of spent fuel storage racks, chemical conditions for a sample pretreatment of a spent fuel storage rack were studied. ...

Hong-Joo Ahn; Myung-Ho Lee; Se-Chul Sohn…

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19 2.3.3. Lignin………………………………………………………. ……………..22 2.3.4.S, Ragauskas A. Pseudo-lignin and pretreatment chemistry.ME, Vinzant TB. Visualizing lignin coalescence and migration

McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Potential of Ferric and Polyaluminium Coagulants for Nanofiltration Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional chemical treatment of soft, cold and humic surface water was studied on a pilot scale, and fouling indexes were used to evaluate the suitability of the pretreated water for nanofiltration. The...

J. Yli-Kuivila; I. T. Miettinen; R. Laukkanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Investigation of Ultrafine Particle Formation during Diesel Exhaust Dilution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Ultrafine Particle Formation during Diesel Exhaust Dilution ... In on-road exhaust studies with a heavy duty diesel vehicle and in laboratory studies with two gasoline-fueled passenger cars, we found that ... ... Analyses of Turbulent Flow Fields and Aerosol Dynamics of Diesel Engine Exhaust Inside Two Dilution Sampling Tunnels Using the CTAG Model ...

Ji Ping Shi; Roy M. Harrison

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

115

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic stainless steel the weld will also signi® cantly affect the corrosion resistance. Dissimilar metal welds between a super dissimilar weld. The dilution level was found to decrease as the ratio of volumetric ® ller metal feedrate

DuPont, John N.

116

Effects of thermal pretreatment (removal of steric hindrance) on subsequent nuclear hydrogenation of heavy alkylaromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changes in structures by thermal pretreatment of heavy alkylaromatics, which are very difficult to nuclear hydrogenate, and the effects of the pretreatment on subsequent nuclear hydrogenation were investigated in comparison with catalytic pretreatment of the same feedstock. The following results were obtained: (1) the structures of the thermally pretreated products are quite different from those of the catalytically pretreated ones; (2) subsequent nuclear hydrogenation of the thermally pretreated products becomes much easier because the steric hindrance is removed; (3) in the case where the same feedstock was catalytically pretreated, the products were difficult to nuclear hydrogenate. These results suggest various applications, including heavy oil hydrotreating.

Kubo, Junichi [Nippon Oil Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Central Technical Research Lab.] [Nippon Oil Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Central Technical Research Lab.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method and apparatus for gasifying with a fluidized bed gasifier having integrated pretreating facilities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integral gasifier including a pretreater section and a gasifier section separated by a distribution grid is defined by a single vessel. The pretreater section pretreats coal or other carbon-containing material to be gasified to prevent caking and agglomeration of the coal in the gasifier. The level of the coal bed of the pretreater section and thus the holding or residence time in said bed is selectively regulated by the amount of pretreated coal which is lifted up a lift pipe into the gasifier section. Thus, the holding time in the pretreater section can be varied according to the amount of pretreat necessary for the particular coal to be gasified.

Rice, Louis F. (Arcadia, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Alfoterra-38 (0.05 wt%), Alfoterra-35 (0.05 wt%), SS-6656 (0.05 wt%), and DTAB (1 wt%) altered the wettability of the initially oil-wet calcite plate to an intermediate/water-wet state. Low IFT ({approx}10{sup -3} dynes/cm) is obtained with surfactants 5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover more than 40% of the oil in about 50 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 28% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Residual oil saturation showed little capillary number dependence between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -2}. Wettability alteration increases as the number of ethoxy groups increases in ethoxy sulfate surfactants. Plans for the next quarter include conducting mobilization, and imbibition studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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121

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Simulation studies indicate that both wettability alteration and gravity-driven flow play significant role in oil recovery from fractured carbonates. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover about 55% of the oil in about 150 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration and low tension in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 40% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Cationic surfactant, DTAB recovers about 35% of the oil. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show that imbibition rate is not very sensitive to the surfactant concentration (in the range of 0.05-0.2 wt%) and small amounts of trapped gas saturation. It is however very sensitive to oil permeability and water-oil-ratio. Less than 0.5 M Na2CO3 is needed for in situ soap generation and low adsorption; NaCl can be added to reach the necessary total salinity. The simulation result matches the laboratory imbibition experimental data. Small fracture spacing and high permeability would be needed for high rate of recovery.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show about 61% oil recovery in the case of Alf-38 and 37% in the case of DTAB. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition of the laboratory experiment. Field-scale fracture block simulation shows that as the fracture spacing increases, so does the time of recovery. Plans for the next quarter include simulation studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Safety Slide 1 Hydrofluoric (HF) Acid Hazards http://www.emsworld.com/web/online/Education/Hydrofluoric-Acid-/5$12949  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Slide 1 ­ Hydrofluoric (HF) Acid Hazards http://www.emsworld.com/web may be delayed for up to 24 hours, even with dilute solutions. HF burns affect deep tissue layers

Cohen, Robert E.

128

Effects of Feedstocks and Inoculum Sources on Mixed-Acid and Hydrogen Fermentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incubator ........................................................... 17 2-4 Design of the stainless-steel fermentor ................................................................ 18 2-5 Photograph of the stainless-steel fermentor (clamp removed... and packed-bed fermentations of refined glycerol ...... 300 10-1 Schematic of goals of pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass .......................... 304 10-2 Comparison of the total acid concentrations for fresh and pretreated water hyacinth...

Forrest, Andrea Kelly

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Special dilution refrigerator systems of Milli-Kelvin detector experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several hundred ultra low temperature systems have been designed and built for a variety of applications. One common application is the refrigeration of low temperature detectors. Although many of the requirements are satisfied by standard designs, Oxford Instruments has often built special refrigerators to suit specific detector requirements. A few of the most interesting of these systems will be discussed. (1) dilution refrigerators to cool gravitational wave antennae to 65 mK; (2) rotating dilution refrigerator for cosmic ray detector experiments; (3) compact dilution refrigerator to cool large bolometer arrays within the SCUBA telescope; (4) side access systems for beam line experiments

Batey, G.; Balshaw, N. (Oxford Instruments Ltd., Old Station Way (United Kingdom))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Paramagnetic Relaxation in Dilute Potassium Ferricyanide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paramagnetic relaxation times have been measured for the ground-state doublet of iron present as a dilute substitutional impurity in potassium cobalt cyanide. Measurements were carried out over the temperature range 1.25 to 4.5°K and over a range of Fe/Co concentrations 0.24 to 3.5 at.%. Two frequencies were used, 1.8 and 8.5 Gc/sec, to provide a direct test of the frequency variation of the relaxation time. The "fast-passage-recovery" technique was employed, and a description of the apparatus is included. At 0.24% the 1.8-Gc/sec times are found to be well fitted by a Raman rate 1T1=4.3×10-3 T9 sec-1 over the entire temperature range and over five decades of time. At 8.5 Gc/sec this rate is augmented by a direct rate 1T1=3.1 T. At 0.5% the X-band direct rate is the same, but the Raman rate appears slightly higher; and the L-band rates are substantially faster. All relaxation rates increase with further increases in concentration, but the effect is stronger at 1.8 Gc/sec, so that the rates at both frequencies become equal at 1.7%. Still higher concentrations give rise to behavior not describable by a simple relaxation rate.For low concentration, the theoretical fourth-power frequency dependence of the direct relaxation process is not verified directly because the low frequency rates are always dominated by the Raman process; however, the frequency dependence must be as at least the third power to be consistent with the data. Some attempts are made to interpret the concentration dependence in terms of cross relaxation between single ions and coupled pairs.

Andreas Rannestad and Peter E. Wagner

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

135

Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute Multiphase Flows In Magmatic Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute Multiphase Flows In Magmatic Systems Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The kinematic and dynamic scaling of dilute multiphase mixtures in magmatic systems is the only guarantee for the geological verisimilitude of laboratory experiments. We present scaling relations that can provide a more complete framework to scale dilute magmatic systems because they

137

Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

Cochran, H.D. Jr.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

A lattice Boltzmann method for dilute polymer solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Succi and Stefano Ubertini A lattice Boltzmann method for dilute polymer solutions...560064, India We present a lattice Boltzmann approach for the simulation...Fokker-Planck equation|lattice Boltzmann method|finitely extensible...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

775 Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering P. A systems developed specifically for neutron scattering environ- ments. The refrigerators are completely relatively recently however, the lowest temperatures available in almost all neutron scattering laboratories

Boyer, Edmond

140

Contraction/expansion flow of dilute elastic solutions in microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study is conducted on the nature of extensional flows of mobile dilute polymer solutions in microchannel. By observing such fluids on the microscale it is possible to generate large strain rates ([approximately] ...

Scott, Timothy Peter, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Translation of dilution tolerance for gasoline SI engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are a variety of fuel improvement strategies being developed for spark ignition engines which use dilution. Many of these technologies use a combination of different diluents. It is impractical in optimizing these ...

Niekamp, Troy S. (Troy Steven)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

Steffani, C.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Anatomy of symmetry energy of dilute nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The symmetry energy coefficients of dilute clusterized nuclear matter are evaluated in the $S$-matrix framework. Employing a few different definitions commonly used in the literature for uniform nuclear matter, it is seen that the different definitions lead to perceptibly different results for the symmetry coefficients for dilute nuclear matter. They are found to be higher compared to those obtained for uniform matter in the low density domain. The calculated results are in reasonable consonance with those extracted recently from experimental data.

J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; B. K. Agrawal

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Sludge composting, sludge pretreatment and radiation technology: a review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper reviews the state-of-the-art technologies on sludge conditioning and stabilisation. Radiation technology, best contextualised within the concept of Green Chemistry, is yet another developing area of sludge pretreatment. Besides revisiting some important aspects of sludge treatment by composting, this review paper also appraises the application of gamma ray and ultrasound irradiations particularly in sludge pretreatment and sludge composting for monitoring, and to some extent improving, the degradation and subsequent stabilisation of sludge constituents. The scientific principle of each type of radiation and selected research work are discussed, and future needs for applied research are eventually outlined.

Ackmez Mudhoo; Romeela Mohee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

Riley, M.F.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

148

Acid dyes removal using low cost adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dyestuff production units and dyeing units have always had pressing need techniques that allow economical pre-treatment for colour in the effluent. The effectiveness of adsorption for dye removal from wastewaters has made it an ideal alternative to other expensive treatment options. Removal of acid green

A.H. Aydin; Y. Bulut; O. Yavuz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Review of Alternative Technologies for Pretreatment of Accumulated HLW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accumulated liquid high-level wastes (HLW) from nuclear centers in Russia and the United States (U. S.) contain great amounts of nonradioactive salts; it is prudent to vitrify not the entire volume of these wastes, but only the concentrates of radionuclides recovered from them. For this purpose, different pretreatment technologies based on liquid-liquid extraction are under development.

Romanovsky, V.; Rimski-Korsakov, A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Recovery of Plutonium from Refractory Residues Using a Sodium Peroxide Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycle of plutonium from refractory residues is a necessary activity for the nuclear weapon production complex. Traditionally, high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO2) was leached from the residue matrix using a nitric acid/fluoride dissolving flowsheet. The recovery operations were time consuming and often required multiple contacts with fresh dissolving solution to reduce the plutonium concentration to levels where residual solids could be discarded. Due to these drawbacks, the development of an efficient process for the recovery of plutonium from refractory materials is desirable. To address this need, a pretreatment process was developed. The development program utilized a series of small-scale experiments to optimize processing conditions for the fusion process and demonstrate the plutonium recovery efficiency using ceramic materials developed as potential long-term storage forms for PuO2 and an incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) as te st materials.

Rudisill, T.S.

2003-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Surface pre-treatment for barrier coatings on polyethylene terephthalate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymers have favourable properties such as light weight, flexibility and transparency. Consequently, this makes them suitable for food packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and flexible solar cells. Nonetheless, raw plastics do not possess sufficient barrier functionality against oxygen and water vapour, which is of paramount importance for most applications. A widespread solution is to deposit thin silicon oxide layers using plasma processes. However, silicon oxide layers do not always fulfil the requirements concerning adhesion and barrier performance when deposited on films. Thus, plasma pre-treatment is often necessary. To analyse the influence of a plasma-based pre-treatment on barrier performance, different plasma pre-treatments on three reactor setups were applied to a very smooth polyethylene terephthalate film before depositing a silicon oxide barrier layer. In this paper, the influence of oxygen and argon plasma pre-treatments towards the barrier performance is discussed examining the chemical and topological change of the film.It was observed that a short one-to-ten-second plasma treatment can reduce the oxygen transmission rate by a factor of five. The surface chemistry and the surface topography change significantly for these short treatment times, leading to an increased surface energy. The surface roughness rises slowly due to the development of small spots in the nanometre range. For very long treatment times, surface roughness of the order of the barrier layer's thickness results in a complete loss of barrier properties. During plasma pre-treatment, the trade-off between surface activation and roughening of the surface has to be carefully considered.

H Bahre; K Bahroun; H Behm; S Steves; P Awakowicz; M B?ke; Ch Hopmann; J Winter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Application of High Throughput Pretreatment and Co-Hydrolysis System to Thermochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Although hydrothermal pretreatment is currently being employed in most high were compared to results from hydrothermal pretreatments, providing new insights in understanding their recalcitrance and consolidating processing of enzymes and microorganisms to overcome biomass recalci- trance

California at Riverside, University of

154

Application of Cryocoolers to a Vintage Dilution Refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dilution refrigerator is required for 50mK detector operation of CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search). Besides shielding the dilution refrigerator itself, the liquid nitrogen shield and liquid helium bath in the refrigerator cool the detector cryostat heat shields and cool electronics, resulting in significant external heat loads at 80K and at 4K. An Oxford Instruments Kelvinox 400 has served this role for ten years but required daily transfers of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Complicating the cryogen supply is the location 800 meters below ground in an RF shielded, class 10000 clean room at Soudan, MN. Nitrogen and helium re-liquefiers using cryocoolers were installed outside the clean room and continuously condense room temperature gas and return the liquids to the dilution refrigerator through a transfer line. This paper will describe the design, installation, controls and performance of liquefaction systems.

Schmitt, Richard; Smith, Gary; Ruschman, Mark; /Fermilab; Beaty, Jim; /Minnesota U.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

Oulman, Charles S. [Ames, IA; Chriswell, Colin D. [Slater, IA

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Improving Anaerobic Codigestion of Corn Stover Using Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lignin of the corn stover was measured according to the Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAP) established by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). ... The methane yield per gram of corn stover is an important parameter to estimate the net energy production of the corn stover digestion. ... This means that NaOH pretreatment is an effective way to obtain higher net energy production through anaerobic codigestion of corn stover. ...

Zhaoyang You; Taoyuan Wei; Jay J. Cheng

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determination of americium and curium by isotope dilution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a method for the determination of americium and curium in solutions of spent fuels from water cooled and moderated reactors that is based on isotope dilution with Am 241 and Cm 244 combined with extraction chromatography of americium and curium and alpha spectroscopy of the labels.

Yablochkin, A.V.; Krapivin, M.I.; Fedotov, S.N.; Yudina, V.G.; Yakobson, A.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dry Dilution Refrigerator with He-4 Precool Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

He-3/He-4 dilution refrigerators (DR) are very common in sub-Kelvin temperature research. We describe a pulse tube precooled DR where a separate He-4 circuit condenses the He-3 of the dilution loop. Whereas in our previous work the dilution circuit and the He-4 circuit were separate, we show how the two circuits can be combined. Originally, the He-4 loop with a base temperature of ~ 1 K was installed to make an additional cooling power of up to 100 mW available to cool cold amplifiers and electrical lines. In the new design, the dilution circuit is run through a heat exchanger in the vessel of the He-4 circuit so that the condensation of the He-3 stream of the DR is done by the He-4 stage. A much reduced condensation time (factor of 2) of the He-3/He-4 gas mixture at the beginning of an experiment is achieved. A compressor is no longer needed with the DR as the condensation pressure remains below atmospheric pressure at all times; thus the risk of losing expensive He-3 gas is small. The performance of the DR ...

Uhlig, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Computational Modelling of Particle Degradation in Dilute Phase Pneumatic Conveyors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, GU2 7XH, UK {h.abou-chakra, u.tuzun}@surrey.ac.uk c The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology, University of Greenwich, Wellington Street, Woolwich, London, SE18 6PF, UK {i.bridle, m degradation during dilute phase pneumatic conveying. A numerical procedure, based on a matrix representation

Christakis, Nikolaos

164

Automated control and data acquisition for a small dilution refrigerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An automatic temperature controller and data acquisition system for use with a dilution refrigerator is described. The unit is controlled by a 16?bit home microcomputer and operates and reads a resistance bridge capacitance bridge and temperature controller. Interfacing is achieved with common components and minimum additional wiring. Flexibility is retained in the software to allow application to several types of measurements.

David G. Haase

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transformations transformations of Populus trichocarpa during dilute acid pretreatment Shilin Cao,{ ae Yunqiao Pu,* be Michael Studer,{ ce Charles Wyman cde and Arthur J. Ragauskas* abe Received 4th September 2012, Accepted 4th September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2ra22045h In this study, Populus trichocarpa was subjected to dilute acid pretreatment at varying pretreatment times. The three major components of lignocellulosic biomass, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, were isolated from the starting and dilute acid pretreated poplar. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were utilized to elucidate structural transformations of poplar during dilute acid pretreatment. The results demonstrated that the pretreatment dissolved hemicelluloses and disrupted structural features of lignin and polysaccharides. As revealed by NMR, the

166

Engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for Bioprecipitation of Uranium from Dilute Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiodurans R1 for Bioprecipitation of Uranium from Dilute Nuclear Waste Published ahead of print on 20 October 2006. Deepti...situ approach to biorecovery of uranium from dilute nuclear waste. Nuclear waste contains a variety of heavy metals, radionuclides...

Deepti Appukuttan; Amara Sambasiva Rao; Shree Kumar Apte

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Diluting the founder effect: cryptic invasions expand a marine invader's range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dilute the founder effect for nonindigenous...community of a wooden ship (Yamada 2001...Diluting the founder effect: conservation implications...assemblages entrained by ships are not only species...coastal invasions via ships: effects of emerging strategies...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Novel Approach in Determining Oil Dilution Level on a DPF Equipped...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Novel Approach in Determining Oil Dilution Level on a DPF Equipped Vehicle as a Result of Regeneration A Novel Approach in Determining Oil Dilution Level on a DPF Equipped...

169

Dilution calculations for determining laboratory exhaust stack heights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory exhaust stacks should be designed with sufficient height and exit momentum to avoid re-entry of exhaust and possible air quality problems, and the design should be evaluated before construction. One evaluation method is presented in this paper that combines dilution prediction equations from the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1997) and a dilution criteria of Halitsky (1988). This method is less conservative than a geometric method in the ASHRAE Handbook and is less costly than wind-tunnel modeling. The method should only be applied to relatively simple building geometries with no larger buildings adjacent to them. A planned change to the ASHRAE equations, which would result in larger stacks being necessary, is discussed. Further investigation of this change is recommended using comparisons to wind tunnel data.

Ratcliff, M.A.; Sandru, E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dry dilution refrigerator with He-4 precool loop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-3/He-4 dilution refrigerators (DR) are very common in sub-Kelvin temperature research. We describe a pulse tube precooled DR where a separate He-4 circuit condenses the He-3 of the dilution loop. Whereas in our previous work the dilution circuit and the He-4 circuit were separate, we show how the two circuits can be combined. Originally, the He-4 loop with a base temperature of ? 1 K was installed to make an additional cooling power of up to 100 mW available to cool cold amplifiers and electrical lines. In the new design, the dilution circuit is run through a heat exchanger in the vessel of the He-4 circuit so condensation of the He-3 stream of the DR is done by the He-4 stage. A much reduced condensation time (factor of 2) of the He-3/He-4 gas mixture at the beginning of an experiment is achieved. A compressor is no longer needed with the DR as the condensation pressure remains below atmospheric pressure at all times; thus the risk of losing expensive He-3 gas is small. The performance of the DR has been improved compared to previous work: The base temperature of the mixing chamber at a small He-3 flow rate is now 4.1 mK; at the highest He-3 flow rate of 1.2 mmol/s this temperature increases to 13 mK. Mixing chamber temperatures were measured with a cerium magnesium nitrate (CMN) thermometer which was calibrated with a superconducting fixed point device.

Uhlig, Kurt [Walther-Meissner-Institute, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print Wednesday, 29 November 2006 00:00 The possibility of using electrons' spins in addition to their charge in information technology has created much enthusiasm for a new field of electronics popularly known as "spintronics." An intensely studied approach to obtaining spin-polarized carriers for data-storage devices is the use of diluted magnetic semiconductors created by doping ions like Mn, Fe, or Co having a net spin into a semiconducting host such as GaAs, ZnO, or GaN. The interaction among these spins leads to ferromagnetic order at low temperatures, which is necessary to create spin-polarized carriers. A research team working at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Beamline ID8 made a big leap forward in clarifying the microscopic picture of magnetism and anisotropy in Mn-doped GaAs by resolving localized and hybridized d states using angle-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements.

172

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print The possibility of using electrons' spins in addition to their charge in information technology has created much enthusiasm for a new field of electronics popularly known as "spintronics." An intensely studied approach to obtaining spin-polarized carriers for data-storage devices is the use of diluted magnetic semiconductors created by doping ions like Mn, Fe, or Co having a net spin into a semiconducting host such as GaAs, ZnO, or GaN. The interaction among these spins leads to ferromagnetic order at low temperatures, which is necessary to create spin-polarized carriers. A research team working at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Beamline ID8 made a big leap forward in clarifying the microscopic picture of magnetism and anisotropy in Mn-doped GaAs by resolving localized and hybridized d states using angle-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements.

173

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print The possibility of using electrons' spins in addition to their charge in information technology has created much enthusiasm for a new field of electronics popularly known as "spintronics." An intensely studied approach to obtaining spin-polarized carriers for data-storage devices is the use of diluted magnetic semiconductors created by doping ions like Mn, Fe, or Co having a net spin into a semiconducting host such as GaAs, ZnO, or GaN. The interaction among these spins leads to ferromagnetic order at low temperatures, which is necessary to create spin-polarized carriers. A research team working at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Beamline ID8 made a big leap forward in clarifying the microscopic picture of magnetism and anisotropy in Mn-doped GaAs by resolving localized and hybridized d states using angle-dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements.

174

Dry dilution refrigerator with 4He-1K-loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we summarize experimental work on cryogen-free 3He/4He dilution refrigerators which, in addition to the dilution refrigeration circuit, are equipped with a 4He-1K-stage. This type of DR becomes worth considering when high cooling capacities are needed at T ~ 1 K to cool cold amplifiers and heat sink cables. In our application, the motivation for the construction of this type of cryostat was to do experiments on superconducting quantum circuits for quantum information technology and quantum simulations. In other work, DRs with 1K-stage were proposed for astro-physical cryostats. For neutron scattering research, a top-loading cryogen-free DR with 1K-stage was built which was equipped with a standard commercial dilution refrigeration insert. Cooling powers of up to 100 mW have been reached with our 1K-stage, but higher refrigeration powers were achieved with more powerful pulse tube cryocoolers and higher 4He circulation rates in the 1K-loop. Several different versions of a 1K-loop have been test...

Uhlig, Kurt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Glow discharge pretreatment tools for vacuum web coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last few years plasma pre-treatment has been established as a powerful tool to increase the quality in vacuum web coating whereas, the effect of web pre-treatment under atmospheric conditions is declining due to several reasons, glow discharge assisted in line–in vacuo pre-treatment is much more reliable. Two tools for plasma pre-treatment are presented here. Both are easily scalable as to comply with the needs of large area web coating with a typical coating width of over 2 m, and they operate in a pressure range that is compatible with sputtering and evaporation processes taking place in the same vacuum system. The effect of the glow discharge on polymeric web depends on electron temperature (typically a few electron volts), electron density (ranging typically from 10?9 to 10?11 cm?3), ion energy, and chemical composition. The mentioned electron density range is indispensable to meet the demands of satisfactory production speeds, in particular with evaporation. By means of the so-called Treatmag®, an abnormal glow discharge enhanced by a closed loop tunnel shaped magnetic field is generated in the 10?2 mbar pressure range. This tool is widely used for the improvement of metallic coatings on polymeric web. The ion energies typically range well below 70 eV. Indeed, water vapor and oxygen permeation rates through OPP have been quartered respectively, third. The so-called RF hollow anode described herein next is comprising a capacitively coupled, asymmetric 13.56 \\{MHz\\} radio frequency glow discharge driven in a hollow life electrode, operated in the 10?2 mbar pressure range. The easily scaleable RF hollow anode is dedicated to the dynamic pre-treatment or coating of either dielectric or metal web (or rigid sheet), and can be used in conjunction either with sputtering or, at line speeds of typical 5–10 m/s, with evaporation processes. The RF hollow anode renders ion fluxes of up to 1 mA/cm2 at energies between 100 and several hundred electron volts. So far it complements the Treatmag®, which yields ions with considerably lower energies. The adhesion improvement by the RF hollow anode we attribute to a pronounced increase of the cross-link density (amorphization) in the near surface region of in-plane oriented polymeric web commonly used. Ex situ XPS spectra taken 3 days after venting from PET samples treated at high web speeds are given. It is mentioned that the industrial application of the RF hollow anode is based on the surface modification as yielded in-situ/in-vacuo almost immediately after treatment. In case the RF hollow anode is operated with hydrocarbon, silane or other gases, it can also be employed for thin base-coatings or top-coatings on web material.

M. Geisler; G. Hoffmann; R. Ludwig; G. Steiniger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute. B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu.

P. Touborg and J. Høg

1974-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

l-Amino Acid Transporter-1 and Boronophenylalanine-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Human Brain Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nebulizer, quartz spray chamber, and nickel cones. Calibration used matrix-matched aqueous standards prepared from boron-10-enriched boric acid. Standards and specimens to be assayed were diluted with an aqueous solution containing 2 butanol...

Allah Detta and Garth S. Cruickshank

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synergistic Enhancement of Cellobiohydrolase Performance on Pretreated Corn Stover by Addition of Xylanase and Esterase Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant increases in the depolymerization of corn stover cellulose by cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei were observed using small quantities of non-cellulolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes. Purified endoxylanase (XynA), ferulic acid esterase (FaeA), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe1) all enhanced Cel7A performance on corn stover subjected to hot water pretreatment. In all cases, the addition of these activities improved the effectiveness of the enzymatic hydrolysis in terms of the quantity of cellulose converted per milligram of total protein. Improvement in cellobiose release by the addition of the non-cellulolytic enzymes ranged from a 13-84% increase over Cel7A alone. The most effective combinations included the addition of both XynA and Axe1, which synergistically enhance xylan conversions resulting in additional synergistic improvements in glucan conversion. Additionally, we note a direct relationship between enzymatic xylan removal in the presence of XynA and the enhancement of cellulose hydrolysis by Cel7A.

Selig, M. J.; Knoshaug E. P.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pretreatment of automobile shredder residue (ASR) for fuel utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automobile shredder residue (ASR) was pretreated to improve its quality for fuel utilization. Composition analysis revealed that ASR components could be classified into four groups: (1) urethane and textile—light fraction and combustibles containing low levels of ash and Cl; (2) plastics and rubber—light or heavy fraction and combustibles containing high levels of Cl; (3) metals and electrical wire—heavy fraction and incombustibles, and (4) particles smaller than 5.6 mm with high ash contents. Based on these results, we successively performed sieving to remove particles smaller than 5.6 mm, float and sink separations to reject the heavy fraction and plastics and rubber containing Cl, thermal treatment under an inert atmosphere to remove Cl derived from PVC, and char washing to remove soluble chlorides. This series of pretreatments enabled the removal of 78% of the ash and 91% of the Cl from ASR. Sieving using a 5.6-mm mesh removed a considerable amount of ash. Product quality was markedly improved after the float and sink method. Specifically, the sink process using a 1.1 g cm?3 medium fluid rejected almost all rubber containing Cl and a large amount of PVC. The remaining Cl in char, after heating at 300 °C under an inert atmosphere and washing, was considered to be present as insoluble chlorides that volatilized at temperatures above 300 °C. Based on a tradeoff relationship between product quality and treatment cost, ASR may be utilized as a form of refuse plastic fuel or char.

I.H. Hwang; S. Yokono; T. Matsuto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Synergistic Inhibitors for Dilute High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were conducted to determine the effectiveness of various combinations of anodic inhibitors in the prevention of pitting in carbon steel exposed to dilute radioactive waste. Chromate, molybdate, and phosphate were investigated as replacements for nitrite, whose effective concentrations are incompatible with the waste vitrification process. The polarization scans were performed in non-radioactive waste simulants. Their results showed that acceptable combinations of phosphate with chromate and phosphate with molybdate effectively prevented pitting corrosion. Chromate with molybdate could not replace nitrite.

Wiersma, B.J.; Zapp, P.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electrical conductivity of dispersions: from dry foams to dilute suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new data for the electrical conductivity of foams in which the liquid fraction ranges from two to eighty percent. We compare with a comprehensive collection of prior data, and we model all results with simple empirical formul\\ae. We achieve a unified description that applies equally to dry foams and emulsions, where the droplets are highly compressed, as well as to dilute suspensions of spherical particles, where the particle separation is large. In the former limit, Lemlich's result is recovered; in the latter limit, Maxwell's result is recovered.

K. Feitosa; S. Marze; A. Saint-Jalmes; D. J. Durian

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

183

Zero sound modes of dilute Fermi gases with arbitrary spin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by the recent success of optical trapping of alkali-metal bosons, we have studied the zero sound modes of dilute Fermi gases with arbitrary spin-f, which are spin-S excitations (0<~S<~2f). The dispersion of the mode (S) depends on a single Landau parameter F(S), which is related to the scattering lengths of the system through a simple formula. Measurement of (even a subset of) these modes in finite magnetic fields will enable one to determine all the interaction parameters of the system.

S.-K. Yip and Tin-Lun Ho

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment: Biochemical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment 16 September 1997; 20 February 1998 Abstract: The effectiveness of ethanol pretreatment on pre was previously demonstrated, and the mechanism of action of ethanol was attributed in part to both lipid removal

Zand, Robert

185

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

186

Improved Anaerobic Digestion by the Addition of Paper Tube Residuals: Pretreatment, Stabilizing, and Synergetic Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pretreatments with steam explosion were performed on the paper tubes and evaluated by batch assays measuring the biomethane potential. ... 3.1 Biomethane Potential of Untreated and Treated Paper Tubes: Batch Assays ... The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of steam pretreatment on the biomethane potential of biofibers from digested manure. ...

Anna Teghammar; Maria del Pilar Castillo; Johnny Ascue; Claes Niklasson; Ilona Sárvári Horváth

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

GRR/Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If wastewater is not discharged into a municipal sewer system, the nonpoint source and NPDES permit inquiries are sufficient. A common approach to wastewater treatment is to treat on-site. See Idaho's

188

Infrared Optical Constants of Highly Diluted Sulfuric Acid Solution Droplets at Cirrus Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The data evaluation procedure, previously developed for open-path TDLAS measurements in combustion processes,(28) water sprays,(29) and on stratospheric balloon platforms,(30) ensured a precise correction of the broadband optical scattering losses caused by the aerosol and cloud particles along the absorption path, as well as the pressure and temperature changes during the expansion. ...

Robert Wagner; Stefan Benz; Helmut Bunz; Ottmar Möhler; Harald Saathoff; Martin Schnaiter; Thomas Leisner; Volker Ebert

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Stability Regimes of Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One option for combustion in zero-emission Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants is non-premixed combustion of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen in air. An important aspect to non-premixed combustion is flame stability or anchoring, though only a few fundamental stability studies of these flames have taken place to date. The following paper presents the results of experiments investigating the effects of nitrogen diluent fraction, jet diameter, and exit velocity on the static stability limits of a turbulent hydrogen jet flame issuing from a thin-lipped tube into a quiescent atmosphere. Four different stability limits are observed: detachment from the burner lip, reattachment to the burner lip, transition from a laminar lifted flame base to blowout or to a turbulent lifted flame, and transition from a turbulent lifted flame to blowout. The applicability of existing theories and correlations to the stability results is discussed. These results are an important step in assessing the viability of a non-premixed combustion approach using hydrogen diluted with nitrogen as a fuel.

Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Surface tension in the dilute Ising model. The Wulff construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the surface tension and the phenomenon of phase coexistence for the Ising model on $\\mathbbm{Z}^d$ ($d \\geqslant 2$) with ferromagnetic but random couplings. We prove the convergence in probability (with respect to random couplings) of surface tension and analyze its large deviations : upper deviations occur at volume order while lower deviations occur at surface order. We study the asymptotics of surface tension at low temperatures and relate the quenched value $\\tau^q$ of surface tension to maximal flows (first passage times if $d = 2$). For a broad class of distributions of the couplings we show that the inequality $\\tau^a \\leqslant \\tau^q$ -- where $\\tau^a$ is the surface tension under the averaged Gibbs measure -- is strict at low temperatures. We also describe the phenomenon of phase coexistence in the dilute Ising model and discuss some of the consequences of the media randomness. All of our results hold as well for the dilute Potts and random cluster models.

Marc Wouts

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of food waste and sewage sludge treated using various pretreatment technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic co-digestion with sewage sludge using pretreatment technologies and food waste. We studied the effects of various pretreatment methods (thermal...

Seungjin Kim; Kwangkeun Choi; Jong-Oh Kim; Jinwook Chung

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment of Poplar by Leading Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment mass loadings of 5.8­116 mg/g of glucan in poplar wood prior to pretreat- ment. In addition, the enzyme by enzymes for all pretreatments, xylanase leverage on glucan removal decreased at high cellulase loadings

California at Riverside, University of

193

Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar yields from different switchgrass sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments eased comparisons. All pretreatments enhanced sugar recovery from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic production. The high world con- sumption of fossil energy also drives up accumulation of carbon dioxide

California at Riverside, University of

194

Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reaction Alcohol Standard Alcohol Co. Power Energy Fuels Lignocellulose Gasification CO/H2 Fermentation Alcohol Alico Inc., Bioenergy, Coskata Lignocellulose Acid Hydrolysis Sugar Fermentation Alcohol Arkenol, BlueFire Ethanol, Masada...

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of a Partial Flow Dilution System for Transient Particulate Matter Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A commercially available partial flow dilution system was evaluated against a constant volume sampling system over a suite of transient engine dynamometer tests.

196

Scanning Hall probe microscopy of a diluted magnetic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the micromagnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor as a function of temperature and applied field with a scanning Hall probe microscope built in our laboratory. The design philosophy for this microscope and some details are described. The samples analyzed in this work are Ga{sub 0.94}Mn{sub 0.06}As films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetic domains are 2-4 mum wide and fairly stable with temperature. Magnetic clusters are observed above T{sub C}, which we ascribe to MnAs defects too small and sparse to be detected by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

Kweon, Seongsoo [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Samarth, Nitin [Physics Department, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lozanne, Alex de [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Vibrational Dynamics of Isotopically Dilute Nitrogen to 104 GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman studies to 104 GPa of a 14N2 host with dilute 15N2 and 14N15N isotopic species indicate an increase in vibrational coupling with pressure. The lowest frequency branch of the isotopic species 15N2 reaches a plateau around 100 GPa suggesting the onset of bond weakening for molecules located on particular sites. An unusual intensity increase is observed for the isotopic ?1 guest modes. The phase transitions above 20 GPa appear to involve an increase in the number of inequivalent sites, with possibly subtle changes in the orientational behavior of particular molecules in the pressure range 25 to 50 GPa not readily revealed in recent x-ray diffraction studies.

H. Olijnyk and A. P. Jephcoat

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

Effects of dilution conditions on diesel particle size distribution and filter mass measurements in case of marine fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Particle emission characteristics were studied from heavy-duty diesel engine operating on fuels with sulfur levels relevant to marine operation, i.e. 0.05% S and 3% S respectively. Effects of primary dilution temperature (PDT) and primary dilution ratio (PDR) were investigated together with effect of filter media and time of filter conditioning. PDT increase was found slowing down nucleation rate due to increase of saturation vapor pressures of volatile species. In turn, increasing PDR reduces partial pressure of exhaust species and hence weakens both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. All these effects are amplified by high sulfur content in marine fuels which increases available amount of nucleation-prone vapor-phase semivolatile compounds. At the same time, water condensation artifact was observed at PDR = 3. No filter type was found to be overwhelmingly superior as certain positive and/or negative measurement artifacts are inherently associated with all filter materials. The filter conditioning time was also found to cause substantial PM mass variation, as control over VOC take up from (or lost to) laboratory air and hydration of sulfuric acid is required. The standard 24 hour conditioning time was found insufficient to reach complete PM mass equilibrium, so longer time is required when measuring from high-sulfur fuels.

Sergey Ushakov; Harald Valland; Jørgen B. Nielsen; Erik Hennie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of co-firing of coal and pretreated biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This master thesis describes the co-firing concept, benefits and opportunities of pretreated biomass in pulverized coal boilers for industrial use. Burning fossil fuels, i.e.… (more)

Hye, A S M Abdul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Predicted Effect of Minerals on Pretreatment 1013 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicted Effect of Minerals on Pretreatment 1013 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113 of cellulose to cellulase enzymes has #12;1014 Lloyd and Wyman Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113

California at Riverside, University of

202

Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Process for Biomass Is Successfully Implemented at Larger Scale  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

DOE-funded researchers have shown that a new, highly effective pretreatment process used in the production of biofuel can be executed at a larger scale than ever achieved before.

203

Effect of Plasma Pretreatment Followed by Nanoclay Loading on Flame Retardant Properties of Cotton Fabric  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research work the effect of plasma treatment with nitrogen gas followed by nanoclay treatment on flame retardancy of cotton fabrics ... , nitrogen plasma pretreatment has synergistic effect on nanoclay fo...

Sheila Shahidi; Mahmood Ghoranneviss

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Synthesis of three advanced biofuels from ionic liquid-pretreated switchgrass using engineered Escherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and yard waste, respectively...for yard waste control strain...pCellulose on plant biomass treated...liquid pre-treatment . Biofuel...Insights into plant cell wall degradation...bioenergy systems . Biofuels Bioprod...2010 ) An integrated catalytic approach...

Gregory Bokinsky; Pamela P. Peralta-Yahya; Anthe George; Bradley M. Holmes; Eric J. Steen; Jeffrey Dietrich; Taek Soon Lee; Danielle Tullman-Ercek; Christopher A. Voigt; Blake A. Simmons; Jay D. Keasling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Efficient biomass pretreatment using ionic liquids derived from lignin and hemicellulose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pretreatment efficiency . Biofuels 4 ( 1 ): 63 – 72 . 16 Simmons BA Loque D Blanch HW ( 2008 ) Next-generation biomass feedstocks for biofuel production . Genome Biol 9 ( 12 ): 242 . 17 Kilpelainen A ( 2003 ) Wood properties of Scots pines (Pinus...

Aaron M. Socha; Ramakrishnan Parthasarathi; Jian Shi; Sivakumar Pattathil; Dorian Whyte; Maxime Bergeron; Anthe George; Kim Tran; Vitalie Stavila; Sivasankari Venkatachalam; Michael G. Hahn; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Assessment of an ultrafiltration pre-treatment system for a seawater reverse osmosis plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The seawater reverse osmosis system requires extensive pre-treatment in order to ensure reliable performance. The conventional pre-treatment system involves dosing of chemicals, which requires frequent monitoring of raw water quality, and also involves adjusting the dosage. Besides being cumbersome, there is a lot of time lag involved in carrying out these measures. This calls for pre-treatment systems based on physicochemical mechanisms. During the last few years, Ultrafiltration (UF) has emerged as a leading unit operation in order to render raw seawater compatible with reverse osmosis operations. In this context, the Desalination Division of BARC has already installed an operational UF pre-treatment system. In this paper, we examine the role of UF in the overall operations of the seawater reverse osmosis system.

S.A. Tiwari; D. Goswami; S. Prabhakar; P.K. Tewari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Modeling and simulation of landfill gas production from pretreated MSW landfill simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cumulative landfill gas (LFG) production and its rate ... simulated for pretreated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill using four models namely first order exponential ... . Considering the behavior of the p...

Rasool Bux Mahar; Abdul Razaque Sahito…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Phase Uniqueness and Correlation Length in DilutedField Ising Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Uniqueness and Correlation Length in Diluted­Field Ising Models L. R. G. Fontes E. J. Neves Instituto de Matem'atica e Estat'istica, USP November 18, 1994 Abstract The Diluted­Field Ising Model 1 when the field mean is positive. Our methods involve comparisons with ordinary uniform field Ising

209

Viscosity of semi-dilute polymer solutions M. Adam and M. Delsanti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

549 Viscosity of semi-dilute polymer solutions M. Adam and M. Delsanti Laboratoire Léon viscosity measurements on semi-dilute solutions (c* c 10 %). The viscosity variation is independent to the solvent viscosity. With concentration, the following variations were observed : 2014 for PIB-toluene, ~r

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Fusion of Dilute AL Lattice Models Yu-kui Zhou1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion of Dilute AL Lattice Models Yu-kui Zhou1 , Paul A. Pearce2 Mathematics Department The fusion procedure is implemented for the dilute AL lattice models. A fusion hierarchy of functional ansatz equations of the transfer matrices have been given. 1 Introduction The fusion procedure

Pearce, Paul A.

211

Physical mechanisms for the offshore detachment of the Changjiang Diluted Water in the East China Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical mechanisms for the offshore detachment of the Changjiang Diluted Water in the East China mechanisms for the summertime offshore detachment of the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) into the East China in the northern coastal area of the Changjiang mouth offshore over a submerged plateau that extends toward Cheju

Chen, Changsheng

212

Metal-insulator transition in dilute alkali-metal systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The metal-insulator transition is studied for dilute systems of alkali metals. Using a spin-split self-consistent band-structure approach, we find the transition density, a strikingly enhanced magnetic susceptibility, and the electron effective mass. The critical density nc is found to be given by the simple relation rsc=r0+2.8. Here rsc=[3(4?nc)]13 and r0 is the model potential radius which is roughly the radius of the neutral atom. The Mott criterion of nc13aB?0.25 (where aB is the appropriate Bohr orbit) is found to be inadequate for describing these systems. The predicted effective mass and magnetic susceptibility enhancements are largest for Li and become systematically smaller for the heavier alkalis. We compare our results for the transition density with two sets of experiments, namely the gas-liquid critical density and the metal-insulator transition for codeposited thick films of alkali-metal and rare-gas atoms. Good agreement is found in both cases.

J. H. Rose

1981-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Novel Approach in Determining Oil Dilution Level on a DPF Equipped Vehicle as a Result of Regeneration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

¢This approach can be easily adopted for developing optimum engine calibration meeting performance, emissions and oil dilution.

214

Concentrating aqueous volatile fatty acid salt solutions using a tertiary amine mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and that reaction is difficult to reverse (Streitwieser and Heathcock, 1976; King and Poole, 1994). Tertiary amines (R, N) do not form amides but generally give lower K, values than secondary amines. For the extraction of undissociated carboxylic acids, aliphatic... by acidifying with carbon dioxide under pressure in the presence of a suitable solvent (Busche, 1988). Gregor has used electrodialysis to recover acetic acid from dilute (1-5 wt%) acetate solutions. With newer membranes, acid concentrations up to 30% were...

Gaskin, David J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Inert Gas Dilution Effect on the Flammability Limits of Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

previous one from U.S. BMs???????....69 5.3 Ethane flammability properties with dilution of nitrogen (25 ?C and 1 atm)??????????????????????..????.. 70 5.4 Propane flammability properties with dilution of nitrogen (25 ?C and 1 atm...)???????????????????????..???.. 72 5.8 Flammability properties of methane and propane at different molar radios (20 %/80%, 40%/60%, 60%/40%, and 80%/20%) with dilution of nitrogen (25 ?C and 1 atm)?..????.?..?????????73 5.9 Flammability properties of ethane and propane...

Zhao, Fuman

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effect of hydrous ethanol on crankcase oil dilution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adequate lubrication is of the utmost importance in internal combustion engines. Low temperature operation with low-proof alcohol may create some operational problems if alcohol and/or water accumulates in the crankcase oil. Condensates of unburned alcohol and water maybe blown into the crankcase oil with blowby gases. These condensates may form an emulsion with the crankcase oil that may restrict the supply of oil for adequate lubrication. Three engine tests were performed to identify the effect of low-proof ethanol fueling on crankcase oil dilution and degradation. The first test was hydrous ethanol carburetion in a 2.3 liter, 4 cylinder, 1974 Ford gasoline engine. The second test was a mixture of low-proof ethanol fumigation and normal diesel fuel injection (at reduced rate) in an Allis-Chalmers Model 2900 turbocharged diesel engine. The third test was also a mixture of ethanol fumigation and diesel injection in an Allis-Chalmers Mod2800 naturally aspirated diesel engine. Independent parameters of crankcase oil temperature, engine load and speed, percent of total energy in the form of ethyl alcohol and proof of the ethyl alcohol were considered and varied. After each test the oil was sampled for determination of flash point, fire points, water by centrifuge, water by distillation, and viscosity at room temperature. Results for the first test indicate that the use of ethanol of 130 proof or less may result in accumulation of water in the crankcase oil that may be harmful to the engine. In the second and third tests although there was a decrease in fire and flash points as well as in the viscosity of the oil, no appreciable amount of water or alcohol was detected in the crankcase oil. It is important to mention that there was a maximum alcohol fuel flow rate beyond which the diesel engine starts to knock or misfire.

Khalifa, G.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Maintenance of Parent Strategies is Associated with Pre-Treatment Parent Fidelity, Treatment Assignment, and Post Treatment Community Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuller, A. (2011). JASPER: Interventionist workshops atjoint attention intervention (JASPER) in which the specificlevel of naturally occurring JASPER fidelity pre-treatment.

Fuller, Amy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Determination of boron in nuclear materials by isotope dilution technique. Part I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of the mass-spectrometric stable-isotope dilution technique for the determination of microgram and submicrogram quantities of boron in nuclear materials is described. An adequate...10B) is added t...

J. Marsel; D. Milivojevi?

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Determination of boron traces in rye grass BCR 281 by isotope dilution mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the isotope dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) determination of boron in rye grass at the 5 ?g...?1 level has been developed. The mass spectrometric measurements are performed using negative thermal ...

A. Lamberty; V. Holland; A. Verbruggen…

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for Bioprecipitation of Uranium from Dilute Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...February 15, 2007 ERRATUM ERRATUM Engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for Bioprecipitation of Uranium from Dilute Nuclear Waste Deepti Appukuttan Amara Sambasiva Rao Shree Kumar Apte Molecular Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre...

Deepti Appukuttan; Amara Sambasiva Rao; Shree Kumar Apte

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Structural, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Mn-doped CdS Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diluted magnetic CdS:Mn nanoparticles were synthesized by the aqueous...2+) concentrations (x...=7–10 atom %) at room temperature in nitrogen atmosphere and capped with Thiogelycerol. The X-ray diffraction patter...

S. Salimian; S. Farjami Shayesteh

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

New materials for methane capture from dilute and medium-concentration...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New materials for methane capture from dilute and medium-concentration sources Previous Next List J. Kim, A. Maiti, L.-C. Lin, J. K. Stolaroff, B. Smit, and R. D. Aines, Nature...

223

An algorithm for U-Pb isotope dilution data reduction and uncertainty propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-precision U-Pb geochronology by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry is integral to a variety of Earth science disciplines, but its ultimate resolving power is quantified by the uncertainties of ...

McLean, Noah Morgan

224

Dendritic cells: sensors of extreme antigen dilutions and role in immunity against Salmonella typhimurium infections   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intention of the work described in this thesis was to identify whether extremely high dilutions of antigen can induce changes in dendritic cell maturation and dendritic cell ability to initiate immune responses. ...

Zienkiewicz, Dimitrios Tomasz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Statement of work for architect-engineer services, initial pretreatment module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Statement of Work describes the Architect-Engineer services to be provided by Raytheon/BNFL in providing a conceptual design (Contract TGW-SVV-063869) for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM), Project W-236B, at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington. The IPM Project, a radiochemical process facility, will be designed and constructed for an initial phase of waste pretreatment, which will be for the removal of cesium from supernatant wastes to produce a Low-level waste (LLW) stream to a vitrification facility. The design shall also accommodate side streams of High-Level Waste (HLW) fractions that will be directed to suitable, existing storage tanks where they will be recombined with an additional high-activity waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-activity waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository.

Sowa, K.B.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Study of Lean Premixed Methane Combustion with CO2 Dilution under Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In gas turbines, high air dilution is used in order to keep the turbine inlet temperature (TIT)(7) below the metallurgical temperature limit of the first turbine stages. ... It was shown that CO2 dilution could be an efficient method for increasing CO2 concentration in exhaust gas, thus making its capture easier. ... Efforts were focused on the impacts on cycle efficiency, combustion, gas turbine components, and cost. ...

Stéphanie de Persis; Gilles Cabot; Laure Pillier; Iskender Gökalp; Abdelakrim Mourad Boukhalfa

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

The effects of an ambient salinity gradient on the dilution of dense brine jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE MCCULLOUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY NAYNE MCCULLOUGH Approved as to style and content by: Robert E. Randall (Chair of Committee...

McCullough, Gary Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Microcanonical simulation of the site-diluted three-dimensional Ising model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a microcanonical simulation to obtain the phase diagram in the temperature-concentration space of the three-dimensional site-diluted Ising model, for concentrations of magnetic atoms in the range 1?p?0.4. The temperature and concentration dependence of the magnetization, internal energy, and specific heat are calculated on 32×32×32 lattices. The resulting phase diagram agrees well with recent Monte Carlo simulations and extends the numerical estimates up to the regime of strong dilution.

Andréia A. de Alcântara, Adauto J. F. de Souza, and F. G. Brady Moreira

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Conversion for Avicel and AFEX pretreated corn stover by Clostridium thermocellum and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation: Insights into microbial conversion of pretreated cellulosic biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for for Avicel and AFEX pretreated corn stover by Clostridium thermocellum and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation: Insights into microbial conversion of pretreated cellulosic biomass Xiongjun Shao a , Mingjie Jin b,c , Anna Guseva a , Chaogang Liu d , Venkatesh Balan b,c , David Hogsett d , Bruce E. Dale b,c , Lee Lynd a,d,⇑ a Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA b Biomass Conversion Research Laboratory (BCRL), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, MBI Building, 3900 Collins Road, Lansing, MI 48910, USA c Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA d Mascoma Corporation, 67 Etna Road, Suite 300, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 March 2011 Received in revised form 6 May 2011 Accepted

232

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the pretreatment solutions that allow treatment to be tailored to specific wastes, processing ahead of the completion schedules for the main treatment facilities, and reduction of technical risks associated with future processing schedules. Wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River offer challenging scientific and engineering tasks. At both sites, space limitations confound the ability to effectively retrieve and treat the wastes. Additionally, the radiation dose to the worker operating and maintaining the radiochemical plants has a large role in establishing the desired radioactivity removal. However, the regulatory requirements to treat supernatant and saltcake tank wastes differ at the two sites. Hanford must treat and remove radioactivity from the tanks based on the TriParty Agreement and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing (WIR) documentation. These authorizing documents do not specify treatment technologies; rather, they specify endstate conditions. Dissimilarly, Waste Determinations prepared at SRS in accordance with Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act along with state operating permits establish the methodology and amounts of radioactivity that must be removed and may be disposed of in South Carolina. After removal of entrained solids and site-specific radionuclides, supernatant and saltcake wastes are considered to be low activity waste (LAW) and are immobilized in glass and disposed of at the Hanford Site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) or formulated into a grout for disposal at the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility. Wastes stored at the Hanford Site or SRS comprise saltcake, supernate, and sludges. The supernatant and saltcake waste fractions contain primarily sodium salts, metals (e.g., Al, Cr), cesium-137 (Cs-137), technetium-99 (Tc-99) and entrained solids containing radionuclides such as strontium-90 (Sr-90) and transuranic elements. The sludges contain many of the transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

The effect of dilution on the gas retention behavior of Tank 241-SY- 103 waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-five of the 177 underground waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site have been placed on the Flammable Gas watch list. These 25 tanks, containing high-level waste generated during plutonium and uranium processing, have been identified as potentially capable of accumulating flammable gases above the lower flammability limit (Babad et al. 1991). In the case of Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103, it has been proposed that diluting the tank waste may mitigate this hazard (Hudson et al. 1995; Stewart et al. 1994). The effect of dilution on the ability of waste from Tank 241-SY-103 to accumulate gas was studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A similar study has been completed for waste from Tank 241-SY-101 (Bredt et al. 1995). Because of the additional waste-storage volume available in Tank 241-SY-103 and because the waste is assumed to be similar to that currently in Tank 241-SY-101, Tank 241-SY-103 became the target for a demonstration of passive mitigation through in-tank dilution. In 1994, plans for the in-tank dilution demonstration were deferred pending a decision on whether to pursue dilution as a mitigation strategy. However, because Tank 241-SY-103 is an early retrieval target, determination of how waste properties vary with dilution will still be required.

Bredt, P.R.; Tingey, S.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Pretreatment/Radionuclide Separations of Cs/Tc from Supernates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant improvements have been made in ion exchange and solvent extraction materials and processes available for separation of the radionuclides cesium and technetium from both acid and alkaline waste solutions. New ion exchange materials and solvent extraction reagents are more selective for Cs over sodium and potassium than previous materials. The higher selectivity gives higher Cs capacity and improved separation processes. Technetium removal has been improved by new ion exchange resins, which have either improved capacity or easier elution. Several different crown ethers have been shown to extract pertechnetate ion selectively over other anions. Organic complexants in some waste solutions reduce pertechnetate ion and stabilize the reduced species. Selective oxidation allows conversion to pertechnetate without oxidation of the organic complexants.

Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of high-level waste pretreatment processes with an approximate reasoning model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an approximate-reasoning (AR)-based model to analyze pretreatment options for high-level waste is presented. AR methods are used to emulate the processes used by experts in arriving at a judgment. In this paper, the authors first consider two specific issues in applying AR to the analysis of pretreatment options. They examine how to combine quantitative and qualitative evidence to infer the acceptability of a process result using the example of cesium content in low-level waste. They then demonstrate the use of simple physical models to structure expert elicitation and to produce inferences consistent with a problem involving waste particle size effects.

Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Agnew, S.F.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of moisture removal and energy usage in pretreatment module of waste cooking oil for biodiesel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) is a plausible low cost biodiesel feedstock but it exhibits few unfavorable parameters for conversion into biodiesel. One of the parameter is the presence of high moisture content which will inhibit or retard catalyst during the acid esterification or base transesterification causing lower purity and yield of biodiesel. This will effect the post processing and escalate production cost making WCO a not favorable biodiesel feedstock. Therefore, it is important to have an effective moisture removal method to reduce the moisture content below 0.05%wt or 500 ppm in WCO for an efficient biodiesel production. In this work, the effectiveness of moisture removal and the energy usage of a newly develop innovative pretreatment module has been evaluated and reported. Results show that the pretreatment module is able to reduce up to 85% to effectively reduce the moisture content to below 500ppm of the initial moisture content of WCO and only consume 157 Wh/l energy compared to conventional heating that consume 386 Wh/l and only remove 67.6% moisture in 2 hours.

K Palanisamy; M K Idlan; N Saifudin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect of Catalyst Pre-Treatment on Chirality-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that catalyst pre-treatment conditions can have a profound effect on the chiral distribution in single-walled carbon nanotubes chemical vapor deposition. Using a SiO2-supported Cobalt model catalyst and pre-treatment in NH3, we obtain a...

Fouquet, Martin; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Thomsen, Christian; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ethanol fermentation of cassava starch pretreated with alkali  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In view of the current industrial process for the conventional ethanol fermentation, in which raw starch materials are heated at 120 degrees C for 2 h, conditions for an alternative process were set: an overall time from saccharification to ethanol fermentation of within 3-4 days, an operation temperature of below 60 degrees C, an ethanol yield of over 93%, and a ratio of raw material to fermentation volume of within 1:4. To meet these conditions, previously a steeping method of starch materials in 0.5N HCl solution at 60 degrees C for 12 h were used, followed by combined actions of ..cap alpha..-amylase and glucoamylase. The ethanol yield from uncooked cassava starch treated under the conditions described was 95% after fermentation for 3 days with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the use of a relatively higher concentration of acid for steeping is still a problem and gelatinization of starch materials is insufficient. This communication, therefore, describes effects of alkali steeping and structural change of starch granules on the ethanol fermentation. 8 references.

Shin, Y.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Choe, Y.K.; Kim, H.S.; Byun, S.M.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2007 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Pretreatment: the key to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presents important opportunities to achieve very low costs, pretreatment of naturally resistant cellulosic materials is essential if we are to achieve high yields from biological operations; this operation biological, chemical, physical, and thermal approaches have been investigated over the years, but only those

California at Riverside, University of

242

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Upgrading Recovered Paper With Enzyme Pretreat ment and Pressurized Peroxide Bleaching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tiveness of enzymes for toner removal was subsequently confirmed on an industrial scale (2,3). In addition to be effective for toner ink removal, can improve the bleachability of low quality recovered paper. When followed mixed recovered paper demonstrated that an enzymatic pretreatment improves the removal of residual inks

Abubakr, Said

244

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment on the Enzymatic understand these trade-offs, comparative data are reported on xylan and lignin removal and enzymatic with just water enhanced the xylan dissolution rate, more than doubled total lignin removal, and increased

California at Riverside, University of

245

Does change in accessibility with conversion depend on both the substrate and pretreatment technology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to hydrolysis rates slowing down with conversion, the heterogeneous nature of biomass, which affects glucanDoes change in accessibility with conversion depend on both the substrate and pretreatment, respectively, and its change with conversion were measured for pure Avicel glucan and poplar solids that had

California at Riverside, University of

246

Comparing different pre-treatment methods for strongly compacted organic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sieving: a case study on Roman waterlogged deposits Patricia Vandorpe and Stefanie Jacomet Four preComparing different pre-treatment methods for strongly compacted organic sediments prior to wet of the experiment was to find out which pre- treatment method facilitates the sieving process without destroying

Jacomet, Stefanie

247

Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessment of Combinations between Pretreatment and Conversion Configurations for Bioethanol Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Therefore, useful alternatives can be generated, although additional factors need to be considered. ... Therefore, the most appropriate conversions to combine with SE are SHCF and SSCF. ... The black color bar represents the energy cost for pretreatment and conversion steps, and the gray color bar represents the energy cost for the distillation step. ...

Carolina Conde-Mejía; Arturo Jiménez-Gutiérrez; Mahmoud M. El-Halwagi

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

De-oiling and Pre-treatments for High-Quality Potato Chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A de-oiling step using a centrifuge ensures oil content reduction and improves the quality of fried snacks. A commercial deep-fat fryer with the basket loaded with potatoes and a sample holder was used to fry potato slices, non-pretreated, blanched...

Kim, Tae Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparison of trichostatin A and valproic acid treatment regimens in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new compounds for the therapy of fibrotic diseases. In this study we compared the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and valproic acid, in an experimental model of kidney fibrosis. In mice, doxorubicin (adriamycin) can cause nephropathy characterized by chronic proteinuria, glomerular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, as seen in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Two treatment regimens were applied, treatment was either started prior to the doxorubicin insult or delayed until a significant degree of proteinuria and fibrosis was present. Pre-treatment of trichostatin A significantly hampered glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as did the pre-treatment with valproic acid. In contrast, the development of proteinuria was only completely inhibited in the pre-treated valproic acid group, and not in the pre-treated trichostatin A animals. In the postponed treatment with valproic acid, a complete resolution of established doxorubicin-induced proteinuria was achieved within three days, whereas trichostatin A could not correct proteinuria in such a treatment regimen. However, both postponed regimens have comparable efficacy in maintaining the kidney fibrosis to the level reached at the start of the treatments. Moreover, not only the process of fibrosis, but also renal inflammation was attenuated by both HDAC inhibitors. Our data confirm a role for HDACs in renal fibrogenesis and point towards a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors. The effect on renal disease progression and manifestation can however be different for individual HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • Valproic acid is a potent antiproteinuric drug, whereas trichostatin A is not. • Trichostatin A and valproic acid reduce kidney fibrosis in doxorubicin nephropathy. • Both valproic acid and trichostatin A attenuate renal inflammation.

Van Beneden, Katrien, E-mail: kvbenede@vub.ac.be [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Geers, Caroline [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Pauwels, Marina [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mannaerts, Inge [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Wissing, Karl M. [Department of Nephrology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Van den Branden, Christiane [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Grunsven, Leo A. van, E-mail: lvgrunsv@vub.ac.be [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are to investigate various coal pretreatment techniques and to determine the effect of these pretreatment procedures on the reactivity of the coal. Reactivity enhancement will be evaluated under both direct hydroliquefaction and co-processing conditions. Coal conversion utilizing low rank coals and low severity conditions (reaction temperatures generally less than 350{degrees}C) are the primary focus of the liquefaction experiments, as it is expected that the effect of pretreatment conditions and the attendant reactivity enhancement will be greatest for these coals and at these conditions. This document presents a comprehensive report summarizing the findings on the effect of mild alkylation pretreatment on coal reactivity under both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing conditions. Results of experiments using a dispersed catalyst system (chlorine) are also presented for purposes of comparison. IN general, mild alkylation has been found to be an effective pretreatment method for altering the reactivity of coal. Selective (oxygen) methylation was found to be more effective for high oxygen (subbituminous) coals compared to coals of higher rank. This reactivity enhancement was evidenced under both low and high severity liquefaction conditions, and for both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing reaction environments. Non-selective alkylation (methylation) was also effective, although the enhancement was less pronounced than found for coal activated by O-alkylation. The degree of reactivity enhancement was found to vary with both liquefaction and/or co-processing conditions and coal type, with the greatest positive effect found for subbituminous coal which had been selectively O-methylated and subsequently liquefied at low severity reaction conditions. 5 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optical spacing effect in organic photovoltaic cells incorporating a dilute acceptor layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of spacing layers in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can enhance light absorption by optimizing the spatial distribution of the incident optical field in the multilayer structure. We explore the optical spacing effect in OPVs achieved using a diluted electron acceptor layer of C{sub 60}. While optical spacing is often realized by optimizing buffer layer thickness, we find that optical spacing via dilution leads to cells with similar or enhanced photocurrent. This is observed despite a smaller quantity of absorbing molecules, suggesting a more efficient use of absorbed photons. In fact, dilution is found to concentrate optical absorption near the electron donor-acceptor interface, resulting in a marked increase in the exciton diffusion efficiency. Contrasting the use of changes in thickness to engineer optical absorption, the use of dilution does not significantly alter the overall thickness of the OPV. Optical spacing via dilution is shown to be a viable alternative to more traditional optical spacing techniques and may be especially useful in the continued optimization of next-generation, tandem OPVs where it is important to minimize competition for optical absorption between individual sub-cells.

Menke, S. Matthew; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Holmes, Russell J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in pretreated biomass through conversion of xylan and xylo-dioxide makes conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin Containing Substrates Bin Yang cellulose and solids containing 56% cellulose and 28% lignin from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn of cellulase and particularly beta-glucosidase on lignin. Of particular note, BSA treatment of pretreated corn

California at Riverside, University of

255

Persistence of magnons in a site-diluted dimerized frustrated antiferromagnet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Persistence of magnons in a site-diluted dimerized frustrated antiferromagnet Persistence of magnons in a site-diluted dimerized frustrated antiferromagnet This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23 416003 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0953-8984/23/41/416003) Download details: IP Address: 128.219.49.9 The article was downloaded on 17/10/2011 at 17:07 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS: CONDENSED MATTER J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23 (2011) 416003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/23/41/416003 Persistence of magnons in a site-diluted dimerized frustrated antiferromagnet M B Stone 1 , A Podlesnyak 1 , G Ehlers

256

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

MOBILE SYSTEMS FOR DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM AND URANIUM CONTAINING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile melt-dilute (MMD) module for the treatment of aluminum research reactor spent fuel is being developed. The process utilizes a closed system approach to retain fission products/gases inside a sealed canister after treatment. The MMD process melts and dilutes spent fuel with depleted uranium to obtain a fissile fraction of less than 0.2. The final ingot is solidified inside the sealed canister and can be stored safely either wet or dry until final disposition or reprocessing. The MMD module can be staged at or near the research reactor fuel storage sites to facilitate the melt-dilute treatment of the spent fuel into a stable non-proliferable form.

Adams, T

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Abstract 296: Pre-treatment clinical laboratory tests indicative of metabolic status are associated with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...296: Pre-treatment clinical laboratory tests indicative of metabolic status are associated...value of serum pre-treatment laboratory tests for prognostic purposes in non-small...identify pre-treatment routine laboratory tests indicative of a patient's overall metabolic...

Fanmao Zhang; Qing H. Meng; Yuanqing Ye; Michelle AT Hildebrandt; Maosheng Huang; Xifeng Wu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thermal pretreated sludge: Role of microbial community structure and correlation with process performances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal hydrolysis pretreatment coupled with Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (TAD) for Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) treatment is a promising combination to improve biodegradation kinetics during stabilization. However, to date there is a limited knowledge of the anaerobic biomass composition and its impact on TAD process performances. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the microbial communities selected in two semi-continuous anaerobic digesters, fed with untreated and thermal pretreated sludge, were investigated. The systems were operated for 250 days at different organic loading rate. 16S rRNA gene clonal analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analyses allowed us to identify the majority of bacterial and archaeal populations. Proteolytic Coprothermobacter spp. and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter spp. living in strict syntrophic association were found to dominate in TAD process. The establishment of a syntrophic proteolytic pathway was favoured by the high temperature of the process and enhanced by the thermal pretreatment of the feeding sludge. Proteolytic activity, alone or with thermal pretreatment, occurred during TAD as proven by increasing concentration of soluble ammonia and soluble COD (sCOD) during the process. However, the availability of a readily biodegradable substrate due to pretreatment allowed to significant sCOD removals (more than 55%) corresponding to higher biogas production in the reactor fed with thermal pretreated sludge. Microbial population dynamics analysed by FISH showed that Coprothermobacter and Methanothermobacter immediately established a stable syntrophic association in the reactor fed with pretreated sludge in line with the overall improved TAD performances observed under these conditions.

M.C. Gagliano; C.M. Braguglia; A. Gianico; G. Mininni; K. Nakamura; S. Rossetti

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw for biofuels production. It was observed that increasing the pretreatment temperature decreased the remaining solid, increased the enzymatic digestibility, and increased the xylan removal. When 0.2–5.0% \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 were employed in pretreatments, increasing the inorganic salt concentration slightly diminished the remaining solid, though the enzymatic digestibility was enhanced. Under the higher-than-2% condition, no xylan remained in the solid residues after pretreatment. With pretreatment time, the remaining solid slightly decreased, but the enzymatic digestibility was increased. Moreover, xylan removal was linearly increased to 15 min, after which it was completely hydrolyzed. Overall, these results indicated that pretreatment by 2% \\{NH4Cl\\} or MgCl2 at 185 °C for 15 min completely hydrolyzes the xylan of miscanthus straw. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the physical surface of the miscanthus straw showed an apparently damaged surface area and exposure of the internal structure after pretreatment with \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 by SEM.

Kyeong Eop Kang; Don-Hee Park; Gwi-Taek Jeong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Investigation and demonstration of the durability of air plasma pre-treatment on polypropylene automotive bumpers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Higher utilisation of low-density materials such as polymers and polymer composites is a pre-requisite for the lightweight vehicle of the future. Of the commodity polymers polypropylene (PP) is by far the most attractive for the automotive industry. Additionally, PP can be utilised as a glass or mineral filled composite which may be used for semi-structural applications. A major problem is that PP (along with other polyolefins) has a non-polar surface chemistry which means the wetting characteristics of components made from this material are poor. Ultimately, this will result in poor adhesion of paints, coatings or adhesive bonding products. This problem has been overcome in the majority of instances by treating the surface of the substrate in order to alter the surface chemistry. PP has found extensive use as films and flat sheets and hence certain techniques such as flame and corona have been favoured despite both having problems of heterogeneous or patchy treatment across a surface. However, for complex 3-D automotive shapes, such as bumpers, these methods are less useful. While flame treatment for example is widely used it has several disadvantages in a commercial volume production environment which all centre around the potential for the part to undergo overtreatment, incipient melting or melting during machine stops etc., as well as the hazards associated with combustible gas. An alternative method is atmospheric plasma pre-treatment. This work has investigated the effect of a forced air plasma pre-treatment on surface chemistry and bond strength of a commercial grade polypropylene material. The plasma head was attached to a robot arm which makes it highly suited to continuous production environments and can treat complex surfaces. A range of translation speeds were investigated and the surface chemistry and topography of the treated surfaces were examined using atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The processing was further optimised by single lap-shear testing. An optimised set of parameters was used to pre-treat and bond a full size automotive bumper assembly with a polyurethane (PU) adhesive. Bumpers were then subjected to a standard automotive range of climate conditioning as well as soaking at ?20°C and 70°C before front centre impact testing. Parts pre-treated and bonded using this pre-treatment and adhesive system, successfully passed all the required standard automotive impact tests. For added benefit, it was also found that the open time of the pre-treatment was 1 week depending on storage conditions.

Rebecca Stewart; Vannessa Goodship; Felicity Guild; Martyn Green; Jeff Farrow

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coexistence of Ising cluster excitations and intracluster excitations in diluted Ising magnets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To elucidate magnetic excitations in diluted Ising magnets over the entire magnetic concentration, we performed neutron inelastic-scattering experiments on two-dimensional diluted Ising magnets Rb2CocMg1-cF4, (c=0.1,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.58), whose magnetic concentration was below the percolation threshold. We found that Ising cluster excitations and intracluster excitations coexist over the entire concentration region, and that the scattering intensities from these different origins change with the concentration.

Hironobu Ikeda and Kenji Ohoyama

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Prompt neutron decay constants in uranium diluted with matrix material systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rossi-Alpha measurements were performed on uranium diluted with matrix material systems to determine the prompt neutron decay constants. These constants represent an eigenvalue characteristic of these particular critical assemblies, which can be experimentally measured by the Rossi-Alpha or pulse neutron source techniques and calculated by a deterministic or Monte Carlo method. In the measurements presented in this summary, highly enriched foils diluted in various X/{sup 235}U ratios with polyethylene and SiO{sub 2}, and polyethylene and aluminum were assembled to a high multiplication and the prompt neutron decay constants were obtained by the Rossi-Alpha technique.

Sanchez, R. G. (Rene G.); Loaiza, D. J. (David J.); Brunson, G. S. (Glenn S.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Long-Range Order of Dilute Rare-Earth Spin Ensemble Revealed with Cavity QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work demonstrates strong coupling regime between an Erbium ion spin ensemble and Hybrid Cavity-Whispering Gallery Modes in a Yttrium Aluminium Garnet dielectric crystal. Coupling strengths of $220$~MHz and mode quality factors in excess of $10^6$ are demonstrated. The spin ensemble exhibits memory effects as well as remnant magnetisation. A qualitative change of system magnetic field response between 190 and 445mK is interpreted as a phase transition. This work is the first observation of the long range order in an ensemble of dilute Rare-Earth impurities similar to the phenomenon of dilute ferromagnetism in semiconductors.

W. G. Farr; M. Goryachev; J. M. le Floch; P. Bushev; M. E. Tobar

2014-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Galvanic corrosion of structural aluminum coupled with mild steel in a dilute sodium dichromate electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or the requirement for' the deqr, e of MASTER OF SCIl-NCI= Jaruary IgiO Major Sub ect: Civii I. ngineering GALVANIC CORROSION GF STRUCTURAI. ALUMINUM COUPLED WITH MILD STI:EL IN A DILUTE SODIUii DICIIROMA1'E ELECTROLTTE A Thesis ROBERT FRANKLIN FORD, JR.... Approved as to style and content by: + ~J Co-Chairman of Commii:t C Co-Chair n of Committe~e Member+ I Head of D=p rtm t) Januar; IDIO ABSTRACT Calvanic Corrosion of Structural Aluminum Coup'led with Mild Steel in a Dilute Sodium Dichromate...

Ford, Robert Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Role of Liquid Waste Pretreatment Technologies in Solving the DOE Clean-up Mission W. R. Wilmarth March 5 2009 March 5, 2009 HLW Corporate Board Phoenix AZ HLW Corporate Board, Phoenix, AZ Co-authors M. E. Johnson, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company G. Lumetta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory N Machara DOE Office of Engineering and Technology N. Machara, DOE Office of Engineering and Technology M. R. Poirier, Savannah River National Laboratory P C S DOE S h Ri P. C. Suggs, DOE Savannah River M. C. Thompson, Savannah River National Laboratory, Retired Retired 2 Background Separations is a fundamental business within DOE. The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval The role of separations today is to expedite waste retrieval, processing and closure. Recognized as part of E&T Roadmap

268

Structural changes in switchgrass lignin and hemicelluloses during pretreatments by NMR analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

changes changes in switchgrass lignin and hemicelluloses during pretreatments by NMR analysis Reichel Samuel a, c , Marcus Foston a, c , Nan Jiang a, c , Lenong Allison a, c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a, b, c, * a School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA b Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 14 May 2011 Received in revised form 13 August 2011 Accepted 25 August 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Switchgrass Pretreatment HSQC NMR analysis Lignin a b s t r a c t Switchgrass is currently being developed as a sustainable bio-energy crop due to its broad adaptability, high mass yield and low agricultural input. Its current conversion to biofuels is detrimentally impacted by its native recalcitrance which is typically addressed using

269

HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

HAMILTON, D.W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant places first complex piping module in Pretreatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crews at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant, also known as the "Vit Plant," placed a 19-ton piping module inside the Pretreatment Facility. The module was lifted over 98-foot-tall walls and lowered into a space that provided less than two inches of clearance on each side and just a few feet on each end. It was set 56 feet above the ground.

271

Improved Adhesion of Dense Silica Coatings on Polymers by Atmospheric Plasma Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved Adhesion of Dense Silica Coatings on Polymers by Atmospheric Plasma Pretreatment ... In another study,(7) which compared the treatments of low- and atmospheric-pressure plasmas, the authors reported that the low-pressure plasma treatment increased the adhesion with extended treatment time but prolonged atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment decreased the adhesion to epoxy. ... The authors begin with a brief overview of adhesion theory, and of the physics and chem. of cold plasmas. ...

Linying Cui; Alpana N. Ranade; Marvi A. Matos; Geraud Dubois; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal Pretreatment of Wood for Cogasification/cofiring of Biomass and Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of biomass as a co-feed in coal and biomass co-firing and co-gasification requires size reduction of the biomass. Reducing biomass to below 0.2 mm without pretreatment is difficult and costly because biomass is fibrous and compressible. Torrefaction is a promising thermal pretreatment process and has the advantages of increasing energy density, improving grindability, producing fuels with more homogenous compositions and hydrophobic behavior. Temperature is the most important factor for the torrefaction process. Biomass grindability is related to cell wall structure, thickness and composition. Thermal treatment such as torrefaction can cause chemical changes that significantly affect the strength of biomass. The objectives of this study are to understand the mechanism by which torrefaction improves the grindability of biomass and discuss suitable temperatures for thermal pretreatment for co-gasification/cofiring of biomass and coal. Wild cherry wood was selected as the model for this study. Samples were prepared by sawing a single tangential section from the heartwood and cutting it into eleven pieces. The samples were consecutively heated at 220, 260, 300, 350, 450 and 550oC for 0.5 hr under flowing nitrogen in a tube furnace. Untreated and treated samples were characterized for physical properties (color, dimensions and weight), microstructural changes by SEM, and cell wall composition changes and thermal behaviors by TGA and DSC. The morphology of the wood remained intact through the treatment range but the cell walls were thinner. Thermal treatments were observed to decompose the cell wall components. Hemicellulose decomposed over the range of ~200 to 300oC and resulted in weakening of the cell walls and subsequently improved grindability. Furthermore, wood samples treated above 300oC lost more than 39% in mass. Therefore, thermal pretreatment above the hemicelluloses decomposition temperature but below 300oC is probably sufficient to improve grindability and retain energy value.

Wang, Ping; Howard, Bret; Hedges, Sheila; Morreale, Bryan; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Berry, David

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

Gerber, M.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

Gerber, M.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enhanced methane production from wool textile residues by thermal and enzymatic pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methane production from two types of wool textile wastes (TW1 and TW2) was investigated. To improve the digestibility of these textiles, different pretreatments were applied, and comprised thermal treatment (at 120 °C for 10 min), enzymatic hydrolysis (using an alkaline endopeptidase at different levels of enzymatic loading, at 55 °C for 0, 2, and 8 h), and a combination of these two treatments. Soluble protein concentration and sCOD (soluble chemical oxygen demand) were measured to evaluate the effectivity of the different pretreatment conditions to degrade wool keratin. The sCOD as well as the soluble protein content had increased in both textile samples in comparison to untreated samples, as a response to the different pretreatments indicating breakdown of the wool keratin structure. The combined treatments and the thermal treatments were further evaluated by anaerobic batch digestion assays at 55 °C. Combined thermal and enzymatic treatment of TW1 and TW2 resulted in methane productions of 0.43 N m3/kg VS and 0.27 N m3/kg VS, i.e., 20 and 10 times higher yields, respectively, than that gained from untreated samples. The application of thermal treatment by itself was less effective and resulted in increasing the methane production by 10-fold for TW1 and showing no significant improvement for TW2.

Maryam M. Kabir; Gergely Forgács; Ilona Sárvári Horváth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

COARSENING AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN DILUTE DIBLOCK COPOLYMER MELTS AND MIXTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COARSENING AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN DILUTE DIBLOCK COPOLYMER MELTS AND MIXTURES KARL GLASNER RUSTUM, on the other hand, is responsible for producing self-organized patterns. We construct approximations based upon incompatible [9]. Block copoly- mers, on the other hand, are inhomogeneous chain molecules composed of two

Glasner, Karl B.

278

Viscosity and longest relaxation time of semi-dilute polymer solutions. I. Good solvent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1185 Viscosity and longest relaxation time of semi-dilute polymer solutions. I. Good solvent M expliqués par un modèle de reptation classique. Abstract. 2014 The zero shear viscosity and longest concentration (4 c/c* 70), we find that : 2014 both the relative viscosity ~r and the longest relaxation time TR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Henry's law, surface tension, and surface adsorption in dilute binary mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Henry's law, surface tension, and surface adsorption in dilute binary mixtures Akira Onukia. The solute partitioning between gas and liquid Henry's law and the surface tension change are discussed fraction X and the temperature-derivative / T cx,p of the surface tension at fixed pressure p

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

hal00272925, SURFACE TENSION IN THE DILUTE ISING MODEL. THE WULFF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hal­00272925, version 1 ­ 14 Apr 2008 SURFACE TENSION IN THE DILUTE ISING MODEL. THE WULFF CONSTRUCTION. MARC WOUTS Abstract. We study the surface tension and the phenomenon of phase coexistence in probability (with respect to random couplings) of surface tension and analyze its large deviations : upper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

Impact of N2 dilution on combustion and emissions in a spark ignition CNG engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to reduce \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) emissions, N2 (nitrogen) was introduced as dilution gas to dilute mixture with a specially-designed injection device. The impacts of varying N2 DR (dilution ratio) on the combustion and the exhaust emissions were investigated, including engine heat release rate, indicator diagram, NOx, CO (carbon monoxide), THC (total hydrocarbon) emissions and so on. For this study, a modified 6.6 L CNG (compressed natural gas) engine was tested and N2 was injected into the end of intake manifold by a specially-designed device. The results showed that N2 dilution has a significant influence on the combustion and the exhaust emissions. With the rise of N2 DR, the maximum of pressure in cylinder and the maximum of heat release rate exhibited decrease trends, the centre of heat release curve showed a moving backward tendency. Higher N2 DR exhibited lower \\{NOx\\} (17–81%) emissions, but higher emissions of THC (3–78%) and CO (1–28%). The change of BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) can be ignored with N2 DR no more than 167%. Satisfactory results can be obtained, with lower \\{NOx\\} (31%) emissions, lower BSFC (0.5%), and relatively higher THC (6%) and CO (1%) emissions, when N2 DR is 67%.

Zhongshu Wang; Hongbin Zuo; Zhongchang Liu; Weifeng Li; Huili Dou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Modeling dilute sediment suspension using large-eddy simulation with a dynamic mixed model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling dilute sediment suspension using large-eddy simulation with a dynamic mixed model Yi Transport of suspended sediment in high Reynolds number channel flows Re=O 600 000 is simulated using large-eddy simulation along with a dynamic-mixed model DMM . Because the modeled sediment concentration is low

Fringer, Oliver B.

284

Spin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel Bejar,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The transport properties of Mn-based heterostructures have been studied10 including miniband transportSpin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel. The spin polarization oscillates in both magnetic and nonmagnetic quantum wells and the time average

Sánchez, David

285

Tuning the optical properties of dilute nitride site controlled quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that deterministic control of the properties of pyramidal site-controlled quantum dots (QD) could be achieved by exposing the QD layer to nitrogen precursor unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy). The properties that could be tuned include an expected emission reduction in dilute nitride materials, excitonic pattern (biexciton binding energy) and improved carrier confinement potential symmetry (reduced fine-structure splitting)

Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Mereni, L. O.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted Seawater, Seawater, and in Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted Seawater, Seawater, and in Ice M. N. BRONSTEIN, R. J. PRICE, E. M. STRANGE, E. F. MELVIN, C. M. DEWEES mixtures of seawater and freshwater, refrigerated seawater, and chilled mixtures of seawater and ice

287

Noise-Induced Intermittency in a Convecting Dilute Solution of He3 in Superfluid He4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements on a convecting dilute He3-superfluid-He4 solution show a transition from periodic to chaotic behavior via intermittency. In a region near but below the onset of intermittency, injection of external noise greater than some threshold value induces chaos.

H. Haucke; R. E. Ecke; Y. Maeno; J. C. Wheatley

1984-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Summary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): corn stover pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University ... the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were appl...

Richard T. Elander; Bruce E. Dale; Mark Holtzapple; Michael R. Ladisch…

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Towards a metagenomic understanding on enhanced biomethane production from waste activated sludge after pH 10 pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding the effects of pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of sludge waste from wastewater treatment plants is becoming increasingly important, as impetus moves towards the utilization of sludge for rene...

Mabel Ting Wong; Dong Zhang; Jun Li; Raymond Kin Hi Hui…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Magnetic quenching of time-reversed light in photorefractive diluted magnetic semiconductors M. Dinu, I. Miotkowski, and D. D. Nolte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic quenching of time-reversed light in photorefractive diluted magnetic semiconductors M 47907-1396 Received 18 February 1998 Magnetic fields selectively quench phase conjugation during photorefractive four-wave mixing experiments in the diluted magnetic semiconductor Cd1 xMnxTe. Phase conjugation

Nolte, David D.

292

Electric field as pretreatment to enhance the activity of a whole-cell biocatalyst for hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a method using two successive cultures, solid then liquid, for the production and use of a hydrocarbon degrading biocatalyst (BC) is proposed. Hexadecane (HXD) was used as a model hydrocarbon. An electric field was applied during the solid state culture (SSC) as a novel approach, denoted the electric field pretreatment, to enhance the HXD degrading activity. Afterward, the catalytic activity (CA) was determined in liquid culture. The CA of the biocatalyst pretreated and untreated was evaluated, discriminating between sorption capacity and HXD degradation rate; biomass production on the electric field pretreated biocatalyst was only 20% of that on the untreated biocatalyst, but the maximum biocatalyst sorption capacity was enhanced from 119 ± 41 mg (g BC)?1 to 207 ± 23 mg (g BC)?1 by the effect of the electric field pretreatment. The activity of the biocatalyst was mainly associated with the pretreated fungal biomass; its activity was 9-fold higher than that of the untreated biomass. Linear model was used to obtain the affinity constant and Langmuir to adjust maximum sorption capacity. This enhancement in sorption capacity was associated with the high HXD degradation rate observed here; 86% of the initial HXD was eliminated in 42 h by the pretreated biocatalyst, whilst 53% was eliminated in 48 h by the untreated biocatalyst.

V. Sánchez-Vázquez; I. González; M. Gutiérrez-Rojas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Topographical differences in soil N transformation using15N dilution method along a slope in a conifer plantation forest in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil N transformation was investigated using15N dilution method along a slope on a conifer plantation forest. Although there was no significant difference in...15N dilution method showed a distinct difference not...

Naoko Tokuchi; Muneto Hirobe; Keisuke Koba

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Comparison of the processes induced by nitrogen dilution on the photodissociation of silane and disilane at 193 nm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare the influence of the dilution of silane and disilane in nitrogen during laser photodissociation to produce silicon at 193 nm, at room temperature in a static reaction chamber. The experimental results show that the conversion of the reactant gas and its deposition yield can be controlled by varying adequately the extent of dilution. So, two total pressure regions have been observed, independent of the dilution: below 40–50 Torr, the variations of stable species concentration are very important but above these values the variation in the dilution rate has practically no effects on their concentrations. In the first region, during the silane photodissociation at the initial reactant pressure below 5 Torr, the conversion of silane increases with increasing dilution, and at higher initial reactant pressure the conversion of silane tends to rise only a little. In contrast, at any initial reactant pressure, the conversion of disilane during its photodecomposition decreases with increasing dilution. In the second region, the concentration of each stable gaseous species tends to reach a pressure stationary-state. For both the silane and disilane photodissociation, the deposition yield of silicon increases with decreasing the initial reactant gas pressure and it reaches a pressure stationary-state above 50% dilution; but in all the cases, it is greater in disilane photolysis than that of silane. A simple kinetic model is proposed for which the computed results predict the time-evolution of gas composition and amount of silicon deposited.

B. Aka; E. Boch

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Memory and mood during MDMA intoxication, with and without memantine pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Previous studies have shown that single doses of MDMA can affect mood and impair memory in humans. The neuropharmacological mechanisms involved in MDMA-induced memory impairment are not clear. Memantine, an NMDA and alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor antagonist, was able to reverse MDMA-induced memory impairment in rats. This study investigated whether treatment with memantine can prevent MDMA-induced memory impairment in humans. 15 subjects participated in a double-blind, placebo controlled, within-subject design. Subjects received both pre-treatment (placebo/memantine 20 mg) (T1) and treatment (placebo/MDMA 75 mg) (T2) on separate test days. T1 preceded T2 by 120 min. Memory function was assessed 90 min after T2 by means of a Visual Verbal Learning Task, a Prospective Memory Task, the Sternberg Memory Task and the Abstract Visual Pattern Learning Task. Profile of Mood State and psychomotor performance were also assessed to control whether MDMA and memantine interactions would selectively pertain to memory or transfer to other domains as well. MDMA significantly impaired performance in the visual verbal learning task and abstract visual pattern learning task. Pre-treatment with memantine did not prevent MDMA-induced memory impairment in these two tasks. Both positive (vigour, arousal, elation) and negative mood effects (anxiety) were increased by MDMA. The responses were not altered by pretreatment with memantine which had no effect on memory or mood when given alone. These preliminary results suggest that memantine does not reverse MDMA-induced memory impairment and mood in humans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘CNS Stimulants’.

E.B. de Sousa Fernandes Perna; E.L. Theunissen; K.P.C. Kuypers; P. Heckman; R. de la Torre; M. Farre; J.G. Ramaekers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Structure of finite-RSB asymptotic Gibbs measures in the diluted spin glass models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a possible approach to proving the M\\'ezard-Parisi formula for the free energy in the diluted spin glass models, such as diluted K-spin or random K-sat model at any positive temperature. In the main contribution of the paper, we show that a certain small modification of the Hamiltonian in any of these models forces all finite-RSB asymptotic Gibbs measures in the sense of the overlaps to satisfy the M\\'ezard-Parisi ansatz for the distribution of spins. Unfortunately, what is still missing is a description of the general full-RSB asymptotic Gibbs measures. If one could show that the general case can be approximated by finite-RSB case in the right sense then one could a posteriori remove the small modification of the Hamiltonian to recover the M\\'ezard-Parisi formula for the original model.

Dmitry Panchenko

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effects of Inert Dilution and Preheating Temperature on Lean Flammability Limit of Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean flammability limits (LFL) of syngas mixtures were measured at different levels of inert dilution and unburned gas preheating temperatures using a counter-flow flame burner. ... The syngas and air are then premixed within a mixing chamber before being injected into the counter-flow burners. ... (45) Multicomponent transport was used in the calculation to account for the Soret effect, which generally enhance the burning intensity of lean syngas flame. ...

Suhui Li; Yang Zhang; Xiaolong Qiu; Bo Li; Hai Zhang

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aerosol dilution and dispersion at the Nuclear Science Center confinement building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments Release 4 1, Reactor Pool Area Release tt' 2, Irradiation CelL Release 4 3. Beam Port 4 Flow Rate Measurements. CHAPTER III SAMPLING SYSTEM CALIBRATION Introduction Equipment Air Sampler. GMA Chemical Cartridge Efficiency Determination... 52 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 2. 1 Flow Rate Measurements. 22 3. 1 Efficiency Calibration. The statistical counting error at the 90% confidence level is given for each determination. 33 4. 1 Reactor Bridge Dilution Factors. The statistical...

Contreras Gonzalez, Yenny Rose

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Semiclassical Approximation for Non-Abelian Field Strength Correlators in the Instanton Dilute Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field strength correlators are semi-classically evaluated in the dilute gas model of non-Abelian sources (instantons) and compared with lattice data for QCD at zero temperature. We show that one of the Euclidean invariant, tensorial structures vanishes for configurations being purely selfdual or anti-selfdual. We compute the invariant functions contributing to the correlators within the two lowest orders in an instanton density expansion. Fitting instanton size and density for quenched and full QCD, we obtain a reasonable description.

E. -M. Ilgenfritz; B. V. Martemyanov; S. V. Molodtsov; M. Müller--Preussker; Yu. A. Simonov

1997-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effect of Lignin Removal by Alkaline Peroxide Pretreatment on the Susceptibility of Corn Stover to Purified Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreatment of corn stover with alkaline peroxide (AP) at pH 11.5 resulted in reduction of lignin content in the residual solids as a function of increasing batch temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of these materials revealed notably more textured surfaces on the plant cell walls as a result of the delignifying pretreatment. As expected, digestion of the delignified samples with commercial cellulase preparations showed an inverse relationship between the content of lignin present in the residual solids after pretreatment and the extent of both glucan and xylan conversion achievable. Digestions with purified enzymes revealed that decreased lignin content in the pretreated solids did not significantly impact the extent of glucan conversion achievable by cellulases alone. Not until purified xylanolytic activities were included with the cellulases were significant improvements in glucan conversion realized. In addition, an inverse relationship was observed between lignin content after pretreatment and the extent of xylan conversion achievable in a 24-h period with the xylanolytic enzymes in the absence of the cellulases. This observation, coupled with the direct relationship between enzymatic xylan and glucan conversion observed in a number of cases, suggests that the presence of lignins may not directly occlude cellulose present in lignocelluloses but rather impact cellulase action indirectly by its association with xylan.

Selig, M. J.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

The pretreatment with enhanced coagulation and a UF membrane for seawater desalination with reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of reverse osmosis (RO) for desalination process has increased rapidly with the construction of large RO plants. Although there have been considerable improvements in membrane materials and operation experience, the fouling of membranes is a significant problem up to the present. There have been many instances of fouling of RO membranes caused by the presence of iron and silica. Biomineralization is usually believed to be caused by microorganisms metabolizing at iron and silica present. Its formation process was studied and described first in the present work, then the enhanced coagulation with Fe(VI) and UF membrane treatment process for pretreatment of reverse osmosis for desalination has been investigated in a laboratory for 3–4 months. The main aim is to reduce the feed water pollution, such as turbidity, iron, silica and aglae, microbial contamination in order to control biofouling and mineralization on the membrane surface. The results showed that the biomineralization formation process is the adsorption of organism and the biosorption of inorganics onto the organic matrix. The pretreatment results show that turbidity is less than 0.5 NTU, iron concentration never exceeds 0.2 mg/l, silicon concentration must not exceed 0.1 mg/l; and the removal rate of aglae and microbial is more than 98%.

Wei Ma; Yaqian Zhao; Lu Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Effects of Argon Dilution on the Translational and Rotational Temperatures of SiH in Silane and Disilane Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of argon dilution on the translational and rotational temperatures of SiH in both silane and disilane plasmas have been investigated using the imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique. The average rotational temperature ...

Jie Zhou; Jianming Zhang; Ellen R. Fisher

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental study on the spatial distribution of particle rotation in the upper dilute zone of a cold CFB riser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle rotation plays an important role in gas-solid flows. This paper presents an experimental investigation on the spatial distribution of average rotation speed for glass beads in the upper dilute zone of a ...

Xue-cheng Wu; Qin-hui Wang; Chen Tian…

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Dilution Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct-Injection (SGDI) Combustion Control Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-dilution...

305

Instability of dilute poly(ethylene-oxide) solutions Y. Layec and M.-N. Layec-Raphalen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-121 Instability of dilute poly(ethylene-oxide) solutions Y. Layec and M.-N. Layec property. Poly- (ethylene-oxide) (PEO) is one such water-soluble polymer largely used in turbulent flows [1

Boyer, Edmond

306

Assessment of effective parameters on dilution using approximate reasoning methods in longwall mining method, Iran coal mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately more than 90% of all coal production in Iranian underground mines is derived directly longwall mining method. Out of seam dilution is one of the essential problems in these mines. Therefore the dilution can impose the additional cost of mining and milling. As a result, recognition of the effective parameters on the dilution has a remarkable role in industry. In this way, this paper has analyzed the influence of 13 parameters (attributed variables) versus the decision attribute (dilution value), so that using two approximate reasoning methods, namely Rough Set Theory (RST) and Self Organizing Neuro- Fuzzy Inference System (SONFIS) the best rules on our collected data sets has been extracted. The other benefit of later methods is to predict new unknown cases. So, the reduced sets (reducts) by RST have been obtained. Therefore the emerged results by utilizing mentioned methods shows that the high sensitive variables are thickness of layer, length of stope, rate of advance, number of miners, type of...

Owladeghaffari, H; Saeedi, G H R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Distribution of 1-butanol between organic solvent and acidic solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1-butanol, a major TBP-degraded product, is known to react explosively with concentrated nitric acid under non-heated conditions. However, no quantitative data is available on the distribution behavior in the Purex solution. The distribution of 1-butanol between tributyl phosphate(TBP) diluted with n-dodecane and aqueous solution of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate was investigated under various conditions, by changing the concentration of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, the composition of the organic mixture, the organic to aqueous phase volume ratio, and temperature. 1-butanol was found to distribute more in solvent phase, but the distribution ratio is not large, less than four under typical Purex solution conditions. The ratio was found to be correlated with the molar concentration of free TBP and 1-butanol. Effects of these characteristics on safety in radiochemical plants will be discussed from the local accumulation of 1-butanol.

Asakura, T.; Nemoto, H.; Uchiyama, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of pretreatment method of natural bacteria source on microbial community and bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of pretreatment method of cow dung compost, which was employed as natural hydrogen bacteria source, on the microbial community, population distribution of microbes and hydrogen production potential were investigated in the batch tests. The maximum hydrogen yield of 290.8 mL/L-culture appeared in the pretreated method A (infrared drying) by dark fermentation. The pretreated method of compost significantly affected microbial succession, population distribution of microbes. Both Clostridium sp. and Enterobacter sp. were found to be two species of preponderant hydrogen-producing bacteria, the next best was Bacteroides sp. and Veillonella sp., the last was Lactobacillus sp. and Streptococcus sp., which were also essential. The results showed that the mutualism and symbiosis relations of the mixed bacteria played a critical role in hydrogen fermentation process.

Zhao-Xia Song; Yang Dai; Qi-Long Fan; Xiao-Hu Li; Yao-Ting Fan; Hong-Wei Hou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000{degrees}F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation and hydrocracking. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effect of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to that obtained using catalytically modified host oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effects of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to those obtained using catalytically modified heavy oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1993-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification using a modified EPID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are high resolution systems that produce electronic dose maps with minimal time required for equipment setup, and therefore potentially present a time-saving alternative for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) pretreatment verification. A modified commercial EPID was investigated operated with an opaque sheet blocking the optical signal produced in the phosphor layer as a precursor to a switched mode dual dosimetry-imaging EPID system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this system for direct dose to water dosimetry for pretreatment IMRT verification. Methods: A Varian amorphous silicon EPID was modified by placing an opaque sheet between the Gd{sub 2}S{sub 2}O:Tb phosphor layer and the photodiode array to block the optical photons. The EPID was thus converted to a direct-detecting system (dEPID), in which the high energy radiation deposits energy directly in the photodiode array. The copper build-up was replaced with d{sub max} solid water. Sixty-one IMRT beams of varying complexity were delivered to the EPID, to EDR2 dosimetric film and to a 2D ion chamber array (MapCheck). EPID data was compared to film and MapCheck data using gamma analysis with 3%, 3mm pass criteria. Results: The fraction of points that passed the gamma test was on average 98.1% and 98.6%, for the EPID versus film and EPID versus MapCheck comparisons, respectively. In the case of comparison with film, the majority of observed discrepancies were associated with problems related to film sensitivity or processing. Conclusions: The very close agreement between EPID and both film and MapCheck data demonstrates that the modified EPID is suitable for direct dose to water measurement for pretreatment IMRT verification. These results suggest a reconfigured EPID could be an efficient and accurate dosimeter. Alternatively, optical switching methods could be developed to produce a dual-mode EPID with both dosimetry and imaging capabilities.

Gustafsson, Helen; Vial, Philip; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney 2065 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia) and Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Sydney 2170 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia); School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308 (Australia) and Radiation Oncology Department, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle 2310 (Australia)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content andis the wood chip width, M is the moisture content (%), G is

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, I. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Advanced Photovoltaics Development Center, Advanced Energy Research Center, Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., 108 Ohmori, Anpachi-cho, Anpachi-gun, Gifu 503-0195 (Japan)

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Reduction of Emissions from a Syngas Flame Using Micromixing and Dilution with CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen-rich syngas can be burned stably in the designed combustor, and each suite of nozzles forms a flame surface. ... The smaller dilution ratio and the higher fuel heating value means the fuel can be burned quickly after it leaves the nozzles, resulting in strong heat release in the frontal section of the burner. ... There are, however, gaps in the fundamental understanding of syngas combustion and emissions, as most previous research has focused on flames burning individual fuel components such as H2 and CH4, rather than syngas mixts. ...

Yongsheng Zhang; Tianming Yang; Xueqi Liu; Long Tian; Zhongguang Fu; Kai Zhang

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Weak localization of dilute 2D electrons in undoped GaAs heterostructures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the resistivity and magnetoresistance of dilute 2D electrons are reported. The temperature dependence of the resistivity can be qualitatively described through phonon and ionized impurity scattering. While the temperature dependence indicates no ln(T) increase in the resistance, a sharp negative magnetoresistance feature is observed at small magnetic fields. This is shown to arise from weak localization. At very low density, we believe weak localization is still present, but cannot separate it from other effects that cause magnetoresistance in the semi-classical regime.

Seamons, John Andrew; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Concentration of light organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption on bound silicalite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional distillation with a reflux ratio of 1. 5 R;? for the same separation. Approximately 10. 3 MJ L of the 21. 7 MJ L can be recycled to other processes such as stillage drying so the actual energy consumed is 11. 4 M J L . The intermediate heat pump... which is hydrophilic. The adsorption of water by the binder increases the energy needed to regenerate the column and dilutes the ethanol product. This occurrence is eliminated by using a. hydrophobic binder to attach the Silicalite to heat exchanger...

Flores, Kathryn Louise

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor Li(Zn,Mn)P with decoupled charge and spin doping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a diluted magnetic semiconductor, Li(Zn,Mn)P, in which charge and spin are introduced independently via lithium off-stoichiometry and the isovalent substitution of Mn2+ for Zn2+, respectively. Isostructural to (Ga,Mn)As, Li(Zn,Mn)P was found to be a p-type ferromagnetic semiconductor with excess lithium providing charge doping. First-principles calculations indicate that excess Li is favored to partially occupy the Zn site, leading to hole doping. Ferromagnetism with Curie temperature up to 34 K is achieved while the system still shows semiconducting transport behavior.

Z. Deng; K. Zhao; B. Gu; W. Han; J. L. Zhu; X. C. Wang; X. Li; Q. Q. Liu; R. C. Yu; T. Goko; B. Frandsen; L. Liu; Jinsong Zhang; Yayu Wang; F. L. Ning; S. Maekawa; Y. J. Uemura; C. Q. Jin

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Anisotropic exchange coupling in diluted magnetic semiconductors: Ab initio spin-density functional theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A different scheme to calculate the exchange tensor J?ij describing in a phenomenological way the anisotropic exchange coupling of two moments in a magnetically ordered system is presented. The ab initio approach is based on spin-polarized relativistic multiple-scattering theory within the framework of spin-density functional theory. The scheme is applied to ferromagnetic CrTe as well as the diluted magnetic semiconductor system Ga1?xMnxAs. In the latter case the results show that there is a noticeable anisotropy in the exchange coupling present, although not as pronounced as those suggested in recent theoretical investigations.

H. Ebert and S. Mankovsky

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Cellulose solventbased biomass pretreatment breaks highly ordered hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solvent-Based Solvent-Based Biomass Pretreatment Breaks Highly Ordered Hydrogen Bonds in Cellulose Fibers of Switchgrass Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Sungsool Wi, 3 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,4 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 540-231-7414, fax: 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 Chemistry Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 4 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 25 June 2010; revision received 23 August 2010; accepted 4 October 2010 Published online 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com).

320

The Zymomonas mobilis regulator hfq contributes to tolerance against multiple lignocellulosic pretreatment inhibitors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yang et al. BMC Microbiology 2010, 10:135 Yang et al. BMC Microbiology 2010, 10:135 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/10/135 Open Access R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E BioMed Central © 2010 Yang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Research article The Zymomonas mobilis regulator hfq contributes to tolerance against multiple lignocellulosic pretreatment inhibitors Shihui Yang 1,2 , Dale A Pelletier 1 , Tse-Yuan S Lu 1 and Steven D Brown* 1,2 Abstract Background: Zymomonas mobilis produces near theoretical yields of ethanol and recombinant strains are candidate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities.

Gabriela Ionescu; Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Cosmin M?rculescu; Adrian Badea; Tiberiu Apostol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gantry-angle resolved VMAT pretreatment verification using EPID image prediction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) uses images integrated over the entire delivery or over large subarcs. This work aims to develop a new method for gantry-angle-resolved verification of VMAT dose delivery using EPID.Methods: An EPID dose prediction model was used to calculate EPID images as a function of gantry angle for eight prostate patient deliveries. EPID image frames at 7.5 frames per second were acquired during delivery via a frame-grabber system. The gantry angle for each image was encoded in kV frames which were synchronized to the MV frames. Gamma analysis results as a function of gantry angle were assessed by integrating the frames over 2° subarcs with an angle-to-agreement tolerance of 0.5° about the measured image angle.Results: The model agreed with EPID images integrated over the entire delivery with average Gamma pass-rates at 2%, 2 mm of 99.7% (10% threshold). The accuracy of the kV derived gantry angle for each image was found to be 0.1° (1 SD) using a phantom test. For the gantry-resolved analysis all Gamma pass-rates were greater than 90% at 3%, 3 mm criteria (with only two exceptions), and more than 90% had a 95% pass-rate, with an average of 97.3%. The measured gantry angle lagged behind the predicted angle by a mean of 0.3°± 0.3°, with a maximum lag of 1.3°.Conclusions: The method provides a comprehensive and highly efficient pretreatment verification of VMAT delivery using EPID. Dose delivery accuracy is assessed as a function of gantry angle to ensure accurate treatment.

Woodruff, Henry C.; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia)] [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Fuangrod, Todsaporn [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia)] [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); McCurdy, Boyd M. C. [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada) [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter region Mail Centre, Newcastle, NSW 2310 (Australia)] [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter region Mail Centre, Newcastle, NSW 2310 (Australia)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Harnessing Genetic Diversity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Fermentation of Xylose in Hydrolysates of Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide-Pretreated Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HiSeq sequencing platform utilizing a TruSeq...5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were not quantified...and pretreatment chemicals. Compared to defined...of furfural and HMF, two inhibitors...5-hydroxymethylfurfural and new chemical evidence for HMF conversion to 2...

Trey K. Sato; Tongjun Liu; Lucas S. Parreiras; Daniel L. Williams; Dana J. Wohlbach; Benjamin D. Bice; Irene M. Ong; Rebecca J. Breuer; Li Qin; Donald Busalacchi; Shweta Deshpande; Chris Daum; Audrey P. Gasch; David B. Hodge

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Harnessing Genetic Diversity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Fermentation of Xylose in Hydrolysates of Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide-Pretreated Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inhibitory effects on cell growth and fermentation...34). Alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP...production of fuel ethanol. J...characterization of cell wall decomposition...Banerjee, G , S Car, T Liu, DL Williams...integration of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment...organization of plant cell walls, p 61-93...

Trey K. Sato; Tongjun Liu; Lucas S. Parreiras; Daniel L. Williams; Dana J. Wohlbach; Benjamin D. Bice; Irene M. Ong; Rebecca J. Breuer; Li Qin; Donald Busalacchi; Shweta Deshpande; Chris Daum; Audrey P. Gasch; David B. Hodge

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Infinite dilution activity coefficient and vapour liquid equilibrium measurements for dimethylsulphide and tetrahydrothiophene with hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity coefficients at infinite dilution (??) of dimethylsulphide (DMS) in four hydrocarbon solvents were measured using the dilutor technique at temperatures between 288 K and 303 K. The four hydrocarbons were hexane, 1-hexene, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 2,4,4-trimethyl-1-pentene. The dilutor technique is based on the stripping of the highly diluted solute, i.e. DMS, by a constant flow of inert gas. The gas composition was analysed by gas chromatography and the rate of solute removal was calculated from the area of the peaks. In addition, a static total pressure apparatus was used to measure the vapour–liquid equilibrium of the binary systems of propane + DMS and propane + tetrahydrothiophene at 293 K and 313 K. In the static total pressure method, the analysis of the constituent phases is avoided. The systems’ components were injected to the equilibrium cell in known amounts. The composition of the liquid and vapour phase was calculated from the measured temperature and total pressure. The parameters for the Wilson activity coefficient model were regressed. When possible, a comparison between our experimental results and data found in the literature was performed.

Piia Haimi; Petri Uusi-Kyyny; Juha-Pekka Pokki; Ville Alopaeus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of [11C]MFTC for PET Imaging of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase in Rat and Monkey Brains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of [11C]MFTC for PET Imaging of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase in Rat and Monkey Brains ... Positron emission tomography (PET) summation images of rat brains showed high radioactivity in the frontal cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus, which was consistent with the regional distribution pattern of FAAH in rodent brain. ... Pretreatment with MFTC or FAAH-selective URB597 significantly reduced the uptake in the brain. ...

Katsushi Kumata; Joji Yui; Akiko Hatori; Jun Maeda; Lin Xie; Masanao Ogawa; Tomoteru Yamasaki; Yuji Nagai; Yoko Shimoda; Masayuki Fujinaga; Kazunori Kawamura; Ming-Rong Zhang

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Specific Heat of the Dilute Ising Magnet LiHoxY1xF4 J. A. Quilliam,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specific Heat of the Dilute Ising Magnet LiHoxY1ÿxF4 J. A. Quilliam,1,2 C. G. A. Mugford,1,2 A 2006; published 18 January 2007) We present specific heat data on three samples of the dilute Ising [2]. The material LiHoxY1ÿxF4 is a nearly perfect example of a dilute, dipolar-coupled Ising magnet

Le Roy, Robert J.

329

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

EVALUATION OF SUPPLEMENTAL PRE-TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS TO MEET TRL 6 ROTARY MICROFILTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S-saltcake. Based on FY2011 dollars used in the TMP, these tests will have ROM costs of $950K and require up to 10 months to complete. Completion of the simulant testing will satisfy the TRL 5 and TRL 6 criteria that are related to system testing with materials that represent the full range of properties in a relevant environment.

HUBER HJ

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

High efficiency electrotransformation of Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis cells pretreated with lithium acetate and dithiothreitol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A goal for the food industry has always been to improve strains of Lactococcus lactis...and stabilize beneficial traits. Genetic engineering is used extensively for manipulating this lactic acid bacterium, while ...

Maria Papagianni; Nicholaos Avramidis; George Filioussis

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in a II-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Zn1-xCrxTe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic and magneto-optical properties of a Cr-doped II-VI semiconductor ZnTe were investigated. Magnetic circular dichroism measurements showed a strong interaction between the sp carriers and localized d spins, indicating that Zn1-xCrxTe is a diluted magnetic semiconductor. The Curie temperature of the film with x=0.20 was estimated to be 300±10???K, which is the highest value ever reported for a diluted magnetic semiconductor in which sp-d interactions were confirmed. In spite of its high Curie temperature, Zn1-xCrxTe film shows semiconducting electrical transport properties.

H. Saito; V. Zayets; S. Yamagata; K. Ando

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transition and self-sustained turbulence in dilute suspensions of finite-size particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the transition to turbulence of channel flow of finite-size particle suspensions at low volume fraction, i.e. $\\Phi \\approx 0.001$. The critical Reynolds number above which turbulence is sustained reduces to $Re \\approx 1675$, in the presence of few particles, independently of the initial condition, a value lower than that of the corresponding single-phase flow, i.e. $Re\\approx1775$. In the dilute suspension, the initial arrangement of the particles is important to trigger the transition at a fixed Reynolds number and particle volume fraction. As in single phase flows, streamwise elongated disturbances are initially induced in the flow. If particles can induce oblique disturbances with high enough energy within a certain time, the streaks breakdown, flow experiences the transition to turbulence and the particle trajectories become chaotic. Otherwise, the streaks decay in time and the particles immigrate towards the channel core in a laminar flow.

Lashgari, Iman; Brandt, Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Medium effects and the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas away from the conformal limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the shear viscosity of a dilute Fermi gas as a function of the scattering length in the vicinity of the unitarity limit. The calculation is based on kinetic theory, which provides a systematic approach to transport properties in the limit in which the fugacity $z=n\\lambda^3/2$ is small. Here, $n$ is the density of the gas and $\\lambda$ is the thermal wave length of the fermions. At leading order in the fugacity expansion the shear viscosity is independent of density, and the minimum shear viscosity is achieved at unitarity. At the next order medium effects modify the scattering amplitude as well as the quasi-particle energy and velocity. We show that these effects shift the minimum of the shear viscosity to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) side of the resonance, in agreement with the result of recent experiments.

Bluhm, Marcus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Polarization-preserving confocal microscope for optical experiments in a dilution refrigerator with high magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the design and operation of a fiber-based cryogenic confocal microscope. It is designed as a compact cold-finger that fits inside the bore of a superconducting magnet, and which is a modular unit that can be easily swapped between use in a dilution refrigerator and other cryostats. We aimed at application in quantum optical experiments with electron spins in semiconductors and the design has been optimized for driving with, and detection of optical fields with well-defined polarizations. This was implemented with optical access via a polarization maintaining fiber together with Voigt geometry at the cold finger, which circumvents Faraday rotations in the optical components in high magnetic fields. Our unit is versatile for use in experiments that measure photoluminescence, reflection, or transmission, as we demonstrate with a quantum optical experiment with an ensemble of donor-bound electrons in a thin GaAs film.

Maksym Sladkov; M. P. Bakker; A. U. Chaubal; D. Reuter; A. D. Wieck; C. H. van der Wal

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Polarization-preserving confocal microscope for optical experiments in a dilution refrigerator with high magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the design and operation of a fiber-based cryogenic confocal microscope. It is designed as a compact cold-finger that fits inside the bore of a superconducting magnet, and which is a modular unit that can be easily swapped between use in a dilution refrigerator and other cryostats. We aimed at application in quantum optical experiments with electron spins in semiconductors and the design has been optimized for driving with, and detection of optical fields with well-defined polarizations. This was implemented with optical access via a polarization maintaining fiber together with Voigt geometry at the cold finger, which circumvents Faraday rotations in the optical components in high magnetic fields. Our unit is versatile for use in experiments that measure photoluminescence, reflection, or transmission, as we demonstrate with a quantum optical experiment with an ensemble of donor-bound electrons in a thin GaAs film.

Sladkov, Maksym; Chaubal, A U; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; van der Wal, C H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Polarization-preserving confocal microscope for optical experiments in a dilution refrigerator with high magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the design and operation of a fiber-based cryogenic confocal microscope. It is designed as a compact cold-finger that fits inside the bore of a superconducting magnet and which is a modular unit that can be easily swapped between use in a dilution refrigerator and other cryostats. We aimed at application in quantum optical experiments with electron spins in semiconductors and the design has been optimized for driving with and detection of optical fields with well-defined polarizations. This was implemented with optical access via a polarization maintaining fiber together with Voigt geometry at the cold finger which circumvents Faraday rotations in the optical components in high magnetic fields. Our unit is versatile for use in experiments that measure photoluminescence reflection or transmission as we demonstrate with a quantum optical experiment with an ensemble of donor-bound electrons in a thin GaAs film.

Maksym Sladkov; M. P. Bakker; A. U. Chaubal; D. Reuter; A. D. Wieck; C. H. van der Wal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cooling power of the dilution refrigerator with a perfect continuous counterflow heat exchanger  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The model of the perfect continuous counterflow heat exchanger introduced by Frossati et al. to describe the performance of dilution refrigerators is solved rigorously with the proper boundary condition. Unlike the original solution by Frossati et al. the present solution gives the refrigerator cooling power which is in good agreement with experimental data over the entire temperature range. The analysis of the cooling power using the present result allows more detailed evaluation of the refrigerator performance than has been possible with the analysis of the base temperature. An approximate expression for the cooling power is discussed which simplifies the prediction of the cooling rate of a large thermal load such as a copper nuclear?demagnetization stage.

Y. Takano

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI specialists meeting on boron dilution reactivity transients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the meeting was to bring together experts involved in the different activities related to boron dilution transients. The experts came from all involved parties, including research organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and utilities. Information was openly shared and discussed on the experimental results, plant and systems analysis, numerical analysis of mixing and probability and consequences of these transients. Regulatory background and licensing implications were also included to provide the proper frame work for the technical discussion. Each of these areas corresponded to a separate session. The meeting focused on the thermal-hydraulic aspects because of the current interest in that subject and the significant amount of new technical information being generated.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Construction of a Dilution Refrigerator Based Ultra-Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We constructed a dilution refrigerator based ultra-low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (ULT-STM) which works at temperatures down to 20 mK, in magnetic fields up to 6 T and in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). One can load samples/tips, which are prepared in a UHV chamber, to an STM head maintaining the low temperature and UHV conditions. After then they can be cooled back to the base temperature in several hours. We report results of a test measurement on a superconducting NbSe2 sample as well as recent STM/STS studies on graphite samples such as observations of the Landau quantization and visualization of the possible localized states in magnetic fields.

Hiroshi Kambara; Tomohiro Matsui; Yasuhiro Niimi; Hiroshi Fukuyama

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Exponential approach to, and properties of, a non-equilibrium steady state in a dilute gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a kinetic model of a system in contact with several thermal reservoirs at different temperatures $T_\\alpha$. Our system is a spatially uniform dilute gas whose internal dynamics is described by the nonlinear Boltzmann equation with Maxwellian collisions. Similarly, the interaction with reservoir $\\alpha$ is represented by a Markovian process that has the Maxwellian $M_{T_\\alpha}$ as its stationary state. We prove existence and uniqueness of a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) and show exponential convergence to this NESS in a metric on probability measures introduced into the study of Maxwellian collisions by Gabetta, Toscani and Wenberg (GTW). This shows that the GTW distance between the current velocity distribution to the steady-state velocity distribution is a Lyapunov functional for the system. We also derive expressions for the entropy production in the system plus the reservoirs which is always positive.

Eric A. Carlen; Joel L. Lebowitz; Clement Mouhot

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat Capacity of Palladium and Dilute Palladium: Iron Alloys from 1.4 to 100°K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat-capacity measurements have been made on pure palladium and a series of dilute palladium-iron alloys over the temperature range 1.4 to 100°K. All alloys exhibit a ferromagnetic specific heat anomaly, the entropy of which is proportional to iron concentration. This entropy corresponds to a mean spin of 1.1±0.3 per iron atom. The disagreement between the latter figure and the value obtained from the saturation moment of more concentrated alloys is discussed. For the most concentrated alloy a T32 spin-wave term is observed, the magnitude of which is in approximate agreement with theory. The Debye ? for pure palladium appears to have an anomalous temperature dependence.

Boyd W. Veal and John A. Rayne

1964-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geometric pumping induced by shear flow in dilute liquid crystalline polymer solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate nonlinear rheology of dilute liquid crystalline polymer solutions under time dependent two-directional shear flow. We analyze the Smoluchowski equation, which describes the dynamics of the orientation of a liquid crystalline polymer, by employing technique of the full counting statistics. In the adiabatic limit, we derive the expression for time integrated currents generated by a Berry-like curvature. Using this expression, it is shown that the expectation values of the time-integrated angular velocity of a liquid crystalline polymer and the time-integrated stress tensor are generally not zero even if the time average of the shear rate is zero. The validity of the theoretical calculations is confirmed by direct numerical simulations of the Smoluchowski equation. Nonadiabatic effects are also investigated by simulations and it is found that the time-integrated stress tensor depends on the speed of the modulation of the shear rate if we adopt the isotropic distribution as an initial state.

Shunsuke Yabunaka; Hisao Hayakawa

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electrophoretic Mobility and Electric Conductivity in Dilute Suspensions of Charge-Regulating Composite Spheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

15 On the basis of a formula derived from the theory of a planar particle surface, these experimental results could be used to calculate the fixed charge density and the hydrodynamic resistance parameter of the porous surface layer. ... If the electrolyte solution is dilute, Jm is given by Here, u is the fluid velocity field relative to the particle, ? is the electric potential distribution, nm and zm are the concentration (number density) distribution and the valence of species m, respectively, Dm is the diffusion coefficient of species m, which is assumed to be constant both inside and outside the porous surface layer, e is the elementary electric charge, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature. ...

Jau M. Ding; Huan J. Keh

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Numerical simulation of dilute and dense layered coal-dust explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multidimensional time-dependent simulations were performed to study the interaction of a shock wave and resulting shear layer with layers of coal dust. The simulations used a high-order compressible numerical method for fluid dynamics and included a Eulerian kinetic-theory-based granular multiphase model applicable over a range from dense to dilute particle volume fractions. Two cases were considered: a loose dust layer with an initial volume fraction of 1%, and a dense dust layer with an initial volume fraction of 47%. For both cases, the final result is a coupled complex consisting of a shock leading a coal-dust flame. In the simulations presented here, a shock is initially produced from remnants of a natural gas detonation, which has decayed into a shock once it passes into a region containing no gaseous fuel. This shock weakens further due to mechanical and thermal losses from lifting and entraining the coal dust. The lifted dust subsequently ignites in the shock-heated air and produces a structure similar to a mixing-limited, nonpremixed flame. The flame consists of a burning coal dust wave that follows the shock. The distance between the shock and ignition point is determined by the induction length of carbon char, which is ? 170 cm and ? 15 cm for the 47% and 1% cases, respectively. The burning of coal particles is predominantly from heterogeneous reactions with carbon char, and volatilized methane combustion is a secondary effect. Air and particles are mixed by relative velocity between the gas and solid phases. Coal particles burn and produce pressure waves that accelerate the shock from Mach 2.2 to 2.6 for the dilute layer, and from Mach 1.7 to 1.8 in the dense layer.

Ryan W. Houim; Elaine S. Oran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Is Response to Radiotherapy in Patients Related to the Severity of Pretreatment Pain?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions. Results: During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.

Kirou-Mauro, Andrea; Hird, Amanda; Wong, Jennifer; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)], E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Determination of porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simonsâ Â’ stain and NMR techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

porosity porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons' stain and NMR techniques Xianzhi Meng a , Marcus Foston a,1 , Johannes Leisen b , Jaclyn DeMartini c , Charles E. Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,⇑ a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, BioEnergy Science Center, Riverside, CA 92507, USA h i g h l i g h t s  Cellulose accessibility was tested by Simons' stain and multiple NMR techniques.  Pretreatment increases the pore size and overall surface area of the

350

The Impact of Biomass Pretreatment on the Feasibility of Overseas Biomass Conversion to Fischer?Tropsch Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Impact of Biomass Pretreatment on the Feasibility of Overseas Biomass Conversion to Fischer?Tropsch Products ... One of the most promising options to produce transportation fuels from biomass is the so-called biomass-to-liquids (BtL) route, in which biomass is converted to syngas from which high-quality Fischer?Tropsch (FT) fuels are synthesized. ... Alternatively to converting biomass into liquids or coal-like material, new and dedicated feeding systems for biomass can be developed. ...

Robin W. R. Zwart; Harold Boerrigter; Abraham van der Drift

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000 F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effects of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to those obtained using catalytically modified heavy oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments. In the progress report for January, 1993--March, 1993, we concluded that the dispersed iron based catalysts were not effective in hydrotreating the AMOCO VTR at 400{degree}C. During the second quarter of this year, several pretreatment runs were conducted at 440{degree}C using molybdenum naphthenate, a known active hydrotreatment catalyst. The reaction time was increased from one hour to two hours, during which time the reaction pressure leveled off. hen Mo naphthenate was added at a concentration of 500 ppM of Mo, coke production was drastically reduced, to less than 3%. Gas production was also reduced which resulted in higher oil (pentane soluble) yields. At a higher catalyst loading of 2,000 ppM of Mo there was little change to the products, the asphaltene content decreasing slightly. This indicates that a catalyst loading of 500 ppM of Mo is probably sufficient for hydrotreating the AMOCO VTR, and there is little benefit in increasing the loading to 2000 ppM.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

RAMAN AND IR STUDY OF NARROW BANDGAP A-SIGE AND C-SIGE FILMS DEPOSITED USING DIFFERENT HYDROGEN DILUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with a fixed germane to disilane ratio of 0.72 and a wide range], cathode deposition [2], and using disilane- germane mixture without H dilution [3] in PECVD process. A gas mixture of disilane, germane and hydrogen was used with a fixed germane to disilane ratio of 0

Deng, Xunming

353

Effects of Fuel-Side Nitrogen Dilution on Structure and NOx Formation of Turbulent Syngas Non-premixed Jet Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this syngas non-premixed burner, the nozzle inner and outer diameters are 7.72 mm and 9.46 mm, respectively. ... Prathap, C.; Ray, A.; Ravi, M. R.Investigation of nitrogen dilution effects on laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel at atmospheric condition Combust. ...

Jeongwon Lee; Sangwoon Park; Yongmo Kim

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A tale of shales: the relative roles of production, decomposition, and dilution in the accumulation of organic-rich strata,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Paleontology, New York State Museum, The State Education Department, Albany, NY 12230, USA e College of MarineA tale of shales: the relative roles of production, decomposition, and dilution in the accumulation Abstract A new consensus on the processes responsible for organic carbon burial in ancient epeiric seas has

Sageman, Brad

355

hal-00272925,version1-14Apr2008 SURFACE TENSION IN THE DILUTE ISING MODEL. THE WULFF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hal-00272925,version1-14Apr2008 SURFACE TENSION IN THE DILUTE ISING MODEL. THE WULFF CONSTRUCTION. MARC WOUTS Abstract. We study the surface tension and the phenomenon of phase coexistence for the Ising respect to random couplings) of surface tension and analyze its large deviations : upper deviations occur

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Fertility of Beef Recipients Following a Fixed-Time Embryo Transfer Protocol that Includes Follicle Stimulating Hormone Diluted in Hyaluronan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was performed to test the viability of administering a single 40 mg dose of Folltropin-V® (FSH, Bioniche Animal Health) diluted in SRF (MAP-5 50, Sodium Hyaluronate, Bioniche Animal Health) on day 5 of a recipient synchronization protocol...

Thorne, Jacob Westley

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute 2010 Keywords: Poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) Micelle Small angle neutron scattering a b angle neutron scattering. We found three transitions of the poly ((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate

Kofinas, Peter

358

Role of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, typically 5 (20­30) times smaller for Cr-based (Mn-based) III-V DMS than the value expected, 3 B= Cr4 BRole of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1 J. E configurations coexist and the statistical distribution and associated magnetism will depend sensitively

Medvedeva, Julia E.

359

Regional transport and dilution during high-pollution episodes in southern France: Summary of findings from the Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of findings from the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport transport and dilution of pollutants within the Field Experiment to Constraint Models of Atmospheric of Atmospheric Pollution and Emissions Transport (ESCOMPTE), J. Geophys. Res., 112, D13105, doi:10.1029/2006JD

Ribes, Aurélien

360

Combined filtered cathodic arc etching pretreatment-magnetron sputter deposition of highly adherent CrN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrN films were prepared on steel substrates by a hybrid method utilizing filtered cathodic arc for Cr ion pretreatment and magnetron sputtering for coating deposition. During pretreatment the substrates were biased to -1200 V and exposed to filtered chromium plasma. The substrate-coating interface formed during the pretreatment contained a Cr-enriched modified layer with composition that was strongly influenced by the temperature of the substrate as observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy--energy dispersive spectroscopy. The modified layer had a nanocrystalline morphology and thickness of 15 nm. The path of formation of the layer is linked to the combined action of implantation, diffusion, and resputtering. The resulting adhesion of 3 {mu}m thick CrN films was very high with scratch test critical load values of 83 N. The morphology of the films was smooth without large scale defects and the microstructure was columnar. The coatings behaved well in dry sliding tests with very low wear coefficients of 2.3x10{sup -16} m{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, which can be linked to the high adhesion and defect-free microstructure. The smooth coatings also had a high resistance to corrosion as demonstrated by potentiodynamic tests with particularly high pitting potentials of +800 mV.

Ehiasarian, A. P.; Anders, A.; Petrov, I. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fatty acid analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

Elmaleh, David R. (Newton Center, MA); Livni, Eli (Brookline, MA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Structural Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization Characterization and Comparison of Switchgrass Ball-milled Lignin Before and After Dilute Acid Pretreatment Reichel Samuel & Yunqiao Pu & Babu Raman & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 25 April 2009 / Accepted: 10 August 2009 # Humana Press 2009 Abstract To reduce the recalcitrance and enhance enzymatic activity, dilute H 2 SO 4 pretreatment was carried out on Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Ball-milled lignin was isolated from switchgrass before and after pretreatment. Its structure was characterized by 13 C, HSQC, and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. It was confirmed that ball-milled switchgrass lignin is of HGS type with a considerable amount of p-coumarate and felurate esters of lignin. The major ball-milled lignin interunit was the β-O-4 linkage, and a minor amount of phenylcoumarin, resinol, and spirodienone units were also present. As a result of the acid pretreatment,

363

Nucleic acid detection compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cleavage of nucleic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Production of D-lactic acid from sugarcane bagasse using steam-explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the production of D-lactic acid from unutilized sugarcane bagasse using steam explosion pretreatment. The optimal steam pressure for a steaming time of 5 min was determined. By enzymatic saccharification using Meicellase, the highest recovery of glucose from raw bagasse, 73.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 20 atm. For residue washed with water after steam explosion, the glucose recovery increased up to 94.9% at a steam pressure of 20 atm. These results showed that washing with water is effective in removing enzymatic reaction inhibitors. After steam pretreatment (steam pressure of 20 atm), D-lactic acid was produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC 3534 from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse and washed residue. The conversion rate of D-lactic acid obtained from the initial glucose concentration was 66.6% for the hydrolyzate derived from steam-exploded bagasse and 90.0% for that derived from the washed residue after steam explosion. These results also demonstrated that the hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse (without washing with water) contains fermentation inhibitors and washing with water can remove them.

Chizuru Sasaki; Ryosuke Okumura; Ai Asakawa; Chikako Asada; Yoshitoshi Nakamura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE ACIDS CONTAINING PHOSPHOROUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for ACIDS CONTAINING PHOSPHOROUS Location(s): ___________________________________________________ Chemical(s): Hypophosphorous acid, methylphosphonic acid, phosphonic acid, phosphoric acid, phosphorous

Pawlowski, Wojtek

367

The viscosity radius in dilute polymer solutions: Universal behaviour from DNA rheology and Brownian dynamics simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The swelling of the viscosity radius, $\\alpha_\\eta$, and the universal viscosity ratio, $U_{\\eta R}$, have been determined experimentally for linear DNA molecules in dilute solutions with excess salt, and numerically by Brownian dynamics simulations, as a function of the solvent quality. In the latter instance, asymptotic parameter free predictions have been obtained by extrapolating simulation data for finite chains to the long chain limit. Experiments and simulations show a universal crossover for $\\alpha_\\eta$ and $U_{\\eta R}$ from $\\theta$ to good solvents in line with earlier observations on synthetic polymer-solvent systems. The significant difference between the swelling of the dynamic viscosity radius from the observed swelling of the static radius of gyration, is shown to arise from the presence of hydrodynamic interactions in the non-draining limit. Simulated values of $\\alpha_\\eta$ and $U_{\\eta R}$ are in good agreement with experimental measurements in synthetic polymer solutions reported previously, and with the measurements in linear DNA solutions reported here.

Sharadwata Pan; D. Ahirwal; Duc At Nguyen; T. Sridhar; P. Sunthar; J. Ravi Prakash

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

Crooker, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Samarth, Nitin [PENN STATE U

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report documents the technical results of the 3-year project entitled, “Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels,” funded under the NETL of DOE. The research was conducted under six main tasks: 1) program management and planning; 2) turbulent flame speed measurements of syngas mixtures; 3) laminar flame speed measurements with diluents; 4) NOx mechanism validation experiments; 5) fundamental NOx kinetics; and 6) the effect of impurities on NOx kinetics. Experiments were performed using primary constant-volume vessels for laminar and turbulent flame speeds and shock tubes for ignition delay times and species concentrations. In addition to the existing shock- tube and flame speed facilities, a new capability in measuring turbulent flame speeds was developed under this grant. Other highlights include an improved NOx kinetics mechanism; a database on syngas blends for real fuel mixtures with and without impurities; an improved hydrogen sulfide mechanism; an improved ammonia kintics mechanism; laminar flame speed data at high pressures with water addition; and the development of an inexpensive absorption spectroscopy diagnostic for shock-tube measurements of OH time histories. The Project Results for this work can be divided into 13 major sections, which form the basis of this report. These 13 topics are divided into the five areas: 1) laminar flame speeds; 2) Nitrogen Oxide and Ammonia chemical kinetics; 3) syngas impurities chemical kinetics; 4) turbulent flame speeds; and 5) OH absorption measurements for chemical kinetics.

Peterson, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankat; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Camou, Alejandro; Aul, Christopher

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Full oxide heterostructure combining a high-TC diluted ferromagnet with a high-mobility conductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the growth of heterostructures composed of layers of the high-Curie temperature ferromagnet Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO3 (Co-LSTO) with high-mobility SrTiO3 (STO) substrates processed at low oxygen pressure. While perpendicular spin-dependent transport measurements in STO//Co-LSTO/LAO/Co tunnel junctions demonstrate the existence of a large spin polarization in Co-LSTO, planar magnetotransport experiments on STO//Co-LSTO samples evidence electronic mobilities as high as ?104cm2?Vs at T=10K. At high enough applied fields and low enough temperatures (?H?6T, T?4K) Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations are also observed. We present an extensive analysis of these quantum oscillations and relate them with the electronic properties of STO, for which we find large scattering rates up to ?10?11s. Thus this work opens up the possibility to inject a spin-polarized current from a high-Curie temperature diluted oxide into an isostructural system with high mobility and a large spin diffusion length.

G. Herranz, M. Basletic, M. Bibes, R. Ranchal, A. Hamzic, E. Tafra, K. Bouzehouane, E. Jacquet, J. P. Contour, A. Barthélémy, and A. Fert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions via reversible reaction with aldehydes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions via reaction with formaldehyde to form 4-methyl-1,3-dioxolane or with acetaldehyde to form 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane was studied experimentally. The equilibrium and kinetics of the reaction with formaldehyde were studied in systems catalyzed by Amberlite IR-120 ion exchange resin. The equilibrium constant ranged from 5.9 to 8.7 in the temperature range from 25 to 85 C, with no obvious trend with respect to temperature. The kinetics was found to be first-order in the concentrations of propylene glycol, formaldehyde, and Amberlite IR-120, with an activation energy of 102 kJ/mol. In the reaction with acetaldehyde, the equilibrium constant decreased from 18.1 at 40 C to 8.5 at 83 C. The kinetics was faster than with formaldehyde. The volatilities of 4-methyl-1,3-dioxolane and 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane relative to water were 100 and 33, respectively. Of several solvents screened, aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited the highest distribution of 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane from the aqueous into the organic phase. Recovery of propylene glycol by reactive distillation with formaldehyde or acetaldehyde is hampered by unfavorable chemical and phase equilibria. A process combining reaction and extraction into an organic solvent appears to be more attractive and substantially reduces the energy requirement, in comparison with a triple-effect evaporation process.

Broekhuis, R.R.; Lynn, S.; King, C.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dry Dilution Refrigerator for Experiments on Quantum Effects in the Microwave Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the Walther-Mei{\\ss}ner-Institut (WMI), a new cryogen-free 3He/4He dilution refrigerator (DR) has been completed; the cryostat will be employed to cool experiments on superconducting quantum circuits for quantum information technology and quantum simulations. All major components have been made at the WMI. The DR offers lots of space at the various stages of the apparatus for microwave components and cables. E. g., the usable space at the mixing chamber has a height of more than 60 cm and a diameter of 30 cm (mixing chamber mounting plate). To cool cables and cold amplifiers, the DR is equipped with a separate 4He-1K-loop which offers a cooling power of up to 100 mW near 1K. The refrigeration power of the still is 18 mW at 0.9 K; the diameter of its mounting plate is 35 cm. The cryostat rests in an aluminum trestle on air springs to attenuate building vibrations. It is precooled by a Cryomech PT410-RM pulse tube cryocooler (PTC) which is mechanically decoupled from the vacuum can of the cryostat by a bello...

Marx, A; Uhlig, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electronic structure of diluted magnetic semiconductor superlattices: In-plane magnetic field effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) superlattices under an in-plane magnetic field is studied within the framework of the effective-mass theory; the strain effect is also included in the calculation. The numerical results show that an increase of the in-plane magnetic field renders the DMS superlattice from the direct band-gap system to the indirect band-gap system, and spatially separates the electron and the hole by changing the type-I band alignment to a type-II band alignment. The optical transition probability changes from type I to type II and back to type I like at large magnetic field. This phenomenon arises from the interplay among the superlattice potential profile, the external magnetic field, and the sp-d exchange interaction between the carriers and the magnetic ions. The shear strain induces a strong coupling of the light- and heavy-hole states and a transition of the hole ground states from “light”-hole to “heavy”-hole-like states.

Hai-Bin Wu, Kai Chang, and Jian-Bai Xia

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Separation of compounds with multiple -OH groups from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with organoboronate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complexing extractant agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA) in its anionic form (NPB). NPBA and Aliquat 336 (quaternary amine) is dissolved in 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, and the extractant is contacted with aq. NaOH. Solutes investigated were 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, fructose, sorbitol and lactic acid. Batch extraction experiments were performed at 25{degree}C. Partition coefficients, distribution ratios and loadings are reported for varying concentrations of solute and NPB. All solutes complexed with NPB{sup {minus}}, with all complexes containing only one NPB{sup {minus}} per complex. The 1:1 complexation constants for the solutes glycerol, fructose and sorbitol follow trends similar to complexation with B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} (aq.), i.e. the complexation constants increase with increasing number of {minus}OH groups available for complexation. Assumption of 1:1 complex is not valid for 1, 2-propanediol, which showed overloading (more than one mole of solute complexed to one mole NPB{sup {minus}}) at higher concentrations. The {minus}OH group on the NPB{sup {minus}} which is left uncomplexed after one solute molecule had bound to the other two {minus}OH groups may be responsible for the overloading. Overloading is also observed in extraction of tactic acid, but through a different mechanism. It was found that TOMA{sup +} can extract lactic acid to an extent comparable to the uptake of lactic acid by NPB{sup {minus}}. The complexation is probably through formation of an acid-base ion pair. Losses of NPBA into the aqueous phase could lead to problems, poor economics in industrial separation processes. One way of overcoming this problem would be to incorporate the NPBA onto a solid support.

Chow, Tina Kuo Fung

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded Magnetic Nanoparticles for Spent Nuclear Fuel. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded...

377

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pretreatment verification of dose calculation and delivery by means of measurements with PLEXITOM™ phantom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aim To validate a pretreatment verification method of dose calculation and dose delivery based on measurements with Metaplex PTW phantom. Background The dose-response relationships for local tumor control and radiosensitive tissue complications are strong. It is widely accepted that an accuracy of dose delivery of about 3.5% (one standard deviation) is required in modern radiotherapy. This goal is difficult to achieve. This paper describes our experience with the control of dose delivery and calculations at the ICRU reference point. Materials and methods The calculations of dose at the ICRU reference point performed with the treatment planning system CMS XiO were checked by measurements carried out in the PLEXITOM™ phantom. All measurements were performed with the ion chamber positioned in the phantom, at the central axis of the beam, at depth equivalent to the radiological depth (at gantry zero position). The source-to-phantom surface distance was always set to keep the source-to-detector distance equal to the reference point depth defined in the ICRU Report 50 (generally, 100 cm). The dose was measured according to IAEA TRS 398 report for measurements in solid phantoms. The measurement results were corrected with the actual accelerator's output factor and for the non-full scatter conditions. Measurements were made for 111 patients and 327 fields. Results The average differences between measurements and calculations were 0.03% (SD = 1.4%), 0.3% (SD = 1.0%), 0.1% (SD = 1.1%), 0.6% (SD = 1.8%), 0.3% (SD = 1.5%) for all measurements, for total dose, for pelvis, thorax and H&N patients, respectively. Only in 15 cases (4.6%), the difference between the measured and the calculated dose was greater than 3%. For these fields, a detailed analysis was undertaken. Conclusion The verification method provides an instantaneous verification of dose calculations before the beginning of a patient's treatment. It allows to detect differences smaller than 3.5%.

Pawe? Wo?owiec; Pawe? Kuko?owicz; Krzysztof Lis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Specific Heats of Dilute Cu-Co Alloys between 1.5° and 4.5°K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specific heats of eight specimens of dilute copper-cobalt alloys were measured in the range of 1.5° to 4.5°K. Cobalt concentration of these samples lay between ¼ and 2½ weight percent. At all concentrations the specific heat is greater than that of pure copper, with the excess linear in temperature and quadratic in concentration for the lower concentrations at the higher temperatures. Near the lower end of this temperature range, samples of greater than 1¼% cobalt also exhibit an additional anomaly which appears to have a characteristic temperature proportional to cobalt concentration. A comparison to the specific heats of dilute Cu-Mn alloys shows that the magnetic interactions in Cu-Co and Cu-Mn must differ greatly in character.

L. T. Crane and J. E. Zimmerman

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Extended coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization in dilute-magnetic-semiconductor quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the possibility that the coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization is improved in dilute magnetic semiconductors. In usual nonmagnetic quantum wells, the spin polarization of the electrons injected from a ferromagnetic source electrode oscillates spatially because of the spin precession due to spin-orbit effective magnetic fields, i.e., the Rashba and Dresselhaus fields. However, the polarization is damped within an oscillation period by the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation. In paramagnetic dilute magnetic semiconductors, impurity spin polarization is induced under the electron-spin polarization, and this impurity polarization influences the electron-spin precession and possibly improves the spatial electron-spin coherence. The validity of this effect is demonstrated by a numerical simulation for a CdMnTe quantum well.

Tsuchiya, Takuma [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University (Hokudai), Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

382

Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

PUBLIC AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE OF BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE VS DILUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 21, 2009, the Energy Facilities Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) provided a recommendation to the Department of Energy's Environmental Management program (DOE-EM) concerning supplemental guidance on blending methodologies to use to classify waste forms to determine if the waste form meets the definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste or can be classified as Low-Level Waste (LLW). The guidance provides specific examples and methods to allow DOE and its Contractors to properly classify waste forms while reducing the generation of TRU wastes. TRU wastes are much more expensive to characterize at the generator's facilities, ship, and then dispose at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) than Low-Level Radioactive Waste's disposal. Also the reduction of handling and packaging of LLW is inherently less hazardous to the nuclear workforce. Therefore, it is important to perform the characterization properly, but in a manner that minimizes the generation of TRU wastes if at all possible. In fact, the generation of additional volumes of radioactive wastes under the ARRA programs, this recommendation should improve the cost effective implementation of DOE requirements while properly protecting human health and the environment. This paper will describe how the message of appropriate, less expensive, less hazardous blending of radioactive waste is the 'right' thing to do in many cases, but can be confused with inappropriate 'dilution' that is frowned upon by regulators and stakeholders in the public. A proposal will be made in this paper on how to communicate this very complex and confusing technical issue to regulatory bodies and interested stakeholders to gain understanding and approval of the concept. The results of application of the proposed communication method and attempt to change the regulatory requirements in this area will be discussed including efforts by DOE and the NRC on this very complex subject.

Goldston, W.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Exchange interactions in III-V and group-IV diluted magnetic semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effective pair exchange interactions between Mn atoms in III-V and group-IV diluted magnetic semiconductors are determined from a two-step first-principles procedure. In the first step, the self-consistent electronic structure of a system is calculated for a collinear spin structure at zero temperature with the substitutional disorder treated within the framework of the coherent-potential approximation. The effective exchange pair interactions are then obtained in a second step by mapping the total energies associated with rotations of magnetic moments onto an effective classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian using the magnetic force theorem and one-electron Green functions. The formalism is applied to Ga1-xMnxAs alloys with and without As antisites, and to Ge1-xMnx alloys recently studied experimentally. A detailed study of the behavior of pair exchange interactions as a function of the distance between magnetic atoms as well as a function of the concentrations of the magnetic atoms and compensating defects is presented. We have found that due to disorder and the half-metallic character of the system the pair exchange interactions are exponentially damped with increasing distance between the Mn atoms. The exchange interactions between Mn atoms are ferromagnetic for distances larger than the ones corresponding to the averaged nearest-neighbor Mn-Mn distance. The pair exchange interactions are also reduced with increasing concentrations of the Mn atoms and As antisites. As a simple application of the calculated exchange interactions we present mean-field estimates of Curie temperatures.

J. Kudrnovský; I. Turek; V. Drchal; F. Máca; P. Weinberger; P. Bruno

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Unconventional Relationshipsfor Hemicellulose Hydrolysis and Subsequent Cellulose Digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid to recover high yields of sugars directly from hemicellulose and subsequently by enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual cellulose, and these sugars can be used to produce fuels and needed technology advances. Hemicellulose removal is affected by solids concentration and flow through

California at Riverside, University of

389

Controlling acid rain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn the northeastern USA are caused by the large scale combustion of fossil fuels within this region. Average precipitation acidity is pH 4.2, but spatial and temporal ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Engineering Platform - 10173  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy-Office of River Protection’s Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks at Richland, Washington. In support of this effort, engineering-scale tests at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) have been completed to confirm the process design and provide improved projections of system capacity. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale facility designed, constructed, and operated to test the integrated leaching and ultrafiltration processes being deployed at the WTP. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes with prototypic equipment and control strategies and non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The testing approach used a nonradioactive aqueous slurry simulant to demonstrate the unit operations of caustic and oxidative leaching, cross-flow ultrafiltration solids concentration, and solids washing. Parallel tests conducted at the laboratory scale with identical simulants provided results that allow scale-up factors to be developed between the laboratory and PEP performance. This paper presents the scale-up factors determined between the laboratory and engineering-scale results and presents arguments that extend these results to the full-scale process.

Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Barnes, Steven M.; Gilbert, Robert A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fermentation inhibitors and their recovery from acid wood hydrolyzates as chemicals of value  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this study was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fermentation inhibition removal from acid hydrolyzates of lignocellulosic materials and recovery of the by-products of acid hydrolysis as chemicals of value. The acid hydrolyzates of mixed hardwoods were produced from the continuous flow demonstration unit (CFDU) at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory. Two separate liquid product streams were the prehydrolyzate (S1H) and the second stage hydrolyzate (S2H). Candida utilis NRRL Y-900 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL 2034 were used to monitor the fermentability of these two product streams, respectively. Two pretreatment methods were investigated in detail: flashing and solvent extraction. For the S1H, flashing was adequate to enable cell production with Candida utilis. The S2H rehired solvent extraction to ensure ethanolic fermentation at high concentrations of glucose (12% or higher). A solvent was selected for the extraction process and process flow designs were proposed to recycle the solvent and isolate commercial by-products, including furfural, methanol, acetic acid and, potentially, formic acid, levulinic acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

Tran, Hao Cao.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Extraction behavior of trivalent lanthanides from nitric acid medium by selected structurally related diglycolamides as novel extractants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The extraction affinity of trivalent lanthanides, Ln(III), from nitric acid medium has been explored using a series of ten structurally related synthesized diglycolamides (DGA) diluted with toluene. The structure-reactivity relationship with extraction of trivalent lanthanides as well as their atomic number was investigated. The extraction of nitric acid and selected lanthanide ions by N,N,N?,N?-tetradodeceyldiglycolamide (TDDGA), from nitric acid medium was studied in details. Distribution ratio of the trivalent lanthanide ions has been studied as a function of aqueous HNO3 concentrations, DGA concentration, and temperature. The stoichiometry of La(III), Nd(III), and Eu(III) was determined at different nitric acid concentrations by slope analysis of extraction data, and enthalpy change accompanied by extraction was also determined and reported in this work.

E.A. Mowafy; D. Mohamed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyacrylic acid composite membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyacrylic acid salts for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ehthanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanata solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structure showed selectivity in permeating water over a wide range of feed concentrations. 4 tabs.

Neidlinger, H.H.

1985-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT ON PT-CO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS FOR THE OXYGEN-REDUCTION REACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon supported Pt and Pt-Co electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in low temperature fuel cells were prepared by the reduction of the metal salts with sodium borohydride and sodium formate. The effect of surface treatment with nitric acid on the carbon surface and Co on the surface of carbon prior to the deposition of Pt was studied. The catalysts where Pt was deposited on treated carbon the ORR reaction preceded more through the two electron pathway and favored peroxide production, while the fresh carbon catalysts proceeded more through the four electron pathway to complete the oxygen reduction reaction. NaCOOH reduced Pt/C catalysts showed higher activity that NaBH{sub 4} reduced Pt/C catalysts. It was determined that the Co addition has a higher impact on catalyst activity and active surface area when used with NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agent as compared to NaCOOH.

Fox, E.; Colon-Mercado, H.

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

Anticholinesterase therapeutics. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of side-chain substituted quaternary imidazolium salts as pretreatment agents for organophosphonate intoxication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several quaternary imidazolium salts of the general formula 1 below, with R = CH3 or CH=NOH, n = 1 or 2, and X = sulfonamide, sulfamide, amide, urea, carbamate, or phosphonamide substituent were prepared, characterized, and evaluated intramuscularly in the mouse as pretreatment agents for protection against soman. Many of the compounds exhibited activity that was comparable to or better than pyridostigmine in the 15- to 60-minute pretreatment regimen indicating a rapid onset of protection. The analog of 1 with X = (N,N-dimethylamino)carbonyloxy provided significant protection at the 120 min time point distinguishing this substituent from the others and identifying it for further study.

Harris, R.N.; Koolpe, G.A.; Sanderson, R.A.; Musallam, H.A.; Engle, R.R.

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an update of NREL’s ongoing process design and economic analyses of processes related to developing ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

398

Chlorophyll and acid rain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chlorophyll and acid rain Chlorophyll and acid rain Name: beachbum Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: A while ago I read an article that stated that after a plant received acid rain, there seemed to be less of chlorophyll a and b in the plant. I was wondering where does the chlorophyll go and what is the actual process (cell structure affected?). Replies: I think that less chlorophyll being present would be more likely a result of less being produced. Plant cell constantly turn over cell material, it will also constantly produce more. So if one compares a plant not exposed to acid rain (presumably producing a normal amount of chlorophyll and the exposed plant then one sees that the exposed plant has less chlorophyll than the unexposed plant. I do not think I can answer the rest of your question.

399

Nucleic Acid Softwars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nucleic Acid Software Nucleic Acid Software FR3D, a software for finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. Sarver, M., Zirbel, C.L., Stombaugh, J., Mokdad, A. and Leontis, N.B. (2008) FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. J Math Biol, 56, 215-252. RNAView, a program for quickly generating a display of RNA/DNA secondary structures with tertiary interactions. Yang, H., Jossinet, F., Leontis, N., Chen, L., Westbrook, J., Berman, H.M. and Westhof, E. (2003) Tools for the automatic identification and classification of RNA base pairs. Nucleic Acids Res, 31, 3450-3460. RNAMLview, a program to display and/or edit RNAView 2-dimensional diagrams. 3DNA, a software package for the analysis, rebuilding and visualization of three-dimensional nucleic acid structures.

400

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

(Acid rain workshop)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

Turner, R.S.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Electrical Phenomena Occurring during the Freezing of Dilute Aqueous Solutions and Their Possible Relationship to Thunderstorm Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery of an electrical effect accompanying the orderly freezing of dilute aqueous solutions is reported. Potential differences as great as 230 volts are measured across the water-ice interface during the the freezing process. At a freezing rate of about 1 cc per min., a current of 1 ?amp. is measured. The character of the effect is a function of the nature and concentration of the solute. The dependence of the effect on the structure of the ions of the solute and the molecular structure of water is shown.Possible application of this effect to chemical detection and to the formation of thunderstorm electricity is discussed.

E. J. Workman and S. E. Reynolds

1950-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fatty Acid Carcass Mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008... Major Subject: Animal Science FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Turk, Stacey N.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

The utilization of tricarboxylic acid cycle acids and the uptake of succinic acid by Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UTILIZATION OF TRICARBOXYLIC ACID CYCLE ACIDS AND THE UPTAKE OF SUCCINIC ACID BY NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by PATTI LYNN GILLILAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Ma) or Subject: Microbiology THE UTILIZATION OF TRICARBOXYLIC ACID CYCLE ACIDS AND THE UPTAKE OF SUCCINIC ACID BY NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by PATTI LYNN GILLILAND Approved as to style and content by...

Gilliland, Patti Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Engineering of a high-throughput screening system to identify cellulosic biomass, pretreatments, and enzyme formulations that enhance sugar release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass, Pretreatments, and Enzyme Formulations That Enhance Sugar Release Michael H. Studer, Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Simone Brethauer, Heather L. McKenzie, Charles E. Wyman Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: þ951-781-5791; fax: þ951-781-5790; e-mail: charles.wyman@ucr.edu Received 7 April 2009; revision received 21 August 2009; accepted 31 August 2009 Published online 3 September 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22527 ABSTRACT: The recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the only abundant, sustainable feedstock for making liquid fuels, is a primary

406

NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden knowledge of plant cell wall structures and identify ideal pretreatment of plant material. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and BioEnergy Science Center combined different microscopic imaging methods to gain a greater understanding of the relationships between biomass cell wall structure and enzyme digestibility. This breakthrough could lead to optimizing sugar yields and lowering the costs of making biofuels. Using the new approach, NREL researchers discovered the localization of the enzymes responsible for deconstruction of the cell wall polymers and the effects of enzyme action on the cell wall. Unlike traditional composition analysis, the new methods allow access to

407

Bamboo saccharification through cellulose solvent-based biomass pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis at ultra-low cellulase loadings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bamboo Bamboo saccharification through cellulose solvent-based biomass pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis at ultra-low cellulase loadings Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh a,b , Zhiguang Zhu a , Tsung-Jen Ho c,d , Ming-Der Bai e , Yi-Heng Percival Zhang a,b,f, * a Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA c Pilot Process and Applications Department of Chemical Engineering Division, Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 30011, Taiwan d Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Chungli 32001, Taiwan e BioFuel Department

408

Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

Shih, Chien-Ju

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working to exposures. #12;Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Programs Office

Wilcock, William

410

Recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions via reversible reaction with aldehydes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A means is proposed for separating propylene glycol and other compounds bearing multiple hydroxyl groups by reversible chemical reaction. Glycols react with aldehydes in cyclic acetalization reactions to form substituted dioxolanes. Propylene glycol reacts with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to form 4-methyl-1,3-dioxolane and 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane. The reaction is catalyzed homogeneously by strong mineral acids or heterogeneously by cation exchange resins in the acid form. Separation processes utilizing this reaction would include an acetalization step, several distillative separation steps and finally a hydrolysis step in which the reaction is reversed. Both reaction steps must be forced to completion by removing the reaction product simultaneously. The equilibrium and kinetics of the reaction with formaldehyde were studied experimentally in systems catalyzed by Amberlite IR-120 ion exchange resin. A number of solvents were screened for their ability to extract 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane from aqueous solution. Aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited the highest distribution into the organic phase. To achieve an effective separation of propylene glycol from aqueous solution by combined reaction with formaldehyde and distillation, formaldehyde would have to be present in excess and would be difficult and costly to separate from the aqueous solution. In reactive distillation using acetaldehyde as a reactant this is not a problem. A large flow of acetaldehyde would be necessary to recover the propylene glycol sufficiently in a distillative process. In a process combining reaction and extraction into an organic solvent this problem is avoided. Process simulation indicates the energy input of such a process is less than half of the energy required in a triple-effect evaporation process. This benefit is offset by higher capital costs and increased complexity in the reaction/extraction process.

Broekhuis, R.R.; Lynn, S.; King, C.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Size-selected Pt Nanoparticles Synthesized via Micelle Encapsulation: Effect of Pretreatment and Oxidation State on the Activity for Methanol Decomposition and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Oxidation State on the Activity for Methanol Decomposition and Oxidation Jason R. Croya , S. Mostafaa,b , H-synthesized Pt nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 was studied for methanol decomposition and oxidation reactions. An O2-pretreatment is observed to be effective for producing clean, stable, and active nanoparticles

Kik, Pieter

412

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment. Quarterly technical progress report, March--May 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are to investigate various coal pretreatment techniques and to determine the effect of these pretreatment procedures on the reactivity of the coal. Reactivity enhancement will be evaluated under both direct hydroliquefaction and co-processing conditions. Coal conversion utilizing low rank coals and low severity conditions (reaction temperatures generally less than 350{degrees}C) are the primary focus of the liquefaction experiments, as it is expected that the effect of pretreatment conditions and the attendant reactivity enhancement will be greatest for these coals and at these conditions. This document presents a comprehensive report summarizing the findings on the effect of mild alkylation pretreatment on coal reactivity under both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing conditions. Results of experiments using a dispersed catalyst system (chlorine) are also presented for purposes of comparison. IN general, mild alkylation has been found to be an effective pretreatment method for altering the reactivity of coal. Selective (oxygen) methylation was found to be more effective for high oxygen (subbituminous) coals compared to coals of higher rank. This reactivity enhancement was evidenced under both low and high severity liquefaction conditions, and for both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing reaction environments. Non-selective alkylation (methylation) was also effective, although the enhancement was less pronounced than found for coal activated by O-alkylation. The degree of reactivity enhancement was found to vary with both liquefaction and/or co-processing conditions and coal type, with the greatest positive effect found for subbituminous coal which had been selectively O-methylated and subsequently liquefied at low severity reaction conditions. 5 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nucleic Acid Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nucleic Acid Tools Nucleic Acid Tools RNA 3D Motif Atlas, a representative collection of RNA 3D internal and hairpin loop motifs. Petrov, A.I., Zirbel, C.L., Leontis, N.B. (2013) Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D motif atlas. RNA. Non-redundant List of RNA-containing 3D structures. Leontis, N.B., & Zirbel, C.L. (2012) In Leontis, N. B., Westhof. E. (ed.), RNA 3D structure analysis and prediction. Springer Berlin Heidelberg Vol. 27, pp. 281-298. RNA Base Triple Atlas, a collection of motifs consisting of two RNA basepairs. Abu Almakarem, A.S., Petrov, A.I., Stombaugh, J., Zirbel, C.L. and Leontis, N.B. (2012) Comprehensive survey and geometric classification of base triples in RNA structures. Nucleic Acids Res, 40, 1407-1423. R3D Align, an application for detailed nucleotide to nucleotide

416

A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Effect of dilution and contaminants on strength and hydraulic conductivity of sand grouted with colloidal silica gel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colloidal silica (CS) is a low-viscosity liquid that can be made to gel by addition of brine. This property allows it to be injected into, or mixed with, soil, so that after gelling the colloidal silica blocks the pore space in the soil and forms a barrier to the flow of contaminated groundwater or non-aqueous liquids (NAPLs). Gelled-in-place CS was first studied for the petroleum industry and later for protecting groundwater quality. Noll investigated the use of colloidal silica diluted so that its solids content was reduced from 30% (a typical nominal value for material as delivered) to values as low as 5%. The more dilute colloids could still be made to gel, although more slowly, and the resulting gel was weaker. Because the proposed application of colloidal silica grout involves emplacing it in the subsurface by permeation, jet grouting, or soil mixing where its role as a barrier will be to resist flow of contaminants, the effects of these contaminants on the properties of the grouted soil is also of interest. This work comprised four tasks. In Task 1, samples of grouted sand were prepared with a range of CS dilutions, for measurement of hydraulic conductivity and unconfined-compressive strength. In Task 2, these properties were measured on samples of grouted sand that incorporated 5% volumetric saturation of NAPLs. In Task 3, samples, prepared without any contaminants, were immersed in contaminant liquids and tested after 30 and 90 days. Task 4 was added because NAPL contamination in the samples of Tasks 2 and 3 impelled modifications in the test methods, and comparison of the results of Task 2 and Task 1 suggested that these modifications had introduced errors. In Task 4, samples were tested both ways, to confirm that in Tasks 2 and 3 strength was underestimated and hydraulic conductivity was overestimated. Despite the existence of these known systematic errors, the inclusion of control samples in Tasks 2 and 3 permits conclusions to be drawn from these data.

Persoff, P.; Apps, J.A.; Moridis, G.J. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

Burnett, David

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions by reversible chemical complexation with organoboronates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extractants consisting of an ion-pair of Aliquat 336 with phenylboronate or 3-nitrophenylboronate were prepared in various diluents (2-ethylhexanol, toluene, o-xylene or diisobutylketone). In batch experiments propyleneglycol (1,2-PD) was effectively extracted even at low concentrations. Heterogeneous complexation constants {beta}{sub 11} calculated at 25 C were 45-120 (mol/1){sup {minus}1} in 2-ethylhexanol, 34.8 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in toluene, 37.6 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in o-xylene and 14.4 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in diisobutylketone. In 2-ethythexanol, there was no significant effect of extractant concentration on the complexation constant. Equilibrium water concentration in the extractants was 8-12 wt %, decreasing with 1,2-PD uptake. Nearly all extractant/diluent systems exhibited overloading (more than stoichiometric uptake of 1,2-PD). Evidence for aggregation of the ion-pair extractant in organic phase was found from water solubilization studies (molar solubilization ratios up to 10) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy studies. Solubilization of 1,2-PD within hydrophilic aggregate interiors may explain the observed overloading. The complexation constant decreased with increasing temperature, but not enough to make back extraction after a temperature change attractive. Back extraction may be achieved after acidification with carbon dioxide to convert the organoboronate anion to the corresponding organoboronic acid. Up to 80% of the extracted 1,2-PD was backextracted in a batch extraction using C0{sub 2}. The extractant could then be regenerated by stripping carbon dioxide from solution at temperatures exceeding 110 C. However, at these temperatures the extractant appears to undergo a transformation in which color changes and extraction capacity is reduced to about 60% of original value.

Broekhuis, R.R.; Lynn, S.; King, C.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Dilute magnetism and spin-orbital percolation effects in Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a combination of resonant magnetic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the doped spin-orbital Mott insulator Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 (0.07?x?0.70). We show that Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 represents a unique model system for the study of dilute magnetism in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling, and provide evidence of a doping-induced change in magnetic structure and a suppression of magnetic order at xc?0.17. We demonstrate that Rh-doping introduces Rh3+/Ir5+ ions which effectively hole-dope this material. We propose that the magnetic phase diagram for this material can be understood in terms of a novel spin-orbital percolation picture.

J. P. Clancy; A. Lupascu; H. Gretarsson; Z. Islam; Y. F. Hu; D. Casa; C. S. Nelson; S. C. LaMarra; G. Cao; Young-June Kim

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Co-Doped (La,Sr)TiO3-?: A High Curie Temperature Diluted Magnetic System with Large Spin Polarization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) experiments that demonstrate the existence of a significant spin polarization in Co-doped (La,Sr)TiO3-? (Co-LSTO), a ferromagnetic diluted magnetic oxide system (DMOS) with high Curie temperature. These TMR experiments have been performed on magnetic tunnel junctions associating Co-LSTO and Co electrodes. Extensive structural analysis of Co-LSTO combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy excluded the presence of Co clusters in the Co-LSTO layer and thus, the measured ferromagnetism and high spin polarization are intrinsic properties of this DMOS. Our results argue for the DMOS approach with complex oxide materials in spintronics.

G. Herranz, R. Ranchal, M. Bibes, H. Jaffrès, E. Jacquet, J.-L. Maurice, K. Bouzehouane, F. Wyczisk, E. Tafra, M. Basletic, A. Hamzic, C. Colliex, J.-P. Contour, A. Barthélémy, and A. Fert

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrochemical and corrosion behavior of a 304 stainless-steel-based metal alloy wasteform in dilute aqueous environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrochemical and corrosion behavior of a stainless-steel-based alloy made as a prototype metallic nuclear wasteform to immobilize 99Tc, has been studied in a number of reference solutions ranging in pH from 4 to 10. The results showed the 47SS(304)-9Zr–23Mo prototype alloy contained at least five distinct phases with the majority of the Re, used as a Tc surrogate, contained within a Fe2Mo intermetallic phase. Polarization studies showed this alloy exhibited generally passive behavior in a range of dilute aqueous environments. Impedance measurements indicated passivity breakdown events can occur and lead to localized corrosion, especially in slightly alkaline conditions.

Jian Chen; R. Matthew Asmussen; Dmitrij Zagidulin; James J. Noël; David W. Shoesmith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tuning the magnetic and structural phase transitions of PrFeAsO via Fe/Ru spin dilution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction and muon spin relaxation measurements are used to obtain a detailed phase diagram of PrFe1{xRuxAsO. The isoelectronic substitution of Ru for Fe acts eectively as spin dilution, suppressing both the structural and magnetic phase transitions. The temperature, TS, of the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition decreases gradually as a function of x. Slightly below TS coherent precessions of the muon spin are observed corresponding to static magnetism, possibly re ecting a signicant magneto-elastic coupling in the FeAs layers. Short range order in both the Fe and Pr moments persists for higher levels of x. The static magnetic moments disappear at a concentration coincident with that expected for percolation of the J1 - J2 square lattice model.

Yiu, Yuen [ORNL; Bonfa, Pietro [University of Parma, Italy; Sanna, Samuele [Universita di Pavia, Italy; De Renzi, Roberto [University of Parma, Italy; Caretta, Pietro [Universita di Pavia, Italy; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Huq, Ashfia [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

Yang, Fei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

Separation of uranium from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions with extractant-coated magnetic microparticles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D{sub 2}EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions. The results suggest that a synergistic interaction between the particle surface and solvent coating may explain why the particles display, in some cases, orders of magnitude of higher partitioning coefficients than are estimated from solvent-extraction measurements. Particles coated with TBP and those coated with a combination of TOPO and D{sub 2}EHPA displayed the most desirable characteristics for removing uranium from dilute acid environments typical of contaminated groundwater. Uranium separation from moderate to highly acidic waste streams typical of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear wastes is best accomplished using particles coated with a combination of CMPO and TBP.

Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effect of syngas composition and CO2-diluted oxygen on performance of a premixed swirl-stabilized combustor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future energy systems based on gasification of coal or biomass for co-production of electrical power and fuels may require gas turbine operation on unusual gaseous fuel mixtures. In addition, global climate change concerns may dictate the generation of a CO{sub 2} product stream for end-use or sequestration, with potential impacts on the oxidizer used in the gas turbine. In this study the operation at atmospheric pressure of a small, optically accessible swirl-stabilized premixed combustor, burning fuels ranging from pure methane to conventional and H{sub 2}-rich and H{sub 2}-lean syngas mixtures is investigated. Both air and CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen are used as oxidizers. CO and NO{sub x} emissions for these flames have been determined from the lean blowout limit to slightly rich conditions ({phi} - 1.03). In practice, CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen systems will likely be operated close to stoichiometric conditions to minimize oxygen consumption while achieving acceptable NO{sub x} performance. The presence of hydrogen in the syngas fuel mixtures results in more compact, higher temperature flames, resulting in increased flame stability and higher NO{sub x} emissions. Consistent with previous experience, the stoichiometry of lean blowout decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content in the syngas. Similarly, the lean stoichiometry at which CO emissions become significant decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content. For the mixtures investigated, CO emissions near the stoichiometric point do not become significant until {phi} > 0.95. At this stoichiometric limit, CO emissions rise more rapidly for combustion in O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures than for combustion in air.

Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Middle East, extended reach horizontal wells (on the order of 25,000 feet of horizontal displacement) are commonly acid stimulated by jetting acid out of drill pipe. The acid is jetted onto the face of the openhole wellbore as the drill pipe...

Sasongko, Hari

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Acid placement and coverage in the acid jetting process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many open-hole acid treatments are being conducted by pumping acid through jetting ports placed at the end of coiled tubing or drill pipe. The filter-cake on the bore-hole is broken by the jet; the acid-soluble material is dissolved, creating...

Mikhailov, Miroslav I.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Design of experiments to assess pre-treatment and co-digestion strategies that optimize biogas production from macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A design of experiments was applied to evaluate different strategies to enhance the methane yield of macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) of G. vermiculophylla after physical pre-treatment (washing and maceration) reached 481 ± 9 L CH4 kg?1 VS, corresponding to a methane yield of 79 ± 2%. No significant effects were achieved in the BMP after thermochemical pre-treatment, although the seaweeds solubilisation increased up to 44%. Co-digestion with glycerol or sewage sludge has proved to be effective for increasing the methane production. Addition of 2% glycerol (w:w) increased the BMP by 18%, achieving almost complete methanation of the substrate (96 ± 3%). Co-digestion of seaweed and secondary sludge (15:85%, TS/TS) increased the BMP by 25% (605 ± 4 L CH4 kg?1 VS) compared to the seaweed individual digestion.

J.V. Oliveira; M.M. Alves; J.C. Costa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effect of protein source and homogenization pressure on storage stability of retort processed dilute whey protein emulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emulsions stabilized with acid whey or sweet whey were prepared using homogenization pressures of 30 or 90MPa. The emulsions were then canned and sterilized at 250F for 5 minutes. Emulsion stability, particle size and rheological properties were...

Bhatia, Sachin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Poole, Loree J. (Baton Rouge, LA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Ising Model on Diluted Graphs and Strong Amenability Olle H aggstr om \\Lambda Roberto H. Schonmann y Jeffrey E. Steif z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ising Model on Diluted Graphs and Strong Amenability Olle H¨ aggstr¨ om \\Lambda Roberto H. Schonmann y Jeffrey E. Steif z May 10, 1999 Abstract Say that a graph has persistent transition if the Ising that the critical temperature for the Ising model with no external field on the infinite clusters of Bernoulli

437

Effect of H2/CO ratio and N2/CO2 dilution rate on laminar burning velocity of syngas investigated by direct measurement and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laminar burning velocities of syngas/air premixed flames, varying with H2/CO ratio (from 5/95 to 75/25) and N2 or CO2 dilution rate (from 0% to 60%), were accurately measured using a Teflon coated Heat Flux burner and OH-PLIF based Bunsen flame method. Experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, with fuel/air equivalence ratios ranging from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Coupled with experimental data, three chemical kinetic mechanisms, namely GRI-Mech 3.0, USC Mech II and Davis H2–CO mechanism, were validated. The Davis H2–CO and USC Mech II mechanisms appear to provide a better prediction for the laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity variations with H2 and dilution gas contents were systematically investigated. For given dilution gas fraction, the laminar burning velocity reduction rate was enhanced as H2/CO ratio increasing. Effects of the syngas components and equivalence ratio variation on the concentrations of radical H and OH were also studied. It appears that there is a strong linear correlation between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum concentration of the H radical in the reaction zone for syngas. This characteristic is exclusively different from that in methane air premixed flame. These findings indicated that the high thermal diffusivity of the H radical played an important role in the laminar burning velocity enhancement and affected the laminar burning velocity reduction rate under dilution condition.

Z.H. Wang; W.B. Weng; Y. He; Z.S. Li; K.F. Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw ... ?-Cellulose was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, Missouri). ... This evidence suggests that CHW pretreatment may produce bio-oil that is composed of a greater amount of sugars and furanics and fewer small molecules and may therefore be a viable option to modify the chemical composition of bio-oils. ...

Robert Lee Johnson; Shi-Shen Liaw; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Su Ha; Sean S.-Y. Lin; Armando G. McDonald; Shulin Chen

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal treatment induced change of diluted oxygen doped ZnTe films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report the growth of diluted oxygen doped ZnTe films (ZnTe:O) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The effect of a post thermal annealing on the properties of the highly mismatched films has been investigated. It is found that the in-situ doping leads to an effective incorporation of oxygen into ZnTe films with different occupation configurations either on Zn or on Te site. The subsequent annealing process in a vacuum ambient leads to an enhancement of the oxygen incorporation into the ZnTe:O films due to the diffusion of the residual oxygen while the annealing with the same as-grown sample covered on top of the surface (denoted as “face-to-face” annealing in the text) is beneficial to the improvement of the film quality with manifest intermediate band emission at around 1.9?eV as revealed by the low-temperature photoluminescence. This study indicates that the mass-productive MOCVD technique may be suitable for the growth of highly mismatched ZnTe:O films for the application of the intermediate band solar cell.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nucleic acid detection methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Separation of compounds with multiple -OH groups from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with organoboronate. [1,2-propanediol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complexing extractant agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA) in its anionic form (NPB). NPBA and Aliquat 336 (quaternary amine) is dissolved in 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, and the extractant is contacted with aq. NaOH. Solutes investigated were 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, fructose, sorbitol and lactic acid. Batch extraction experiments were performed at 25{degree}C. Partition coefficients, distribution ratios and loadings are reported for varying concentrations of solute and NPB. All solutes complexed with NPB{sup {minus}}, with all complexes containing only one NPB{sup {minus}} per complex. The 1:1 complexation constants for the solutes glycerol, fructose and sorbitol follow trends similar to complexation with B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} (aq.), i.e. the complexation constants increase with increasing number of {minus}OH groups available for complexation. Assumption of 1:1 complex is not valid for 1, 2-propanediol, which showed overloading (more than one mole of solute complexed to one mole NPB{sup {minus}}) at higher concentrations. The {minus}OH group on the NPB{sup {minus}} which is left uncomplexed after one solute molecule had bound to the other two {minus}OH groups may be responsible for the overloading. Overloading is also observed in extraction of tactic acid, but through a different mechanism. It was found that TOMA{sup +} can extract lactic acid to an extent comparable to the uptake of lactic acid by NPB{sup {minus}}. The complexation is probably through formation of an acid-base ion pair. Losses of NPBA into the aqueous phase could lead to problems, poor economics in industrial separation processes. One way of overcoming this problem would be to incorporate the NPBA onto a solid support.

Chow, Tina Kuo Fung.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Pretreated densified biomass products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Acidic gas capture by diamines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

c0ee00378f 1..5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and and pretreatment chemistry Poulomi Sannigrahi, Dong Ho Kim, Seokwon Jung and Arthur Ragauskas * Received 22nd August 2010, Accepted 26th November 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0ee00378f The formation of pseudo-lignin by the combination of carbohydrate and lignin degradation products has been proposed to be responsible for the increased Klason lignin content in biomass pretreated under acidic conditions. Direct evidence for the presence of pseudo-lignin has never been presented. The formation of additional lignin-like material may be detrimental to enzymatic hydrolysis due to the non-productive binding of enzymes with lignin. To investigate the chemistry of pseudo-lignin formation, dilute acid pretreatments were performed on delignified hybrid poplar biomass under conditions of varying severity. The results show a progressive increase in the Klason lignin content of the acid

446

3D DVH-based metric analysis versus per-beam planar analysis in IMRT pretreatment verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate methods of pretreatment IMRT analysis, using real measurements performed with a commercial 2D detector array, for clinical relevance and accuracy by comparing clinical DVH parameters. Methods: We divided the work into two parts. The first part consisted of six in-phantom tests aimed to study the sensitivity of the different analysis methods. Beam fluences, 3D dose distribution, and DVH of an unaltered original plan were compared to those of the delivered plan, in which an error had been intentionally introduced. The second part consisted of comparing gamma analysis with DVH metrics for 17 patient plans from various sites. Beam fluences were measured with the MapCHECK 2 detector, per-beam planar analysis was performed with the MapCHECK software, and 3D gamma analysis and the DVH evaluation were performed using 3DVH software. Results: In a per-beam gamma analysis some of the tests yielded false positives or false negatives. However, the 3DVH software correctly described the DVH of the plan which included the error. The measured DVH from the plan with controlled error agreed with the planned DVH within 2% dose or 2% volume. We also found that a gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm was too lax to detect some of the forced errors. Global analysis masked some problems, while local analysis magnified irrelevant errors at low doses. Small hotspots were missed for all metrics due to the spatial resolution of the detector panel. DVH analysis for patient plans revealed small differences between treatment plan calculations and 3DVH results, with the exception of very small volume structures such as the eyes and the lenses. Target coverage (D{sub 98} and D{sub 95}) of the measured plan was systematically lower than that predicted by the treatment planning system, while other DVH characteristics varied depending on the parameter and organ. Conclusions: We found no correlation between the gamma index and the clinical impact of a discrepancy for any of the gamma index evaluation possibilities (global, local, 2D, or 3D). Some of the tests yielded false positives or false negatives in a per-beam gamma analysis. However, they were correctly accounted for in a DVH analysis. We also showed that 3DVH software is reliable for our tests, and is a viable method for correlating planar discrepancies with clinical relevance by comparing the measured DVH of target and OAR's with clinical tolerance.

Carrasco, Pablo; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ruiz, Agusti; Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Sant Antoni Maria Claret, 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Isotope Dilution Analysis for Flow Injection ICPMS Determination of Microgram per Gram Levels of Boron in Iron and Steel after Matrix Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotope Dilution Analysis for Flow Injection ICPMS Determination of Microgram per Gram Levels of Boron in Iron and Steel after Matrix Removal ... 15,16ID analysis coupled with ICPMS is a powerful technique capable of highly accurate and precise determinations of elements that have two or more stable isotopes. ... To determine boron in unknowns, first the boron isotopic composition of the enriched spike must be characterized, and then the total boron concentration of the spike solution must be determined. ...

Aurora G. Coedo; Teresa Dorado; Bernardo J. Fernandez; Francisco J. Alguacil

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

The complexation behavior of neptunium and plutonium with nitrilotriacetic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first stability constant of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was determined at four ionic strengths (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 M) using spectrophotometry. Nonlinear least-squares data fitting identified the complex as NpO{sub 2}NTA{sup 2-}. The Specific Ion Interaction Theory (S.I.T) approximation method was used to determine the stability constants at infinite dilution. First results on Pu{sup 4+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA are reported. The stability constant for the Pu(NTA){sup +} complex at I = 0.1 M strength is given. From results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA (I = 1 M) at pH < 3, the stability constant was derived for PuO{sub 2} NTA{sup {minus}}. At pH > 3, NTA partially reduced PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to PuO{sub 2}{sup +}. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Nitsche, H.; Becraft, K.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

Jerry D. Cohen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Separation of americium and europium from solutions of nitric and perchloric acid using dipicolinic acid diamides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extraction of nitric acid, perchloric acid, americium, and europium with dialkyldiarylamides of 2,6-pyridinecarboxylic (dipicolinic) acid in polar fluorinated solvents (diluents) was analysed. Among the extrac...

M.Yu. Alyapyshev; V. A. Babain; I. V. Smirnov…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Separation of americium and europium from solutions of nitric and perchloric acid using dipicolinic acid diamides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extraction of nitric acid, perchloric acid, americium, and europium with dialkyldiarylamides of 2,6-pyridinecarboxylic (dipicolinic) acid in polar fluorinated solvents (diluents) was analysed. Among the extrac...

M. Yu. Alyapyshev; V. A. Babain; I. V. Smirnov…

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Development of an on-line isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA–ICP-MS) method for determination of boron in silicon wafers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method has been developed based on an on-line isotope dilution technique couple with laser ablation/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA–ICP-MS), for the determination of boron in p-type silicon wafers. The laser-ablated sample aerosol was mixed on-line with an enriched boron aerosol supplied continuously using a conventional nebulization system. Upon mixing the two aerosol streams, the isotope ratio of boron changed rapidly and was then recorded by the ICP-MS system for subsequent quantification based on the isotope dilution principle. As an on-line solid analysis method, this system accurately quantifies boron concentrations in silicon wafers without the need for an internal or external solid reference standard material. Using this on-line isotope dilution technique, the limit of detection for boron in silicon wafers is 2.8 × 1015 atoms cm?3. The analytical results obtained using this on-line methodology agree well with those obtained using wet chemical digestion methods for the analysis of p-type silicon wafers containing boron concentrations ranging from 1.0 × 1016 to 9.6 × 1018 atoms cm?3.

Chao-Kai Yang; Po-Hsiang Chi; Yong-Chine Lin; Yuh-Chang Sun; Mo-Hsiung Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ethylene Production from Linolenic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and Mapson1 have shown that linolenic 1 J acid may serve as a precursor of ethylene. The possi -bility that the ... . The possi -bility that the ethylene that is evolved from plants arises from linolenic acid was investigated by determining the relationship ...

F. B. ABELES

1966-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid J. E. Roberts, J. F. Wishart, L. Martinez, C. F. Chignell Photochem.Photobiol. 72, 467-471 (2000) Abstract: The tryptophan metabolite xanthurenic acid has been isolated from aged human cataractous lenses. The photophysical properties of xanthurenic acid were examined to determine if it is a potential chromophore for age-related cataractogenesis. We found that xanthurenic acid produces singlet oxygen (F*= 0.17; CD3OD) with the same efficiency as the lenticular chromophore N-formyl kynurenine and quenches singlet oxygen at a rate similar to other tryptophan metabolites (2.1 x 107 M-1 s-1; CD3OD) found in the eye. As the mechanisms of induction of cataracts may also involve redox reactions, the interactions of hydrated electrons (e-aq), the azide radical

455

Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263+-0.02 g cellulose L{sup -1} for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci [Chemical Engineering Department of Istanbul Technical University, Ayazaga, Maslak, Istanbul, 34469 (Turkey)

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

457

acs_ef_ef-2009-01062p 1..11  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 1347-1357 : DOI:10.1021/ef901062p Published on Web 01/11/2010 Surface Characterization of Dilute Acid Pretreated Populus deltoides by ToF-SIMS Seokwon Jung, †,§ Marcus Foston, †,§ M. Cameron Sullards, †,§ and Art J. Ragauskas* ,†,‡,§ † BioEnergy Science Center, ‡ Institute of Paper Science and Technology, and § School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th zSt., Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA Received September 20, 2009. Revised Manuscript Received December 10, 2009 Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to analyze the molecular constituents on cross sections of juvenile poplar (Populus deltoids) stems before and after dilute acid pretreatment (DAP). Bulk analysis of milled and 50 μm thick cross sections of poplar

458

acs_ef_ef-2010-00882t 1..9  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

r r XXXX American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels XXXX, XXX, 000-000 : DOI:10.1021/ef100882t Changes in the Structure of the Cellulose Fiber Wall during Dilute Acid Pretreatment in Populus Studied by 1 H and 2 H NMR Marcus Foston and Arthur J. Ragauskas* BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Received October 28, 2009. Revised Manuscript Received August 30, 2010 Dilute acid pretreatment (DAP) is a frequently employed technique in biofuel production to increase overall sugar and subsequent ethanol yields from downstream fermentation. This is done prior to enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose to increase accessible surface area as well as to remove or redistribute hemicellulose and lignin, which have an inhibitory effect

459

The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

Peter Zalupski; Rocklan McDowell; Guy Dutech

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Acrylic acid polymerization and its graft copolymerization to poly(ethylene oxide) by gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free radical initiated polymerization of acrylic acid was investigated in methanol-water solutions with and without poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The formation of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) initiated both by gamma irradiation and water soluble azo initiators was found to follow classical free radical kinetics. A significant increase in the rate of the propagation step (together with the degree of polymerization) was observed as the water fraction of the medium increased. During homogeneous polymerization of acrylic acid in methanol-water solutions containing poly(ethylene oxide), PAA grafting efficiency was found to be 67% and independent of initiation rate and yield. A mechanism of grafting to poly(ethylene oxide) was proposed. Chain transfer to PEO (K/sub tr/ = 6.5 x 10/sup -5/) was found to be the dominant mechanism for graft formation. Drag reduction characteristics of these PEO-PAA graft copolymers were measured in dilute aqueous solutions as a function of Reynolds number and solution pH. PEO graft copolymers containing 45% by mole PAA graft had, in neutral and basic solutions, drag reduction characteristics equivalent on a mass basis to the initial PEO. However at low pH, drag reduction characteristics disappeared as the PEO-PAA coacervate formed.

Hochberg, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dilute acid pretreated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Treatment of acid mine wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acid mine drainage often results from the oxidation sulfide minerals to form sulfuric acid. As a consequence, high concentrations of metals in the both the suspended and dissolved state result from the low pH water. This paper discusses several of the more common treatment methods for acid mine drainage including the use of chemical precipitation agents, pH correction agents, filtration methods, and biodegradation methods. Advanced treatment technologies are also briefly described and include microfiltration, reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis.

Hayward, D.; Barnard, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Naphthenic acid corrosion literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naphthenic acid corrosion is a growing concern for refineries processing crudes containing high levels of naphthenic acid. Due to this concern initiatives in place to better understand the mechanism of corrosion for mitigating the corrosion. During the 1996 Fall Corrosion Group, organized existing literature relevant to the literature search. Committee Week, NACE International many refineries have and evaluate methods T-8 Refining Industry a task group, T-8-22, to perform a review and compilation of naphthenic acid corrosion. This paper provides a summary of the literature research.

Babaian-Kibala, E. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, Sugar Land, TX (United States); Nugent, M.J. [Tosco Refining Co., Linden, NJ (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Asphaltene damage in matrix acidizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work addresses the problem of asphaltene deposition that occurs during acid treatments of oil reservoirs. Asphaltenes are present to some degree in most hydrocarbons. Due to the molecular weight of the components these asphaltenes are more...

Hinojosa, Roberto Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C+ ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C+ ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400?eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film–substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp3 hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20?mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C+ ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

E Rismani; S K Sinha; S Tripathy; H Yang; C S Bhatia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Factors controlling naphthenic acid corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted to elucidate the influence of chemical and physical parameters on corrosion of type 1018 carbon steel (CS, UNS G10180) and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel in oils containing naphthenic acids (NAs) for application to crude oil refinery systems. Effects of test duration, temperature, and acid concentration were assessed for a range of single acids of varying carbon numbers and for NA mixtures in mineral oil (MO) and in heavy vacuum gas oil (HGVO). In addition, a limited study of the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) addition to the acid-oil mixture was conducted. Use of the total acid number (TAN) as a measure of corrosiveness of a crude oil was discredited further. For the same TAN value, molecular size and structure of the acid were shown to have an important influence. Tests conducted in HGVO showed lower corrosion rates than in MO, suggesting inhibition caused by S species in the oil or the steric hindrance of naphtheno-aromatic acids. In oil containing the mixture of NAs, the corrosion rate of type 1018 CS was lower than that for 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel. The 0.1% H{sub 2}S that passed through the acid-oil mixtures had an inhibiting effect on corrosion. Predicting corrosiveness of a crude oil from the measurement of TAN, distribution of NA composition, and S content and form was particularly challenging. The simple tests used were informative, but further work will be required to establish a standard test method that can provide an adequate ranking of crudes.

Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Slavcheva, E. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Shone, B. [Ty Isa, Nr Mold (United Kingdom)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effects of Fluorine-Containing Graft and Block Copolymer Additives on Removal Characteristics of Dilute Benzene in Water by Microphase-Separated Membranes Modified with These Additives  

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Add to ACS ChemWorx ... When larger amounts of the PFA-g-PDMS and PFA-b-PDMS were added to a PMMA/PDMS, the latter additive could keep the microphase-separated structures with a continuous PDMS phase, but the former did not. ... Thus, in this study the pervaporation characteristics for the removal of benzene from a dilute aqueous solution of benzene using PFA-g-PDMS/PMMA-g-PDMS and PFA-b-PDMS/PMMA-g-PDMS membranes, which were prepared by adding fluorine-containing graft and block copolymer additives to the PMMA-g-PDMS membrane, were investigated. ...

Tadashi Uragmi; Hiroshi Yamada; Takashi Miyata

2006-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

A New Flow Control Technique Using Diluted Epinephrine in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate Embolization of Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysms Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) has been used as an effective liquid embolization material, its indication for pseudoaneurysms has seemingly been limited because of the technical difficulties of using NBCA, such as reflux to the parent artery and causing significant infarction. Thus, considerable skill in using NBCA or a device to control blood flow during its polymerization is required to achieve embolization without severe complications. We report our new technique for controlling blood flow using diluted epinephrine in transcatheter arterial NBCA embolization of five pseudoaneurysms in four cases secondary to hemosuccus pancreaticus.

Morishita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hmorif@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamagami, Takuji [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate Sc