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1

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

Marriner, John; /Fermilab

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Data acquisition systems for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will image {Pi} steradians about the north galactic cap in five filters, and acquire one million spectra using a dedicated 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. The authors describe the data acquisition system for the survey`s three main detectors: an imaging camera, mounting 54 Tektronix charge-coupled devices (CCD); a pair of spectrographs, each mounting a pair of CCDs; and a smaller monitor telescope camera. The authors describe the system`s hardware and software architecture, and relate it to the survey`s special requirements for high reliability and need to understand its instrumentation in order to produce a consistent survey over a five year period.

Petravick, D.; Berman, E.; MacKinnon, B.; Nicinski, T.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Rechenmacher, R.; Annis, J.; Kent, S.; McKay, T.; Stoughton, C.; Husby, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

7

The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. I. PHOTOMETRIC RECALIBRATION WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We describe photometric recalibration of data obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR. Although LINEAR was designed for astrometric discovery of moving objects, the data set described here contains over 5 billion photometric measurements for about 25 million objects, mostly stars. We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data from the overlapping {approx}10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky to recalibrate LINEAR photometry and achieve errors of 0.03 mag for sources not limited by photon statistics with errors of 0.2 mag at r {approx} 18. With its 200 observations per object on average, LINEAR data provide time domain information for the brightest four magnitudes of the SDSS survey. At the same time, LINEAR extends the deepest similar wide-area variability survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, by 3 mag. We briefly discuss the properties of about 7000 visually confirmed periodic variables, dominated by roughly equal fractions of RR Lyrae stars and eclipsing binary stars, and analyze their distribution in optical and infrared color-color diagrams. The LINEAR data set is publicly available from the SkyDOT Web site.

Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan P.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

THE SEVENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11,663 deg{sup 2} of imaging data, with most of the {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog contains five-band photometry for 357 million distinct objects. The survey also includes repeat photometry on a 120 deg. long, 2.{sup 0}5 wide stripe along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap, with some regions covered by as many as 90 individual imaging runs. We include a co-addition of the best of these data, going roughly 2 mag fainter than the main survey over 250 deg{sup 2}. The survey has completed spectroscopy over 9380 deg{sup 2}; the spectroscopy is now complete over a large contiguous area of the Northern Galactic Cap, closing the gap that was present in previous data releases. There are over 1.6 million spectra in total, including 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic latitude. The astrometry has all been recalibrated with the second version of the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, reducing the rms statistical errors at the bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this problem is less severe than previously reported for the majority of galaxies. Finally, we describe a series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.

Abazajian, Kevork N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer K.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Berman, Eileen F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Agueeros, Marcel A. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury SL Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); An, Deokkeun [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Anderson, Kurt S. J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bell, Eric F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, J. C. [McDonald Observatory and Dept. of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Beers, Timothy C. [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, CSCE: Center for the Study of Cosmic Evolution, and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belokurov, Vasily [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Berlind, Andreas A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bernardi, Mariangela [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(

Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometr...

Sako, Masao; Becker, A; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Frieman, J A; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Reiss, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Subba-Rao, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Choi, C; Dembicky, J; Harnavek, M; Ihara, Y; Im, M; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Long, D C; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Pan, K; Saurage, G; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Masao Sako; B. Bassett; A. Becker; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; J. A. Frieman; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; M. SubbaRao; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; C. Choi; J. Dembicky; M. Harnavek; Y. Ihara; M. Im; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesi?ski; D. C. Long; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; K. Pan; G. Saurage; S. A. Snedden

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and Data Release Nine from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

SDSS Collaboration

17

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; IveziÄ?, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Portsmouth U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Bristol U. /Apache Point Observ. /Liverpool John Moores U., ARI /Columbia U., CBA /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Durham U. /Portsmouth U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Naval Academy, Annapolis /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /New Mexico State U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab /Apache Point Observ. /Gottingen U. /Chicago U. /San Francisco State U. /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Fermilab /Apache Point Observ. /Durham U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona U. /Stockholm U. /Apache Point Observ. /Lick Observ. /Sussex U. /Barcelona U. /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Fermilab /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Chicago U. /Fermilab /South African Astron. Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Fermilab

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Joshua A. Frieman; B. Bassett; A. Becker; C. Choi; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; M. Im; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; J. L. Marshall; D. McGinnis; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; M. Sako; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Annis; R. J. Assef; J. Barentine; R. Bender; R. D. Blandford; W. N. Boroski; M. Bremer; H. Brewington; C. A. Collins; A. Crotts; J. Dembicky; J. Eastman; A. Edge; E. Edmondson; E. Elson; M. E. Eyler; A. V. Filippenko; R. J. Foley; S. Frank; A. Goobar; T. Gueth; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; U. Hopp; Y. Ihara; Ž. Ivezi?; S. Kahn; J. Kaplan; S. Kent; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; W. Kollatschny; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesi?ski; D. Lamenti; G. Leloudas; H. Lin; D. C. Long; J. Lucey; R. H. Lupton; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; J. Mendez; C. W. Morgan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; L. Ostman; K. Pan; C. M. Rockosi; A. K. Romer; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; G. Saurage; K. Schlesinger; S. A. Snedden; J. Sollerman; C. Stoughton; M. Stritzinger; M. SubbaRao; D. Tucker; P. Vaisanen; L. C. Watson; S. Watters; J. C. Wheeler; B. Yanny; D. York

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Software standards, methods and quality control for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Collaboration involves upwards of 50 scientists, many of whom are involved in the development and use of the software needed to acquire, process and archive the image and spectroscopic data sets. Fermilab has major responsibilities in the development and maintenance of the project`s software and for its software engineering practices. The authors report on the standards and methodologies they have developed in support of these activities.

Pordes, R.; Berman, E.; Petravick, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). Computing Div.] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hot DB White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ugriz photometry and optical spectroscopy for 28 DB and DO white dwarfs with temperatures between 28,000K and 45,000K. About 10 of these are particularly well-observed; the remainder are candidates. These are the hottest DB stars yet found, and they populate the "DB gap" between the hotter DO stars and the familiar DB stars cooler than 30,000K. Nevertheless, after carefully matching the survey volumes, we find that the ratio of DA stars to DB/DO stars is a factor of 2.5 larger at 30,000 K than at 20,000 K, suggesting that the "DB gap" is indeed deficient and that some kind of atmospheric transformation takes place in roughly 10% of DA stars as they cool from 30,000 K to 20,000 K.

Eisenstein, D J; Köster, D; Kleinmann, S J; Nitta, A; Smith, P S; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Neilsen, E H; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Liebert, James; Koester, Detlev; Nitta, Atsuko; Smith, Paul S.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hot DB White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ugriz photometry and optical spectroscopy for 28 DB and DO white dwarfs with temperatures between 28,000K and 45,000K. About 10 of these are particularly well-observed; the remainder are candidates. These are the hottest DB stars yet found, and they populate the "DB gap" between the hotter DO stars and the familiar DB stars cooler than 30,000K. Nevertheless, after carefully matching the survey volumes, we find that the ratio of DA stars to DB/DO stars is a factor of 2.5 larger at 30,000 K than at 20,000 K, suggesting that the "DB gap" is indeed deficient and that some kind of atmospheric transformation takes place in roughly 10% of DA stars as they cool from 30,000 K to 20,000 K.

Daniel J. Eisenstein; James Liebert; Detlev Koester; S. J. Kleinmann; Atsuko Nitta; Paul S. Smith; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; Jurek Krzesinski; Eric H. Neilsen Jr.; Dan Long; Donald P. Schneider; Stephanie A. Snedden

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

A 250 GHz Survey of High Redshift QSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations at 250 GHz (1.2 mm), 43 GHz, and 1.4 GHz of a sample of 41 QSOs at z > 3.7 found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect 16 sources with a 250 GHz flux density greater than 1.4 mJy. The combination of centimeter and millimeter wavelength observations indicates that the 250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission. Assuming a dust temperature of 50 K, the implied dust masses for the 16 detected sources are in the range 1.5e8 to 5.9e8 Msun, and the dust emitting regions are likely to be larger than 1 kpc in extent. The radio-through-optical spectral energy distributions for these sources are within the broad range defined by lower redshift, lower optical luminosity QSOs. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UV emission from the active nucleus (AGN) and a starburst concurrent with the AGN, with implied star formation rates between 500 and 2000 Msun/year.

Carilli, C L; Rupen, M P; Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Menten, K M; Kreysa, E; Schneider, D P; Bertarini, A; Yun, M S; Zylka, R; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)  

SciTech Connect

The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

New Neutrino Mass Bounds from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release 8 Photometric Luminous Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present neutrino mass bounds using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts measured from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release Eight (SDSS DR8). The galaxies have photometric redshifts between $z = 0.45$ and $z = 0.65$, and cover 10,000 square degrees and thus probe a volume of 3$h^{-3}$Gpc$^3$, enabling tight constraints to be derived on the amount of dark matter in the form of massive neutrinos. A new bound on the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

de Putter, Roland; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, Antonio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; White, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Kirkby, David; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Percival, Will J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.

N. Padmanabhan; D. J. Schlegel; D. P. Finkbeiner; J. C. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; H. J. Brewington; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; D. Johnston; S. M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; E. H. Neilsen; A. Nitta; C. Loomis; R. H. Lupton; S. Roweis; S. A. Snedden; M. A. Strauss; D. L. Tucker

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, N; Finkbeiner, D P; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Brewington, H J; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hogg, D W; Ivezic, Z; Johnston, D; Kent, S M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Loomis, C; Lupton, R H; Roweis, S; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Tucker, D L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL /Fermilab /Subaru Telescope /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

Koester, B P; Annis, J; Wechsler, R H; Evrard, A; Bleem, L; Becker, M; Johnston, D; Sheldon, E; Nichol, R; Miller, C; Scranton, R; Bahcall, N; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Schneider, D; Sneddin, S; Voges, W; York, D; 10.1086/509599

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

B. P. Koester; T. A. McKay; J. Annis; R. H. Wechsler; A. Evrard; L. Bleem; M. Becker; D. Johnston; E. Sheldon; R. Nichol; C. Miller; R. Scranton; N. Bahcall; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; D. Schneider; S. Sneddin; W. Voges; D. York; SDSS collaboration

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A CATALOG OF QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a compilation of properties of the 105,783 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7) quasar catalog. In this product, we compile continuum and emission line measurements around the H{alpha}, H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions, as well as other quantities such as radio properties, and flags indicating broad absorption line quasars, disk emitters, etc. We also compile virial black hole mass estimates based on various calibrations. For the fiducial virial mass estimates we use the Vestergaard and Peterson (VP06) calibrations for H{beta} and C IV, and our own calibration for Mg II which matches the VP06 H{beta} masses on average. We describe the construction of this catalog and discuss its limitations. The catalog and its future updates will be made publicly available online.

Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM, 88349 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Discovery of New Ultracool White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of five very cool white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Four are ultracool, exhibiting strong collision induced absorption (CIA) from molecular hydrogen and are similar in color to the three previously known coolest white dwarfs, SDSS J1337+00, LHS 3250 and LHS 1402. The fifth, an ultracool white dwarf candidate, shows milder CIA flux suppression and has a color and spectral shape similar to WD 0346+246. All five new white dwarfs are faint (g > 18.9) and have significant proper motions. One of the new ultracool white dwarfs, SDSS J0947, appears to be in a binary system with a slightly warmer (T_{eff} ~ 5000K) white dwarf companion.

Evalyn Gates; Geza Gyuk; Hugh C. Harris; Mark Subbarao; Scott Anderson; S. J. Kleinman; James Liebert; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; Jurek Krzesinski; Don Q. Lamb; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Peter R. Newman; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Catalog of Spectroscopically Confirmed White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 9316 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. We have selected the stars through photometric cuts and spectroscopic modeling, backed up by a set of visual inspections. Roughly 6000 of the stars are new discoveries, roughly doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs. We analyze the stars by performing temperature and surface gravity fits to grids of pure hydrogen and helium atmospheres. Among the rare outliers are a set of presumed helium-core DA white dwarfs with estimated masses below 0.3 Msun, including two candidates that may be the lowest masses yet found. We also present a list of 928 hot subdwarfs.

Eisenstein, D J; Harris, H C; Kleinmann, S J; Nitta, A; Silvestri, N M; Anderson, S A; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Neilsen, E H; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Liebert, James; Harris, Hugh C.; Nitta, Atsuko; Silvestri, Nicole; Anderson, Scott A.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Catalog of Spectroscopically Confirmed White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 9316 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. We have selected the stars through photometric cuts and spectroscopic modeling, backed up by a set of visual inspections. Roughly 6000 of the stars are new discoveries, roughly doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs. We analyze the stars by performing temperature and surface gravity fits to grids of pure hydrogen and helium atmospheres. Among the rare outliers are a set of presumed helium-core DA white dwarfs with estimated masses below 0.3 Msun, including two candidates that may be the lowest masses yet found. We also present a list of 928 hot subdwarfs.

Daniel J. Eisenstein; James Liebert; Hugh C. Harris; S. J. Kleinmann; Atsuko Nitta; Nicole Silvestri; Scott A. Anderson; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; Jurek Krzesinski; Eric H. Neilsen Jr.; Dan Long; Donald P. Schneider; Stephanie A. Snedden

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Discovery of New Ultracool White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of five very cool white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Four are ultracool, exhibiting strong collision induced absorption (CIA) from molecular hydrogen and are similar in color to the three previously known coolest white dwarfs, SDSS J1337+00, LHS 3250 and LHS 1402. The fifth, an ultracool white dwarf candidate, shows milder CIA flux suppression and has a color and spectral shape similar to WD 0346+246. All five new white dwarfs are faint (g > 18.9) and have significant proper motions. One of the new ultracool white dwarfs, SDSS J0947, appears to be in a binary system with a slightly warmer (T_{eff} ~ 5000K) white dwarf companion.

Gates, E; Harris, H C; Subba-Rao, M; Anderson, S; Kleinman, S J; Liebert, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Lamb, D Q; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Gates, Evalyn; Gyuk, Geza; Harris, Hugh C.; Subbarao, Mark; Anderson, Scott; Liebert, James; Brewington, Howard; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Lamb, Don Q.; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Newman, Peter R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) Supernova Data and the Stripe82 Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already.

The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).[taken and edited from Supernova Survey page at http://www.sdss.org/supernova/aboutsupernova.html]

All three surveys summarized are:

  • Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees.
  • SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sightlines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way.
  • Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4.
The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publically accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

SDSS Collaboration

39

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" r...

Schneider, Donald P; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Boroson, Todd A; Ross, Nicholas P; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Inada, Naohisa; Jester, Sebastian; Knapp, G R; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Thakar, Anirudda R; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, Daniel; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; Hibon, Pascale; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kron, Richard G; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lupton, Robert H; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, K; Pier, Jeffrey R; Price, Ted N; Saxe, David H; Schlegel, David J; Simmons, Audry; Snedden, Stephanie A; SubbaRao, Mark U; Szalay, Alexander S; Weinberg, David H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution about 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

D. P. Schneider; P. B. Hall; G. T. Richards; D. E. Vanden Berk; S. F. Anderson; X. Fan; S. Jester; C. Stoughton; M. A. Strauss; M. SubbaRao; W. Brandt; J. E. Gunn; B. Yanny; N. A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; W. N. Boroski; H. J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; R. Brunner; I. Csabai; M. Doi; D. J. Eisenstein; J. A. Frieman; M. Fukugita; J. Gray; M. Harvanek; T. M. Heckman; Željko Ivezi?; S. Kent; S. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesinski; D. C. Long; J. Loveday; R. H. Lupton; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen; H. Jo Newberg; P. R. Newman; R. Nichol; A. Nitta; J. R. Pier; C. M. Rockosi; D. H. Saxe; D. J. Schlegel; S. A. Snedden; A. S. Szalay; A. R. Thakar; A. Uomoto; D. G. York

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution of ~2000. The spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

Donald P. Schneider; Patrick B. Hall; Gordon T. Richards; Michael A. Strauss; Daniel E. Vanden Berk; Scott F. Anderson; W. N. Brandt; Xiaohui Fan; Sebastian Jester; Jim Gray; James E. Gunn; Mark U. SubbaRao; Anirudda R. Thakar; Chris Stoughton; Alexander S. Szalay; Brian Yanny; Donald G. York; Neta A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; Michael R. Blanton; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Robert J. Brunner; Francisco J. Castander; Istvan Csabai; Joshua A. Frieman; Masataka Fukugita; Michael Harvanek; David W. Hogg; Zeljko Ivezic; Stephen M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; Richard G. Kron; Jurek Krzesinski; Daniel C. Long; Robert H. Lupton; Atsuko Nitta; Jeffrey R. Pier; David H. Saxe; Yue Shen; Stephanie A. Snedden; David H. Weinberg; Jian Wu

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Adler Planetarium, Chicago /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Eotvos U. /Tokyo U., Astron. Dept. /Tokyo U., RESCEU /Tokyo U., ICRR /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Microsoft, BARC /Johns Hopkins U. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Sussex U., Astron. Ctr. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

OPTICALLY SELECTED BL LACERTAE CANDIDATES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE SEVEN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a sample of 723 optically selected BL Lac candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) spectroscopic database encompassing 8250 deg{sup 2} of sky; our sample constitutes one of the largest uniform BL Lac samples yet derived. Each BL Lac candidate has a high-quality SDSS spectrum from which we determine spectroscopic redshifts for {approx}60% of the objects. Redshift lower limits are estimated for the remaining objects utilizing the lack of host galaxy flux contamination in their optical spectra; we find that objects lacking spectroscopic redshifts are likely at systematically higher redshifts. Approximately 80% of our BL Lac candidates match to a radio source in FIRST/NVSS, and {approx}40% match to a ROSAT X-ray source. The homogeneous multiwavelength coverage allows subdivision of the sample into 637 radio-loud BL Lac candidates and 86 weak-featured radio-quiet objects. The radio-loud objects broadly support the standard paradigm unifying BL Lac objects with beamed radio galaxies. We propose that the majority of the radio-quiet objects may be lower-redshift (z < 2.2) analogs to high-redshift weak line quasars (i.e., active galactic nucleus with unusually anemic broad emission line regions). These would constitute the largest sample of such objects, being of similar size and complementary in redshift to the samples of high-redshift weak line quasars previously discovered by the SDSS. However, some fraction of the weak-featured radio-quiet objects may instead populate a rare and extreme radio-weak tail of the much larger radio-loud BL Lac population. Serendipitous discoveries of unusual white dwarfs, high-redshift weak line quasars, and broad absorption line quasars with extreme continuum dropoffs blueward of rest-frame 2800 A are also briefly described.

Plotkin, Richard M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Kimball, Amy E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); Richmond, Michael W. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Shemmer, Ohad [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Voges, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); York, Donald G. [University of Chicago and the Fermi Institute, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)], E-mail: plotkin@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: anderson@astro.washington.edu (and others)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst. Tech.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Actively Star Forming Elliptical Galaxies at Low Redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report discovery of actively star forming elliptical galaxies in a morphologically classified sample of bright galaxies at a low redshift obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The emission lines of these galaxies do not show the characteristics of active galactic nuclei, and thus their strong H$\\alpha$ emission is ascribed to star formation with a rate nearly as high as that is seen in typical late spiral galaxies. This is taken as evidence against the traditional view that all elliptical galaxies formed early and now evolve only passively. The frequency of such star forming elliptical galaxies is a few tenths of a percent in the sample, but increases to 3% if we include active S0 galaxies. We may identify these galaxies as probable progenitors of so-called E+A galaxies that show the strong Balmer absorption feature of A stars superimposed on an old star population. The approximate match of the abundance of active elliptical plus S0 galaxies with that of E+A galaxies indicates that the duration of such late star formation episodes is of the order of $\\gsim 1$ Gyr. If we interpret these galaxies as new additions to the early-type galaxy population, and if we assume a power law for their number evolution, the abundance of early-type galaxies at $z=1$ is about 30% less than that at $z=0$.

Masataka Fukugita; Osamu Nakamura; Edwin L. Turner; Joe Helmboldt; R. C. Nichol

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Spiral Disk Opacity from Occulting Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between su...

Holwerda, B W; Bolton, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Spiral Disk Opacity from Occulting Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between surface brightness and optical depth that has been found in nearby galaxies. Hence, we conclude that the SDSS spectral catalog is an excellent way to find occulting pairs and construct a uniform local sample. However, higher resolution than the SDSS images is needed to disentangle the effects of spiral arms and Hubble type from evolution since z = 0.2.

B. W. Holwerda; W. C. Keel; A. Bolton

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 SPECTROSCOPIC M DWARF CATALOG. II. STATISTICAL PARALLAX ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical parallax analysis of low-mass dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We calculate absolute r-band magnitudes (M{sub r} ) as a function of color and spectral type and investigate changes in M{sub r} with location in the Milky Way. We find that magnetically active M dwarfs are intrinsically brighter in M{sub r} than their inactive counterparts at the same color or spectral type. Metallicity, as traced by the proxy {zeta}, also affects M{sub r} , with metal-poor stars having fainter absolute magnitudes than higher metallicity M dwarfs at the same color or spectral type. Additionally, we measure the velocity ellipsoid and solar reflex motion for each subsample of M dwarfs. We find good agreement between our measured solar peculiar motion and previous results for similar populations, as well as some evidence for differing motions of early and late M-type populations in U and W velocities that cannot be attributed to asymmetric drift. The reflex solar motion and the velocity dispersions both show that younger populations, as traced by magnetic activity and location near the Galactic plane, have experienced less dynamical heating. We introduce a new parameter, the independent position altitude (IPA), to investigate populations as a function of vertical height from the Galactic plane. M dwarfs at all types exhibit an increase in velocity dispersion when analyzed in comparable IPA subgroups.

Bochanski, John J. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); West, Andrew A., E-mail: jjb29@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

DISTRIBUTION OF MAXIMAL LUMINOSITY OF GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

Extreme value statistics is applied to the distribution of galaxy luminosities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We analyze the DR8 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS), as well as the luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Maximal luminosities are sampled from batches consisting of elongated pencil beams in the radial direction of sight. For the MGS, results suggest a small and positive tail index {xi}, effectively ruling out the possibility of having a finite maximum cutoff luminosity, and implying that the luminosity distribution function may decay as a power law at the high-luminosity end. Assuming, however, {xi} = 0, a non-parametric comparison of the maximal luminosities with the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel distribution (limit distribution for variables distributed by the Schechter fit) indicates a good agreement provided that uncertainties arising from both the finite batch size and the batch-size distribution are accounted for. For a volume-limited sample of LRGs, results show that they can be described as being the extremes of a luminosity distribution with an exponentially decaying tail, provided that the uncertainties related to batch-size distribution are taken care of.

Taghizadeh-Popp, M.; Szalay, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ozogany, K.; Racz, Z. [Institute for Theoretical Physics-HAS, Eoetvoes University, Pazmany setany 1/a, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Regoes, E., E-mail: mtaghiza@pha.jhu.edu [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

The age of the Milky Way halo stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determined the age of the stellar content of the Galactic halo by considering main-sequence turn-off stars. From the large number of halo stars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we could accurately detect the turn-off as a function of metallicity, which was done by looking at the hottest (bluest) stars of a population. Using isochrones with turn-off temperatures and metallicites of the stars we found that our stellar sample consisted of one dominating stellar population, with no age gradient as a function of metallicity. This would mean that the dominating population of the Galactic halo formed rapidly, probably during the collapse of the proto-Galactic gas. Moreover, we could find a significant number of stars with hotter temperatures than the turn-off, which might be explained as young stars formed in external galaxies and accreted later on to our Milky Way. Motivated by the current debate about the efficiency of gravitational settling (atomic diffusion) in the interior of old solar-type stars, we us...

Jofre, Paula

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. II. STATISTICAL LENS SAMPLE FROM THETHIRD DATA RELEASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 ({approx}4188 deg{sup 2}), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1-inch and 20-inch and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10{sup -0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations ({approx} 1-inch - 2-inch) and one is a large separation (15-inch) system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.

Inada, N; Oguri, M; Becker, R H; Shin, M; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; White, R L; Pindor, B; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Johnston, D E; Gregg, M D; Kayo, I; Eisenstein, D; Hall, P B; Castander, F J; Clocchiatti, A; Chiu, K; Kawano, Y; Scranton, R; Frieman, J; Keeton, C R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Turner, E L; Burless, S; Brunner, R J; Sheldon, E S; Bahcall, N A; Fukugita, M

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties o...

Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Jester, S; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Brandt, W; Gunn, J E; Yanny, B; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Boroski, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R; Csabai, I; Doi, M; Eisenstein, D J; Frieman, J A; Fukugita, M; Gray, J; Harvanek, M; Heckman, T M; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Kleinman, S; Knapp, G R; Kron, R G; Krzesínski, J; Long, D C; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Margon, B; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Newman, P R; Nichol, R; Nitta, A; Pier, J R; Rockosi, C M; Saxe, D H; Schlegel, D J; Snedden, S A; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Uomoto, A; York, D G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry...

Schneider, Donald P; Richards, Gordon T; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Anderson, Scott F; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Jester, Sebastian; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; SubbaRao, Mark U; Thakar, Anirudda R; Stoughton, Chris; Szalay, Alexander S; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Castander, Francisco J; Csabai, Istvan; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Daniel C; Lupton, Robert H; Nitta, Atsuko; Pier, Jeffrey R; Saxe, David H; Shen, Yue; Snedden, Stephanie A; Weinberg, David H; Wu, Jian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5 m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Ly{alpha} absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared, with a resolving power R = {lambda}/FWHM {approx} 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 nm < {lambda} < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.

Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gunn, James E.; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Uomoto, Alan [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rockosi, Constance M. [UC Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 375 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building (ISB) Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Leger, French; Owen, Russell; Anderson, Lauren [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 09195 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S.; Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon; Long, Dan [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Annis, James, E-mail: smee@pha.jhu.edu [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. IV. DISSECTING DUST  

SciTech Connect

We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously constrain best-fit main-sequence stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight toward each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V} , can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30 Degree-Sign ). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell, but support the models by Fitzpatrick and Cardelli et al. For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random){+-}0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5 Degree-Sign ), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the 10 SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx}0.1-0.2. Our best estimate for the intrinsic scatter of R{sub V} in the regions probed by SEGUE stripes is {approx}0.2. We introduce a method for efficient selection of candidate red giant stars in the disk, dubbed 'dusty parallax relation', which utilizes a correlation between distance and the extinction along the line of sight. We make these best-fit parameters, as well as all the input SDSS and 2MASS data, publicly available in a user-friendly format. These data can be used for studies of stellar number density distribution, the distribution of dust properties, for selecting sources whose SED differs from SEDs for high-latitude main-sequence stars, and for estimating distances to dust clouds and, in turn, to molecular gas clouds.

Berry, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Keira J.; Gibson, Robert R.; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Loebman, Sarah [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Juric, Mario [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bellovary, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vrbanec, Dijana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kimball, Amy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Schlegel, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 50R5032, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 deg{sup 2}, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between z = 0.45 and z = 0.65, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. This data set spans 11,000 deg{sup 2} and probes a volume of 3 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We describe in detail the construction of the survey window function and various systematics affecting our measurement. With such a large volume, high-precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given careful control and understanding of the observational systematics. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at four redshift slices with an accuracy of {approx}15%, with a bin size of {delta}{sub l} = 10 on scales of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs; at l {approx} 40-400). We also apply corrections to the power spectra due to systematics and derive cosmological constraints using the full shape of the power spectra. For a flat {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with cosmic microwave background Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 (WMAP7) and H{sub 0} constraints from using 600 Cepheids observed by Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3; HST), we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.73 {+-} 0.019 and H{sub 0} to be 70.5 {+-} 1.6 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km. For an open {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with WMAP7 + HST, we find {Omega}{sub K} = 0.0035 {+-} 0.0054, improved over WMAP7+HST alone by 40%. For a wCDM model, when combined with WMAP7+HST+SN, we find w = -1.071 {+-} 0.078, and H{sub 0} to be 71.3 {+-} 1.7 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km, which is competitive with the latest large-scale structure constraints from large spectroscopic surveys such as the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) and WiggleZ. We also find that systematic-corrected power spectra give consistent constraints on cosmological models when compared with pre-systematic correction power spectra in the angular scales of interest. The SDSS-III Data Release 8 (SDSS-III DR8) Angular Clustering Data allow a wide range of investigations into the cosmological model, cosmic expansion (via BAO), Gaussianity of initial conditions, and neutrino masses. Here, we refer to our companion papers for further investigations using the clustering data. Our calculation of the survey selection function, systematics maps, and likelihood function for the COSMOMC package will be released at http://portal.nersc.gov/project/boss/galaxy/photoz/.

Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Xiaohui Fan; Michael A. Strauss; Gordon T. Richards; Joseph F. Hennawi; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Aleksandar M. Diamond-Stanic; Jennifer L. D onley; Linhua Jiang; J. Serena Kim; Marianne Vestergaard; Jason E. Young; James E. Gunn; Robert H. Lupton; Gillian R. Knapp; Donald P. Schneider; W. N. Brandt; Neta A. Bahcall; J. C. Barentine; J. Brinkmann; Howard J. Brewington; Masataka F ukugita; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. N eilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden; Wolfgang Voges

2005-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.

Fan, X; Barentine, J C; Becker, R H; Brandt, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hennawi, J F; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Lupton, R H; Nitta, A; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Vestergaard, M; Voges, W; White, R L; Young, J E; eilsen, E H N; onley, J L D; ukugita, M F; Bahcall, Neta A.; Becker, Robert H.; Brewington, Howard J.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Harvanek, Michael; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Voges, Wolfgang; White, Richard L.; Young, Jason E.; eilsen, Eric H. N; onley, Jennifer L. D; ukugita, Masataka F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Survey of z > 5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Discovery of Seven Additional Quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx} 2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha}+NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson troughs in Ly{alpha}. These troughs are narrower than those observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; Becker, R H; White, R L; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Donley, J L; Jiang, L; Kim, J S; Vestergaard, M; Young, J E; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R H; Knapp, G R; Schneider, D P; Brandt, W N; Bahcall, N A; Barentine, J C; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H J; Fukugita, M; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesinski, J; Long, D; Neilsen Jr., E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Voges, W

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

IMPROVED AND QUALITY-ASSESSED EMISSION AND ABSORPTION LINE MEASUREMENTS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new database of absorption and emission-line measurements based on the entire spectral atlas from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 7th data release of galaxies within a redshift of 0.2. Our work makes use of the publicly available penalized pixel-fitting (pPXF) and gas and absorption line fitting (gandalf) IDL codes, aiming to improve the existing measurements for stellar kinematics, the strength of various absorption-line features, and the flux and width of the emissions from different species of ionized gas. Our fit to the stellar continuum uses both standard stellar population models and empirical templates obtained by combining a large number of stellar spectra in order to fit a subsample of high-quality SDSS spectra for quiescent galaxies. Furthermore, our fit to the nebular spectrum includes an exhaustive list of both recombination and forbidden lines. Foreground Galactic extinction is implicitly treated in our models, whereas reddening in the SDSS galaxies is included in the form of a simple dust screen component affecting the entire spectrum that is accompanied by a second reddening component affecting only the ionized gas emission. In order to check for systematic departures from the rather standard set of assumptions that enters our models, we provide a quality assessment for our fit to the SDSS spectra in our sample, for both the stellar continuum and the nebular emissions and across different wavelength regions. This quality assessment also allows the identification of objects with either problematic data or peculiar features. We hope to foster the discovery potential of our database; therefore, our spectral fit is available to the community. For example, based on the quality assessment around the H{alpha} and [N II] {lambda}6584 lines, approximately 1% of the SDSS spectra classified as 'galaxies' by the SDSS pipeline do in fact require additional broad lines to be matched, even though they do not show a strong continuum from an active nucleus, as do the SDSS objects classified as 'quasars'. Finally, we provide new spectral templates for galaxies of different Hubble types, obtained by combining the results of our spectral fit for a subsample of 452 morphologically selected objects.

Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Sarzi, Marc [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Schawinski, Kevin, E-mail: yi@yonsei.ac.kr [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS and SDSS-II): Data from the SDSS Legacy Survey (Data Release 7)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

63

Galaxy Zoo 2: detailed morphological classifications for 304,122 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the data release for Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2), a citizen science project with more than 16 million morphological classifications of 304,122 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Morphology is a powerful probe for quantifying a galaxy's dynamical history; however, automatic classifications of morphology (either by computer analysis of images or by using other physical parameters as proxies) still have drawbacks when compared to visual inspection. The large number of images available in current surveys makes visual inspection of each galaxy impractical for individual astronomers. GZ2 uses classifications from volunteer citizen scientists to measure morphologies for all galaxies in the DR7 Legacy survey with m_r>17, in addition to deeper images from SDSS Stripe 82. While the original Galaxy Zoo project identified galaxies as early-types, late-types, or mergers, GZ2 measures finer morphological features. These include bars, bulges, and the shapes of edge-on disks, as well as quantifying the relat...

Willett, Kyle W; Bamford, Steven P; Masters, Karen L; Simmons, Brooke D; Casteels, Kevin R V; Edmondson, Edward M; Fortson, Lucy F; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Simpson, Robert J; Skibba, Ramin A; Smith, Arfon M; Thomas, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ultracompact AM CVn Binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Three Candidates Plus the First Confirmed Eclipsing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM CVn systems are a rare (about a dozen previously known) class of cataclysmic variables, arguably encompassing the shortest orbital periods (down to about 10 minutes) of any known binaries. Both binary components are thought to be degenerate (or partially so), likely with mass-transfer from a helium-rich donor onto a white dwarf, driven by gravitational radiation. Although rare, AM CVn systems are of high interest as possible SN Ia progenitors, and because they are predicted to be common sources of gravity waves in upcoming experiments such as LISA. We have identified four new AM CVn candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectral database. All four show hallmark spectroscopic characteristics of the AM CVn class: each is devoid of hydrogen features, and instead shows a spectrum dominated by helium. All four show double-peaked emission, indicative of helium-dominated accretion disks. Limited time-series CCD photometric follow-on data have been obtained for three of the new candidates from the AR...

Anderson, S F; Homer, L; Joshi, N R; Margon, B; Silvestri, N M; Szkody, P; Wolfe, M A; Agol, E; Becker, A C; Henden, A; Hall, P B; Knapp, G R; Richmond, M W; Schneider, D P; Stinson, G; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Anderson, Scott F.; Haggard, Daryl; Homer, Lee; Joshi, Nikhil R.; Margon, Bruce; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Szkody, Paula; Wolfe, Michael A.; Agol, Eric; Becker, Andrew C.; Henden, Arne; Hall, Patrick B.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stinson, Gregory; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ultracompact AM CVn Binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Three Candidates Plus the First Confirmed Eclipsing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM CVn systems are a rare (about a dozen previously known) class of cataclysmic variables, arguably encompassing the shortest orbital periods (down to about 10 minutes) of any known binaries. Both binary components are thought to be degenerate (or partially so), likely with mass-transfer from a helium-rich donor onto a white dwarf, driven by gravitational radiation. Although rare, AM CVn systems are of high interest as possible SN Ia progenitors, and because they are predicted to be common sources of gravity waves in upcoming experiments such as LISA. We have identified four new AM CVn candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectral database. All four show hallmark spectroscopic characteristics of the AM CVn class: each is devoid of hydrogen features, and instead shows a spectrum dominated by helium. All four show double-peaked emission, indicative of helium-dominated accretion disks. Limited time-series CCD photometric follow-on data have been obtained for three of the new candidates from the ARC 3.5m; most notably, a 28.3 minute binary period with sharp, deep eclipses is discovered in one case, SDSS J0926+3624. This is the first confirmed eclipsing AM CVn, and our data allow initial estimates of binary parameters for this ultracompact system. The four new SDSS objects also provide a substantial expansion of the currently critically-small sample of AM CVn systems.

Scott F. Anderson; Daryl Haggard; Lee Homer; Nikhil R. Joshi; Bruce Margon; Nicole M. Silvestri; Paula Szkody; Michael A. Wolfe; Eric Agol; Andrew C. Becker; Arne Henden; Patrick B. Hall; Gillian R. Knapp; Michael W. Richmond; Donald P. Schneider; Gregory Stinson; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Optically Selected BL Lacertae Candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a sample of 723 optically selected BL Lac candidates from the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic database encompassing 8250 deg^2 of sky; our sample constitutes one of the largest uniform BL Lac samples yet derived. Each BL Lac candidate has a high-quality SDSS spectrum from which we determine spectroscopic redshifts for ~60% of the objects. Redshift lower limits are estimated for the remaining objects utilizing the lack of host galaxy flux contamination in their optical spectra; we find that objects lacking spectroscopic redshifts are likely at systematically higher redshifts. Approximately 80% of our BL Lac candidates match to a radio source in FIRST/NVSS, and ~40% match to a ROSAT X-ray source. The homogeneous multiwavelength coverage allows subdivision of the sample into 637 radio-loud BL Lac candidates and 86 weak-featured radio-quiet objects. The radio-loud objects broadly support the standard paradigm unifying BL Lac objects with beamed radio galaxies. We propose that the majority of the radio-quiet obj...

Plotkin, Richard M; Brandt, W N; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Fan, X; Hall, P B; Kimball, A E; Richmond, M W; Schneider, D P; Shemmer, O; Voges, W; York, D G; Bahcall, N A; Snedden, S; Bizyaev, D; Brewington, H; Malanushenko, V; Malanushenko, E; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Simmonds, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low-Surface-Brightness Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Search Method and Test Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a pilot study to use imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to search for low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. For our pilot study we use a test sample of 92 galaxies from the catalog of Impey et al. (1996) distributed over 93 SDSS fields of the Early Data Release (EDR). Many galaxies from the test sample are either LSB or dwarf galaxies. To deal with the SDSS data most effectively a new photometry software was created, which is described in this paper. We present the results of the selection algorithms applied to these 93 EDR fields. Two galaxies from the Impey et al. test sample are very likely artifacts, as confirmed by follow-up imaging. With our algorithms, we were able to recover 87 of the 90 remaining test sample galaxies, implying a detection rate of $\\sim$96.5%. The three missed galaxies fall too close to very bright stars or galaxies. In addition, 42 new galaxies with parameters similar to the test sample objects were found in these EDR fields (i.e., $\\sim$47% additional galaxies). We present the main photometric parameters of all identified galaxies and carry out first statistical comparisons. We tested the quality of our photometry by comparing the magnitudes for our test sample galaxies and other bright galaxies with values from the literature. All these tests yielded consistent results. We briefly discuss a few unusual galaxies found in our pilot study, including an LSB galaxy with a two-component disk and ten new giant LSB galaxies.

Alexei Y. Kniazev; Eva K. Grebel; Simon A. Pustilnik; Alexander G. Pramskij; Tamara F. Kniazeva; Francisco Prada; Daniel Harbeck

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE): Data from a Spectroscopic Survey of 240,000 Stars with g=14-20  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already.

SEGUE, which stands for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, was one of those three surveys. The images and spectra obtained by SEGUE allowed astronomers to map the positions and velocities of hundreds of thousands of stars, from faint, relatively near-by (within about 100 pc or roughly 300 light-years) ancient stellar embers known as white dwarfs to bright stellar giants located in the outer reaches of the stellar halo, more than 100,000 light-years away. Encoded within the spectral data are the composition and temperature of these stars, vital clues for determining the age and origin of different populations of stars within the Galaxy. [from the SEGUE page at http://www.sdss.org/segue/] View illustrative spectra for various types of stars or go directly to the SDSS page for Data Release Seven at http://www.sdss.org/dr7/.

All three surveys summarized are:

  • Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees.
  • SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sightlines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way.
  • Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4.
The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publically accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

SDSS-II SEGUE Collaboration; Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

69

Galactic Globular and Open Clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Crowded Field Photometry and Cluster Fiducial Sequences in ugriz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present photometry for globular and open cluster stars observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In order to exploit over 100 million stellar objects with r < 22.5 mag observed by SDSS, we need to understand the characteristics of stars in the SDSS ugriz filters. While star clusters provide important calibration samples for stellar colors, the regions close to globular clusters, where the fraction of field stars is smallest, are too crowded for the standard SDSS photometric pipeline to process. To complement the SDSS imaging survey, we reduce the SDSS imaging data for crowded cluster fields using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME suite of programs and present photometry for 17 globular clusters and 3 open clusters in a SDSS value-added catalog. Our photometry and cluster fiducial sequences are on the native SDSS 2.5-meter ugriz photometric system, and the fiducial sequences can be directly applied to the SDSS photometry without relying upon any transformations. Model photometry for red giant branch and main...

An, Deokkeun; Clem, James L; Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance M; Morrison, Heather L; Harding, Paul; Gunn, James E; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Cudworth, Kyle M; Ivans, Inese I; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lee, Young Sun; Lupton, Robert H; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Watters, Shannon; York, Donald G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Galactic Globular and Open Clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Crowded Field Photometry and Cluster Fiducial Sequences in ugriz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present photometry for globular and open cluster stars observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In order to exploit over 100 million stellar objects with r < 22.5 mag observed by SDSS, we need to understand the characteristics of stars in the SDSS ugriz filters. While star clusters provide important calibration samples for stellar colors, the regions close to globular clusters, where the fraction of field stars is smallest, are too crowded for the standard SDSS photometric pipeline to process. To complement the SDSS imaging survey, we reduce the SDSS imaging data for crowded cluster fields using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME suite of programs and present photometry for 17 globular clusters and 3 open clusters in a SDSS value-added catalog. Our photometry and cluster fiducial sequences are on the native SDSS 2.5-meter ugriz photometric system, and the fiducial sequences can be directly applied to the SDSS photometry without relying upon any transformations. Model photometry for red giant branch and main-sequence stars obtained by Girardi et al. cannot be matched simultaneously to fiducial sequences; their colors differ by ~0.02-0.05 mag. Good agreement (< ~0.02 mag in colors) is found with Clem et al. empirical fiducial sequences in u'g'r'i'z' when using the transformation equations in Tucker et al.

Deokkeun An; Jennifer A. Johnson; James L. Clem; Brian Yanny; Constance M. Rockosi; Heather L. Morrison; Paul Harding; James E. Gunn; Carlos Allende Prieto; Timothy C. Beers; Kyle M. Cudworth; Inese I. Ivans; Zeljko Ivezic; Young Sun Lee; Robert H. Lupton; Dmitry Bizyaev; Howard Brewington; Elena Malanushenko; Viktor Malanushenko; Dan Oravetz; Kaike Pan; Audrey Simmons; Stephanie Snedden; Shannon Watters; Donald G. York

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Efficient Photometric Selection of Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: 100,000 z<3 Quasars from Data Release One  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 100,563 unresolved, UV-excess (UVX) quasar candidates to g=21 from 2099 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release One (DR1) imaging data. Existing spectra of 22,737 sources reveals that 22,191 (97.6%) are quasars; accounting for the magnitude dependence of this efficiency, we estimate that 95,502 (95.0%) of the objects in the catalog are quasars. Such a high efficiency is unprecedented in broad-band surveys of quasars. This ``proof-of-concept'' sample is designed to be maximally efficient, but still has 94.7% completeness to unresolved, g<~19.5, UVX quasars from the DR1 quasar catalog. This efficient and complete selection is the result of our application of a probability density type analysis to training sets that describe the 4-D color distribution of stars and spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS. Specifically, we use a non-parametric Bayesian classification, based on kernel density estimation, to parameterize the color distribution of astronomical sources -- allowing for fast and robust classification. We further supplement the catalog by providing photometric redshifts and matches to FIRST/VLA, ROSAT, and USNO-B sources. Future work needed to extend the this selection algorithm to larger redshifts, fainter magnitudes, and resolved sources is discussed. Finally, we examine some science applications of the catalog, particularly a tentative quasar number counts distribution covering the largest range in magnitude (14.2survey.

Gordon T. Richards; Robert C. Nichol; Alexander G. Gray; Robert J. Brunner; Robert H. Lupton; Daniel E. Vanden Berk; Shang Shan Chong; Michael A. Weinstein; Donald P. Schneider; Scott F. Anderson; Jeffrey A. Munn; Hugh C. Harris; Michael A. Strauss; Xiaohui Fan; James E. Gunn; Zeljko Ivezic; Donald G. York; J. Brinkmann

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

SDSS J0806+2006 and SDSS J1353+1138: Two New Gravitationally Lensed Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z_s=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z_s=1.629 with image separations of 1.40" and 1.41" respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z_l~0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z_l~0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Inada, N; Becker, R H; White, R L; Gregg, M D; Schechter, P L; Kawano, Y; Kochanek, C S; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; York, D G; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Schechter, Paul L.; Kawano, Yozo; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; York, Donald G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

SDSS J0806+2006 and SDSS J1353+1138: Two New Gravitationally Lensed Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z_s=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z_s=1.629 with image separations of 1.40" and 1.41" respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z_l~0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z_l~0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Naohisa Inada; Masamune Oguri; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Michael D. Gregg; Paul L. Schechter; Yozo Kawano; Christopher S. Kochanek; Gordon T. Richards; Donald P. Schneider; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden; Donald G. York

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sdss j0806+2006 and sdss j1353+1138: two new gravitationally lensed quasars from the sloan digital sky survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z{sub s}=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z{sub s}=1.629 with image separations of 1.40'' and 1.41'' respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z{sub l} {approx} 0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z{sub l} {approx} 0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.

Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Schechter, Paul L.; Kawano, Yozo; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; York, Donald G.; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /MIT, MKI /Nagoya U. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Johns Hopkins U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

CONSTRAINTS ON THE SHAPE OF THE MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM JEANS EQUATIONS APPLIED TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We search for evidence of dark matter in the Milky Way by utilizing the stellar number density distribution and kinematics measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to heliocentric distances exceeding {approx}10 kpc. We employ the cylindrically symmetric form of Jeans equations and focus on the morphology of the resulting acceleration maps, rather than the normalization of the total mass as done in previous, mostly local, studies. Jeans equations are first applied to a mock catalog based on a cosmologically derived N-body+SPH simulation, and the known acceleration (gradient of gravitational potential) is successfully recovered. The same simulation is also used to quantify the impact of dark matter on the total acceleration. We use Galfast, a code designed to quantitatively reproduce SDSS measurements and selection effects, to generate a synthetic stellar catalog. We apply Jeans equations to this catalog and produce two-dimensional maps of stellar acceleration. These maps reveal that in a Newtonian framework, the implied gravitational potential cannot be explained by visible matter alone. The acceleration experienced by stars at galactocentric distances of {approx}20 kpc is three times larger than what can be explained by purely visible matter. The application of an analytic method for estimating the dark matter halo axis ratio to SDSS data implies an oblate halo with q{sub DM} = 0.47 {+-} 0.14 within the same distance range. These techniques can be used to map the dark matter halo to much larger distances from the Galactic center using upcoming deep optical surveys, such as LSST.

Loebman, Sarah R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Quinn, Thomas R.; Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Christensen, Charlotte R. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Juric, Mario, E-mail: sloebman@astro.washington.edu [LSST Corporation, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Intergalactic stars in z~0.25 galaxy clusters: systematic properties from stacking of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse the spatial distribution and colour of the intracluster light (ICL) in 683 clusters of galaxies between z=0.2 and 0.3, selected from approx 1500 deg^2 of the SDSS-DR1. Surface photometry in the g, r and i bands is conducted on stacked images of the clusters, after rescaling them to the same metric size and masking out resolved sources. We are able to trace the average surface brightness profile of the ICL out to 700 kpc, where it is less than 1/10,000 of the mean surface brightness of the dark night sky. The ICL appears as a clear surface brightness excess with respect to an inner R^1/4 profile which characterises the mean profile of the BCG. The surface brightness (SB) of the ICL ranges from 27.5 mag/arcsec^2 at 100 kpc to roughly 32 at 700 kpc in the observed r-band (26.5 to 31 in the rest-frame g-band). We find that, on average, the ICL contributes only a small fraction of the total optical emission in a cluster (10.9+-5.0% within 500 kpc). The radial distribution of the ICL is more centrally concentrated than that of the cluster galaxies, but the colours of the two components are identical within the statistical uncertainties. In the mean the ICL is aligned with and more flattened than the BCG itself. This alignment is substantially stronger than that of the cluster light as a whole. The SB of the ICL correlates both with BCG luminosity and with cluster richness, while the fraction of the total light in the ICL is almost independent of these quantities. These results support the idea that the ICL is produced by stripping and disruption of galaxies as they pass through the central regions of clusters. Our measurements of the diffuse light also constrain the faint-end slope of the cluster LF. Slopes alphalight from undetected galaxies than is observed in the diffuse component.

Stefano Zibetti; Simon D. M. White; Donald P. Schneider; Jon Brinkmann

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

78

Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyrae type ab (RRab) and type c (RRc) stars. RRab stars havefrom V ? 0.5 to V ? 2. RRc stars have nearly symmetric,band magnitude of RRab and RRc stars. A comprehensive review

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a survey in Balmer Alpha of the entire Northern sky above declination -30 deg. This survey provides the first calibrated, velocity-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Galaxy. With one-degree spatial resolution, 12 km s^{-1} velocity resolution, and sensitivity to features as faint as 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 cm^{-6} pc), this survey provides the deepest maps of the ionized content of the Galaxy to date. In addition to probing the detailed kinematic structure of the Warm Ionized Medium and the vertical structure of the ionized content in spiral arms, initial results include the discovery of several faint, extended (d > 1\\deg) H II regions and the first map of the ionized component of an intermediate velocity cloud.

L. M. Haffner

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has surveyed the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas in the Galaxy above declination -30 degrees. The WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS) has an angular resolution of one degree and provides the first absolutely-calibrated, kinematically-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) within ~ +/-100 km/s of the Local Standard of Rest. Leveraging WHAM's 12 km/s spectral resolution, we have modeled and removed atmospheric emission and zodiacal absorption features from each of the 37,565 spectra. The resulting H-Alpha profiles reveal ionized gas detected in nearly every direction on the sky with a sensitivity of 0.15 R (3 sigma). Complex distributions of ionized gas are revealed in the nearby spiral arms up to 1-2 kpc away from the Galactic plane. Toward the inner Galaxy, the WHAM-NSS provides information about the WIM out to the tangent point down to a few degrees from the plane. Ionized gas is also detected toward many intermediate velocity clouds at high latitudes. Several new H II regions are revealed around early B-stars and evolved stellar cores (sdB/O). This work presents the details of the instrument, the survey, and the data reduction techniques. The WHAM-NSS is also presented and analyzed for its gross properties. Finally, some general conclusions are presented about the nature of the WIM as revealed by the WHAM-NSS.

L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte; G. J. Madsen; K. P. Jaehnig; J. W. Percival

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Christos Altantzis, MIT, and Martin Schmitt, LAV. All the images were generated from their work at LAV. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys PI Name: Christos Frouzakis PI Email: frouzakis@lav.mavt.ethz.ch Institution: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Chemistry The combustion of coal and petroleum-based fuels supply most of the energy needed to meet the world's transportation and power generation demands. To address the anticipated petroleum shortage, along with increasing energy

82

DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

Shin, Min-Su [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Yong-Ik, E-mail: msshin@umich.edu, E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: dakim@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ybyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate {beta} {identical_to} {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.55}/b. The result is {beta} = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which leads to an estimate of the density parameter {Omega}{sub m} = 0.20 {+-} 0.08.

Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Jarrett, Thomas [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bilicki@camk.edu.pl [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris - UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mushotzky, R. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Evans, P. A., E-mail: whbaumga@alum.mit.edu [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey of Galactic Ionized Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a one-degree resolution, velocity-resolved northern sky survey of H-alpha emission from our Galaxy. The unprecedented sensitivity of the instrument and accurate spectral subtraction of atmospheric features allow us to detect Galactic features as faint as 0.1 Rayleighs (EM ~ 0.25 cm^{-6} pc). This survey allows a direct comparison of the ionized and neutral components of the ISM on a global scale for the first time. All-sky maps of H-alpha emission in select velocity bands highlight the rich kinematic structure of the Galaxy's ionized gas. The full set of data from the WHAM survey is now available at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/. (abridged)

G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Astronomical Images from FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. These maps have 1.8" pixels, a typical rms of 0.15 mJy, and a resolution of 5". The best way to gain access to specific images is through the FIRST Cutout Server. It allows users to extract a specific image section from the coadded image database. All images taken through 2004 are available through the Cutout Server. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected. Both images and catalogs, searchable through specialized interfaces, are available at the FIRST website, and images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Data were collected from 1993 through 2002.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

87

CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a uniform all-sky survey of bright blazars, selected primarily by their flat radio spectra, that is designed to provide a large catalog of likely gamma-ray AGN. The defined sample has 1625 targets with radio and X-ray properties similar to those of the EGRET blazars, spread uniformly across the |b| > 10 deg sky. We also report progress toward optical characterization of the sample; of objects with known R < 23, 85% have been classified and 81% have measured redshifts. One goal of this program is to focus attention on the most interesting (e.g., high redshift, high luminosity, ...) sources for intensive multiwavelength study during the observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST.

Healey, Stephen E; Cotter, Garret; Michelson, Peter F; Schlafly, Edward F; Readhead, Anthony C S; Giommi, Paolo; Chaty, Sylvain; Grenier, Isabelle A; Weintraub, Lawrence C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

Madsen, G J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

THE WHAM NORTHERN SKY SURVEY AND THE NATURE OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM IN THE GALAXY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H? emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between H I and H II in the diffuse ISM. 1.

G. J. Madsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

G. J. Madsen

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey: I. Source selection and observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) is an international collaborative program which has obtained high-resolution radio images of over 10000 flat-spectrum radio sources in order to create the largest and best studied statistical sample of radio-loud gravitationally lensed systems. With this survey, combined with detailed studies of the lenses found therein, constraints can be placed on the expansion rate, matter density, and dark energy (e.g. cosmological constant, quintessence) content of the Universe that are complementary to and independent of those obtained through other methods. CLASS is aimed at identifying lenses where multiple images are formed from compact flat-spectrum radio sources, which should be easily identifiable in the radio maps. Because CLASS is radio-based, dust obscuration in lensing galaxies is not a factor, and the relative insensitivity of the instrument to environmental conditions leads to nearly uniform sensitivity and resolution over the entire survey. In four observing seasons from 1994-1999, CLASS has observed 13783 radio sources with the VLA at 8.4 GHz at 0.2 arcsecond resolution. When combined with the JVAS survey, the CLASS sample contains over 16,000 images. A complete sample of 11685 flat-spectrum sources was observed, selected from GB6 catalogue at 4.85 GHz and the NVSS at 1.4 GHz. So far, CLASS has found 16 new gravitational lens systems, and the JVAS/CLASS survey contains a total of 22 lenses. (Abridged)

S. T. Myers; N. J. Jackson; I. W. A. Browne; A. G. de Bruyn; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; P. N. Wilkinson; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; J. P. McKean; M. A. Norbury; P. M. Phillips; D. Rusin; M. C. Shepherd; C. M. Sykes

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Catalogue of RR Lyrae Stars from the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for RR Lyrae stars has been conducted in the publicly available data of the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Candidates have been selected by the statistical properties of their variation; the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis with appropriate limits determined from a sample 314 known RRab and RRc stars listed in the GCVS. From the period analysis and light curve shape of over 3000 candidates 785 RR Lyrae have been identified of which 188 are previously unknown. The light curves were examined for the Blazhko effect and several new stars showing this were found. Six double-mode RR Lyrae stars were also found of which two are new discoveries. Some previously known variables have been reclassified as RR Lyrae stars and similarly some RR Lyrae stars have been found to be other types of variable, or not variable at all.

Patrick Wils; Christopher Lloyd; Klaus Bernhard

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of RR Lyrae Stars in the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS), obtained from the first generation Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-I), to identify and study RR Lyrae variable stars in the solar neighborhood. We initially identified 1197 RRab (RR0) candidate stars brighter than the ROTSE median magnitude V = 14. Periods, amplitudes, and mean V magnitudes are determined for a subset of 1188 RRab stars with well defined light curves. Metallicities are determined for 589 stars by the Fourier parameter method and by the relationship between period, amplitude, and [Fe/H]. We comment upon the difficulties of clearly classifying RRc (RR1) variables in the NSVS dataset. Distances to the RRab stars are calculated using an adopted luminosity-metallicity relation with corrections for interstellar extinction. The 589 RRab stars in our final sample are used to study the properties of the RRab population within 5 kpc of the Sun. The Bailey diagram of period versus amplitude shows that the largest component o...

Kinemuchi, K; Wozniak, P R; McKay, T A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Analysis of RR Lyrae Stars in the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS), obtained from the first generation Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-I), to identify and study RR Lyrae variable stars in the solar neighborhood. We initially identified 1197 RRab (RR0) candidate stars brighter than the ROTSE median magnitude V = 14. Periods, amplitudes, and mean V magnitudes are determined for a subset of 1188 RRab stars with well defined light curves. Metallicities are determined for 589 stars by the Fourier parameter method and by the relationship between period, amplitude, and [Fe/H]. We comment upon the difficulties of clearly classifying RRc (RR1) variables in the NSVS dataset. Distances to the RRab stars are calculated using an adopted luminosity-metallicity relation with corrections for interstellar extinction. The 589 RRab stars in our final sample are used to study the properties of the RRab population within 5 kpc of the Sun. The Bailey diagram of period versus amplitude shows that the largest component of this sample belongs to Oosterhoff type I. Metal-rich ([Fe/H] > -1) RRab stars appear to be associated with the Galactic disk. Our metal-rich RRab sample may include a thin disk as well as a thick disk population, although the uncertainties are too large to establish this. There is some evidence among the metal-rich RRab stars for a decline in scale height with increasing [Fe/H], as was found by Layden (1995). The distribution of RRab stars with -1 < [Fe/H] < -1.25 indicates that within this metallicity range the RRab stars are a mixture of stars belonging to halo and disk populations.

K. Kinemuchi; H. A. Smith; P. R. Wozniak; T. A. McKay; the ROTSE Collaboration.

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

97

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Constraints on Cosmological Parameters from the Analysis of the Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey Radio-Selected Gravitational Lens Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and the properties of the lensing galaxies from gravitational lens statistics based on the final Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey (CLASS) data. For a flat universe with a classical cosmological constant, we find that the present matter fraction of the critical density is $\\Omega_{\\rm m}=0.31^{+0.27}_{-0.14}$ (68%) $^{+0.12}_{-0.10}$ (systematic). For a flat universe with a constant equation of state for dark energy $w = p_x({pressure})/\\rho_x({energy density})$, we find $w < -0.55^{+0.18}_{-0.11}$ (68%).

K. -H. Chae; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; I. W. A. Browne; A. G. de Bruyn; C. D. Fassnacht; P. Helbig; N. J. Jackson; L. J. King; L. V. E. Koopmans; S. Mao; D. R. Marlow; J. P. McKean; S. T. Myers; M. Norbury; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; D. Rusin; C. M. Sykes; P. N. Wilkinson; E. Xanthopoulos; T. York

2002-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

GROUP FINDING IN THE STELLAR HALO USING M-GIANTS IN THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY: AN EXTENDED VIEW OF THE PISCES OVERDENSITY?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A density-based hierarchical group-finding algorithm is used to identify stellar halo structures in a catalog of M-giants from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The intrinsic brightness of M-giant stars means that this catalog probes deep into the halo where substructures are expected to be abundant and easy to detect. Our analysis reveals 16 structures at high Galactic latitude (greater than 15{sup 0}), of which 10 have been previously identified. Among the six new structures, two could plausibly be due to masks applied to the data, one is associated with a strong extinction region, and one is probably a part of the Monoceros Ring. Another one originates at low latitudes, suggesting some contamination from disk stars, but also shows protrusions extending to high latitudes, implying that it could be a real feature in the stellar halo. The last remaining structure is free from the defects discussed above and hence is very likely a satellite remnant. Although the extinction in the direction of the structure is very low, the structure does match a low-temperature feature in the dust maps. While this casts some doubt on its origin, the low-temperature feature could plausibly be due to real dust in the structure itself. The angular position and distance of this structure encompass the Pisces overdensity traced by RR Lyraes in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). However, the 2MASS M-giants indicate that the structure is much more extended than what is visible with the SDSS, with the point of peak density lying just outside Stripe 82. The morphology of the structure is more like a cloud than a stream and reminiscent of that seen in simulations of satellites disrupting along highly eccentric orbits. This finding is consistent with expectations of structure formation within the currently favored cosmological model: assuming the cosmologically predicted satellite orbit distributions are correct, prior work indicates that such clouds should be the dominant debris structures at large Galactocentric radii ({approx}100 kpc and beyond).

Sharma, Sanjib; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Carlberg, Joleen K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Munoz, Ricardo R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bullock, James [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

CONSTRUCTION OF A CALIBRATED PROBABILISTIC CLASSIFICATION CATALOG: APPLICATION TO 50k VARIABLE SOURCES IN THE ALL-SKY AUTOMATED SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

With growing data volumes from synoptic surveys, astronomers necessarily must become more abstracted from the discovery and introspection processes. Given the scarcity of follow-up resources, there is a particularly sharp onus on the frameworks that replace these human roles to provide accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classification catalogs. Such catalogs inform the subsequent follow-up, allowing consumers to optimize the selection of specific sources for further study and permitting rigorous treatment of classification purities and efficiencies for population studies. Here, we describe a process to produce a probabilistic classification catalog of variability with machine learning from a multi-epoch photometric survey. In addition to producing accurate classifications, we show how to estimate calibrated class probabilities and motivate the importance of probability calibration. We also introduce a methodology for feature-based anomaly detection, which allows discovery of objects in the survey that do not fit within the predefined class taxonomy. Finally, we apply these methods to sources observed by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS), and release the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog (MACC), a 28 class probabilistic classification catalog of 50,124 ASAS sources in the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars. We estimate that MACC achieves a sub-20% classification error rate and demonstrate that the class posterior probabilities are reasonably calibrated. MACC classifications compare favorably to the classifications of several previous domain-specific ASAS papers and to the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, which had classified only 24% of those sources into one of 12 science classes.

Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Brink, Henrik; Crellin-Quick, Arien [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Butler, Nathaniel R., E-mail: jwrichar@stat.berkeley.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

Four Faint T Dwarfs from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Southern Stripe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of four faint T dwarfs newly discovered from the UKIDSS first data release. The sample, drawn from an imaged area of ~136 square degrees to a depth of Y=19.9 (5-sigma, Vega), is located in the SDSS Southern Equatorial Stripe, a region of significant future deep imaging potential. We detail the selection and followup of these objects, three of which are spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs ranging from type T2.5 to T7.5, and one is photometrically identified as early T. Their magnitudes range from Y=19.01 to 19.88 with derived distances from 34 to 98 pc, making these among the coldest and faintest brown dwarfs known. The sample brings the total number of T dwarfs found or confirmed by UKIDSS data in this region to nine, and we discuss the projected numbers of dwarfs in the future survey data. We estimate that ~240 early- and late-T dwarfs are discoverable in the UKIDSS LAS data, falling significantly short of published model projections and suggesting that IMFs and/or birthrates may be at the low end of possible models. Thus, deeper optical data has good potential to exploit the UKIDSS survey depth more fully, but may still find the potential Y dwarf sample to be extremely rare.

Kuenley Chiu; Michael C. Liu; Linhua Jiang; Katelyn N. Allers; Daniel P. Stark; Andrew Bunker; Xiaohui Fan; Karl Glazebrook; Trent J. Dupuy

2007-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey:II. Gravitational lens candidate selection and follow-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the final results of the search for gravitationally lensed flat-spectrum radio sources found in the combination of CLASS (Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey) and JVAS (Jodrell-Bank VLA Astrometric Survey). VLA observations of 16,503 sources have been made, resulting in the largest sample of arcsec-scale lens systems available. Contained within the 16,503 sources is a complete sample of 11,685 sources having two-point spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz flatter than -0.5 and 5 GHz flux densities $\\geq$30 mJy. A subset of 8,958 sources form a well-defined statistical sample suitable for analysis of the lens statistics. We describe the systematic process by which 149 candidate lensed sources were picked from the statistical sample on the basis of possessing multiple compact components in the 0.2 arcsec-resolution VLA maps. Candidates were followed up with 0.05 arcsec resolution MERLIN and 0.003 arcsec VLBA observations at 5 GHz and rejected as lens systems if they failed well-defined surface brightness and/or morphological tests. Maps for all the candidates can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/research/gravlens/index.html We summarize the properties of each of the 22 gravitational lens systems in JVAS/CLASS. Twelve are double-image systems, nine are four-image systems and one is a six-image system. Thirteen constitute a statistically well-defined sample giving a point-source lensing rate of 1:690$\\pm$190. The interpretation of the results in terms of the properties of the lensing galaxy population and cosmological parameters will be published elsewhere. (Abridged)

I. W. A. Browne; P. N. Wilkinson; N. J. F. Jackson; S. T. Myers; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; M. Norbury; D. Rusin; C. M. Sykes; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; A. G. de Bruyn; K-H. Chae; P. Helbig; L. J. King; J. P. McKean; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; E. Xanthopoulos; T. York

2002-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Digital commemoration: surveying the social media revival of historical crises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Social media has facilitated coordination efforts to help save lives, but are people using social media after the emergency phase? To answer this question, the author conducted a study surveying the social media revival of 111 crisis events that occurred ... Keywords: commemoration, crisis informatics, cyberinfrastructure, social media, survey, web sphere

Sophia B. Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Review: Digital image steganography: Survey and analysis of current methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steganography is the science that involves communicating secret data in an appropriate multimedia carrier, e.g., image, audio, and video files. It comes under the assumption that if the feature is visible, the point of attack is evident, thus the goal ... Keywords: Adaptive steganography, Digital image steganography, Frequency domain, Security, Spatial domain

Abbas Cheddad; Joan Condell; Kevin Curran; Paul Mc Kevitt

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

BNL | Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) sloan telescope The 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in New Mexico Mapping the Luminous Universe How are galaxies clustered together? What is fueling the accelerating expansion of the universe? Just what is dark energy? These are the big questions that scientists working at the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) are asking. Brookhaven National Lab is a member of BOSS, the largest of the four surveys that make up the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, which maps the sky over the Northern Hemisphere with New Mexico's 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in an attempt to define dark energy and measure its effects. Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search

106

Clear Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clear Skies A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10025 "convective adjustment"takes place. Energy is transported upward within the...

107

The Linear Theory Power Spectrum from the Lyman-alpha Forest in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the SDSS Lyman-alpha forest P_F(k,z) measurement to determine the linear theory power spectrum. Our analysis is based on fully hydrodynamic simulations, extended using hydro-PM simulations. We account for the effect of absorbers with damping wings, which leads to an increase in the slope of the linear power spectrum. We break the degeneracy between the mean level of absorption and the linear power spectrum without significant use of external constraints, which is possible because of the high precision of the P_F(k,z) measurements over a wide range of redshift and scale. We infer linear theory power spectrum amplitude Delta^2_L(k_p=0.009s/km,z_p=3.0)=0.452_{-0.057-0.116}^{+0.069+0.141} and slope n_eff(k_p,z_p)=-2.321_{-0.047-0.102}^{+0.055+0.131} (errors are Delta chi^2=1 and 4, with possible systematic errors included through nuisance parameters in the fit; the errors are correlated with r~0.63). The inferred curvature of the linear power spectrum and the evolution of its amplitude and slope with r...

McDonald, P; Cen, R; Weinberg, D H; Burles, S; Schneider, D P; Schlegel, D J; Bahcall, Neta A; Brinkmann, J; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Vanden Berk, Daniel E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Linear Theory Power Spectrum from the Lyman-alpha Forest in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the SDSS Ly-alpha forest P_F(k,z) measurement to determine the linear theory power spectrum. Our analysis is based on fully hydrodynamic simulations, extended using hydro-PM simulations. We account for the effect of absorbers with damping wings, which leads to an increase in the slope of the linear power spectrum. We break the degeneracy between the mean level of absorption and the linear power spectrum without significant use of external constraints. We infer linear theory power spectrum amplitude Delta^2_L(k_p=0.009s/km,z_p=3.0)=0.452_{-0.057-0.116}^{+0.069+0.141} and slope n_eff=-2.321_{-0.047-0.102}^{+0.055+0.131} (possible systematic errors are included through nuisance parameters in the fit - a factor >~5 smaller errors would be obtained on both parameters if we ignored modeling uncertainties). The errors are correlated and not perfectly Gaussian, so we provide a chi^2 table to accurately describe the results. The result corresponds to sigma_8=0.85, n=0.94, for a LCDM model with Omega_m=0.3, Omega_b=0.04, and h=0.7, but is most useful in a combined fit with the CMB. The inferred curvature of the linear power spectrum and the evolution of its amplitude and slope with redshift are consistent with expectations for LCDM models, with the evolution of the slope, in particular, being tightly constrained. We use this information to constrain systematic contamination, e.g., fluctuations in the UV background. This paper should serve as a starting point for more work to refine the analysis, including technical improvements such as increasing the size and number of the hydrodynamic simulations, and improvements in the treatment of the various forms of feedback from galaxies and quasars.

P. McDonald; U. Seljak; R. Cen; D. Shih; D. H. Weinberg; S. Burles; D. P. Schneider; D. J. Schlegel; N. A. Bahcall; J. W. Briggs; J. Brinkmann; M. Fukugita; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. E. Vanden Berk

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

INVESTIGATION OF THE ERRORS IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY PROPER-MOTION MEASUREMENTS USING SAMPLES OF QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate in detail the probability distribution function (pdf) of the proper-motion measurement errors in the SDSS+USNO-B proper-motion catalog of Munn et al. using clean quasar samples. The pdf of the errors is well represented by a Gaussian core with extended wings, plus a very small fraction (<0.1%) of 'outliers'. We find that while formally the pdf could be well fit by a five-parameter fitting function, for many purposes it is also adequate to represent the pdf with a one-parameter approximation to this function. We apply this pdf to the calculation of the confidence intervals on the true proper motion for an SDSS+USNO-B proper-motion measurement, and discuss several scientific applications of the SDSS proper-motion catalog. Our results have various applications in studies of the galactic structure and stellar kinematics. Specifically, they are crucial for searching hyper-velocity stars in the Galaxy.

Dong Ruobing; Gunn, James; Knapp, Gillian [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Rockosi, Constance [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Blanton, Michael, E-mail: rdong@astro.princeton.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sky in Google Earth: The Next Frontier in Astronomical Data Discovery and Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy began as a visual science, first through careful observations of the sky using either an eyepiece or the naked eye, then on to the preservation of those images with photographic media and finally the digital encoding of that information via CCDs. This last step has enabled astronomy to move into a fully automated era -- where data is recorded, analyzed and interpreted often without any direct visual inspection. Sky in Google Earth completes that circle by providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys covering the full sky. By streaming imagery, catalogs, time domain data, and ancillary information directly to a user, Sky can provide the general public as well as professional and amateur astronomers alike with a wealth of information for use in education and research. We provide here a brief introduction to Sky in Google Earth, focusing on its extensible environment, how it may be integrated into the research process and how it can bring astronomical research to a broader community. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, applications developed within Sky are accessible not just within the Google framework but through any visual browser that supports the Keyhole Markup Language. We present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope.

Ryan Scranton; Andrew Connolly; Simon Krughoff; Jeremy Brewer; Alberto Conti; Carol Christian; Brian McLean; Craig Sosin; Greg Coombe; Paul Heckbert

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect from the cross correlation of WMAP 3 year and the NRAO VLA sky survey data: New results and constraints on dark energy  

SciTech Connect

We cross correlate the new 3 year Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background data with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio galaxy data and find further evidence of late integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect taking place at late times in cosmic history. Our detection makes use of a novel statistical method (P. Baldi, G. Kerkyacharian, D. Marinucci, and D. Picard, math.ST/0606154 and P. Baldi, G. Kerkyacharian, D. Marinucci, D. Picard, math.ST/0606599) based on a new construction of spherical wavelets, called needlets. The null hypothesis (no ISW) is excluded at more than 99.7% confidence. When we compare the measured cross correlation with the theoretical predictions of standard, flat cosmological models with a generalized dark energy component parameterized by its density, {omega}{sub DE}, equation of state w and speed of sound c{sub s}{sup 2}, we find 0.3{<=}{omega}{sub DE}{<=}0.8 at 95% C.L., independently of c{sub s}{sup 2} and w. If dark energy is assumed to be a cosmological constant (w=-1), the bound on density shrinks to 0.41{<=}{omega}{sub DE}{<=}0.79. Models without dark energy are excluded at more than 4{sigma}. The bounds on w depend rather strongly on the assumed value of c{sub s}{sup 2}. We find that models with more negative equation of state (such as phantom models) are a worse fit to the data in the case c{sub s}{sup 2}=1 than in the case c{sub s}{sup 2}=0.

Pietrobon, Davide [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', V. della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Balbi, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata' and INFN Sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata', V. della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Marinucci, Domenico [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', V. della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

QUEST1 VARIABILITY SURVEY. III. LIGHT CURVE CATALOG UPDATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports an update to the QUEST1 (QUasar Equatorial Survey Team, Phase 1) Variability Survey (QVS) light curve catalog, which links QVS instrumental magnitude light curves to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) objects and photometry. In the time since the original QVS catalog release, the overlap between publicly available SDSS data and QVS data has increased by 8% in sky coverage and 16,728 in number of matched objects. The astrometric matching and the treatment of SDSS masks have been refined for the updated catalog. We report on these improvements and present multiple bandpass light curves, global variability information, and matched SDSS photometry for 214,941 QUEST1 objects.

Rengstorf, A. W.; Thompson, D. L. [Purdue University Calumet, Department of Chemistry and Physics, 2200 169th St., Hammond, IN 46323 (United States); Mufson, S. L.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Adams, B.; Baltay, C.; Gebhard, M. [Indiana University, 727 E. 3rd St., Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Andrews, P.; Coppi, P.; Emmet, W. [Yale University, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Vivas, A. K.; Abad, C.; Bongiovanni, A.; Briceno, C.; Bruzual, G.; Prugna, F. Della; Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones de AstronomIa, Apartado Postal 264, Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bailyn, C. [Yale University, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06250-8101 (United States); Ferrin, I.; Fuenmayor, F. [Universidad de Los Andes, Apartado Postal 26, Merida 5251 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: adamwr@calumet.purdue.edu (and others)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The July, 2008 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

114

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

115

Discovery and Characterization of Transiting Super Earths Using an All-Sky Transit Survey and Follow-up by the James Webb Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doppler and transit surveys are finding extrasolar planets of ever smaller mass and radius, and are now sampling the domain of super Earths (1–3R?). Recent results from the Doppler surveys suggest that discovery of a ...

Seager, Sara

116

The Determination of Sky View-Factors in Urban Environments Using Video Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is described whereby sky view-factors may be determined using a video camera equipped with a fish-eye lens. The video image is digitized and then analyzed to distinguish between “sky” and “non-sky” pixels. View-factors are calculated ...

D. G. Steyn; J. E. Hay; Ian D. Watson; Glenn T. Johnson

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. II. AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF DIFFUSE O VII AND O VIII EMISSION INTENSITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an all-sky catalog of diffuse O VII and O VIII line intensities, extracted from archival XMM-Newton observations. This catalog supersedes our previous catalog, which covered the sky between l = 120 Degree-Sign and l = 240 Degree-Sign . We attempted to reduce the contamination from near-Earth solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission by excluding times of high solar wind proton flux from the data. Without this filtering, we were able to extract measurements from 1868 observations. With this filtering, nearly half of the observations became unusable, and only 1003 observations yielded measurements. The O VII and O VIII intensities are typically {approx}2-11 and {approx}10 L.U. were observed. We compared our measurements with models of the heliospheric and geocoronal SWCX. The heliospheric SWCX intensity is expected to vary with ecliptic latitude and solar cycle. We found that the observed oxygen intensities generally decrease from solar maximum to solar minimum, both at high ecliptic latitudes (which is as expected) and at low ecliptic latitudes (which is not as expected). The geocoronal SWCX intensity is expected to depend on the solar wind proton flux incident on the Earth and on the sightline's path through the magnetosheath. The intensity variations seen in directions that have been observed multiple times are in poor agreement with the predictions of a geocoronal SWCX model. We found that the oxygen lines account for {approx}40%-50% of the 3/4 keV X-ray background that is not due to unresolved active galactic nuclei, in good agreement with a previous measurement. However, we found that this fraction is not easily explainable by a combination of SWCX emission and emission from hot plasma in the halo. We also examined the correlations between the oxygen intensities and Galactic longitude and latitude. We found that the intensities tend to increase with longitude toward the inner Galaxy, possibly due to an increase in the supernova rate in that direction or the presence of a halo of accreted material centered on the Galactic center. The variation of intensity with Galactic latitude differs in different octants of the sky, and cannot be explained by a single simple plane-parallel or constant-intensity halo model.

Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: dbh@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Survey of Cloud Computing Challenges from a Digital Forensics Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computing and communication technologies have merged to produce an environment where many applications and their associated data reside in remote locations, often unknown to the users. The adoption of cloud computing promises many benefits to users and ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Computer Forensic Examiners, Computer Forensics, Digital Forensics, Forensic Data Acquisition

Gregory H. Carlton; Hill Zhou

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transformation from SDSS Photometric System to Johnson-Morgan-Cousins System in HK Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the transformation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric system to the Johnson-Morgan-Cousins System in the HK Survey. This research was done in late 2001, so the SDSS photometry was taken from the database prior to the release of DR1. This paper is being posted because it is referenced in other papers in the literature, but will not be submitted to a refereed journal because it uses unpublished versions of the catalogs.

Chongshan Zhao; Heidi Jo Newberg

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

COBE Sky Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBE sky map COBE sky map This map of the ancient sky shows the minute variations in the microwave background discovered by the team led by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory astrophysicist George Smoot. As seen in the map, vast regions of space have minute variations in temperature. Over billions of years, gravity magnified these small differences into the clusters of galaxies we observe today. Displayed horizontally across the middle of the map is the Milky Way galaxy. The image, a 360-degree map of the whole sky, shows the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map was derived from one year of data taken by the Differential Microwave Radiometers onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite. Using Galactic coordinates, the map shows the plane of the Milky Way galaxy horizontally and the center of our galaxy at its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

The catacombs of san giovanni in syracuse: surveying, digital enhancement and revitalization of an archaeological landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is a cross-disciplinary research carried out by archaeologists, engineers and architects aimed at the knowledge and enhancement of the San Giovanni catacombs complex in Syracuse. The study uses the most innovative 3D surveying and virtual ... Keywords: 3d modeling, Roman catacombs, knowledge, laser scanning, virtual archaeology, virtual fruition

Elisa Bonacini; Graziana D'Agostino; Mariateresa Galizia; Cettina Santagati; Mariarita Sgarlata

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Earth Occultation Imaging Applied to BATSE -- Application to a Combined BATSE-GBM Survey of the Hard X-Ray Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined BATSE-GBM hard X-ray catalog is presented based on Earth Occultation Imaging applied to a reanalysis of BATSE data. An imaging approach has been developed for the reanalysis of Earth Occultation analysis of BATSE data. The standard occultation analysis depends on a predetermined catalog of potential sources, so that a real source not present in the catalog may induce systematic errors when source counts associated with an uncatalogued source are incorrectly attributed to catalog sources. The goal of the imaging analysis is to find a complete set of hard X-ray sources, including sources not in the original BATSE occultation catalog. Using the imaging technique, we have identified 15 known sources and 17 unidentified sources and added them to the BATSE occultation catalog. The resulting expanded BATSE catalog of sources observed during 1991-2000 is compared to the ongoing GBM survey.

Zhang, Yuan; Case, Gary; Ling, James; Wheaton, William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY: PARAMETERIZING THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATE AS A FUNCTION OF HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Supernova Survey-II (SDSS-II SN Survey), we measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of galaxy properties at intermediate redshift. A sample of 342 SNe Ia with 0.05 0.15) SNe Ia in highly star-forming galaxies. We consider that the high levels of dust in these systems may be obscuring the reddest and faintest SNe Ia.

Smith, Mathew [Department of Physics, University of Western Cape, Bellville 7530, Cape Town (South Africa); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Dilday, Benjamin [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Marriner, John; Frieman, Joshua [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kessler, Richard [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6-8 Melrose Road, Muizenberg 7945 (South Africa); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Lampeitl, Hubert [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Sako, Masao [Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: matsmith2@gmail.com [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sky Train Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Train Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Train Corp. Place Palm Harbor, Florida Zip 34684 Sector Services Product Sky Train Corporation is a consultant company...

125

Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Energy Place Germany Product A German company which is involved with the development of a 10MW STEG plant in the Moura region of...

126

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Infrared Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infrared sky from space is the sum of a cosmic signal from galaxies, quasars, and perhaps more exotic sources; and foregrounds from the Milky Way and from the Solar System. At a distance of 1 AU from the Sun, the foreground from interplanetary dust is very bright between 5 and 100 microns, but ``very bright'' is still several million times fainter than the background produced by ground-based telescopes. In the near infrared 1-2.2 micron range the space infrared sky is a thousand times fainter than the OH nightglow from the Earth's atmosphere. As a result of these advantages, wide-field imaging from space in the infrared can be an incredibly sensitive method to study the Universe.

E. L. Wright

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of unprecedented depth, temporal breadth, and sky coverage, consisting of images from the seven-year span of the Palomar-Quest and Near-Earth Astroid Tracking (NEAT) transient surveys and the current Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The database currently has over 13 million images stored on the NERSC Global Filesystem but data from the PTF are accumulating at the rate of about 105TB per year. The challenge is not only archiving the data but processing it in near-real time to observe rare and fleeting cosmic events as they happen so that experimental astronomers can be alerted. Why it Matters: The PTF will probe gaps in the transient phase space and

129

The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: measurements of the growth of structure and expansion rate at z=0.57 from anisotropic clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the anisotropic clustering of massive galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) sample, which consists of 264,283 galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 0.57, and when combined imply \\Omega_{\\Lambda} = 0.74 +/- 0.016, independent of the Universe's evolution at z<0.57. In our companion paper (Samushia et al. prep), we explore further cosmological implications of these observations.

Reid, Beth A; White, Martin; Percival, Will J; Manera, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gunn, James E; Honscheid, Klaus; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Muna, Demitri; Nichol, Robert C; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; de Putter, Roland; Roe, N A; Ross, Nicholas P; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin S; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Snedden, Stephanie; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Infrared Sky Brightness Monitors for Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two sky brightness monitorsone for the near-infrared and one for the mid-infraredhave been developed for site survey work in Antarctica. The instruments, which we refer to as the NISM (Near-Infrared Sky Monitor) and the MISM (Mid-Infrared Sky Monitor), are part of a suite of instruments being deployed in the Automated Astrophysical Site-Testing Observatory (AASTO). The chief design constraints include reliable, autonomous operation, low power consumption, and of course the ability to operate under conditions of extreme cold. The instruments are currently operational at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, prior to deployment at remote, unattended sites on the high antarctic plateau. 1. INTRODUCTION The antarctic plateau is recognized as having the potential to provide some of the best astronomical observing conditions on earth (see, e.g., Burton et al. 1994). Almost all the site testing to date has been carried out at the South Pole, where it has already been demonstrated t...

Storey Ashley Boccas; J. W. V. Storey; M. C. B. Ashley; M. Boccas; M. A. Phillips; A. E. T. Schinckel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sky Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, Inc is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References "Sky Energy, Inc" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSkyEnergyInc&oldid351167...

132

Measurements of sky luminance, sky illuminance, and horizontal solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents initial findings of a sky measurement program currently in progress at the National Bureau of Standards. Measurements are reported on sky luminance and illuminance and how they relate to horizontal solar radiation and sun position. Correlations are presented relating horizontal illuminance to horizontal solar radiation, and zenith luminance to solar altitude. These empirical models are particularly suitable for use in daylighting energy studies since they are based on existing solar data currently available on standard weather tapes.

Treado, S.; Gillette, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

134

The universe at extreme scale: multi-petaflop sky simulation on the BG/Q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Next-generation sky surveys will map billions of galaxies to ...

Salman Habib; Vitali Morozov; Hal Finkel; Adrian Pope; Katrin Heitmann; Kalyan Kumaran; Tom Peterka; Joe Insley; David Daniel; Patricia Fasel; Nicholas Frontiere; Zarija Luki?

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates f...

Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sky Volt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volt Volt Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Volt Facility Sky Volt Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sky Volt LLC (community owned) Energy Purchaser City of Greenfield - excess to Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Greenfield IA Coordinates 41.29038343°, -94.48851585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.29038343,"lon":-94.48851585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

138

RECIPIENT:SkyFuel, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SkyFuel, Inc. SkyFuel, Inc. u.s. DEPARTl.\IIEN T OF ENER qY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlvIINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITL E: SkyFuel 8aseload Parabolic Trough Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement I.nstrument N mber NEPA Control Number CID Number Baseload DE-EEOO03584 GFO-OOO3584-002 G03584 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed achon, as NEP] Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.tA), I have made the followmg determmatlOn: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Descnptlon : 83.6 Small-scale Sltmg, construction, modification, operation, and de mmlSSlonlng of faCilities for smaliscale research research and and development projects; conventionallaboralory 0 rations (such as preparation of chemical

139

Science satellites scour skies for Santa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

satellites scour skies for Santa Science satellites scour skies for Santa Beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, Dec. 24, scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the...

140

`blue-sky' science Spending review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cooling Towers Fiddlers Ferry #12;What are the benefits of `blue-sky' science? At a time where every penny

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Feature Extraction from Whole-Sky Ground-Based Images for Cloud-Type Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several features that can be extracted from digital images of the sky and that can be useful for cloud-type classification of such images are presented. Some features are statistical measurements of image texture, some are based on the Fourier ...

Josep Calbó; Jeff Sabburg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Constraint on the cosmological f(R) model from the multipole power spectrum of the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample and prospects for a future redshift survey  

SciTech Connect

A constraint on the viable f(R) model is investigated by confronting theoretical predictions with the multipole power spectrum of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, data release 7. We obtain a constraint on the Compton wavelength parameter of the f(R) model on the scales of cosmological large-scale structure. A prospect of constraining the Compton wavelength parameter with a future redshift survey is also investigated. The usefulness of the redshift-space distortion for testing the gravity theory on cosmological scales is demonstrated.

Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Gen; Narikawa, Tatsuya; Sato, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Huetsi, Gert [Tartu Observatory, EE-61602 Torevere (Estonia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

SkyBuilt Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name SkyBuilt Power Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22207 Sector Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product US-based renewable energy system...

144

Digital PCR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Digital PCR. Summary: Digital PCR (dPCR) is a method used to quantify nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, cDNA). ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Digital materials for digital fabrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces digital materials by analogy with digital computation and digital communications. Traditional fabrication techniques include pick-and-place, roll-to-roll, molding, patterning and more. Current research ...

Popescu, George A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

A physically-based night sky model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a physically-based model of the night sky for realistic image synthesis. We model both the direct appearance of the night sky and the illumination coming from the Moon, the stars, the zodiacal light, and the atmosphere. To accurately ...

Henrik Wann Jensen; Frédo Durand; Julie Dorsey; Michael M. Stark; Peter Shirley; Simon Premože

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SEGUE: A Spectroscopic Survey of 240,000 stars with g=14-20  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Survey obtained {approx}240,000 moderate-resolution (R {approx} 1800) spectra from 3900 {angstrom} to 9000 {angstrom} of fainter Milky Way stars (14.0 10 per resolution element, stellar atmospheric parameters are estimated, including metallicity, surface gravity, and effective temperature. SEGUE obtained 3500 deg{sup 2} of additional ugriz imaging (primarily at low Galactic latitudes) providing precise multicolor photometry ({sigma}(g, r, i) {approx} 2%), ({sigma}(u, z) {approx} 3%) and astrometry ({approx}0.1) for spectroscopic target selection. The stellar spectra, imaging data, and derived parameter catalogs for this survey are publicly available as part of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7.

Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Rockosi, Constance; /UC, Santa Cruz; Newberg, Heidi Jo; /Rensselaer Poly.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U.; Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer K.; /Fermilab; Alcorn, Bonnie; /Fermilab; Allam, Sahar S.; /Fermilab; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Texas U. /University Coll. London; An, Deokkeun; /Ohio State U.; Anderson, Kurt S.J.; /Apache Point Observ. /New Mexico State U.; Anderson, Scott; /Washington U., Seattle

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Host Galaxy Spectra and Consequences for SN Typing From The SDSS SN Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in ...

Olmstead, Matthew D; Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Brewington, Howard; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B; Dawson, Kyle S; Ebelke, Garrett L; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Gupta, Ravi R; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Nichol, Robert C; Oravetz, Daniel J; Pan, Kaike; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey E; Smith, Mathew; Snedden, Stephanie A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Fun with polarizers D. Fun with polarizers In one respect, Einstein's mathematical analysis (like Rayleigh's earlier one) proves quite accurate, in a way that's easy to demonstrate. This has to do with how the sky's scattered light is polarized. Try looking at a patch of clear sky through one lens of a pair of polarizing sunglasses while you rotate the lens. You'll notice that the sky looks brighter as you look through the lens in some positions, and darker when the lens is in other positions. If the sun is not far from the patch of sky you're looking at, you'll find that the sky looks brightest when the sun is to the left or right of the lens, and darkest when the sun is "above the top" or "below the bottom" of the lens. Why is this? Any kind of wave-whether sound wave, water wave, light wave-is associated

152

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

153

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky July 24, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

154

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

155

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

156

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky December 24, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every year since 1998, the Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab has been using state-of-the-art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to monitor St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 a.m. ET on Christmas Eve. Since Santa doesn't file his flight path with the Federal Aviation

157

SkyPower Pekon Electronics JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SkyPower-Pekon Electronics JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product Joint venture for development of Indian wind farms. References SkyPower-Pekon Electronics...

158

Beijing Sky Solar Investment Management Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Solar Investment Management Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Sky Solar Investment & Management Co. Place Beijing, China Sector Solar Product Beijing based company...

159

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mobile digital calendars in knowledge work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article investigates the usage of mobile digital-calendar solutions in a knowledge work setting through the means of an empirical survey (n = 220) among managers and experts in a global telecommunications company. It is indicated, that the mobile digital ... Keywords: PIM, calendar use, digital calendars, electronic calendaring, electronic scheduling, global telecommunications, knowledge work, mobile calendars, mobile communications, mobile computing, personal information management

Anna Sell

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Multi-Object, Fiber-Fed Spectrographs for SDSS and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber sp...

Smee, Stephen; Uomoto, Alan; Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David; Rockosi, Constance M; Carr, Michael A; Leger, French; Dawson, Kyle S; Olmstead, Matthew D; Brinkmann, Jon; Owen, Russell; Barkhouser, Robert H; Honscheid, Klaus; Harding, Paul; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H; Loomis, Craig; Anderson, Lauren; Annis, James; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Burles, Scott; Burns, James G; Castander, Francisco; Connolly, Andrew; Davenport, James R; Ebelke, Garrett; Epps, Harland; Feldman, Paul D; Friedman, Scott; Frieman, Joshua; Heckman, Timothy; Hull, Charles L; Knapp, Gillian R; Lawrence, David M; Loveday, Jon; Mannery, Edward J; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Merrelli, Aronne; Muna, Demitri; Newman, Peter; Nichol, Robert C; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pope, Adrian C; Ricketts, Paul G; Shelden, Alaina; Sandford, Dale; Siegmund, Walter; Simmons, Audrey; Smith, D; Snedden, Stephanie; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael; SubbaRao, Mark; Tremonti, Christy; Waddell, Patrick; York, Donald G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Digital Forensics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hany Farid Department of Computer Science Institute for Security ... the advent of digital cameras, powerful personal computers, and sophisticated ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of light intensity spanning orders of magnitude. But one of the persistent problems in using sky images to infer fractional sky cover is the intensity range limitations of the camera detector. It is desirable to have bright enough images to be able to detect thin clouds, yet this often means the part of the image near the

166

Big Sky Wind Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Wind Facility Sky Wind Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Sky Wind Facility Facility Big Sky Wind Facility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Energy Developer Edison Mission Energy Energy Purchaser PJM Market Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.579967°, -89.46177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.579967,"lon":-89.46177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel Inc SkyFuel Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Inc Name SkyFuel Inc Address 18300 W Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Solar thermal power Website http://www.skyfuel.com/ Coordinates 39.862942°, -105.206509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.862942,"lon":-105.206509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578°, -118.186347° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein "Einstein and the Daytime Sky" (continued) A B C D C. Imitation of opal Since Einstein was addressing a more general question than the color of the atmosphere, his results...

170

Sky Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Sector Wind energy Product Developer of a high-altitude wind turbine technology. References Sky Power LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

171

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the Undergraduate Non-Science Major Classroom & Lab of Public Outreach Dept.Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Chicago Sky #12;Google Sky, World interactive labs and self-directed modules that utilize new, emerging, software tools, specifically Google Sky

Collar, Juan I.

174

SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at ...

Ivezic, Z; Uomoto, A; Bond, N; Beers, T; Allende-Prieto, C; Wilhelm, R; Lee, Y S; Sivarani, T; Juric, M; Lupton, R; Rockosi, C M; Knapp, G; Gunn, J; Yanny, B; Jester, S; Kent, S; Pier, J; Munn, J A; Richards, G; Newberg, H; Blanton, M; Eisenstein, D; Hawley, S; Anderson, S; Harris, H; Kiuchi, F; Chen, A; Bushong, J; Sohi, H; Haggard, D; Kimball, A; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the ~10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

Z. Ivezic; D. Schlegel; A. Uomoto; N. Bond; T. Beers; C. Allende Prieto; R. Wilhelm; Y. Sun Lee; T. Sivarani; M. Juric; R. Lupton; C. Rockosi; G. Knapp; J. Gunn; B. Yanny; S. Jester; S. Kent; J. Pier; J. Munn; G. Richards; H. Newberg; M. Blanton; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; S. Anderson; H. Harris; F. Kiuchi; A. Chen; J. Bushong; H. Sohi; D. Haggard; A. Kimball; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. Snedden; for the SDSS Collaboration

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Multimedia Gallery from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 8.4 meter Large LSST will survey the entire visible sky deeply in multiple colors every week with its three-billion pixel digital camera, probing the mysteries of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, and opening a movie-like window on objects that change or move rapidly: exploding supernovae, potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids, and distant Kuiper Belt Objects. [Copied from http://www.lsst.org/lsst/about] The LSST is still in the design and development phase and will be ready for its scientific work approximately four years after construction starts in Chile. Meanwhile, the multimedia gallery on the LSST website provides insight into the project as it will look and operate. The images of the casting of the giant mirror are very interesting, as are the live webcam images of the leveling of land on top of El Pinon. Also available are animations and short video clips.

177

Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

Myers, D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Digital PCR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emulsion generator produces water-in-oil ... Number of PCR cycles Page 68. ... based on quote for 12.765 digital arrays 2012 &list price Sept 2012 ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

SolarSkies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarSkies SolarSkies Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarSkies Address 106 Donovan Drive Place Alexandria, Minnesota Zip 56308 Country United States Sector Solar Coordinates 45.88897°, -95.3536576° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.88897,"lon":-95.3536576,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35,...

Sako, M; Frieman, J A; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Becker, A; De Jongh, F; Dilday, B; Estrada, J; Hendry, J; Holtzman, J; Kaplan, J; Kessler, R; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J P; Miknaitis, G; Riess, A; Tucker, D; Barentine, J; Blandford, R D; Brewington, H; Dembicky, J; Harvanek, M; Hawley, S; Hogan, C; Johnston, D; Kahn, S; Ketzeback, B; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Lamenti, D; Long, D; McMillan, R; Newman, P; Nitta, A; Nichol, R; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S; Snedden, S A; Stoughton, C; York, D; Sako, Masao; Romani, Roger; Frieman, Josh; Carthy, Jen Adelman-Mc; Becker, Andrew; Jongh, Fritz De; Dilday, Ben; Estrada, Juan; Hendry, John; Holtzman, Jon; Kaplan, Jared; Kessler, Rick; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam; Tucker, Douglas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Sky Wind Farm Desert Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner American Electric Power Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser City of San Antonio Texas (Utility Company) Location Pecos County TX Coordinates 30.926626°, -102.100067° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.926626,"lon":-102.100067,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

SkyFuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel SkyFuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Name SkyFuel Address 18300 West Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303.330.0276 Website http://www.skyfuel.com Coordinates 39.8630176°, -105.2064482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8630176,"lon":-105.2064482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skies Foundation Skies Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: American Clean Skies Foundation Name American Clean Skies Foundation Address 750 1st Street NE, Suite 1100 Place Washington, DC Zip 20002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 2007 Phone number (202) 682-6294 Website http://www.cleanskies.org/ Coordinates 38.899704°, -77.007068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.899704,"lon":-77.007068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

184

The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35, the so-called 'redshift desert', in the Hubble diagram. Detailed investigation of the spectral properties of these moderate-redshift SNe Ia will also provide a bridge between local SNe and high-redshift objects, and will help us understand the systematics for future cosmological applications that require high photometric precision. Finally, the large survey volume also provides the opportunity to select unusual supernovae for spectroscopic study that are poorly sampled in other surveys. We report on some of the early results from this program and discuss potential future applications.

Masao Sako; Roger Romani; Josh Frieman; Jen Adelman-McCarthy; Andrew Becker; Fritz DeJongh; Ben Dilday; Juan Estrada; John Hendry; Jon Holtzman; Jared Kaplan; Rick Kessler; Hubert Lampeitl; John Marriner; Gajus Miknaitis; Adam Riess; Douglas Tucker; J. Barentine; R. Blandford; H. Brewington; J. Dembicky; M. Harvanek; S. Hawley; C. Hogan; D. Johnston; S. Kahn; B. Ketzeback; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Lamenti; D. Long; R. McMillan; P. Newman; A. Nitta; R. Nichol; R. Scranton; E. Sheldon; S. Snedden; C. Stoughton; D. York; the SDSS Collaboration

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Digital Strategy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New expectations require the Federal Government to be ready to deliver and receive digital information and services anytime, anywhere and on any device. It must do so safely, securely, and with...

186

Digital diorama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital Diorama may be briefly presented as: a historical exploration of the vision devices, performances, and installations of the nineteenth century, and their influences on the project. These histories of the magic ...

Spikol, Daniel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Spectroscopic Survey of Faint Quasars in the SDSS Deep Stripe: I. Preliminary Results from the Co-added Catalog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the first results of a deep spectroscopic survey of faint quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Southern Survey, a deep survey carried out by repeatedly imaging a 270 deg^2 area. Quasar candidates were selected from the deep data with good completeness over 02.0) at the faint end, indicating a break in the QLF slope. Using a luminosity-dependent density evolution model, we find that the quasar density at M_{g}<-22.5 peaks at z~2, which is later in cosmic time than the peak of z~2.5 found from surveys of more luminous objects. The SFQS QLF is consistent with the results of the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, the SDSS, and the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey, but probes fainter quasars. We plan to obtain more quasars from future observations and establish a complete faint quasar sample with more than 1000 objects over 10 deg^2.

L. Jiang; X. Fan; R. J. Cool; D. J. Eisenstein; I. Zehavi; G. T. Richards; R. Scranton; D. Johnston; M. A. Strauss; D. P. Schneider; J. Brinkmann

2006-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

Blue Sky Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Fuels Bio Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Bio-Fuels Place Oakland, California Zip 94602 Product Blue Sky owns and operates a biodiesel plant in Idaho with a capacity of 37.9mLpa (10m gallons annually). Coordinates 37.805065°, -122.273024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.805065,"lon":-122.273024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

NETL: News Release - Eyes in the Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 28, 2003 August 28, 2003 Eyes in the Sky... Remote Sensing Technology Maps Flow of Groundwater from the Air Photo: Remote Sensor Suspended Beneath a Helicopter Detects Groundwater Beneath the Surface DOE is using remote sensors suspended from helicopters to map the flow of groundwater that may be affected by energy projects. In four states this past spring and summer, eyes have turned skyward as helicopters zig-zagged over hills and valleys, towing torpedo- or spiderweb-like contraptions that conjured up thoughts of Superman - "Look! Up in the sky!" But the "x-ray vision" in this case isn't comic-book fantasy. Instead, using aerial remote sensing techniques, researchers working with the U.S. Department of Energy are "seeing" through solid ground to create

190

New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Sky Energy New Sky Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Sector Carbon Product Colorado-based startup that focuses on using chemical technology to convert carbon dioxide to usable outputs. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The distinction between a fluid's liquid and gaseous phases breaks down at a certain temperature and pressure; when illuminated under these conditions, the fluid looks milky white, like a common opal. Einstein found how this relates to the reason the sky is blue. A B C D A. A path with a detour If you look at many artists' renderings of Albert Einstein, you are likely to find some that depict Einstein with some representation of the universe as a whole, or black holes, or other objects in deep space. Because many such pictures exist, we may, somewhat unconsciously, associate Einstein with the dark nighttime sky. This is a quite reasonable association, since Einstein's theories of space and time deal with the universe as a whole and with certain astrophysical

192

Blue Sky Optimum Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimum Energy Optimum Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Optimum Energy Place Buffalo, New York Product Blue Sky offers a processing system to produce biodiesel at a cheaper price. Coordinates 42.88544°, -78.878464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88544,"lon":-78.878464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

Conergy SkyPower JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyPower JV SkyPower JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Conergy & SkyPower JV Place Canada Sector Solar Product Canada-based solar project developer. References Conergy & SkyPower JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Conergy & SkyPower JV is a company located in Canada . References ↑ "Conergy & SkyPower JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conergy_SkyPower_JV&oldid=343842" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

194

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) Place Mountain View, California Zip 94043 Sector Solar Product California-based and founded by a former Applied Materials executive, Cogenra Solar is a stealth mode solar company. References Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) is a company located in Mountain View, California . References ↑ "Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cogenra_Solar_formerly_SkyWatch_Energy&oldid=343766"

195

Global Trends in Digital Governance: A Longitudinal Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the research findings of a digital governance survey conducted in the fall of 2009. The study replicates previous surveys of large municipalities worldwide in 2007, 2005, and 2003. This longitudinal assessment, focused on the assessment ... Keywords: Citizen Participation, Digital Democracy, E-Governance, E-Government, Privacy, Services, Usability

Marc Holzer; Aroon Manoharan; Marc Fudge

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SkyVision SkyVision SkyVision logo. Calculates the overall optical characteristics (transmittance, absorptance, reflectance and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient) of conventional and tubular skylights, performance indicators of skylight/room interfaces (well efficiency and coefficient of utilization), indoor daylight availability (daylight factor and illuminance) and daily/annual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts, lighting and shading controls, site location and sky/ground conditions. SkyVision is unique--it uses the state-of-art glazing models and ray-tracing-based methods to compute the optical characteristics of skylights and indoor daylight availability. Screen Shots

197

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Kevin Dome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

198

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dailyannual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts,...

199

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

200

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Solar Product Designs and installs photovoltaic, solar thermal and co-generation power generation systems for domestic use. References Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings...

202

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Participate Today in Digital Materials Data Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 19, 2013 ... Purdue Research Center Focuses on Computational Materi... New Study ... Big Data: The management of very large sets of data. For the ...

204

Real-time rendering of daylight sky scene for virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realistic rendering of sky scene is important in virtual environment. Traditional methods are mostly based on skybox, thus failing to realistically simulate the change of sky scene under different weathers and conditions. In this paper, a new sky light ...

Changbo Wang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pink Skies coming to Northern New Mexico October 15-16  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pink Skies Coming To Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Pink Skies coming to...

206

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Quasar Luminosity Function from Data Release Nine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the optical Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine (DR9), we select a uniform sample of 22,301 i<=21.8 quasars over an area of 2236 sq. deg with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2survey through simulated quasar photometry, and check this completeness estimate using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar k-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M_i(z=2.2) = -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z=3.5. We find that a log-linear relation (in log[Phi*] - M*) ...

Ross, Nicholas P; White, Martin; Richards, Gordon T; Myers, Adam D; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Yeche, Christophe; Swanson, Molly E C; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ge, Jian; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Muna, Demitri; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Schawinski, Kevin; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Silverman, John D; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Weinberg, David H; York, Donald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

Chen Zheng; Roger W. Romani; Masao Sako; John Marriner; Bruce Bassett; Andrew Becker; Changsu Choi; David Cinabro; Fritz DeJongh; Darren L. Depoy; Ben Dilday; Mamoru Doi; Joshua A. Frieman; Peter M. Garnavich; Craig J. Hogan; Jon Holtzman; Myungshin Im; Saurabh Jha; Richard Kessler; Kohki Konishi; Hubert Lampeitl; Jennifer L. Marshall; David McGinnis; Gajus Miknaitis; Robert C. Nichol; Jose Luis Prieto; Adam G. Riess; Michael W. Richmond; Donald P. Schneider; Mathew Smith; Naohiro Takanashi; Kouichi Tokita; Kurt van der Heyden; Naoki Yasuda; Roberto J. Assef; John Barentine; Ralf Bender; Roger D. Blandford; Malcolm Bremer; Howard Brewington; Chris A. Collins; Arlin Crotts; Jack Dembicky; Jason Eastman; Alastair Edge; Ed Elson; Michael E. Eyler; Alexei V. Filippenko; Ryan J. Foley; Stephan Frank; Ariel Goobar; Michael Harvanek; Ulrich Hopp; Yutaka Ihara; Steven Kahn; William Ketzeback; Scott J. Kleinman; Wolfram Kollatschny; Jurek Krzesi?ski; Giorgos Leloudas; Daniel C. Long; John Lucey; Elena Malanushenko; Viktor Malanushenko; Russet J. McMillan; Christopher W. Morgan; Tomoki Morokuma; Atsuko Nitta; Linda Ostman; Kaike Pan; A. Kathy Romer; Gabrelle Saurage; Katie Schlesinger; Stephanie A. Snedden; Jesper Sollerman; Maximilian Stritzinger; Linda C. Watson; Shannon Watters; J. Craig Wheeler; Donald York

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existi...

Zheng, Chen; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Riess, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Assef, Roberto J; Barentine, John; Bender, Ralf; Blandford, Roger D; Bremer, Malcolm; Brewington, Howard; Collins, Chris A; Crotts, Arlin; Dembicky, Jack; Eastman, Jason; Edge, Alastair; Elson, Ed; Eyler, Michael E; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Frank, Stephan; Goobar, Ariel; Harvanek, Michael; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Kahn, Steven; Ketzeback, William; Kleinman, Scott J; Kollatschny, Wolfram; KrzesiÅ?ski, Jurek; Leloudas, Giorgos; Long, Daniel C; Lucey, John; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMillan, Russet J; Morgan, Christopher W; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nitta, Atsuko; Ostman, Linda; Pan, Kaike; Romer, A Kathy; Saurage, Gabrelle; Schlesinger, Katie; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Watson, Linda C; Watters, Shannon; Wheeler, J Craig; York, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info Start Date 2005 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty

212

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

213

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

214

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

215

Real-Time Sky-View Factor Calculation and Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the acquisition of sky-view factor data for climate studies has been time consuming and dependent on postprocessing. However, advances in technology now mean that techniques using fish-eye imagery can be algorithmically processed in ...

L. Chapman; J. E. Thornes

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Clear-Sky Nocturnal Temperatures Forecast and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal evolution of air and soil temperatures are computed for clear-sky situations. The model takes into account the soil heat conduction and the atmospheric radiative transfers by using radiosonde data for temperature, water vapor, and ...

A. Quinft; J. Vanderborght

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Empirical Estimation of Daily Clear Sky Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suitability of two simple empirical equations for the estimation of clear sky radiation was investigated. Results indicated that latitude and altitude were sufficient to estimate the empirical equation coefficients and that the estimates of ...

D. F. Heermann; G. J. Harrington; K. M. Stahl

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Clean Skies Foundation Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 2 October, 2012 - 14:01 Nominations open for 250,000 Multimedia Clean...

219

SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kite, with which it supplements the momentum of commercial vessels on long journeys, saving fuel costs. References SkySails GmbH1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

220

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Feasibility of night-sky radiation with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the procedure involved in the determination of the feasibility of high-sky radiation as the means of rejecting heat through solar collectors for a sample residential house in the Evansville area. It presents conclusions on different types of coatings that are used on solar collectors. It also designs the system, and its backup, in schematic form. For the purpose of cost analysis it discusses the difference of a cooling tower and night-sky radiation.

McKinney, T.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

223

INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chung-Ming, E-mail: rex@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics and Center of Complex Systems, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Preserving digital information forever  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well within our lifetime we can expect to see most information being created, stored and used digitally. Despite the growing importance of digital data, the wider community pays almost no attention to the problems of preserving this digital information ... Keywords: archiving, digital preservation

Andrew Waugh; Ross Wilkinson; Brendan Hills; Jon Dell'oro

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Display of clouds taking into account multiple anisotropic scattering and sky light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: clouds, multiple scattering, optical length, participating media, photo-realism, radiative transfer, sky light

Tomoyuki Nishita; Yoshinori Dobashi; Eihachiro Nakamae

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Digital Sensor Technology  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Digital cultural collections in an age of reuse and remixes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a survey of U.S. cultural institution (CI) professionals about whether CI should seek to control access to and use of digital cultural collections. It describes motivations that encourage institutions to control access ... Keywords: archives, copyright, digital collections, licensing, museums, open access, privacy

Kristin R. Eschenfelder; Michelle Caswell

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

For Physicists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astrophysics. The Center is actively involved with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Dark Energy Survey, the Pierre Auger Project, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, the...

229

Power Optimization in VLSI Layout: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of layout techniques for designing low power digital CMOS circuits. It describes the many issues facing designers at the physical level of design abstraction and reviews some of the techniques and tools that have been ...

Massoud Pedram; Hirendu Vaishnav

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

PRODUCT SURVEY April 2008 GIM International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRODUCT SURVEY April 2008 GIM International [i] Insert here the spectral bands which can Aerial Cameras The first digital aerial cameras were presented to the photogrammetric community the two companies responsible for this innovation. Nine companies now manufacture digital aerial cameras

Giger, Christine

231

Digital Identities | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digital Identities Digital Identities Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is a comprehensive system that provides public-key encryption and digital signature services across a wide...

232

Affordable Digital Planetariums with WorldWide Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital planetariums can provide a broader range of educational experiences than the more classical planetariums that use star-balls. This is because of their ability to project images, content from current research and the 3D distribution of the stars and galaxies. While there are hundreds of planetariums in the country the reason that few of these are full digital is the cost. In collaboration with Microsoft Research (MSR) we have developed a way to digitize existing planetariums for approximately \\$40,000 using software freely available. We describe here how off the shelf equipment, together with MSR's WorldWide Telescope client can provide a rich and truly interactive experience. This will enable students and the public to pan though multi-wavelength full-sky scientific data sets, explore 3d visualizations of our Solar System (including trajectories of millions of minor planets), near-by stars, and the SDSS galaxy catalog.

Rosenfield, Philip; Fay, Jonathan; Carey, Larry; Sayres, Conor; Tofflemire, Benjamin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhenjiang Sky-Solar Co Ltd Place Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 212009 Sector Solar Product A high-tech enterprise specialized in developing and manufacturing solar series lights and solar panels. Coordinates 31.966261°, 119.472687° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.966261,"lon":119.472687,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Lya forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the BAO feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51-1.70 micron) spectra of 10^5 evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for ~15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. MARVELS will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m/s, ~24 visits per star) needed to detect gi...

Eisenstein, Daniel J; Agol, Eric; Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anderson, Scott F; Arns, James A; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barkhouser, Robert; Beers, Timothy C; Berlind, Andreas A; Bickerton, Steven J; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bochanski, John J; Bolton, Adam S; Bosman, Casey T; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard J; Brandt, W N; Breslauer, Ben; Brinkmann, J; Brown, Peter J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burger, Dan; Busca, Nicolas G; Campbell, Heather; Cargile, Phillip A; Carithers, William C; Carlberg, Joleen K; Carr, Michael A; Chen, Yanmei; Chiappini, Cristina; Comparat, Johan; Connolly, Natalia; Cortes, Marina; Croft, Rupert A C; da Costa, Luiz N; Cunha, Katia; Davenport, James R A; Dawson, Kyle; De Lee, Nathan; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; de Simoni, Fernando; Dean, Janice; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L; Edmondson, Edward M; Eiting, Jacob M; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Castella, Bruno Femenia; Ferreira, Leticia Dutra; Fitzgerald, Greg; Fleming, Scott W; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ford, Eric B; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Perez, Ana Elia Garcia; Gaudi, B Scott; Ge, Jian; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A; Gilmore, G; Girardi, Leo; Gott, J Richard; Gould, Andrew; Grebel, Eva K; Gunn, James E; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hearty, Frederick R; Hernandez, Jonay I Gonzalez; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Holtzman, Jon A; Honscheid, Klaus; Inada, Naohisa; Ivans, Inese I; Jiang, Linhua; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A; Jordan, Cathy; Jordan, Wendell P; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kazin, Eyal; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Knapp, G R; Kochanek, C S; Koesterke, Lars; Kollmeier, Juna A; Kron, Richard G; Lang, Dustin; Lawler, James E; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Brian L; Lee, Young Sun; Leisenring, Jarron M; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C; Loomis, Craig P; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H; Ma, Bo; Ma, Zhibo; MacDonald, Nicholas; Mack, Claude; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Majewski, Steven R; Makler, Martin; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Maseman, Paul; Masters, Karen L; McBride, Cameron K; McDonald, Patrick; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Requejo, Olga Mena; Menard, Brice; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Morrison, Heather L; Mullally, Fergal; Muna, Demitri; Murayama, Hitoshi; Myers, Adam D; Naugle, Tracy; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C; Nidever, David L; O'Connell, Robert W; Ogando, Ricardo L C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel J; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pandey, Parul; Parejko, John K; Paris, Isabelle; Pellegrini, Paulo; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Pfaffenberger, Robert; Pforr, Janine; Phleps, Stefanie; Pichon, Christophe; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Raddick, M Jordan; Ramos, Beatriz H F; Ryle, Celine; Reid, I Neill; Rich, James; Richards, Gordon T; Rieke, George H; Rieke, Marcia J; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J; Rockosi, Constance M; Roe, Natalie A; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossetto, Bruno; Sanchez, Ariel G; Santiago, Basilio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo; Schlegel, David J; Schlesinger, Katharine J; Schmidt, Sarah J; Schneider, Donald P; Sellgren, Kris; Shelden, Alaina; Sheldon, Erin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Silverman, John D; Simmerer, Jennifer; Simmons, Audrey E; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M F; Slosar, Anze; Smee, Stephen; Smith, Verne V; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stassun, Keivan G; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stockett, Mark H; Stollberg, Todd; Strauss, Michael A; Tanaka, Masayuki; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tofflemire, Benjamin M; Tojeiro, Rita; Tremonti, Christy A; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Verde, Licia; Vogt, Nicole P; Wake, David A; Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A; White, Martin; White, Simon D M; Wilson, John C; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yeche, Christophe; York, Donald G; Young, Erick; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z \\lesssim 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04+1.61-0.95 % of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used t...

Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Molla, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Ostman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.

Harrison, Craig D.; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Richards, Joseph W.; Deadman, Paul-James [Center for Time Domain Informatics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Kathy Romer, A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Liddle, Andrew R. [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Hoyle, Ben [Institute of Sciences of the Cosmos (ICCUB) and IEEC, Physics Department, University of Barcelona, Barcelona 08024 (Spain); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Stott, John P.; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Sahlen, Martin [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford, S. Adam [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Panel on digital preservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital information in any form is at risk. Software and hardware become obsolete, and versions and file formats change, making data inaccessible. Data stored in even the simplest form are in danger due to computer media degradation and obsolescence. ... Keywords: archival systems, digital libraries, digital preservation, metadata

Joyce Ray; Robin Dale; Reagan Moore; Vicky Reich; William Underwood; Alexa T. McCray

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A blue sky catastrophe in double-diffusive convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global bifurcation of the blue sky catastrophe type has been found in a small Prandtl number binary mixture contained in a laterally heated cavity. The system has been studied numerically applying the tools of bifurcation theory. The catastrophe corresponds to the destruction of an orbit which, for a large range of Rayleigh numbers, is the only stable solution. This orbit is born in a global saddle-loop bifurcation and becomes chaotic in a period doubling cascade just before its disappearance at the blue sky catastrophe.

Esteban Meca; Isabel Mercader; Oriol Batiste; Laureano Ramirez-Piscina

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microsoft Word - NEPA Big Sky Final EA .doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886 886 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment i April 2013 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project (DOE/EA-1886) Contact: For additional copies or more information about this Environmental Assessment, please contact: Mr. Bill Gwilliam U.S. Department of Energy

240

NIST Forensic Science -- Digital Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sign up to receive news about NIST Forensic Science. *Email Address. ... NIST Forensic Science -- Digital Evidence. Digital ...

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Extraction of cloud statistics from whole sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

Computer codes have been developed to extract basic cloud statistics from whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. This report documents, on an algorithmic level, the steps and processes underlying these codes. Appendices comment on code details and on how to adapt to future changes in either the source camera or the host computer.

Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Address 2327 University Way, 3rd Floor Place Bozeman, Montana Zip 59715 Region Pacific Northwest Area Phone number 406-994-3755 Notes One of the US DOE's seven regional carbon sequestration partnerships. Coordinates 45.6565752°, -111.041813° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6565752,"lon":-111.041813,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

The Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Sensitivity to a Sea Surface Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Considering geographical distributions ...

J. Ph Duvel; F. M. Bréon

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Technique for Mapping the Distribution of Diffuse Solar Radiation over the Sky Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to map the distribution of diffuse solar radiation over the sky hemisphere is described. The method is based on an analysis of all-sky, visible photographs and concurrent actinometric measurements of diffuse solar radiance. The ...

L. J. Bruce McArthur; John E. Hay

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Feasibility of GRB with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss feasibility of Gamma ray burst (GRB) with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor and discuss necessity of TeV gamma ray cherenkov all sky monitor.

S. Osone

2003-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented of daytime sky imaging and techniques that may be applied to the analysis of full-color sky images to infer cloud macrophysical properties. Descriptions of two different types of sky-imaging systems developed by the ...

C. N. Long; J. M. Sabburg; J. Calbó; D. Pagès

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Digital Jordan curve theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Efim Khalimsky’s digital Jordan curve theorem states that the complement of a Jordan curve in the digital plane equipped with the Khalimsky topology has exactly two connectivity components. We present a new, short proof of this theorem using induction on the Euclidean length of the curve. We also prove that the theorem holds with another topology on the digital plane but then only for a restricted class of Jordan curves. 1

Christer O. Kiselman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The European Large Area ISO Survey - ISOPHOT results using the MPIA-pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS) will provide Infrared observations of 4 regions in the sky with ISO. Around 2000 Infrared sources have been detected at 7 and 15 microns (with ISOCAM), 90 and 175 microns (with ISOPHOT)) over 13 square degrees of the sky. We present the source extraction pipeline of the 90 microns ISOPHOT observations, describe and discuss the results obtained and derive the limits of the ELAIS observational strategy.

C. Surace; P. Heraudeau; D. Lemke; S. Oliver; M. Rowan-Robinson; the ELAIS consortium

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Digitization Best Practices  

SciTech Connect

This project involved performing tests and documenting results to determine best practices for digitizing older print documents. The digitization process is complicated, especially when original documents exhibit non-standard fonts and are faded. Tests focused on solutions to improve high quality scanning, increase OCR accuracy, and efficiently use embedded metadata. Results are summarized. From the test results on the right sides, we know that when we plan to digitize documents, we should balance Quantity and Quality based on our expectation, and then make final decision for the digitization process.

Xue, Fei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, Irma S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knudson, Frances L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Digital Media Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... video. This work was reported to the 2004 SPIE Conference on Applications of Digital Image Processing XXVII. SubjectiveAssessMethodsForMPEG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Simulator for Microlens Planet Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the status of a computer simulator for microlens planet surveys. The simulator generates synthetic light curves of microlensing events observed with specified networks of telescopes over specified periods of time. Particular attention is paid to models for sky brightness and seeing, calibrated by fitting to data from the OGLE survey and RoboNet observations in 2011. Time intervals during which events are observable are identified by accounting for positions of the Sun and the Moon, and other restrictions on telescope pointing. Simulated observations are then generated for an algorithm that adjusts target priorities in real time with the aim of maximizing planet detection zone area summed over all the available events. The exoplanet detection capability of observations was compared for several telescopes.

Ipatov, Sergei I; Alsubai, Khalid A; Bramich, Daniel M; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus P G; Liebig, Christine; Snodgrass, Colin D B; Street, Rachel A; Tsapras, Yiannis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB) Timothy R., Carr (tcarr@kgs.ukans.edu; 785-864-2135) Scott W. White (whites@kgs.ukans.edu; 785-864-2135) Kansas Geological Survey, University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66047-3726 Lawrence H. Wickstrom (larry.wickstrom@dnr.state.oh.us; 614-265-6598) Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus, OH 43224-1362 James A., Drahovzal (drahovzal@kgs.mm.uky.edu; 859-257-5500) Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0107 Beverly Seyler (seyler@isgs.uiuc.edu; 217-244-2389) Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL 61820 John, A. Rupp (rupp@indiana.edu; 812-855-1323) Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208

254

Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.2846507°, -111.368292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2846507,"lon":-111.368292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

A Survey of z~6 Quasars in the SDSS Deep Stripe: I. a Flux-Limited Sample at z_{AB}<21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of five quasars at z~6 selected from 260 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the Celestial Equator. The five quasars with 20=6.0 and =-25.8 is (5.0+/-2.1) x 10^{-9} Mpc^{-3} mag^{-1}. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z~6 as a power law Phi(L_{1450}) \\propto L_{1450}^{beta}. The slope beta calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1+/-0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z~4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/AGN population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*_{1450}) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low.

Linhua Jiang; Xiaohui Fan; James Annis; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Kuenley Chiu; Huan Lin; Robert H. Lupton; Gordon T. Richards; Michael A. Strauss; Sebastian Jester; Donald P. Schneider

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International Jump to: navigation, search Name OZZ Solar Inc. (Sky Ozz International) Place Concord, Ontario, Canada Zip L4K 4R1 Sector Solar Product Ontario-based OZZ Solar was formed to build commercial and residential rooftop solar projects under the province's feed-in tariff programme. Coordinates 37.344704°, -78.975299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.344704,"lon":-78.975299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa March 1, 2013 - 7:19pm Addthis In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Moapa Band of Paiutes Chairman William Anderson. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes.

258

Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The {\\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \\deg$ due to the $60 \\deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \\deg$ is $0.45\\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\\sim 1.5\\; \\sigma$ positive bias at $60 \\deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-

C. H. Lineweaver; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; L. Tenorio; A. Kogut; P. B. Keegstra; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABRIDGED We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z <0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3$. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of $({0.37}^{+0.17+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.55}^{+0.13+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ ($\\mathrm{SNu}x = 10^{-12} L_{x\\sun}^{-1} \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be $({0.31}^{+0.18+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.49}^{+0.15+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01})$ $\\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be $({2.04}^{+1.99+0.07}_{-1.11-0.04}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.36}^{+0.84+0.01}_...

Dilday, Benjamin; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Mollá, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Östman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Analysis of potential systematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the density field of galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) included in the SDSS Data Release Nine (DR9). DR9 includes spectroscopic redshifts for over 400,000 galaxies spread over a footprint of 3,275 deg^2. We identify, characterize, and mitigate the impact of sources of systematic uncertainty on large-scale clustering measurements, both for angular moments of the redshift-space correlation function and the spherically averaged power spectrum, P(k), in order to ensure that robust cosmological constraints will be obtained from these data. A correlation between the projected density of stars and the higher redshift (0.43 120h^-1Mpc or k < 0.01hMpc^-1. We find that these errors can be ameliorated by weighting galaxies based on their surface brightness and the local stellar density. We use mock galaxy catalogs that simulate the CMASS selection function to determine that randomly selecting galaxy redshifts in order to simulate th...

Ross, Ashley J; Sanchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Ho, Shirley; Kazin, Eyal; Manera, Marc; Reid, Beth; White, Martin; Tojeiro, Rita; McBride, Cameron K; Xu, Xiaoying; Wake, David A; Strauss, Michael A; Montesano, Francesco; Swanson, Molly E C; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S; Dorta, Antonio Montero; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Nichol, Robert C; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Prada, Francisco; Schlegel, David J; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Zehavi, Idit; Blanton, Michael; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Cuesta, Antonio J; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Parejko, John; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Donald P Schneider Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Zhao, Gong-bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Clustering of Galaxies in SDSS-III DR9 Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Constraints on Primordial Non-Gaussianity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the density field of 264,283 galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and included in the SDSS data release nine (DR9). In total, the SDSS DR9 BOSS data includes spectroscopic redshifts for over 400,000 galaxies spread over a footprint of more than 3,000 deg^2. We measure the power spectrum of these galaxies with redshifts 0.43 0), is 99.5%. After quantifying and correcting for the systematic bias and including the added uncertainty, we find -92 0) = 91.0%. A more conservative approach assumes that we have only learned the k-dependence of the systematic bias and allows any amplitude for the systematic correction; we find that the systematic effect is not fully degenerate with that of f_NL,local, and we determine that -168 0) = 68%. This analysis demonstrates the importance of accounting for the impact of Galactic foregrounds on f_NL,local measurements. We outline the methods that account for these systematic biases and uncertainties...

Ross, Ashley J; Carnero, Aurelio; Zhao, Gong-bo; Manera, Marc; Raccanelli, Alvise; Aubourg, Eric; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Cuesta, Antonio J; da Costa, Luiz A N; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ebelke, Garrett; Guo, Hong; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Magana, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; Montesano, Francesco; Nichol, Robert C; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Prada, Francisco; Sanchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Zehavi, Idit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminosity and Color Dependence and Redshift Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the luminosity and color dependence and the redshift evolution of galaxy clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Ninth Data Release. We focus on the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of subsets of its CMASS sample, which includes about 260,000 galaxies over ~3,300 sq. deg in the redshift range 0.43

Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Weinberg, David H; Berlind, Andreas A; Blanton, Michael; Chen, Yanmei; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Kazin, Eyal; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Nuza, Sebastian E; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Swanson, Molly E C; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A; White, Martin; Bahcall, Neta A; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Bundy, Kevin; da Costa, Luiz N A; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Rossi, Graziano; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Streblyanska, Alina; Thomas, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Data visualisation in digital forensics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As digital crimes have risen, so has the need for digital forensics. Numerous state-of-the-art tools have been developed to assist digital investigators conduct proper investigations… (more)

Fei, Bennie Kar Leung

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Survey Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan and is known as the Michigan survey, with many other similar surveys conducted across OECD countries so as to provide up to date information on consumer expectations. Questions on expectations are also sometimes included in panel surveys... be formed, do of course make it possible to assess whether, or how far, such expectations are well-founded by comparing the experiences of individual households with their prior expectations. A key aspect of the Michigan survey, and of many other more recent...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Weale, Martin

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

268

SDSS-III: MASSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEYS OF THE DISTANT UNIVERSE, THE MILKY WAY, AND EXTRA-SOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8), which was made public in 2011 January and includes SDSS-I and SDSS-II images and spectra reprocessed with the latest pipelines and calibrations produced for the SDSS-III investigations. This paper presents an overview of the four surveys that comprise SDSS-III. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation feature of large-scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {>=} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {mu}m data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of 2011 January, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {>=} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS.

Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Agol, Eric; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aihara, Hiroaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Arns, James A. [Kaiser Optical Systems, Ann Arbor, MI 48103 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris-Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS 91501-970 (Brazil); Barkhouser, Robert [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bickerton, Steven J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fast transient digitizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for sequentially scanning a plurality of target elements with an electron scanning beam modulated in accordance with variations in a high-frequency analog signal to provide discrete analog signal samples representative of successive portions of the analog signal; coupling the discrete analog signal samples from each of the target elements to a different one of a plurality of high speed storage devices; converting the discrete analog signal samples to equivalent digital signals; and storing the digital signals in a digital memory unit for subsequent measurement or display.

Villa, Francesco (Palo Alto, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Digital sonar system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal. 4 figs.

Young, K.K.; Wilkes, R.J.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Digital sonar system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal.

Young, Kenneth K. (Seattle, WA); Wilkes, R. Jeffrey (Seattle, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Representing digital assets usingMPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various XML-based approaches aimed at representing compound digital assets have emerged over the last several years. Approaches that are of specific relevance to the digital library community include the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), ... Keywords: Digital Item, Digital asset, MPEG-21 DID, OAI-PMH, OpenURL

Jeroen Bekaert; Emiel De Kooning; Herbert de Sompel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SASIR: The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared Imaging Survey Concept SASIR: The Synoptic All-Sky Infrared Imaging Survey Concept Joshua Bloom UC Berkeley Abstract: I describe an ambitious project - a synoptic survey, of the entire night sky at infrared wavelengths to unprecedented depths using a dedicated wide-field 6.5-meter telescope in San Pedro Martir (SPM), Mexico. The concept is part of a new initiative for a ground-based telescope in partnership with Mexico and the University of California. What the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are to the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS), this project will be to the seminal 2 micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). The science drivers for the synoptic all-sky infrared (SASIR) survey are numerous, from discovery of the precious and rare high-redshift QSOs in the static sky to uncovering and studying

274

The distributed development environment for SDSS software  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration.

Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Questions for the Universe ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

someday shed light on dark matter: Large Hadron Collider, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Fermilab, Batavia, IL VERITAS, Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory,...

276

7F-7/17/98 Fermi News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division, on June 29, 1998, with a Fermilab Employee Recognition Award. Petravick led the group creating the data "pipeline" systems for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey....

277

Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) Contact Information Bill Eaker 828-251-6622 x142 bill@landofsky.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Bill Eaker Photo of Bill Eaker Bill Eaker established the Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition, serving the Western North Carolina region, in 2004 and has served as the coalition's coordinator since then. Eaker has over 31 years of experience in environmental, land use, and growth management planning at the local, regional, and state scales. He has worked at Land of Sky Regional Council

278

Digital Image Authentication: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital image authentication refers to all the techniques performing anti-falsification, digital image copyright protection, or access control. A large number of DIA techniques have been developed to authenticate digital images, including cryptography-based ... Keywords: Data Hiding, Digital Fingerprints, Forensic Science, Image Authentication, Watermarking

Chia-Hung Wei; Yue Li

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

SCO Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey on Future of NIST's Standards Information Services. June 5, 2013. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Clare Allocca 301-975-4359. ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Field Wind Farm Green Field Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Facility Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner We Energies Developer We Energies Energy Purchaser We Energies Location Fond du Lac County WI Coordinates 43.908549°, -88.305384° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.908549,"lon":-88.305384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

283

NEW 145 MHz SOURCE MEASUREMENTS BY PAPER IN THE SOUTHERN SKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa, observed in 2010 May and September. Using two nights of drift scanning with PAPER's 60{sup 0} FWHM beam we have made a map covering the entire sky below +10{sup 0} declination with an effective center frequency of 145 MHz, a 70 MHz bandwidth, and a resolution of 26'. A 4800 deg{sup 2} region of this large map with the lowest Galactic emission reaches an rms of 0.7 Jy. We establish an absolute flux scale using sources from the 160 MHz Culgoora catalog. Using the 408 MHz Molonglo Reference Catalog (MRC) as a finding survey, we identify counterparts to 480 sources in our maps and compare our fluxes to the MRC and to 332 sources in the Culgoora catalog. For both catalogs, the ratio of PAPER to catalog flux averages to 1, with a standard deviation of 50%. This measured variation is consistent with comparisons between independent catalogs observed at different bands. The PAPER data represent new 145 MHz flux measurements for a large number of sources in the band expected to encompass cosmic reionization and represents a significant step toward establishing a model for removing foregrounds to the reionization signal.

Jacobs, Daniel C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United Kingdom); Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason R.; Van der Merwe, Carel, E-mail: jacobsda@sas.upenn.edu [Karoo Array Telescope, Capetown (South Africa)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Validation of MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Given the importance of clouds in modulating the surface energy budget, it is critical to obtain accurate estimates of their fractional amount in the atmospheric column for use in modeling studies. Satellite remote sensing of cloud properties such as cloud amount has the advantage of providing global coverage on a regular basis. Ground-based surveys of cloud fraction offer a practical database for use in determining the accuracy of these remotely sensed estimates of cloud fraction on a regional scale.

287

THE SLACS SURVEY. VIII. THE RELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the relation between the internal structure of early-type galaxies and their environment using 70 strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS Survey. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is used to determine two measures of overdensity of galaxies around each lens-the projected number density of galaxies inside the tenth nearest neighbor ({sigma}{sub 10}) and within a cone of radius one h{sup -1} Mpc (D {sub 1}). Our main results are as follows. (1) The average overdensity is somewhat larger than unity, consistent with lenses preferring overdense environments as expected for massive early-type galaxies (12/70 lenses are in known groups/clusters). (2) The distribution of overdensities is indistinguishable from that of 'twin' nonlens galaxies selected from SDSS to have the same redshift and stellar velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub *}. Thus, within our errors, lens galaxies are an unbiased population, and the SLACS results can be generalized to the overall population of early-type galaxies. (3) Typical contributions from external mass distribution are no more than a few percent in local mass density, reaching 10-20% ({approx}0.05-0.10 external convergence) only in the most extreme overdensities. (4) No significant correlation between overdensity and slope of the mass-density profile of the lens galaxies is found. (5) Satellite galaxies (those with a more luminous companion) have marginally steeper mass-density profiles (as quantified by f {sub SIE} = {sigma}{sub *}/{sigma}{sub SIE} = 1.12 {+-} 0.05 versus 1.01 {+-} 0.01) and smaller dynamically normalized mass enclosed within the Einstein radius ({delta}log M {sub Ein}/M {sub dim} differs by -0.09 {+-} 0.03 dex) than central galaxies (those without). This result suggests that tidal stripping may affect the mass structure of early-type galaxies down to kpc scales probed by strong lensing, when they fall into larger structures.

Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gorecki, Alexia; Marshall, Philip J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Koopmans, Leon V. E. [Kapteyn Institute, P.O. Box 800, 9700AV Groningen (Netherlands); Bolton, Adam S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Moustakas, Leonidas A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Caltech, MS169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Burles, Scott [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: tt@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: gavazzi@iap.fr, E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl, E-mail: bolton@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: leonidas@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: burles@mit.edu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

289

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

290

Imprint of Intergalactic Shocks on the Radio Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong intergalactic shocks are a natural consequence of structure formation in the universe. They are expected to deposit large fractions of their energy in relativistic electrons (xi_e~0.05 according to SNR observations) and magnetic fields (xi_B~0.01 according to cluster halo observations). We calculate the synchrotron emission from such shocks using an analytical model, calibrated with a hydrodynamical LCDM simulation. The resulting signal composes a large fraction of the extragalactic radio background (ERB) below 500 MHz. The associated angular fluctuations dominate the sky for frequencies nu3*10^-4. The fluctuating signal is most pronounced for nugas and magnetic fields. Space missions such as ALFA will thus provide important insight into the structure and composition of our Galaxy (abridged).

Uri Keshet; Eli Waxman; Abraham Loeb

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Blue Sky Energy Inc BSE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Inc BSE Energy Inc BSE Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Energy Inc (BSE) Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) technology. Own a patented technology allowing an increase of power from a PV array of up to 30% more than conventional controllers. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

292

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Leslie L. Schmidt Business Contact Montana State University-Bozeman 309 Montana Hall Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-2381 lschmidt@montana.edu Lee Spangler Technical Contact Montana State University-Bozeman P.O. Box 172460 Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Center for Advanced Energy Studies Cimarex Energy Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Crow Tribe Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration

293

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS) is a Web-based tool to monitor “model minus observation” (M ? O) biases in clear-sky brightness temperatures (BTs) and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) produced by the Advanced Clear-...

Xingming Liang; Alexander Ignatov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Almost a Century of “Imaging” Clouds Over the Whole-Sky Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological whole-sky photography can be traced back to just after the turn of the century. Capturing an objective and well-determined view of the cloud cover over the whole-sky dome has been one of the principal goals of subsequent ...

K. McGuffe; A. Henderson-Sellers

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Computation of Cloud-Base Height from Paired Whole-Sky Imaging Cameras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud-base height (CBH) from pairs of whole-sky images. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated whole-sky imaging (WSI) cameras; this complete ...

Mark C. Allmen; W. Philip Kegelmeyer Jr.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

VLBI surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic surveys of astronomical objects often lead to discoveries, but always provide invaluable information for statistical studies of well-defined samples. They also promote follow-up investigations of individual objects or classes. Surveys using a yet unexplored observing wavelength, a novel technique or a new instrument are of special importance. Significantly improved observing parameters (e.g. sensitivity, angular resolution, monitoring capability) provide new insight into the morphological and physical properties of the objects studied. I give a brief overview of the important Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys conducted in the past. A list of surveys guides us through the developments up until the present days. I also attempt to show directions for the near future.

S. Frey

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky August 26, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA announced today that the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has revealed its first all-sky map in gamma rays. The onboard Large Area Telescope's (LAT) all-sky image-which shows the glowing gas of the Milky Way, blinking pulsars and a flaring galaxy billions of light-years away-was created using only 95 hours of "first light" observations, compared with past missions which took years to produce a similar image. Scientists expect the telescope will discover many new pulsars in our own galaxy, reveal powerful

298

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

299

All Sky Cameras for the characterization of the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The All Sky Camera (ASC) was developed as a universal device for the monitoring of the night sky quality. Eight ASCs are already installed and measure night sky parameters at eight of the candidate sites of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) gamma-ray observatory. The ACS system consists of an astronomical CCD camera, a fish eye lens, a control computer and associated electronics. The measurement is carried out during astronomical night. The images are automatically taken every 5 minutes and automatically processed using the control computer of the device. The analysis results are the cloud fraction (the percentage of the sky covered by clouds) and night sky brightness (in mag/arcsec$^{2}$)

Mandát, Dušan; Ebr, Jan; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Bulik, Tomasz; Allekotte, Ingomar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Open Digital Rights Language: XML for Digital Rights Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Rights Management (DRM) covers a broad area of intellectual property management and enforcement. DRM aims to provide secure and trusted services to control the use and distribution of content. DRM technologies have evolved from the primarily ... Keywords: Digital Rights Management (DRM), Open Digital Rights Language (ODRL), Open Mobile Alliance (OMA), Rights Expression Language, XML, XML Schema

Renato Iannella

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electronic digital computer is designed to solve systems involving a plurality of simultaneous linear equations. The computer can solve a system which converges rather rapidly when using Von Seidel's method of approximation and performs the summations required for solving for the unknown terms by a method of successive approximations.

Stone, J.J. Jr.; Bettis, E.S.; Mann, E.R.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Double-digit growth  

SciTech Connect

The global need for additional generating capacity continues to grow at double digit rates in some cases. Opportunities for partnerships and joint ventures vary considerably by country and region. A closer look is taken at five countries where the playing fields are increasingly tipping to favor outside partners in power development projects -- India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Mexico.

Cartselos, T.; Meade, W.; Hernandez, L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Digital Strategy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Digital Strategy Digital Strategy Digital Strategy November 21, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Implementing the Federal Digital Strategy Implementing the Federal Digital Strategy Alex Cohen Alex Cohen Senior Digital Information Strategist New expectations require the Federal Government to be ready to deliver and receive digital information and services anytime, anywhere and on any device. It must do so safely, securely, and with fewer resources. To build for the future, the Federal Government has developed a Digital Strategy that embraces the opportunity to innovate more with less, and enables entrepreneurs to better leverage government data to improve the quality of services to the American people. The Energy Department has responded to this challenge through key initiatives that make high-value data sets available through API's that

304

Digital buildings - Challenges and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the wider implications of digital buildings (as currently exemplified by building information models) becoming the norm within the building construction sector. Current deployment is reviewed and the growing opportunity to better ... Keywords: BIM, Building, Digital, Futures, Sustainability

Alastair Watson

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Additive assembly of digital materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Class 1E digital systems studies  

SciTech Connect

This document is furnished as part of the effort to develop NRC Class 1E Digital Computer Systems Guidelines which is Task 8 of USAF Rome Laboratories Contract F30602-89-D-0100. The report addresses four major topics, namely, computer programming languages, software design and development, software testing and fault tolerance and fault avoidance. The topics are intended as stepping stones leading to a Draft Regulatory Guide document. As part of this task a small scale survey of software fault avoidance and fault tolerance practices was conducted among vendors of nuclear safety related systems and among agencies that develop software for other applications demanding very high reliability. The findings of the present report are in part based on the survey and in part on review of software literature relating to nuclear and other critical installations, as well as on the authors` experience in these areas.

Hecht, H.; Tai, A.T.; Tso, K.S. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Optical watthour meter digitizer  

SciTech Connect

As concern about energy conservation and energy-use efficiency increases, a simple and inexpensive instrument that would provide accurate, reliable and high-resolution data on electrical energy usage should find widespread application in research and industrial facilities. An instrument that would also provide one or more outputs compatible with a wide range of digital data acquisition systems would be especially appropriate, since the use of automatic data logging equipment is now common, even in small-scale and low-budget operations. An optical watthour meter digitizer was developed which meets these criteria. Based on the induction-type watthour meter, the digitizer provides an output pulse for a fixed amount of energy use. The digitizer senses the motion of the rotor disc of the meter by optically detecting passage of a nonreflective area painted on the underside of the disc. The passage of such area initiates a logic-compatible output pulse that can be used to measure power or energy usage in a variety of ways. The accuracy of the measurement is determined by the watthour meter. The resolution of the measurement is determined by the K/sub h/ constant (in watthours per revolution) of the meter and the number of equally spaced targets painted on the disc. The resolution of this device can be as small as a fraction of a watthour; the resolution of the manually read register on a watthour meter is typically a fraction of a kilowatthour. Several digitizers were fabricated, bench-tested, and installed in the field for long-term performance testing. All are performing satisfactorily.

Andrews, W.H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Crossing the Digital Divide  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear utilities continue to upgrade aging instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with modern digital-based systems to address reliability and obsolescence concerns. In addition, the industry has demonstrated that these systems can be successfully developed and deployed even for highly safety-significant applications, such as reactor protection. However, three factors have retarded wide-scale implementation of digital technology for plant modernization and business innovation: *Large-scale digital upgrades entail considerable risk; *The upgrades are very costly and have not led to bottom-line business improvement, financial or otherwise; *Cyber Security concerns discourage wide-scale digital integration. A new national research program is under way that has been designed to address these industry concerns about expanding the use of digital technology. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has lead responsibility for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies research pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. The LWRS Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D and improvement programs (as defined in INL’s FY2009–2013 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan, INL/MIS08-14918). Its purpose is to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of existing nuclear power plants. The DOE’s program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security. The specific concern addressed by this program is that large-scale I&C obsolescence could become a life-limiting issue for the current nuclear operating fleet.

Ken Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

RFI Comments - Digital Management Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lessons from energy, oil, gas, or any large manufacturing industry ... Enterprise Encryption Key and Digital Certificate Management Market Outlook. ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

A digital metadata schema repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The metadata schema of a digital archive describes the structure and attributes of metadata. Analysis and definition of metadata schema for a new digital archive must be carefully performed at the first stage. To ease the task, we implement a metadata ... Keywords: HTML, XML, digital archive, metadata schema repository, native XML database, web-based

Yen-Chun Lin; Hsiang-An Wang; Chien-Chung Huang; Wei Chen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Catalog Extraction in SZ Cluster Surveys: a matched filter approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method based on matched multifrequency filters for extracting cluster catalogs from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys. We evaluate its performance in terms of completeness, contamination rate and photometric recovery for three representative types of SZ survey: a high resolution single frequency radio survey (AMI), a high resolution ground-based multiband survey (SPT), and the Planck all-sky survey. These surveys are not purely flux limited, and they loose completeness significantly before their point-source detection thresholds. Contamination remains relatively low at <5% (less than 30%) for a detection threshold set at S/N=5 (S/N=3). We identify photometric recovery as an important source of catalog uncertainty: dispersion in recovered flux from multiband surveys is larger than the intrinsic scatter in the Y-M relation predicted from hydrodynamical simulations, while photometry in the single frequency survey is seriously compromised by confusion with primary cosmic microwave background anisotropy. The latter effect implies that follow-up observations in other wavebands (e.g., 90 GHz, X-ray) of single frequency surveys will be required. Cluster morphology can cause a bias in the recovered Y-M relation, but has little effect on the scatter; the bias would be removed during calibration of the relation. Point source confusion only slightly decreases multiband survey completeness; single frequency survey completeness could be significantly reduced by radio point source confusion, but this remains highly uncertain because we do not know the radio counts at the relevant flux levels.

J. -B. Melin; J. G. Bartlett; J. Delabrouille

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Sustainable Enterprise: Enabling the Digital Thread  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. The Sustainable Enterprise: Enabling the Digital Thread ... Verify & Validate Digital Thread Supports Honeywell's Sustainable Enterprise ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Digital scale converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

Upton, Richard G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Metrological digital audio reconstruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with little or no contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods coupled with digital image processing and numerical analysis. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Two examples used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record and a commercial confocal scanning probe to study a 1920's celluloid Edison cylinder. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the samples and with a digitally re-mastered version of an original magnetic recording. There is also a more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software.

Fadeyev; Vitaliy (Berkeley, CA), Haber; Carl (Berkeley, CA)

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

DIGITAL Q METER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital Q meter is described for measuring the Q of mechanical or electrical devices. The meter comprises in combination a transducer coupled to an input amplifier, and an upper and lower level discriminator coupled to the amplifier and having their outputs coupled to an anticoincidence gate. The output of the gate is connected to a scaler. The lower level discriminator is adjusted to a threshold level of 36.8 percent of the operating threshold level of the upper level discriminator. (AEC)

Briscoe, W.L.

1962-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design  

SciTech Connect

In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data  

SciTech Connect

Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes, thereby providing the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here utilizes binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud feature vectors.

Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, Chen-Hui

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy In this video, NREL Principal Scientist Gary Jorgensen and SkyFuel Chief Technology Officer Randy Gee talk about their partnership to develop a thin film to substitute for bulkier glass mirrors on solar-collecting parabolic troughs. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Credit: Fireside Production More Information For more information about NREL's partnership with SkyFuel, read Award-Winning Reflector to Cut Solar Cost and New Solar Technology Concentrates on Cost, Efficiency. Learn more about NREL's Concentrating Solar Power Research. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities

319

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

320

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lidar Determinations of Atmospheric Ice Crystal Layers at South Pole during Clear-Sky Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of lidar measurements of atmospheric ice crystal layers during 36 clear-sky precipitation events at South Pole (2850 m MSL) during the winter over the period March-November 1975 are presented and correlated with ice crystal replicator, ...

Vern N. Smiley; Bruce M. Whitcomb; Bruce M. Morley; Joseph A. Warburton

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Network-ready Camera System Development for All-Sky Observing System Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located on a rooftop and continually monitors the sky for flashes such as bright meteor fireballs, accuracy of time stamping 2. Research autonomous power options (e.g., solar cells). Considerations include

Johnson, Eric E.

324

The Transmission of Sunlight through Cloudy Skies: An Analysis Based on Standard Meteorological Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the use of standard meteorological information to describe the attenuation of sunlight associated with cloudy skies. Datasets consisting of broadband ultraviolet and total spectrally integrated solar irradiance are available ...

John E. Frederick; H. Donnan Steele

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

Sullivan, Peter William

326

Climate Model–Simulated Diurnal Cycles in HIRS Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear-sky brightness temperature measurements from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) are simulated with two climate models via a radiative transfer code. The models are sampled along the HIRS orbit paths to derive diurnal ...

Ian A. MacKenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Anders V. Lindfors

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Clear-Sky Direct-Beam Solar Radiation Versus Altitude: A Proposal for Standard Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author reexamines Klein's (1948) quantitative statements relating clear-sky direct-beam solar radiation to altitude for the lower troposphere, which are of the form (transmissivity) = B + A log (altitude). Klein's summaries are judged to be ...

William P. Lowry

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis within Three-Dimensional Clouds Subjected to Solar and Sky Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional radiative heat transfer analysis of an arbitrary-shaped modeled cloud subjected to solar and sky irradiation has been performed. The Radiation Element Method by Ray Emission Model (REM2) was used for numerical simulation. ...

Toru Nishikawa; Shigenao Maruyama; Seigo Sakai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bergin, M.H. From weather forecasting to exploring the solarWai, et al. "Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imagerand Impact on Solar Forecasting A Thesis submitted in

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Clear-Sky Window Channel Radiances: A Comparison between Observations and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of clear-sky radiances of the Meteosat window channel with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model results is presented, aiming to assess both the model's performance and the quality of the observations. ...

Isabel F. Trigo; Pedro Viterbo

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Comparison of Computed and Observed Insolation under Clear Skies over the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to verify computational methods for ocean heat budgets, observations of insulation under clear skies for 26 days were compared with values computed by a formula previously derived from the Smithsonian Tables. The agreement between ...

R. K. Reed; R. E. Brainard

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

On the Relationship between Clear-Sky Planetary and Surfae Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on simulations, a simple linear relationship is derived between planetary albedo and the surface albedo for the case of clear skies. This relationship enables one to estimate the planetary albedo, given only the surface albedo, and vice ...

T. S. Chen; George Ohring

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NERSC's Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe - NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Project Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe March 30, 2009 STARLIGHT: This image of the Coma cluster was made by combining over 500 images collected between 2001 and 2007. Every night approximately 3,000 astronomical files flow to the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center from automated sky scanning systems all over the world for archiving. After a decade of collecting, the center currently holds over 8 million images, making this one of the largest troves of ground-based celestial images available. Now, a multidisciplinary team of astronomers, computer scientists, and engineers from NERSC are collaborating to develop a user-friendly database system and interface to instantly serve up high-resolution cosmic reference

335

DOE Digital Photo Archive  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DOE Digital Photo Archive is a resource made available to the DOE community as well as the general public for the purposes of enhancing communication, education, and ultimately the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE). The images in the Archive are downloadable as low resolution JPG files and may easily and quickly be requested in high resolution. The database can be browsed or is searchable by science program, sites by name, geographic locations, etc. Each photo has a caption or brief summary, and most are not copyrighted.

336

SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems  

SciTech Connect

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, a now-completed continuation of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {ge} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {micro}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {micro}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx} 15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx} 24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of January 2011, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {ge} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8) in January 2011.

Eisenstein, Daniel J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Weinberg, David H.; /Ohio State U.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arns, James A.; /Michigan U.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bailey, Stephen; /LBL, Berkeley; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Barkhouser, Robert; /Johns Hopkins U. /Michigan State U.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z Exploration, measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {ge} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {micro}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {micro}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx} 15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx} 24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of January 2011, SDSS-III has obtained spectra of more than 240,000 galaxies, 29,000 z {ge} 2.2 quasars, and 140,000 stars, including 74,000 velocity measurements of 2580 stars for MARVELS. In keeping with SDSS tradition, SDSS-III will provide regular public releases of all its data, beginning with SDSS Data Release 8 (DR8) in January 2011.

Eisenstein, Daniel J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Weinberg, David H.; /Ohio State U.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arns, James A.; /Michigan U.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bailey, Stephen; /LBL, Berkeley; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Barkhouser, Robert; /Johns Hopkins U. /Michigan State U.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

JOM Salary Survey - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JOM Salary Survey. This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance. Javascript is required for this site to function, ...

339

Stored program digital process controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital process control function generator wherein a timing clock, in conjunction with programmable read only memories controls variables in a process with respect to time.

Stephenson, Dwight L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

NIST Digital Media Group: publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Guide (See above guide) Download PDF (294 KB) NIST/Library of Congress ... SPIE Conf. ... Mastering and Archiving Uncompressed Digital Video Test ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The digital laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well-known how to control the spatial output from a laser, with most solutions to date involving customised intra-cavity elements in the form of apertures, diffractive optics and free-form mirrors. These optical elements require considerable design and fabrication effort and suffer from the further disadvantage of being immutably connected to the selection of a particular spatial mode. Consequently, most laser systems are designed for the ubiquitous Gaussian mode, whereas it is clear that there are many instances when a customised mode would be preferable. We overcome these limitations with the first digital laser, comprising an electrically addressed reflective phase-only spatial light modulator as an intra-cavity holographic mirror. The phase and amplitude of the holographic mirror may be controlled as simply as writing a new gray-scale image (computer generated hologram) to the device: on-demand laser modes. We show that we can digitally control the laser modes with ease, albeit with higher round-tri...

Ngcobo, Sandile; Burger, Liesl; Forbes, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z ~ 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5 - 10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200 - 2500 Angstrom), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600 - 9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500 - 9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400 - 8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2 - 2.2 microns), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6 - 8.0 microns), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24 - 70 microns), and VLA radio continuum (6 - 20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

M. Davis; P. Guhathakurta; N. Konidaris; J. A. Newman; M. L. N. Ashby; A. D. Biggs; P. Barmby; K. Bundy; S. Chapman; A. L. Coil; C. Conselice; M. Cooper; D. Croton; P. Eisenhardt; R. Ellis; S. Faber; T. Fang; G. G. Fazio; A. Georgakakis; B. Gerke; W. M. Goss; S. Gwyn; J. Harker; A. Hopkins; J. -S. Huang; R. J. Ivison; S. A. Kassin; E. Kirby; A. Koekemoer; D. C. Koo; E. Laird; E. Le Floc'h; L. Lin; J. Lotz; P. J. Marshall; D. C. Martin; A. Metevier; L. A. Moustakas; K. Nandra; K. Noeske; C. Papovich; A. C. Phillips; R. M. Rich; G. H. Rieke; D. Rigopoulou; S. Salim; D. Schiminovich; L. Simard; I. Smail; T. A. Small; B. Weiner; C. N. A. Willmer; S. P. Willner; G. Wilson; E. Wright; R. Yan

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets  

SciTech Connect

In this the first of a series of ''Letters'', we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z {approx} 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS{sup 30} X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX{sup 31} ultraviolet (1200-2500 A), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey{sup 32} optical (3600-9000 {angstrom}), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 {angstrom}), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS{sup 33} optical (4400-8500 {angstrom}), Palomar/WIRC{sup 34} near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC{sup 35} mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA{sup 36} radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope{sup 37}. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.; Coil, A.L.; Conselice, C.; Cooper, M.; Croton, D.; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R.; Faber, S.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, B.; Goss, W.M.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /LBL, Berkeley /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Royal Observ., Edinburgh /Caltech /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Nottingham U. /Caltech, JPL /Imperial Coll., London /UC, Berkeley /NRAO, Socorro /Victoria U. /Sydney U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /NOAO, Tucson /KIPAC, Menlo Park /UCLA /Oxford U. /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

The All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey(AEGIS) Data Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z{approx}1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200-2500 Angstroms), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600-9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400-8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.P.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.C.; Coil,A.L.; Conselice, C.J.; Cooper, M.C.; Croton, D.J.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Ellis, R.S.; Faber, S.M.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke,B.F.; Goss, W.M.; Gwyn, S.; Harker, J.; Hopkins, A.M.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R.J.; Kassin, S.A.; Kirby, E.N.; Koekemoer, A.M.; Koo, D.C.; Laird, E.S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lin, L.; Lotz, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Martin,D.C.; Metevier, A.J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Nandra, K.; Noeske, K.G.; Papovich, C.; Phillips, A.C.; Rich,R. M.; Rieke, G.H.; Rigopoulou, D.; Salim, S.; Schiminovich, D.; Simard, L.; Smail, I.; Small,T.A.; Weiner,B.J.; Willmer, C.N.A.; Willner, S.P.; Wilson, G.; Wright, E.L.; Yan, R.

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

2012 NERSC User Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results 2012 User Survey Text 2012 NERSC User Survey Text The 2012 NERSC User Survey is closed. The following is the text of the survey. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with...

346

BNL | Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Large Synoptic Survey Telescope About LSST Digital Sensor Array Brookhaven & Physics of the Universe LSST Project Website LSST: Providing an Unprecedented View of the Cosmos rendering of the LSST site in Chile A revolutionary 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a massive ground-based telescope will produce unprecedented views of the cosmos, driving discoveries with the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured. New Visions The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will peer into space as no other telescope can. This new facility will create an unparalleled wide-field astronomical survey of our universe - wider and deeper in volume than all previous telescopes combined. The combination of a 3200 megapixel camera sensor array, a powerful supercomputer, a cutting-edge data processing and

347

DIGITAL VIDEO CAMCORDER Instruction Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'emploi VIDEOCÁMARA Y GRABADORA DIGITAL Manual de Instrucciones ENGLISH FRAN�AIS ESPA�OL Mini Digital Video Cassette. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and use in accordance devices or other sources of electric or magnetic radiation. They may cause picture interference

348

Image enhancement by digital computer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 15 years digital computers have been used to greatly improve from images. In this paper we review and discuss a number of techniques for the enhancement of imagery by digital computer. The implications of this technology to verification of arms control treaties is left to the reader.

B. R. Hunt

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

FIRST RESULTS FROM THE CATALINA REAL-TIME TRANSIENT SURVEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the results from the first six months of the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS). In order to search for optical transients (OTs) with timescales of minutes to years, the CRTS analyses data from the Catalina Sky Survey which repeatedly covers 26,000 of square degrees on the sky. The CRTS provides a public stream of transients that are bright enough to be followed up using small telescopes. Since the beginning of the survey, all CRTS transients have been made available to astronomers around the world in real time using HTML tables,RSS feeds, and VOEvents. As part of our public outreach program, the detections are now also available in Keyhole Markup Language through Google Sky. The initial discoveries include over 350 unique OTs rising more than 2 mag from past measurements. Sixty two of these are classified as supernovae (SNe), based on light curves, prior deep imaging and spectroscopic data. Seventy seven are due to cataclysmic variables (CVs; only 13 previously known), while an additional 100 transients were too infrequently sampled to distinguish between faint CVs and SNe. The remaining OTs include active galactic nucleus, blazars, high-proper-motions stars, highly variable stars (such as UV Ceti stars), and transients of an unknown nature. Our results suggest that there is a large population of SNe missed by many current SN surveys because of selection biases. These objects appear to be associated with faint host galaxies. We also discuss the unexpected discovery of white dwarf binary systems through dramatic eclipses.

Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., CA 91225 (United States); Beshore, E.; Larson, S.; Boattini, A.; Gibbs, A.; Hill, R.; Kowalski, R. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Christensen, E. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Catelan, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de AstronomIa y AstrofIsica, Av. Vicuna Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

night sky. Below: The telescope depicted at its future site atop Cerro Pachn in Chile. (Top image by Todd Mason, Mason Productions Inc. LSST Corporation. Bottom image...

351

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey’s (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Optical Sky Brightness at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory from 1992 to 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical UBVRI sky brightness measures from 1992 through 2006. The data are based on CCD imagery obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m, 1.3-m, and 1.5-m telescopes. The B- and V-band data are in reasonable agreement with measurements previously made at Mauna Kea, though on the basis of a small number of images per year there are discrepancies for the years 1992 through 1994. Our CCD-based data are not significantly different than values obtained at Cerro Paranal. We find that the yearly averages of V-band sky brightness are best correlated with the 10.7-cm solar flux taken 5 days prior to the sky brightness measures. This implies an average speed of 350 km/sec for the solar wind. While we can measure an enhancement of the night sky levels over La Serena 10 degrees above the horizon, at elevation angles above 45 degrees we find no evidence that the night sky brightness at Cerro Tololo is affected by artificial light of nearby towns and cities.

Krisciunas, Kevin; Sanhueza, Pedro; Schwarz, Hugo E; Semler, Dylan R; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Vera, Sergio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

OpenEI Community - Federal Digital Strategy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

part of the Federal Digital Strategy http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogopenei-part-federal-digital-strategy

355

Digital Divide: How Can Digital Libraries Bridge the Gap?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have, while making our life easier, created a social divide known as the digital divide. Statistics show that there are significant disparities among the populations in the developed ...

Gobinda G. Chowdhury

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

New Mariners and a Massive Map: Berkeley Computers Calculate What's in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mariners and a Massive Map: Berkeley Computers Calculate What's Mariners and a Massive Map: Berkeley Computers Calculate What's in the Sky New Mariners and a Massive Map: Berkeley Computers Calculate What's in the Sky February 2, 2012 - 12:08pm Addthis This is the Southern Galactic Cap view as recorded by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico took in light from over a third of the total area of the sky (14,000 square degrees) including 1.5 million galaxies. | Photo courtesy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This is the Southern Galactic Cap view as recorded by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico took in light from over a third of the total area of the sky (14,000 square degrees) including 1.5 million galaxies. | Photo courtesy of the Sloan

357

Use of Aeronet Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface G. L. Schuster National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia O. Dubovik National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics Greenbelt, Maryland Motivation The worldwide aerosol robotic network (AERONET) of ground-based radiometers was developed (in part) as a satellite validation tool (Holben et al. 1998). These sites utilize spectral sky-scanning radiometers, providing more information for aerosol retrievals than conventional sunphotometer measurements. The use of the almucantar sky radiance scans in conjunction with the aerosol optical thicknesses are the basis of the AERONET Dubovik retrievals, which provide the aerosol size

358

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment June 27, 2011 - 12:42pm Addthis ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Energy Department's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility recently deployed its mobile facility to

359

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Triggering of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes: PMT trigger rates due to night-sky photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging air Cherenkov telescopes are usually triggered on a coincidence of two or sometimes more pixels, with discriminator thresholds in excess of 20 photoelectrons applied for each pixel. These thresholds required to suppress night-sky background are significantly higher than expected on the basis of a Poisson distribution in the number of night-sky photoelectrons generated during the characteristic signal integration time. We studied noise trigger rates under controlled conditions using an artificial background light source. Large tails in the PMT amplitude response to single photoelectrons are identified as a dominant contribution to noise triggers. The rate of such events is very sensitive to PMT operating parameters.

G. Hermann; C. Köhler; T. Kutter; W. Hofmann

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly noiseless cosmic variance limited experiment. We thus confirm the wisdom of the current strategy for r detection of deeply probed patches covering the f{sub sky} minimum-error trough with balloon and ground experiments.

Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Dore, O. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Full-sky correlation functions for CMB experiments with asymmetric window functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss full-sky convolution of the instrumental beam with the CMB sky signal in CMB single-dish and interferometry experiments, using the method (Challinor et al. 2000) that the measured temperature and polarization anisotropies are defined globally on the group manifold of the three-dimensional rotation by means of Wigner D-functions. We re-derive the anisotropy and polarization correlation functions incorporated with asymmetric window functions, which are then explicitly calculated for a single-dish elliptical Gaussian beam and an interferometric Gaussian beam.

Kin-Wang Ng

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

An Emulated Digital CNN Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new emulated digital CNN Universal Machine chip architecture is introduced and the main steps of the design process are shown in this paper. One core processor can be implemented on 2 × 2 mm^2 silicon ...

Péter Keresztes; ákos Zarándy; Tamás Roska; Péter Szolgay; Tamás Bezák; Timót Hidvégi; Péter Jónás; Attila Katona

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Digital Modeling of Material Appearance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer graphics systems are capable of generating stunningly realistic images of objects that have never physically existed. In order for computers to create these accurately detailed images, digital models of appearance must include robust data to ... Keywords: Computer Graphics

Julie Dorsey; Holly Rushmeier; Franois Sillion

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Digital preservation: overview of current developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ICSTI and ICSU Press, with support from UNESCO, co-sponsored a workshop on digital archiving that brought major stakeholders together to identify the key issues for each group in January 2000. The state of digital archiving art and practice at the time ... Keywords: business models, cooperation, digital archiving, digital preservation, framework, funding, guidelines, policies, projects, stakeholder roles, technologies

Gail M. Hodge

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Automated user modeling for personalized digital libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital libraries (DLs) have become one of the most typical ways of accessing any kind of digitalized information. Due to this key role, users welcome any improvements on the services they receive from DLs. One trend used to improve digital services ... Keywords: Adaptive library services, Digital libraries, Personalization, User modeling

E. Frias-Martinez; G. Magoulas; S. Chen; R. Macredie

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preserving digital data in heterogeneous environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital preservation aims at maintaining digital objects accessible over a long period of time, regardless of the challenges of organizational or technological changes or failures. In particular, data produced in e-Science domains could be reliably stored ... Keywords: data grids, dependability, digital libraries, digital preservation

Gonçalo Antunes; José Barateiro; Manuel Cabral; José Borbinha; Rodrigo Rodrigues

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Decimal System and Double Digits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decimal System and Double Digits Decimal System and Double Digits Name: Ken Status: other Grade: other Country: Canada Date: April 2011 Question: If the origin of the decimal system reflects counting on ten fingers and if zero came into use after the decimal system had been established why did we not create a single symbol for our tenth digit rather than use the double digit 10? If T were to represent the tenth number this would have created a counting system where the number series 1,2...9,T is followed by the same series having a 1 to the left then followed by the same series having a 2 to the left, etc. The T would be the last number in a series of ten single digits rather than be the first number in a series of double digits. The symbol zero would be used only between negative one and positive one because it represents the existence of nothing and, therefore, would have no other function.

370

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY: SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND DATA REDUCTION  

SciTech Connect

We present the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), a 1.1 mm continuum survey at 33'' effective resolution of 170 deg{sup 2} of the Galactic Plane visible from the northern hemisphere. The BGPS is one of the first large area, systematic surveys of the Galactic Plane in the millimeter continuum without pre-selected targets. The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 {<=} l {<=} 90.5, |b| {<=} 0.5. Toward the Cygnus X spiral arm, the coverage was flared to |b| {<=} 1.5 for 75.5 {<=} l {<=} 87.5. In addition, cross-cuts to |b| {<=} 1.5 were made at l= 3, 15, 30, and 31. The total area of this section is 133 deg{sup 2}. With the exception of the increase in latitude, no pre-selection criteria were applied to the coverage in this region. In addition to the contiguous region, four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy were observed: IC1396 (9 deg{sup 2}, 97.5 {<=} l {<=} 100.5, 2.25 {<=} b {<=} 5.25), a region toward the Perseus Arm (4 deg{sup 2} centered on l = 111, b = 0 near NGC 7538), W3/4/5 (18 deg{sup 2}, 132.5 {<=} l {<=} 138.5), and Gem OB1 (6 deg{sup 2}, 187.5 {<=} l {<=} 193.5). The survey has detected approximately 8400 clumps over the entire area to a limiting non-uniform 1{sigma} noise level in the range 11-53 mJy beam{sup -1} in the inner Galaxy. The BGPS source catalog is presented in a previously published companion paper. This paper details the survey observations and data reduction methods for the images. We discuss in detail the determination of astrometric and flux density calibration uncertainties and compare our results to the literature. Data processing algorithms that separate astronomical signals from time-variable atmospheric fluctuations in the data timestream are presented. These algorithms reproduce the structure of the astronomical sky over a limited range of angular scales and produce artifacts in the vicinity of bright sources. Based on simulations, we find that extended emission on scales larger than about 5.'9 is nearly completely attenuated (>90%) and the linear scale at which the attenuation reaches 50% is 3.'8. Comparison with other millimeter-wave data sets implies a possible systematic offset in flux calibration, for which no cause has been discovered. This presentation serves as a companion and guide to the public data release (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/Missions/bolocam.html) through NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). New data releases will be provided through IPAC-IRSA with any future improvements in the reduction. The BGPS provides a complementary long-wavelength spectral band for the ongoing ATLASGAL and Herschel-SPIRE surveys, and an important database and context for imminent observations with SCUBA-2 and ALMA.

Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ginsburg, Adam G.; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Stringfellow, Guy S. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Drosback, Meredith M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bradley, Eric Todd [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Dowell, Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan (Canada); Walawender, Josh [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: jaguirre@sas.upenn.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Annual Capital Expenditures Survey BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Dataset Summary Description Provides national estimates of investment in new and used buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment by U.S. nonfarm businesses with and without employees. Data are published by industry for companies with employees for NAICS 3-digit and selected 4-digit industries. Data on the amount of business expenditures for new plant and equipment and measures of the stock of existing facilities are critical to evaluate productivity growth, the ability of U.S. business to compete with foreign business, changes in industrial capacity, and measures of overall economic performance. In addition, ACES data provide industry analysts with capital expenditure data for market analysis, economic forecasting, identifying business opportunities and developing new and strategic plans. The ACES is an integral part of the Federal Government's effort to improve and supplement ongoing statistical programs. Private companies and organizations,, educators and students, and economic researchers use the survey results for analyzing and conducting impact evaluations on past and current economic performance, short-term economic forecasts, productivity, long-term economic growth, tax policy, capacity utilization, business fixed capital stocks and capital formation, domestic and international competitiveness trade policy, market research, and financial analysis.

372

TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host-galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light curves using both MLCS2K2 and SALT2, and determine color (A{sub V} , c) and light-curve shape ({Delta}, x{sub 1}) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4{sigma} level) finding is that the average fitted A{sub V} from MLCS2K2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that supernovae (SNe) in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

Galbany, Lluis; Miquel, Ramon; Oestman, Linda [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); D'Andrea, Chris B.; Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Frieman, Joshua [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellise Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Marriner, John [Center for Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Nordin, Jakob [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Smith, Mathew [Department of Physics, University of Western Cape, Bellville 7535, Cape Town (South Africa); Sollerman, Jesper [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lluis.galbany@ist.utl.pt [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); and others

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

374

Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A 15-year Simulation of the Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Using the ECMWF Reanalyses: Fluxes and Comparisons with ERBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the project Clear-sky Longwave from ERA (CLERA), in which simulations were performed of clear-sky longwave fluxes and heating rates for the period 1979–93, based on data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

A. Slingo; J. A. Pamment; M. J. Webb

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Reusable learning objects: a survey of LOM-based repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we survey the field of learning object repositories. Learning objects are typically relatively small content components that are meant to be reusable in different contexts. Associated to these learning objects are metadata, so that they ... Keywords: Learning Object Metadata (LOM), digital libraries, learning object repositories, metadata, reusable learning objects

Filip Neven; Erik Duval

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

1998 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results Respondent Summary NERSC has completed its first user survey since its move to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The survey is...

378

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

SciTech Connect

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at NCSA and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used Teragrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

Joseph J. Mohr; Wayne Barkhouse; Cristina Beldica; Emmanuel Bertin; Y. Dora Cai; Luiz da Costa; J. Anthony Darnell; Gregory E. Daues; Michael Jarvis; Michelle Gower; Huan Lin; leandro Martelli; Eric Neilsen; Chow-Choong Ngeow; Ricardo Ogando; Alex Parga; Erin Sheldon; Douglas Tucker; Nikolay Kuropatkin; Chris Stoughton

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky. The algorithm, based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, is aimed at recovering both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations, without any a priori assumption on properties of the components to be separated, except that all of them, but at most one, must have non-Gaussian distributions. The analysis starts from very simple toy-models of the sky emission in order to assess the quality of the reconstruction when inputs are well known and controlled. In particular we study the dependence of the results of separation conducted on and off the Galactic plane independently, showing that optimal separation is achieved for sky regions where components are smoothly distributed. Then we move to more realistic applications on simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; L. Bedini

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cloud Coverage Based on All-Sky Imaging and Its Impact on Surface Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand, two all-sky imaging systems have been in operation for more than 1 yr, measuring the total, opaque, and thin cloud fraction, as well as indicating whether the sun is obscured by clouds. The data provide a ...

G. Pfister; R. L. McKenzie; J. B. Liley; A. Thomas; B. W. Forgan; C. N. Long

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analog Sky Condition Forecasting Based on a k-nn Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range, cloudy–clear sky condition forecasts are important for a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, an approach based on a k-nearest neighbors (k-nn) algorithm was developed and implemented to ...

Timothy J. Hall; Rachel N. Thessin; Greg J. Bloy; Carl N. Mutchler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sky View Factors from High-Resolution Scanned Fish-eye Lens Photographic Negatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computerized method for calculating the sky view factor from fish-eye lens photographic negatives is presented. The images are scanned and stored on CD ROM, each CD holding 100 images. The images can be retrieved at very high resolutions of up ...

Kristina Blennow

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earth’s Surface—Evaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earth’s surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Treaty on Open Skies sensor technologies with potential international safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies is a precedent-setting agreement that allows signatory states to fly aircraft over each other`s territory with sensor systems. The purpose of the Treaty is to improve confidence and security with respect to military activities of the signatories. This paper reviews the sensor technology that is currently allowed by the Treaty on Open Skies and potential future sensor technology. The Treaty on Open Skies does have provisions to allow for the improvement of the technology of the current sensor systems and for the proposal of new sensors after a period of time. This can occur only after the Treaty has been ratified and has entered into force. If this regime was to be used for other than Treaty on Open Skies applications some modifications to the allowed sensor technology should be examined. This paper presents some ideas on potential improvements to existing allowed sensor technology as well as some suggested new advanced sensor systems that would be useful for future potential monitoring of safeguard`s related activities. This paper addresses advanced imaging sensors and non-imaging sensors for potential use in aerial remote sensing roles that involve international data sharing.

Sandoval, M.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr study affirms that the temperature indicated by an inexpensive ($20–$60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky (Tz) is a proxy for total column water vapor [precipitable water (PW)]. From 8 September 2008 to 18 October 2010 Tz was ...

Forrest M. Mims III; Lin Hartung Chambers; David R. Brooks

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparison of Regional Clear-Sky Albedos Inferred from Satellite Observations and Model Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have taken an important first step in validating climate models by comparing model and satellite inferred clear sky TOA (top-of-atmosphere) albedos. Model albodos were computed on a 1° × 1° latitude-longitude grid, allowing for variations in ...

B. P. Briegleb; P. Minnis; V. Ramanathan; E. Harrison

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Investigation of astrophysical phenomena in short time scales with "Pi of the Sky" apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis the data analysis designed by author for the "Pi of the Sky" experiment is presented. The data analysis consists of data reduction and specific algorithms for identification of short time scale astrophysical processes. The algorithms have been tested and their efficiency has been determined and described. The "Pi of the Sky" prototype is collecting data since June 2004 and algorithms could be intensively studied and improved during over 700 nights. A few events of confirmed astrophysical origin and above 100 events in 10s time scale of unknown nature have been discovered. During the data collection period 3 Gamma Ray Bursts (out of 231) occurred in the field of view of the telescope, but no optical counterpart has been found. The upper limits for brightness of the optical counterpart have been determined. The continuous monitoring of the sky and own trigger for optical flashes allowed to determine limits on the number of GRBs without corresponding gamma-ray detection. This allowed determining limits on the ratio of emission collimation in optical and gamma bands, which is R >= 4.4. The perspectives of the full "Pi of the Sky" system has been studied and number of positive detections has been estimated on the level of ~ 2.5 events per year.

Marcin Sokolowski

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evaluation of a Ground-Based Sky Camera System for Use inSurface Irradiance Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evaluation of a ground-based sky camera system for studying the effect of clouds on the level of the ambient ultraviolet radiation. The system has been developed for research in the characterization of the effect of ...

Jeff Sabburg; Joe Wong

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Statistical Exmination of Sky Cover Changes in the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sette Weather Chart constructed in 1939 with data from 1900 to 1936 was used to describe the climatology of cloudless days and to predict cloudless days in the United States for 14 regions. When the data for days having 0.1 sky cover or less ...

William L. Seaver; James E. Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solar Irradiance Anomalies Caused by Clear-Sky Transmission Variations above Mauna Loa: 1958–99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky transmission of the atmosphere contributes to determining the amount of solar irradiance that reaches various levels in the atmosphere, which in turn is fundamental to defining the climate of the earth. As of the end of 1999, ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton; Barry A. Bodhaine

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Posters from the 215th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 8.4 meter Large LSST will survey the entire visible sky deeply in multiple colors every week with its three-billion pixel digital camera, probing the mysteries of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, and opening a movie-like window on objects that change or move rapidly: exploding supernovae, potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids, and distant Kuiper Belt Objects. [Copied from http://www.lsst.org/lsst/about]

The LSST is still in the design and development phase and will be ready for its scientific work approximately four years after construction starts in Chile. The scientific posters prepared by members of the LSST Project Team for the 215 meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January of 2010 provide a detailed, technical look at the project components. Titles of posters available online include:

  • LSST Observatory and Science Opportunities
  • The LSST: A System of Systems
  • LSST: from Science Drivers to Data Products
  • LSST Education and Public Outreach
  • LSST Operations Simulator
  • Simulating the LSST
  • Inventorying the Solar System with LSST
  • Stellar Population Science with LSST
  • Eclipsing Binary Science with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope
  • Mapping Milky Way and Local Volume Structure with LSST
  • Galaxy Evolution with LSST
  • Photometric Redshift Performance of LSST
  • LSST Cosmological Probes
  • Probing Dark Energy with Weak Lensing: Ground versus Space
  • Strong Gravitational Lensing with LSST
  • AGN Science with the LSST
  • Exploring the Transient and Variable Universe with LSST
  • Investigation of LSST RR Lyrae Lightcurve Recovery
  • Calibation of LSST Instrument and Data
  • White Dwarf Starts as LSST Calibrators
  • The Camera for LSST and its Focal Plane Array
  • LSST Telescope and Optics Status
  • Data Management R&D for the LSST Project
  • The Spectrum of LSST Data Analysis Challenges: Kiloscale to Petascale
  • Accelerating LSST Source Catalog Simulations with Graphics Processing Units

LSST Project Team Members

395

Preliminary digital geologic maps of the Mariposa, Kingman, Trona, and Death Valley Sheets, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parts of four 1:250,000-scale geologic maps by the California Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines and Geology have been digitized for use in hydrogeologic characterization. These maps include the area of California between lat. 35{degree}N; Long. 115{degree}W and lat. 38{degree}N, long. 118{degree}W of the Kingman Sheet (Jennings, 1961), Trona Sheet (Jennings and others, 1962), Mariposa Sheet (Strand, 1967), and Death Valley Sheet (Streitz and Stinson, 1974). These digital maps are being released by the US Geological Survey in the ARC/INFO Version 6.1 Export format. The digitized data include geologic unit boundaries, fault traces, and identity of geologic units. The procedure outlined in US Geological Survey Circular 1054 (Soller and others, 1990) was sued during the map construction. The procedure involves transferring hard-copy data into digital format by scanning manuscript maps, manipulating the digital map data, and outputting the data. Most of the work was done using Environmental Systems Research Institute`s ARC/INFO software. The digital maps are available in ARC/INFO Rev. 6.1 Export format, from the USGS, Yucca Mountain Project, in Denver, Colorado.

D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Soil-Web: An online soil survey for California, Arizona, and Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital soil survey products represent one of the largest and most comprehensive inventories of soils information currently available. The complex structure of these databases, intensive use of codes and scientific jargon make it difficult for non-specialists ... Keywords: Education, Online database, Outreach, Soil survey, Spatial database, Visualization

D. E. Beaudette; A. T. O'Geen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012­1176, 77 p. Any use of Environmental Resources Management (Miami-Dade County, Florida) DOI depth of investigation DRG digital raster

398

The MOXE X-ray all-sky monitor for Spectrum-X-Gamma  

SciTech Connect

MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor to be flown on the Russian Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite, to be launched in a few years. It will monitor several hundred X-ray sources on a daily basis, and will be the first instrument to monitor most of the X-ray sky most of the time. MOXE will alert users of more sensitive instruments on Russia`s giant high energy astrophysics observatory and of other instruments to transient activity. MOXE consists of an array of 6 X-ray pinhole cameras, sensitive from 3 to 25 keV, which views 4{pi} steradians (except for a 20{degree} {times} 80{degree} patch which includes the Sun). The pinhole apertures of 0.625 {times} 2.556 cm{sup 2} imply an angular resolution of 2{degree}.4 {times} 9{degree}.7 (on-axis). The MOXE hardware program includes an engineering model, now delivered, and a flight model. The flight instrument will mass approximately 118 kg and draw 38 Watts. For a non-focusing all-sky instrument that is limited by sky background, the limiting sensitivity is a function only of detector area. MOXE, with 6,000 cm{sup 2} of detector area, will, for a 24 hrs exposure, have a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab. MOXE distinguishes itself with respect to other all-sky monitors in its high duty cycle, thus being particularly sensitive to transient phenomena with time scales between minutes and hours.

In`t Zand, J.J.M.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Moss, C.E. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

From Digital Library to Digital Government: A Case Study in Crime Data Mapping and Mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of the significant research activities in digital library, digital government, and e-commerce over the past decade, there seems to be common threads among them and unique challenges and opportunities ahead. For digital library, we are beginning ...

Hsinchun Chen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Digital Innovation and the Division of Innovative Labor: Digital Controls in the Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study of the U.S. automobile industry, we highlight the way the division of innovative labor across firms in the supply chain can be influenced by a particular form of digital innovation known as “digital control systems.” Digital ... Keywords: automotive industry, digital control hierarchy, digital controls, digital innovation, division of innovative labor, dual-product hierarchy, inclusionary hierarchy, mirroring hypothesis, systems integration

Jaegul Lee; Nicholas Berente

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "digital sky survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Digital Networks: Electronics and Beyond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digital Networks: Electronics and Beyond Digital Networks: Electronics and Beyond Speaker(s): Bruce Nordman Date: January 9, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 For the last five years or so, I have made digital networks my prime research focus. For the most part, this has concentrated on IT networks as with PCs and servers, and the network interfaces and network devices that enable it. I will outline how to think about networks as they collide with energy use and efficiency, and report on the several projects we have underway in this area. Networks have a unique relationship to industry standards and I will outline some of the challenges and opportunities this brings. In addition, we have the looming prospect of the networking of many non-electronic loads in buildings (particularly lighting and climate

402

Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one of two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages change the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Apparatus and method for managing digital resources by passing digital resource tokens between queues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of managing digital resources of a digital system includes the step of reserving token values for certain digital resources in the digital system. A selected token value in a free-buffer-queue is then matched to an incoming digital resource request. The selected token value is then moved to a valid-request-queue. The selected token is subsequently removed from the valid-request-queue to allow a digital agent in the digital system to process the incoming digital resource request associated with the selected token. Thereafter, the selected token is returned to the free-buffer-queue. 6 figs.

Crawford, H.J.; Lindenstruth, V.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

On The Independence Of Digits In Connected Digit Strings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the frequently used assumptions in Speaker Verification is that two speech segments (phonemes, subwords, words) are considered to be independent. And therefore, the log-likelihood of a test utterance is just the sum of the log-likelihoods of the speech segments in that utterance. This paper reports about cases in which this observation-independence assumption seems to be violated, namely for those test utterances which call a certain speech model more than once. For example, a pin code which contains a non-unique digit set performs worse in verification than a pin code which consists of four different digits. Results illustrate that violating the independence assumption too much might result in increasing EERs while more information (in form of digits) is added to the test utterance. 1. INTRODUCTION In Speaker Verification (SV) systems using passwords in the form of fixed or prompted digit strings it seems usual to compute the log-likelihood of a claimant being the true speaker...

Johan Koolwaaij; Lou Boves

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Preliminary Design of The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024x1024 HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47'x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE is currently in its Preliminary Design Phase, with the mission Preliminary Design Review scheduled for July, 2005. WISE is scheduled to launch in mid 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

A. K. Mainzer; P. Eisenhardt; E. L. Wright; F. Liu; W. Irace; I. Heinrichsen; R. Cutri; V. Duval

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

'Power and the digital divide'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ethical and political dilemmas raised by Information and Communication Technology (ICT) have only just begun to be understood. The impact of centralised data collection, mass communication technologies or the centrality of computer technology as ... Keywords: Foucault, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), coercion, digital divide, force, power

Jeremy Moss

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Plasma digital density determining device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

Sprott, Julien C. (Madison, WI); Lovell, Thomas W. (Madison, WI); Holly, Donald J. (Madison, WI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Privacy, Predictability or Serendipity and Digital Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the relationship of unplanned social interaction and the fear associated with current attitudes about cities, both place-based and digital. The symbiotic relationship of the physical and digital city is considered. Specifically, the ...

Gary Gumpert; Susan Drucker

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Digital Watermarking and Steganography, 2 edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital audio, video, images, and documents are flying through cyberspace to their respective owners. Unfortunately, along the way, individuals may choose to intervene and take this content for themselves. Digital watermarking and steganography technology ... Keywords: Networking, Security

Ingemar Cox; Matthew Miller; Jeffrey Bloom; Jessica Fridrich; Ton Kalker

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Digital cellular solids : reconfigurable composite materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital materials are comprised of a small number of types of discrete physical building blocks, which assemble to form constructions that meet the versatility and scalability of digital computation and communication ...

Cheung, Kenneth Chun-Wai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413