National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for digital sky survey

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Margon

    1998-08-19

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an ambitious, multi-institutional project to create a huge digital imaging and spectroscopic data bank of 25% of the celestial sphere, approximately 10,000 deg^2 centred on the north galactic polar cap. The photometric atlas will be in 5 specially-chosen colours, covering the pi ster of the Survey area to a limiting magnitude of r~23.1, on 0.4" pixels, resulting in a 1 Tpixel map. This data base will be automatically analysed to catalog the photometric and astrometric properties of 10^8 stellar images, 10^8 galaxies, and 10^6 colour-selected QSO candidates; the galaxy data will in addition include detailed morphological data. The photometric data are used to autonomously and homogeneously select objects for the spectroscopic survey, which will include spectra of 10^6 galaxies, 10^5 QSOs, and 10^5 unusual stars. Although the project was originally motivated by the desire to study Large Scale Structure, we anticipate that these data will impact virtually every field of astronomy, from Earth-crossing asteroids to QSOs at z>6. In particular, the ~12 TByte multi-colour, precision calibrated imaging archive should be a world resource for many decades of the next century.

  2. Photometry from online Digitized Sky Survey Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bacher; S. Kimeswenger; P. Teutsch

    2005-07-22

    Online Digital Sky Survey (DSS) material is often used to obtain information on newly discovered variable stars for older epochs (e.g. Nova progenitors, flare stars, ...). We present here the results of an investigation of photometry on online digital sky survey material in small fields calibrated by CCD sequences. We compared different source extraction mechanisms and found, that even down near to the sensitivity limit, despite the H-compression used for the online material, photometry with an accuracy better than 0\\fm1 rms is possible on DSS-II. Our investigation shows that the accuracy depends strongly on the source extraction method. The SuperCOSMOS scans, although retrieved with an higher spatial resolution, do not give us better results. The methods and parameters presented here, allow the user to obtain good plate photometry in small fields down to the Schmidt plate survey limits with a few bright CCD calibrators, which may be calibrated with amateur size telescopes. Especially for the events mentioned above, new field photometry for calibration purposes mostly exists, but the progenitors were not measured photometrically before. Also the follow up whether stellar concentrations are newly detected clusters or similar work may be done without using mid size telescopes. The calibration presented here is a "local" one for small fields. We show that this method presented here gives higher accuracies than "global" calibrations of surveys (e.g. GSC-II, SuperCOSMOS and USNO-B)

  3. The Palomar-Quest Digital Synoptic Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; C. Baltay; A. A. Mahabal; A. J. Drake; R. Williams; D. Rabinowitz; M. J. Graham; C. Donalek; E. Glikman; A. Bauer; R. Scalzo; N. Ellman; J. Jerke

    2008-01-21

    We describe briefly the Palomar-Quest (PQ) digital synoptic sky survey, including its parameters, data processing, status, and plans. Exploration of the time domain is now the central scientific and technological focus of the survey. To this end, we have developed a real-time pipeline for detection of transient sources. We describe some of the early results, and lessons learned which may be useful for other, similar projects, and time-domain astronomy in general. Finally, we discuss some issues and challenges posed by the real-time analysis and scientific exploitation of massive data streams from modern synoptic sky surveys.

  4. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  5. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

    2005-08-29

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  6. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  8. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT Citation...

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR1 was the first major data release, providing images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 5

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR5 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR2 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 4

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR4 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 3

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR3 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, D L; Richmond, M W; Annis, J; Smith, J A; Allam, S S; Rodgers, C T; Stute, J L; Adelman-McCarthy, J K; Brinkmann, J; Doi, M; Finkbeiner, D; Fukugita, M; Goldston, J; Greenway, B; Gunn, J E; Hendry, J S; Hogg, D W; Ichikawa, S I; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Lampeitl, H; Lee, B C; Lin, H; McKay, T A; Merrelli, A; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Richards, G T; Schlegel, D J; Stoughton, C; Uomoto, A; Yanny, B

    2006-01-01

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the s...

  18. COLORS AND KINEMATICS OF L DWARFS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Sarah J.

    We present a sample of 484 L dwarfs, 210 of which are newly discovered from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic database. We combine this sample with known L dwarfs to investigate their ...

  19. CORRELATIONS AMONG GALAXY PROPERTIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan, E-mail: zhongmu.li@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and History of Science and Technology, Dali University, Dali 671003 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies are complex systems with many properties. Correlations among galaxy properties can supply important clues for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using principal component analysis and least-squares fitting, this paper investigates the correlations among galactic parameters involving more properties (color, morphology, stellar population, and absolute magnitude) than previous studies. We use a volume-limited sample (whole sample) of 75,423 galaxies that was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 and divided into two subsamples (blue and red samples) using a critical color of (g - r) = 0.70 mag. In addition to recovering some previous results, we also obtain some new results. First, all separators for dividing galaxies into two groups can be related via good parameter-first principal component (PC1) correlations. A critical PC1 that indicates whether or not stellar age (or the evolution of a stellar population over time) is important can be used to separate galaxies. This suggests that a statistical parameter, PC1, is helpful in understanding the physical separators of galaxies. In addition, stellar age is shown to be unimportant for red galaxies, while both stellar age and mass are dominating parameters of blue galaxies. This suggests that the various numbers of dominating parameters of galaxies may result from the use of different samples. Finally, some parameters are shown to be correlated, and quantitative fits for a few correlations are obtained, e.g., log(t) = 8.57 + 1.65 (g - r) for the age (log t) and color (g - r) of blue galaxies and log (M{sub *}) = 4.31 - 0.30 M{sub r} for the stellar mass (log M{sub *}) and absolute magnitude (M{sub r}) of red galaxies. The median relationships between various parameter pairs are also presented for comparison.

  20. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  1. An Initial Survey of White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; J. Liebert; S. J. Kleinman; A. Nitta; S. F. Anderson; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; G. Schmidt; M. A. Strauss; D. Vanden Berk; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; N. M. Silvestri; A. Smith; P. Szkody; M. J. Collinge; C. C. Dahn; X. Fan; P. B. Hall; D. P. Schneider; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; J. E. Gunn; G. S. Hennessy; R. Hindsley; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. Q. Lamb; R. H. Lupton; R. C. Nichol; J. R. Pier; D. J. Schlegel; M. SubbaRao; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny; D. G. York

    2003-05-19

    An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15

  2. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.

  3. Automated Classification of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stellar Spectra using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdi Bazarghan; Ranjan Gupta

    2008-04-26

    Automated techniques have been developed to automate the process of classification of objects or their analysis. The large datasets provided by upcoming spectroscopic surveys with dedicated telescopes urges scientists to use these automated techniques for analysis of such large datasets which are now available to the community. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of such surveys releasing massive datasets. We use Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) for automatic classification of about 5000 SDSS spectra into 158 spectral type of a reference library ranging from O type to M type stars.

  4. Low-Mass Dwarf Template Spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Bochanski; Andrew A. West; Suzanne L. Hawley; Kevin R. Covey

    2006-10-20

    We present template spectra of low-mass (M0-L0) dwarfs derived from over 4,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. These composite spectra are suitable for use as medium-resolution (R ~ 1,800) radial velocity standards. We report mean spectral properties (molecular bandhead strengths,equivalent widths) and use the templates to investigate the effects of magnetic activity and metallicity on the spectroscopic and photometric properties of low-mass stars.

  5. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  6. Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2007-06-15

    The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

  7. Magnetic white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Gaensicke; F. Euchner; S. Jordan

    2002-08-26

    We have identified 7 new magnetic DA white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our selection strategy has also recovered all the previously known magnetic white dwarfs contained in the SDSS EDR, KUV03292+0035 and HE0330-0002. Analysing the SDSS fibre spectroscopy of the magnetic DA white dwarfs with our state-of-the-art model spectra, we find dipole field strengths 1.5<=B_d<=63MG and effective temperatures 8500<=Teff<=39000K. As a conservative estimate, we expect that the complete SDSS will increase the number of known magnetic white dwarfs by a factor 3.

  8. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Eric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 6, including Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (see www.sdss.org for general information) will map one-quarter of the entire sky and perform a redshift survey of galaxies, quasars and stars. The DR6 is the sixth major data release and provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download. It is the first data release of SDSS-II, an extension of the original SDSS consisting of three subprojects: Legacy, SEGUE and a Supernova survey. Be sure to check out the separate page for SEGUE also at http://classic.sdss.org/dr6/start/aboutsegue.html.

  10. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: A GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-03-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Co-add Data. We use the artificial neural network (ANN) technique to calculate the photo-z and the nearest neighbor error method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx}13 million objects classified as galaxies in the co-add with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx}83,000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey, the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3, the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph-Very Large Telescope Deep Survey, and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.031. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  11. An Efficient Algorithm for Positioning Tiles in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Blanton; R. H. Lupton; F. Miller Maley; N. Young; I. Zehavi; J. Loveday

    2001-05-30

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will observe around 10^6 spectra from targets distributed over an area of about 10,000 square degrees, using a multi-object fiber spectrograph which can simultaneously observe 640 objects in a circular field-of-view (referred to as a ``tile'') 1.49 degrees in radius. No two fibers can be placed closer than 55'' during the same observation; multiple targets closer than this distance are said to ``collide.'' We present here a method of allocating fibers to desired targets given a set of tile centers which includes the effects of collisions and which is nearly optimally efficient and uniform. Because of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution (which form the bulk of the SDSS targets), a naive covering the sky with equally-spaced tiles does not yield uniform sampling. Thus, we present a heuristic for perturbing the centers of the tiles from the equally-spaced distribution which provides more uniform completeness. For the SDSS sample, we can attain a sampling rate greater than 92% for all targets, and greater than 99% for the set of targets which do not collide with each other, with an efficiency greater than 90% (defined as the fraction of available fibers assigned to targets).

  12. The star formation histories of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Panter; Raul Jimenez; Alan F. Heavens; Stephane Charlot

    2007-04-24

    We present the results of a MOPED analysis of ~3 x 10^5 galaxy spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Three (SDSS DR3), with a number of improvements in data, modelling and analysis compared with our previous analysis of DR1. The improvements include: modelling the galaxies with theoretical models at a higher spectral resolution of 3\\AA; better calibrated data; an extended list of excluded emission lines, and a wider range of dust models. We present new estimates of the cosmic star formation rate, the evolution of stellar mass density and the stellar mass function from the fossil record. In contrast to our earlier work the results show no conclusive peak in the star formation rate out to a redshift around 2 but continue to show conclusive evidence for `downsizing' in the SDSS fossil record. The star formation history is now in good agreement with more traditional instantaneous measures. The galaxy stellar mass function is determined over five decades of mass, and an updated estimate of the current stellar mass density is presented. We also investigate the systematic effects of changes in the stellar population modelling, the spectral resolution, dust modelling, sky lines, spectral resolution and the change of data set. We find that the main changes in the results are due to the improvements in the calibration of the SDSS data, changes in the initial mass function and the theoretical models used.

  13. Bright Lyman Break Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Weinberg, D H; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of six compact, starburst galaxies with redshifts 2.3 < z < 2.8 and r-band magnitudes 19.8-20.5 in the Quasar Catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release (SDSS DR1). The SDSS spectra of these objects resemble the composite spectrum of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z \\approx 3, but the galaxies are 4-5 magnitudes brighter than an ``L*'' LBG and 2-3 magnitudes brighter than the most luminous objects in typical LBG spectroscopic surveys. Star formation rates inferred from the UV continuum luminosities are about 300-1000 M_sun yr^-1 with no correction for dust extinction. Such rates are similar to those inferred for ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but in these UV-bright objects the star formation is evidently not obscured by high dust column densities. The SDSS images show no evidence of multiple imaging or foreground lensing structures, but amplification by gravitational lensing (as in the case of MS 1512-cB58) cannot be ruled out with the present data. Assuming tha...

  14. RELATIVE ORIENTATION OF PAIRS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxton, Jesse; Ryden, Barbara S., E-mail: buxton.45@osu.edu, E-mail: ryden@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    From our study of binary spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find that the relative orientation of disks in binary spiral galaxies is consistent with their being drawn from a random distribution of orientations. For 747 isolated pairs of luminous disk galaxies, the distribution of {phi}, the angle between the major axes of the galaxy images, is consistent with a uniform distribution on the interval [0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign ]. With the assumption that the disk galaxies are oblate spheroids, we can compute cos {beta}, where {beta} is the angle between the rotation axes of the disks. In the case that one galaxy in the binary is face-on or edge-on, the tilt ambiguity is resolved, and cos {beta} can be computed unambiguously. For 94 isolated pairs with at least one face-on member, and for 171 isolated pairs with at least one edge-on member, the distribution of cos {beta} is statistically consistent with the distribution of cos i for isolated disk galaxies. This result is consistent with random orientations of the disks within pairs.

  15. Morphological Classification of Galaxies by Shapelet Decomposition in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon C. Kelly; Timothy A. McKay

    2003-10-16

    We describe application of the `shapelet' linear decomposition of galaxy images to morphological classification using images of $\\sim$ 3000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After decomposing the galaxies we perform a principal component analysis to reduce the number of dimensions of the shapelet space to nine. We find that each of these nine principal components contains unique morphological information, and give a description of each principal component's contribution to a galaxy's morphology. We find that galaxies of differing Hubble type separate cleanly in the shapelet space. We apply a Gaussian mixture model to the 9-dimensional space spanned by the principal components and use the results as a basis for classification. Using the mixture model, we separate galaxies into seven classes and give a description of each class's physical and morphological properties. We find that several of the mixture model classes correlate well with the traditional Hubble types both in their morphology and their physical parameters (e.g., color, velocity dispersions, etc.). In addition, we find an additional class of late-type morphology but with high velocity dispersions and very blue color; most of these galaxies exhibit post-starburst activity. This method provides an objective and quantitative alternative to traditional and subjective visual classification.

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mouyuan; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the MgII and Hbeta broad emission lines and UV/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over $6$ months, containing 357 quasars with MgII and 41 quasars with Hbeta . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional $2854$ quasars with MgII and 572 quasars with Hbeta. The MgII emission line is significantly variable ($\\Delta f/f$ 10% on 100-day timescales), indicating that it is feasible to use the broad MgII line for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of $\\gtrsim 5$ days. We compare the emission-line and...

  17. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Hippel, Ted von [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Physical Sciences, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [University of Oklahoma, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Liebert, James W. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Williams, Kurtis A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, P.O. Box 3011, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); DeGenarro, Steven [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Jeffery, Elizabeth, E-mail: jam@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com, E-mail: kurtis.williams@tamuc.edu, E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com, E-mail: ejeffery@byu.edu [BYU Department of Physics and Astronomy, N283 ESC, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup ?1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup ?1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup ?1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup ?1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  18. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  19. New white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepler, S O; Koester, Detlev; Ourique, Gustavo; Romero, Alejandra Daniela; Reindl, Nicole; Kleinman, Scot J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Valois, A Dean M; Amaral, Larissa A

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 6576 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for carbon dominated spectra DQs. We found one central star of a planetary nebula, one ultra-compact helium binary (AM CVn), one oxygen line dominated white dwarf, 15 hot DO/PG1159s, 12 new cataclysmic variables, 36 magnetic white dwarf stars, 54 DQs, 115 helium dominated white dwarfs, 148 white dwarf+main sequence star binaries, 236 metal polluted white dwarfs, 300 continuum spectra DCs, 230 hot subdwarfs, 2936 new hydrogen dominated white dwarf stars, and 2675 cool hydrogen dominated subdwarf stars. We calculate the mass distribution of all 5883 DAs with S/N>15 in DR12, including the ones in DR7 and DR10, with an average S/N=26, correc...

  20. Variability of QSOs with variable regions in broad absorption troughs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Cheng; Jiang, Xiao-Lei; Ge, Xue

    2015-01-01

    The variability of broad absorption lines is investigated for a sample of 188 broad-absorption-line (BAL) quasars (QSOs) ($z > 1.7$) with at least two-epoch observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), covering a time-scale of about 0.001 -- 3 years in the rest frame. Considering only the longest time-scale between epochs for each QSO, 73 variable regions in the \\civ BAL troughs are detected for 43 BAL QSOs. The proportion of BAL QSOs showing variable regions increases with longer time-interval than about 1 year in the rest frame. The velocity width of variable regions is narrow compared to the BAL-trough outflow velocity. For 43 BAL QSOs with variable regions, it is found that there is a medium strong correlation between the variation of the continuum luminosity at 1500 \\AA\\ and the variation of the spectral index. With respect to the total 188 QSOs, larger proportion of BAL QSOs with variable regions appears bluer during their brighter phases, which implies that the origin of BA...

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  2. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Boroson, Todd A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  3. Morphological Classification of Galaxies by Shapelet Decomposition in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II: Multiwavelength Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Kelly; T. A. McKay

    2004-12-15

    We describe the application of the `shapelet' linear decomposition of galaxy images to multi-wavelength morphological classification using the $u,g,r,i,$ and $z$-band images of 1519 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We utilize elliptical shapelets to remove to first-order the effect of inclination on morphology. After decomposing the galaxies we perform a principal component analysis on the shapelet coefficients to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral morphological parameter space. We give a description of each of the first ten principal component's contribution to a galaxy's spectral morphology. We find that galaxies of different broad Hubble type separate cleanly in the principal component space. We apply a mixture of Gaussians model to the 2-dimensional space spanned by the first two principal components and use the results as a basis for classification. Using the mixture model, we separate galaxies into three classes and give a description of each class's physical and morphological properties. We find that the two dominant mixture model classes correspond to early and late type galaxies, respectively. The third class has, on average, a blue, extended core surrounded by a faint red halo, and typically exhibits some asymmetry. We compare our method to a simple cut on $u-r$ color and find the shapelet method to be superior in separating galaxies. Furthermore, we find evidence that the $u-r=2.22$ decision boundary may not be optimal for separation between early and late type galaxies, and suggest that the optimal cut may be $u-r \\sim 2.4$.

  4. A plausible (overlooked) super-luminous supernova in the Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Koz?owski, Szymon; Wyrzykowski, ?ukasz [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Koposov, Sergey, E-mail: zkostrzewa@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wyrzykow@astrouw.edu.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    We present the discovery of a plausible super-luminous supernova (SLSN), found in the archival data of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, called PSN 000123+000504. The supernova (SN) peaked at m {sub g} < 19.4 mag in the second half of 2005 September, but was missed by the real-time SN hunt. The observed part of the light curve (17 epochs) showed that the rise to the maximum took over 30 days, while the decline time lasted at least 70 days (observed frame), closely resembling other SLSNe of SN 2007bi type. The spectrum of the host galaxy reveals a redshift of z = 0.281 and the distance modulus of ? = 40.77 mag. Combining this information with the SDSS photometry, we found the host galaxy to be an LMC-like irregular dwarf galaxy with an absolute magnitude of M{sub B} = –18.2 ± 0.2 mag and an oxygen abundance of 12+log?[O/H]=8.3±0.2; hence, the SN peaked at M {sub g} < –21.3 mag. Our SLSN follows the relation for the most energetic/super-luminous SNe exploding in low-metallicity environments, but we found no clear evidence for SLSNe to explode in low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies only. The available information on the PSN 000123+000504 light curve suggests the magnetar-powered model as a likely scenario of this event. This SLSN is a new addition to a quickly growing family of super-luminous SNe.

  5. Properties of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Barber; A. Meiksin; T. Murphy

    2006-11-02

    We perform population synthesis modelling of a magnitude-limited sample of 4391 Luminous Red Galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4). We fit measured spectral indices using a large library of high resolution spectra, covering a wide range of metallicities and assuming an exponentially decaying star-formation rate punctuated by bursts, to obtain median-likelihood estimates for the light-weighted age, metallicity, stellar mass and extinction for the galaxies. The ages lie in the range 4-10 Gyr, peaking near 6 Gyr, with metallicities in the range -0.4<[Z/H]<0.4, peaking at [Z/H] ~ 0.2. Only a few per cent of the spectra are better fit allowing for a burst in addition to continuous star-formation. The total stellar masses of all the galaxies are confined to a very narrow range. Our results broadly agree with those of previous groups using an independent population synthesis code. We find, however, that our choice in priors results in ages 1-2 Gyr smaller, decreasing the peak star formation epoch from z=2.3 to z=1.3. We develop a metal evolution model incorporating stochastic star-formation quenching motivated by recent attempts to solve the `anti-hierarchical' formation problem of ellipticals. Two scenarios emerge, a closed box with an effective stellar yield of 0.26, and an accreting box with an effective stellar yield of 0.10. Both scenarios require an IMF weighted towards massive stars and characteristic star-formation quenching times of about 100 Myr, the expected lifetime of luminous QSOs. The models predict an anti-correlation between the age and mean metallicity similar to that observed.

  6. The Mass Function of the Stellar Component of Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Panter; Alan Heavens; Raul Jimenez

    2004-06-11

    Using the MOPED algorithm we determine non-parametrically the Stellar Mass Function of 96,545 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release one. By using the reconstructed spectrum due to starlight we can eliminate contamination from either emission lines or AGN components. Our results give excellent agreement with previous works, but extend their range by more than two decades in mass to 10^{7.5} < M_s/h^{-2}M_\\odot < 10^{12}. We present both a standard Schechter fit and a fit modified to include an extra, high-mass contribution, possibly from cluster cD galaxies. The Schechter fit parameters are $\\phi^*=(7.7\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-3} h^3 Mpc^{-3}$, $M^*=(7.53 \\pm 0.04) \\times 10^{10} h^{-2}M_\\odot$ and $\\alpha=-1.167\\pm 0.004$. Our sample also yields an estimate for the contribution from baryons in stars to the critical density of $\\Omega_{b*}h=(2.40 \\pm 0.04) \\times 10^{-3}$, in good agreement with other indicators. Error bars are statistical and a Salpeter IMF is assumed throughout. We find no evolution of the mass function in the redshift range $0.05 < z < 0.34$ indicating that almost all present day stars were already formed at $z \\sim 0.34$ with little or no star formation activity since then and that the evolution seen in the luminosity function must be largely due to stellar fading.

  7. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Berrier, Joel C.; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  8. Red giant stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. The general field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.; Nissen, P. E.; Wei, P. E-mail: pen@phys.au.dk

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained a sample of ?22,000 red giant branch (RGB) stars based on stellar parameters, provided by the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the CH(G)/MgH indices, measured from the included spectra. The Galactic rest-frame velocity of V {sub gsr} versus longitude for the sample shows the existence of several groups of stars from globular clusters and known streams. Excluding these substructures, a sample of ?16,000 RGB stars from the general field is used to investigate the properties of the thick disk, the inner halo, and the outer halo of our Galaxy. The metallicity and rotational velocity distributions are investigated for stars at 0 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. It is found that the canonical thick disk dominates at 0 kpc < |Z| < 2 kpc and its contribution becomes negligible at |Z| > 3 kpc. The MWTD is present and overlaps with the inner halo at 1 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc. The inner halo starts at 2 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc and becomes the dominated population for 4 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. For halo stars with |Z| > 5 kpc, bimodal metallicity distributions are found for 20 kpc < |Z| < 25 kpc and 35 kpc < RR < 45 kpc, which suggests a dual halo, the inner and the outer halo, as reported in Carollo et al. at low |Z| values. The peak of metallicity for the inner halo is at [Fe/H] ? –1.6 and appears to be at [Fe/H] ? –2.3 for the outer halo. The transition point from the inner to the outer halo is located at |Z| ? 20 kpc and RR ? 35 kpc.

  9. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

  10. Taxonomy of asteroid families among the Jupiter Trojans: Comparison between spectroscopic data and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey colors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Roig; A. O. Ribeiro; R. Gil-Hutton

    2007-12-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the spectral slope and color distributions of Jupiter Trojans, with particular attention to asteroid families. We use a sample of data from the Moving Object Catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, together with spectra obtained from several surveys. A first sample of 349 observations, corresponding to 250 Trojan asteroids, were extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and we also extracted from the literature a second sample of 91 spectra, corresponding to 71 Trojans. The spectral slopes were computed by means of a least-squares fit to a straight line of the fluxes obtained from the Sloan observations in the first sample, and of the rebinned spectra in the second sample. In both cases the reflectance fluxes/spectra were renormalized to 1 at 6230 $\\textrm{\\AA}$. We found that the distribution of spectral slopes among Trojan asteroids shows a bimodality. About 2/3 of the objects have reddish slopes compatible with D-type asteroids, while the remaining bodies show less reddish colors compatible with the P-type and C-type classifications. The members of asteroid families also show a bimodal distribution with a very slight predominance of D-type asteroids, but the background is clearly dominated by the D-types. The L4 and L5 swarms show different distributions of spectral slopes, and bimodality is only observed in L4. These differences can be attributed to the asteroid families since the backgraound asteroids show the same slope distribtuions in both swarms. The analysis of individual families indicates that the families in L5 are taxonomically homogeneous, but in L4 they show a mixture of taxonomic types. We discuss a few scenarios that might help to interpret these results.

  11. The Eleventh and Twelfth Data Releases of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final Data from SDSS-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Shadab; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F; Anderson, Scott F; Andrews, Brett H; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E; Beaton, Rachael L; Bender, Chad F; Berlind, Andreas A; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A Shelden; Brandt, W N; Brauer, D E; Brinkmann, J; Brown, Peter J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A C; Cuesta, Antonio J; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N; Da Rio, Nicola; Davenport, James R A; Dawson, Kyle S; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L; Edmondson, Edward M; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, J G; García-Hernández, D A; Pérez, Ana E García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Hernández, Jonay I González; Grebel, Eva K; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P; Lam, Charles R; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H; Mack, Claude E; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Majewski, Steven R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L; McBride, Cameron K; McGehee, Peregrine M; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D; Newman, Jeffrey A; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C; Nidever, David L; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; O'Connell, Julia E; O'Connell, Robert W; O'Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Audrey E; Oravetz, Daniel J; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K; Park, Changbom; Pâris, Isabelle; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Pinsonneault, Marc H; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Raddick, M Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C; Rockosi, Constance M; Rodrigues, Thaíse S; Rodríguez-Rottes, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Schlegel, David J; Schmidt, Sarah J; Schneider, Donald P; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D; Scóccola, C G; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Skrutskie, M F; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V; Sobreira, Flávia; Stassun, Keivan G; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Tan, Jonathan C; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P; Wake, David A; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Weiner, Benjamin J; White, Martin; Wilson, John C; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2015-01-01

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 sq. deg of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 s...

  12. The eleventh and twelfth data releases of the Sload Digital Sky Survey: final data from SDSS-III

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alam, S.; Slosar, A.; Albareti, F. D.; Prieto, C. A.; Anders, F.

    2015-07-01

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12more »adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg2 of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg2 of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg2; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.« less

  13. Co-evolution of Extreme Star Formation and Quasar: hints from {\\it Herschel} and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Using the public data from the Herschel very wide field surveys, we study the far-infrared properties of optical-selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Within the common area of $\\sim 172~deg^2$, we have identified the far-infrared counterparts for 372 quasars, among which 134 are highly secure detections in the Herschel 250$\\mu$m band (signal-to-noise ratios $\\geq 5$). This sample is the largest far-infrared quasar sample of its kind, and spans a wide redshift range of $0.14\\leq z \\leq 4.7$. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions are consistent with heated dust emission due to active star formation, and the vast majority of them ($\\gtrsim 80$\\%) have total infrared luminosities $L_{IR}>10^{12}L_{\\odot}$ and thus qualify as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. Their infrared luminosities are not correlated with the absolute magnitudes or the black hole masses of the quasars, which further support the interpretation that their far-infrared emissions are not due to their active galactic nucl...

  14. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. IV. STATISTICAL LENS SAMPLE FROM THE FIFTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Fukugita, Masataka; Strauss, Michael A.; Gott, J. Richard; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Becker, Robert H.; Gregg, Michael D.; White, Richard L.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Chiu, Kuenley; Johnston, David E.; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Frieman, Joshua A.

    2010-08-15

    We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i < 19.1 in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1'' < {theta} < 20'' and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, three have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.84{sup +0.06}{sub -0.08}(stat.){sup +0.09}{sub -0.07}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of seven binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.''1 to 16.''6, which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.

  15. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Angstroem break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meusinger, H; Mirhosseini, A; Pertermann, F

    2016-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered a few unusual quasars with a characteristic break in the continuum around 3000 A that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for a systematical search for quasars with such properties in the SDSS spectra archive. We constructed a sample of 23 quasars classified as 3000 A break quasars and two comparison samples of quasars with similar properties, to some extent, but also showing typical BAL features. We computed ensemble-averaged broad-band SEDs based on archival data from SDSS, GALEX, 2MASS, UKIDSS, and WISE. The SEDs were corrected for intrinsic dust absorption by the comparison with the average SED of normal quasars. The de-reddened arithmetic median composite SED of the 3000 A break quasars is found to be indistinguishable from that of the unusual BAL quasars. We conclude that 3000 A break quasars are most likely extreme...

  16. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and ?-ray blazar candidates in the Sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the ?-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and ?-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the ?-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  17. Search for Extremely Metal-poor Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (II): high electron temperature objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Morales-Luis, A B; Munoz-Tunon, C; Garcia-Benito, R; Nuza, S E; Kitaura, F S

    2016-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor (XMP) galaxies are defined to have gas-phase metallicity smaller than a tenth of the solar value (12 + log[O/H] < 7.69). They are uncommon, chemically and possibly dynamically primitive, with physical conditions characteristic of earlier phases of the Universe. We search for new XMPs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in a work that complements Paper I. This time high electron temperature objects are selected; since metals are a main coolant of the gas, metal- poor objects contain high-temperature gas. Using the algorithm k-means, we classify 788677 spectra to select 1281 galaxies having particularly intense [OIII]4363 with respect to [OIII]5007, which is a proxy for high electron temperature. The metallicity of these candidates was computed using a hybrid technique consistent with the direct method, rendering 196 XMPs. A less restrictive noise constraint provides a larger set with 332 candidates. Both lists are provided in electronic format. The selected XMP sample have mean stell...

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, Masamune; et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  19. Color-magnitude distribution of face-on nearby galaxies in Sloan digital sky survey DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shuo-Wen; Feng, Long-Long; Gu, Qiusheng; Huang, Song; Shi, Yong

    2014-05-20

    We have analyzed the distributions in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of a large sample of face-on galaxies to minimize the effect of dust extinctions on galaxy color. About 300,000 galaxies with log (a/b) < 0.2 and redshift z < 0.2 are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog. Two methods are employed to investigate the distributions of galaxies in the CMD, including one-dimensional (1D) Gaussian fitting to the distributions in individual magnitude bins and two-dimensional (2D) Gaussian mixture model (GMM) fitting to galaxies as a whole. We find that in the 1D fitting, two Gaussians are not enough to fit galaxies with the excess present between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The fitting to this excess defines the center of the green valley in the local universe to be (u – r){sub 0.1} = –0.121M {sub r,} 0{sub .1} – 0.061. The fraction of blue cloud and red sequence galaxies turns over around M {sub r,} {sub 0.1} ? –20.1 mag, corresponding to stellar mass of 3 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. For the 2D GMM fitting, a total of four Gaussians are required, one for the blue cloud, one for the red sequence, and the additional two for the green valley. The fact that two Gaussians are needed to describe the distributions of galaxies in the green valley is consistent with some models that argue for two different evolutionary paths from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  20. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krughoff, K. S.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Frieman, Joshua; SubbaRao, Mark; Kilper, Gary; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-10

    Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \\simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  1. Mining the Sloan digital sky survey in search of extremely ?-poor stars in the galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Q. F.; Zhao, G., E-mail: qfxing@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-07-20

    As we know, the majority of metal-poor Galactic halo stars appear to have chemical abundances that were enhanced by ?-elements (e.g., O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti) during the early stage of the Galaxy. Observed metal-poor halo stars preserved this pattern by exhibiting abundance ratios [?/Fe] ?+0.4. A few striking exceptions that show severe departures from the general enhanced ?-element chemical abundance trends of the halo have been discovered in recent years. They possess relatively low [?/Fe] compared to other comparable-metallicity stars, with abundance ratios over 0.5 dex lower. These stars may have a different chemical enrichment history from the majority of the halo. Similarly, low-? abundances are also displayed by satellite dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We present a method to select extremely ?-poor (EAP) stars from the SDSS/SEGUE survey. The method consists of a two-step approach. In the first step, we select suspected metal-poor ([Fe/H] <–0.5) and ?-poor ([Mg/Fe] <0) stars as our targets. In the second step, we determine [Mg/Fe] from low-resolution (R = 2000) stellar spectra for our targets and select stars with [Mg/Fe] <–0.1 as candidate EAP stars. In a sample of 40,000 stars with atmospheric parameters in the range of T{sub eff} = [4500, 7000] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0], and [Fe/H] = [–4.0, +0.5], 14 candidate stars were identified. Three of these stars are found to have already been confirmed by other research.

  2. A search for planetary Nebulae with the Sloan digital sky survey: the outer regions of M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniazev, Alexei Y. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9 7935 (South Africa); Grebel, Eva K.; Martínez-Delgado, David [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Zucker, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Snedden, Stephanie A., E-mail: akniazev@saao.ac.za [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to identify planetary nebula (PN) candidates in imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This method exploits the SDSS's five-band sampling of emission lines in PN spectra, which results in a color signature distinct from that of other sources. Selection criteria based on this signature can be applied to nearby galaxies in which PNe appear as point sources. We applied these criteria to the whole area of M31 as scanned by the SDSS, selecting 167 PN candidates that are located in the outer regions of M31. The spectra of 80 selected candidates were then observed with the 2.2 m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory. These observations and cross-checks with literature data show that our method has a selection rate efficiency of about 90%, but the efficiency is different for the different groups of PN candidates. In the outer regions of M31, PNe trace different well-known morphological features like the Northern Spur, the NGC 205 Loop, the G1 Clump, etc. In general, the distribution of PNe in the outer region 8 < R < 20 kpc along the minor axis shows the {sup e}xtended disk{sup —}a rotationally supported low surface brightness structure with an exponential scale length of 3.21 ± 0.14 kpc and a total mass of ?10{sup 10} M {sub ?}, which is equivalent to the mass of M33. We report the discovery of three PN candidates with projected locations in the center of Andromeda NE, a very low surface brightness giant stellar structure in the outer halo of M31. Two of the PNe were spectroscopically confirmed as genuine PNe. These two PNe are located at projected distances along the major axis of ?48 Kpc and ?41 Kpc from the center of M31 and are the most distant PNe in M31 found up to now. With the new PN data at hand we see the obvious kinematic connection between the continuation of the Giant Stream and the Northern Spur. We suggest that 20%-30% of the stars in the Northern Spur area may belong to the Giant Stream. In our data we also see a possible kinematic connection between the Giant Stream and PNe in Andromeda NE, suggesting that Andromeda NE could be the core or remnant of the Giant Stream. Using PN data we estimate the total mass of the Giant Stream progenitor to be ?10{sup 9} M {sub ?}. About 90% of its stars appear to have been lost during the interaction with M31.

  3. Galactic Globular and Open Clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Crowded Field Photometry and Cluster Fiducial Sequences in ugriz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deokkeun An; Jennifer A. Johnson; James L. Clem; Brian Yanny; Constance M. Rockosi; Heather L. Morrison; Paul Harding; James E. Gunn; Carlos Allende Prieto; Timothy C. Beers; Kyle M. Cudworth; Inese I. Ivans; Zeljko Ivezic; Young Sun Lee; Robert H. Lupton; Dmitry Bizyaev; Howard Brewington; Elena Malanushenko; Viktor Malanushenko; Dan Oravetz; Kaike Pan; Audrey Simmons; Stephanie Snedden; Shannon Watters; Donald G. York

    2008-07-31

    We present photometry for globular and open cluster stars observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In order to exploit over 100 million stellar objects with r photometry for 17 globular clusters and 3 open clusters in a SDSS value-added catalog. Our photometry and cluster fiducial sequences are on the native SDSS 2.5-meter ugriz photometric system, and the fiducial sequences can be directly applied to the SDSS photometry without relying upon any transformations. Model photometry for red giant branch and main-sequence stars obtained by Girardi et al. cannot be matched simultaneously to fiducial sequences; their colors differ by ~0.02-0.05 mag. Good agreement (< ~0.02 mag in colors) is found with Clem et al. empirical fiducial sequences in u'g'r'i'z' when using the transformation equations in Tucker et al.

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: First Broad-line Hbeta and MgII Lags at z>~0.3 from six-Month Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yue; Grier, C J; Peterson, Bradley M; Denney, Kelly D; Trump, Jonathan R; Sun, Mouyuan; Brandt, W N; Kochanek, Christopher S; Dawson, Kyle S; Green, Paul J; Greene, Jenny E; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; McGreer, Ian D; Petitjean, Patrick; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A; Tao, Charling; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zu, Ying; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Ge, Jian; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Reverberation mapping (RM) measurements of broad-line region (BLR) lags in z>0.3 quasars are important for directly measuring black hole masses in these distant objects, but so far there have been limited attempts and success given the practical difficulties of RM in this regime. Here we report preliminary results of 15 BLR lag measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project, a dedicated RM program with multi-object spectroscopy designed for RM over a wide redshift range. The lags are based on the 2014 spectroscopic light curves alone (32 epochs over 6 months) and focus on the Hbeta and MgII broad lines in the 100 lowest-redshift (z0.3 is not yet possible due to the limitations in our current lag sample and selection biases inherent to our program. Our results demonstrate the general feasibility and potential of multi-object RM for z>0.3 quasars, and motivate more intensive spectroscopic and photometric monitoring to derive high-quality lag measurements for these objects...

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. III Constraints on Dark Energy From The Third Data Release Quasar Lens Catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, M; Inada, N; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Becker, R H; Fukugita, M; Gregg, M D; Hall, P B; Hennawi, J F; Johnston, D E; Kayo, I; Keeton, C R; Pindor, B; Shin, M; Turner, E; White, R L; York, D G; Anderson, S F; Bahcall, N A; Brunner, R J; Burles, S; Castander, F J; Chiu, K; Clocchiatti, A; Einsenstein, D; Frieman, J; Kawano, Y; Lupton, R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S

    2007-09-12

    We present cosmological results from the statistics of lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. By taking proper account of the selection function, we compute the expected number of quasars lensed by early-type galaxies and their image separation distribution assuming a flat universe, which is then compared with 7 lenses found in the SDSS Data Release 3 to derive constraints on dark energy under strictly controlled criteria. For a cosmological constant model (w = -1) we obtain {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.74{sub -0.15}{sup +0.11}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.13}(syst.). Allowing w to be a free parameter we find {Omega}{sub M} = 0.26{sub -0.06}{sup +0.07}(stat.){sub -0.05}{sup +0.03}(syst.) and w = -1.1 {+-} 0.6(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.3}(syst.) when combined with the constraint from the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample. Our results are in good agreement with earlier lensing constraints obtained using radio lenses, and provide additional confirmation of the presence of dark energy consistent with a cosmological constant, derived independently of type Ia supernovae.

  6. A Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarf Stars in the First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Kleinman; Hugh C. Harris; Daniel J. Eisenstein; James Liebert; Atsuko Nitta; Jurek Krzesi?ski; Jeffrey A. Munn; Conard C. Dahn; Suzanne L. Hawley; Jeffrey R. Pier; Gary Schmidt; Nicole M. Silvestri; J. Allyn Smith; Paula Szkody; Michael A. Strauss; G. R. Knapp; Matthew J. Collinge; A. S. Mukadam; D. Koester; Alan Uomoto; D. J. Schlegel; Scott F. Anderson; J. Brinkmann; D. Q. Lamb; Donald P. Schneider; Donald G. York

    2004-02-12

    We present the full spectroscopic white dwarf and hot subdwarf sample from the SDSS first data release, DR1. We find 2551 white dwarf stars of various types, 240 hot subdwarf stars, and an additional 144 objects we have identified as uncertain white dwarf stars. Of the white dwarf stars, 1888 are non-magnetic DA types and 171, non-magnetic DBs. The remaining (492) objects consist of all different types of white dwarf stars: DO, DQ, DC, DH, DZ, hybrid stars like DAB, etc., and those with non-degenerate companions. We fit the DA and DB spectra with a grid of models to determine the Teff and log(g) for each object. For all objects, we provide coordinates, proper motions, SDSS photometric magnitudes, and enough information to retrieve the spectrum/image from the SDSS public database. This catalog nearly doubles the known sample of spectroscopically-identified white dwarf stars. In the DR1 imaged area of the sky, we increase the known sample of white dwarf stars by a factor of 8.5. We also comment on several particularly interesting objects in this sample.

  7. Galaxy clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) : A first comparison with the APM Galaxy Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Gaztanaga

    2001-10-09

    We compare the large scale galaxy clustering in the new SDSS early data release (EDR) with the clustering in the APM Galaxy Survey. We cut out pixel maps (identical in size and shape) from the SDSS and APM data to allow a direct comparison of the clustering. Here we concentrate our analysis on an equatorial SDSS strip in the South Galactic Cap (EDR/SGC) with 166 deg^2, 2.5 wide and 65 degrees long. Only galaxies with Petrosian magnitudes 16.8

  8. The Digital Sky Project: Prototyping Virtual Observatory Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J Brunner; T. Prince; J. Good; T. Handley; C. Lonsdale; S. G. Djorgovski

    2000-11-10

    Astronomy is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are in production. The resulting datasets are truly remarkable in their own right; however, a revolutionary step arises in the aggregation of complimentary multi-wavelength surveys (i.e., the cross-identification of a billion sources). The federation of these large datasets is already underway, and is producing a major paradigm shift as Astronomy has suddenly become an immensely data-rich field. This new paradigm will enable quantitatively and qualitatively new science, from statistical studies of our Galaxy and the large-scale structure in the universe, to discoveries of rare, unusual, or even completely new types of astronomical objects and phenomena. Federating and then exploring these large datasets, however, is an extremely challenging task. The Digital Sky project was initiated with this task in mind and is working to develop the techniques and technologies necessary to solve the problems inherent in federating these large databases, as well as the mining of the resultant aggregate data.

  9. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85725 (United States); Howell, Steve B., E-mail: ridgway@noao.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, P.O. Box 1, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ?10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ?3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ?1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  10. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilerci Eser, E., E-mail: ecekilerci@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Goto, T. [National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Doi, Y., E-mail: tomo@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ? 1; their offset from the z ? 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ? 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  11. Dusty WDs in the WISE all sky survey ? SDSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Sara D.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: barber@nhn.ou.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    A recent cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 White Dwarf Catalog with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 ?m performed by Debes et al. resulted in the discovery of 52 candidate dusty white dwarfs (WDs). However, the 6'' WISE beam allows for the possibility that many of the excesses exhibited by these WDs may be due to contamination from a nearby source. We present MMT+SAO Wide-Field InfraRed Camera J- and H-band imaging observations (0.''5-1.''5 point spread function) of 16 of these candidate dusty WDs and confirm that four have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) consistent with a dusty disk and are not accompanied by a nearby source contaminant. The remaining 12 WDs have contaminated WISE photometry and SEDs inconsistent with a dusty disk when the contaminating sources are not included in the photometry measurements. We find the frequency of disks around single WDs in the WISE ? SDSS sample to be 2.6%-4.1%. One of the four new dusty WDs has a mass of 1.04 M {sub ?} (progenitor mass 5.4 M {sub ?}) and its discovery offers the first confirmation that massive WDs (and their massive progenitor stars) host planetary systems.

  12. New Approaches to Object Classification in Synoptic Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Donalek; A. Mahabal; S. G. Djorgovski; S. Marney; A. Drake; E. Glikman; M. J. Graham; R. Williams

    2008-10-27

    Digital synoptic sky surveys pose several new object classification challenges. In surveys where real-time detection and classification of transient events is a science driver, there is a need for an effective elimination of instrument-related artifacts which can masquerade as transient sources in the detection pipeline, e.g., unremoved large cosmic rays, saturation trails, reflections, crosstalk artifacts, etc. We have implemented such an Artifact Filter, using a supervised neural network, for the real-time processing pipeline in the Palomar-Quest (PQ) survey. After the training phase, for each object it takes as input a set of measured morphological parameters and returns the probability of it being a real object. Despite the relatively low number of training cases for many kinds of artifacts, the overall artifact classification rate is around 90%, with no genuine transients misclassified during our real-time scans. Another question is how to assign an optimal star-galaxy classification in a multi-pass survey, where seeing and other conditions change between different epochs, potentially producing inconsistent classifications for the same object. We have implemented a star/galaxy multipass classifier that makes use of external and a priori knowledge to find the optimal classification from the individually derived ones. Both these techniques can be applied to other, similar surveys and data sets.

  13. Cosmology using the Parkes Multibeam Southern-Sky HI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Thomas

    1996-07-02

    I discuss the implications of the Parkes HI Multibeam Southern Sky Survey for cosmology. It will determine the local mass function of HI clouds, detecting several hundred per decade of mass. Each of these will come with a redshift and, for the more massive clouds, an estimate of the velocity width. This will provide an ideal database for peculiar motion studies and for measurements of biasing of galaxies relative to the underlying matter distribution.

  14. Reliability of radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Takahiro; Daishido, Tsuneaki; Tanaka, Tai; Nakao, Ryota; Nomura, Naomi; Sugisawa, Kentaro; Niinuma, Kotaro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kida, Sumiko

    2014-01-20

    This article reports on the reliability of 11 radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey. We derived false detection rates and evaluated the statistical significance of each transient source. A single source, labeled WJN J1443+3439, was statistically significant at the 10{sup –5} significance level; the other 10 sources were insignificant. On the basis of this single detection, the sky surface density of live radio transients was estimated to be 2{sub ?1.9}{sup +9}×10{sup ?6} deg{sup ?2} at a flux density above 3 Jy and a frequency of 1.42 GHz. Since this result is comparable with other survey results and known transients, WJN J1443+3439 could not be excluded. The sky surface density supported a power-law distribution of source count versus flux density. For transient events, the power-law exponent was approximately –3/2. These results are expected to assist radio variable/transient surveys in next-generation facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  15. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) I. Survey description and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, G H; Orrú, E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Ferrari, C; Hardcastle, M J; Jurusik, W; Macario, G; Mulcahy, D; Rafferty, D; Asgekar, A; Brentjens, M; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Toribio, M C; Adebahr, B; Arts, M; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Bray, J; Broderick, J; Cantwell, T; Carroll, P; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Croston, J; Daiboo, S; de Gasperin, F; Gregson, J; Harwood, J; Hassall, T; Heesen, V; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Iacobelli, M; Jeli?, V; Jones, D; Kant, D; Kokotanekov, G; Martin, P; McKean, J P; Morabito, L K; Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pratley, L; Riseley, C; Rowlinson, A; Sabater, J; Scaife, A M M; Scheers, L H A; Sendlinger, K; Shulevski, A; Sipior, M; Sobey, C; Stewart, A J; Stroe, A; Swinbank, J; Tasse, C; Trüstedt, J; Varenius, E; van Velzen, S; Vilchez, N; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Williams, W L; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Wise, M; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Deller, A; Dettmar, R J; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Holties, H A; Intema, H; Jackson, N J; Jütte, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W F A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J...

  16. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Daniel Kumar

    2009-01-06

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based observations as well as (2) techniques to quickly estimate the distances of quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Learning methods considered include genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimisation, artificial neural networks, and radial basis function networks. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates that GAs and PSO can both be efficiently used to model functions that are highly non-linear in several dimensions. It is subsequently demonstrated in the second part that ANNs and RBFNs can be used as effective predictors of spectroscopic redshift given accurate photometry, especially in combination with other learning-based approaches described in the literature. Careful application of these and other ML techniques to problems in astronomy and astrophysics will contribute to a better understanding of stellar evolution, binary star systems, cosmology, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

  17. Proposed (to) EXIST: Hard X-ray Imaging All Sky Survey/Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Grindlay; T. A. Prince; F. Harrison; N. Gehrels; C. J. Hailey; B. Ramsey; M. C. Weisskopf; G. K. Skinner; P. Ubertini

    1998-01-01

    The hard x-ray (10-600 keV) sky is inherently time variable and yet has neither been surveyed nor monitored with a sensitive imaging telescope. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a mission concept, proposed for MIDEX, which would conduct the first imaging all-sky hard x-ray survey as well as provide a sensitive all sky monitor. With $\\sim 60%$ sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be conducted over a wide range of timescales. We summarize the scientific objectives of EXIST for both the survey and monitoring objectives. We describe the mission concept and the instrumentation approach, which would incorporate a large area array of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, as well as some of our ongoing development of CZT array detectors.

  18. Optical Identification of the ASCA Large Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akiyama; K. Ohta; T. Yamada; N. Kashikawa; M. Yagi; W. Kawasaki; M. Sakano; T. Tsuru; Y. Ueda; T. Takahashi; I. Lehmann; G. Hasinger; W. Voges

    2000-01-17

    We present results of optical identification of the X-ray sources detected in the ASCA Large Sky Survey. Optical spectroscopic observations were done for 34 X-ray sources which were detected with the SIS in the 2-7 keV band above 3.5 sigma. The sources are identified with 30 AGNs, 2 clusters of galaxies, and 1 galactic star. Only 1 source is still unidentified. The flux limit of the sample corresponds to 1 x 10^{-13} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} in the 2-10 keV band. Based on the sample, the paper discusses optical and X-ray spectral properties of the AGNs, contribution of the sources to the Cosmic X-ray Background, and redshift and luminosity distributions of the AGNs. An interesting result is that the redshift distribution of the AGNs suggests a deficiency of high-redshift (0.5 10^{44} erg s^{-1}) absorbed narrow-line AGNs (so called type 2 QSOs).

  19. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for Future Very High-Energy...

  20. Discovery of Four Gravitationally Lensed Quasarsfrom the Sloan Digital Sky

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass|FeTe0.55Se0.45SciTech ConnectfromSurvey

  1. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz; David Bacon; Song Chen; Chris Clarkson; Dragan Huterer; Martin Kunz; Roy Maartens; Alvise Raccanelli; Matthias Rubart; Jean-Luc Starck

    2015-01-15

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  2. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  3. DISCOVERIES FROM A NEAR-INFRARED PROPER MOTION SURVEY USING MULTI-EPOCH TWO MICRON ALL-SKY SURVEY DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    We have conducted a 4030 deg[superscript 2] near-infrared proper motion survey using multi-epoch data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find 2778 proper motion candidates, 647 of which are not listed in SIMBAD. ...

  4. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View Full Text DOI: 10.10880004-62561402403 Select the DOI to obtain a copy of this journal article from the publisher....

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport) |SciTech Connect Authors:

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport) |SciTech Connect

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport) |SciTech ConnectSciTech

  9. A Robotic Wide-Angle H-Alpha Survey of the Southern Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Gaustad; P. R. McCullough; W. Rosing; D. Van Buren

    2001-08-31

    We have completed a robotic wide-angle imaging survey of the southern sky (declination less than +15 degrees) at 656.3 nm wavelength, the H-alpha emission line of hydrogen. Each image of the resulting Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) covers an area of the sky 13 degrees square at an angular resolution of approximately 0.8 arcminute, and reaches a sensitivity level of 2 rayleigh (1.2 x 10^-17 erg cm^-2 s^-1 arcsec^-2) per pixel, corresponding to an emission measure of 4 cm^-6 pc, and to a brightness temperature for microwave free-free emission of 12 microkelvins at 30 GHz. Smoothing over several pixels allows features as faint as 0.5 rayleigh to be detected.

  10. Cross-matching Engine for Incremental Photometric Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nádvorník, Ing Ji?í

    2015-01-01

    For light curve generation, a pre-planned photometry survey is needed nowadays, where all of the exposure coordinates have to be given and don't change during the survey. This thesis shows it is not required and we can data-mine these light curves from astronomical data that was never meant for this purpose. With this approach, we can recycle all of the photometric surveys in the world and generate light curves of observed objects for them. This thesis is addressing mostly the catalog generation process, which is needed for creating the light curves. In practice, it focuses on one of the most important problems in astroinformatics which is clustering data volumes on Big Data scale where most of the traditional techniques stagger. We consider a wide variety of possible solutions from the view of performance, scalability, distributability, etc. We defined criteria for time and memory complexity which we evaluated for all of the tested solutions. Furthermore, we created quality standards which we also take into ...

  11. The GMRT High Resolution Southern Sky Survey for pulsars and transients -I. Survey description and initial discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Malenta, Mateusz; Roy, Jayanta; Chengalur, Jayaram N; Keith, Michael; Kudale, Sanjay; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott M; Ray, Paul S; Stappers, Benjamin W

    2015-01-01

    We are conducting a survey for pulsars and transients using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The GMRT High Resolution Southern Sky (GHRSS) survey is an off-Galactic-plane (|b|>5) survey in the declination range -40 deg to -54 deg at 322 MHz. With the high time (up to 30.72 micro-sec) and frequency (up to 0.016275 MHz) resolution observing modes, the 5-sigma detection limit is 0.5 mJy for a 2 ms pulsar with 10% duty cycle at 322 MHz. Total GHRSS sky coverage of 2866 square-deg, will result from 1953 pointings, each covering 1.8 square-deg. The 10-sigma detection limit for a 5 ms transient burst is 1.6 Jy for the GHRSS survey. In addition, the GHRSS survey can reveal transient events like the rotating radio transients or the fast radio bursts. With 35% of the survey completed (i.e. 1000 square-deg), we report the discovery of 10 pulsars, one of which is a millisecond pulsar (MSP), this is one of the highest pulsar per square degree discovery rate for any off-Galactic plane survey. We re-detected 23 k...

  12. FIRST: Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (Data Catalogs from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). Data were collected from 1993 through 2002, with enhanced images produced up through 2011. The Data Catalogs have been cleaned and reissued over time, with the latest version coming out in March, 2014. They contain maps, images, and binary data. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  13. A SOUTHERN SKY AND GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY FOR BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymanski, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2011-10-15

    About 2500 deg{sup 2} of sky south of declination -25{sup 0} and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  14. A Proper Motion Survey Using the First Sky Pass of NEOWISE-Reactivation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Adam C; Cushing, Michael C; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Mainzer, Amy; Gelino, Christopher R; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio B; Bauer, James

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) was reactivated in December of 2013 (NEOWISE) to search for potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. We have conducted a survey using the first sky pass of NEOWISE data and the AllWISE catalog to identify nearby stars and brown dwarfs with large proper motions ($\\mu_{\\rm total}$ $\\gtrsim$ 250 mas yr$^{-1}$). A total of 20,548 high proper motion objects were identified, 1,006 of which are new discoveries. This survey has uncovered a significantly larger sample of fainter objects (W2 $\\gtrsim$13 mag) than the previous WISE motion surveys of Luhman (2014a) and Kirkpatrick et al. (2014). Many of these objects are predicted to be new L and T dwarfs based on near- and mid-infrared colors. Using estimated spectral types along with distance estimates, we have identified several objects likely belonging to the nearby Solar neighborhood (d $potentially nea...

  15. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ?19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  16. Galaxy Clusters in Hubble Volume Simulations: Cosmological Constraints from Sky Survey Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Evrard; T. J. MacFarland; H. M. P. Couchman; J. M. Colberg; N. Yoshida; S. D. M. White; A. R. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; F. R. Pearce; J. A. Peacock; P. A. Thomas

    2002-03-12

    We use giga-particle N-body simulations to study galaxy cluster populations in Hubble Volumes of LCDM (Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) and tCDM (Omega_m=1) world models. Mapping past light-cones of locations in the computational space, we create mock sky surveys of dark matter structure to z~1.4 over 10,000 sq deg and to z~0.5 over two full spheres. Calibrating the Jenkins mass function at z=0 with samples of ~1.5 million clusters, we show that the fit describes the sky survey counts to 5e13 Msun/h). Fitting the observed local temperature function determines the ratio beta of specific thermal energies in dark matter and intracluster gas. We derive a scaling with power spectrum normalization beta \\propto sigma8^{5/3}, and measure a 4% error on sigma8 arising from cosmic variance in temperature-limited cluster samples. Considering distant clusters, the LCDM model matches EMSS and RDCS X-ray-selected survey observations under economical assumptions for intracluster gas evolution. Using transformations of mass-limited cluster samples that mimic sigma8 variation, we explore SZ search expectations for a 10 sq deg survey complete above 10^{14} Msun/h. Cluster counts are shown to be extremely sensitive to sigma8 uncertainty while redshift statistics, such as the sample median, are much more stable. For LCDM, the characteristic temperature at fixed sky surface density is a weak function of redshift, implying an abundance of hot clusters at z>1. Assuming constant beta, four kT>8 keV clusters lie at z>2 and 40 kT>5 keV clusters lie at z>3 on the whole sky. Detection of Coma-sized clusters at z>1 violate LCDM at 95% confidence if their surface density exceeds 0.003 per sq deg, or 120 on the whole sky.

  17. EXIST: A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grindlay; L. Bildsten; D. Chakrabarty; M. Elvis; A. Fabian; F. Fiore; N. Gehrels; C. Hailey; F. Harrison; D. Hartmann; T. Prince; B. Ramsey; R. Rothschild; G. Skinner; S. Woosley

    1999-12-18

    A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concept is presented.

  18. South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS): Data Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun; Fan, Xiaohui; Fan, Zhou; He, Boliang; Jing, Yipeng; Lesser, Michael; Li, Cheng; Nie, Jundan; Shen, Shiyin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) is a deep u-band imaging survey in the Southern Galactic Cap, using the 90Prime wide-field imager on the 2.3m Bok telescope at Kitt Peak. The survey observations started in 2010 and ended in 2013. The final survey area is about 5000 deg2 with a median 5-sigma point source limiting magnitude of about 23.2. This paper describes the survey data reduction process, which includes basic imaging processing, astrometric and photometric calibrations, image stacking, and photometric measurements. Survey photometry is performed on objects detected both on SCUSS u-band images and in the SDSS database. Automatic, aperture, point-spread function (PSF), and model magnitudes are measured on stacked images. Co-added aperture, PSF, and model magnitudes are derived from measurements on single-epoch images. We also present comparisons of the SCUSS photometric catalog with those of the SDSS and CFHTLS.

  19. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, T S; Marshall, J L; Tucker, D; Kessler, R; Annis, J; Bernstein, G M; Boada, S; Burke, D L; Finley, D A; James, D J; Kent, S; Lin, H; Marriner, J; Mondrik, N; Nagasawa, D; Rykoff, E S; Scolnic, D; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; Melchior28, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example...

  20. Dark Energy Survey

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2014-08-12

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  1. Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2012-12-06

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  2. Optical Identification of the Hardest X-ray Source in the ASCA Large Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akiyama; K. Ohta; T. Yamada; M. Eracleous; J. P. Halpern; N. Kashikawa; M. Yagi; W. Kawasaki; M. Sakano; T. Tsuru; Y. Ueda; T. Takahashi

    1998-01-18

    We report the optical identification of the hardest X-ray source (AX J131501+3141) detected in an unbiased wide-area survey in the 0.5--10 keV band, the ASCA Large Sky Survey. The X-ray spectrum of the source is very hard and is well reproduced by a power-law component (Gamma = 1.5^+0.7_-0.6) with N_H = 6^+4_-2 *10^22 cm^-2 (Sakano et al. 1998). We have found a galaxy with R=15.62 mag near the center of the error circle for the X-ray source. The optical spectrum of the galaxy shows only narrow emission lines whose ratios correspond to those of a type 2 Seyfert galaxy at z = 0.072, implying an absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity of 2*10^43 erg sec^-1 (2--10 keV) and M_B = -20.93 mag. A radio point source is also associated with the center of the galaxy. We thus identify the X-ray source with this galaxy as an obscured AGN. The hidden nature of the nucleus of the galaxy in the optical band is consistent with the X-ray spectrum. These results support the idea that the obscured AGNs/QSOs contribute significantly to the cosmic X-ray background in the hard band at the faint flux level.

  3. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  4. Sixty-seven Additional L Dwarfs Discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Davy Kirkpatrick; I. Neill Reid; James Liebert; John E. Gizis; Adam J. Burgasser; David G. Monet; Conard C. Dahn; Brant Nelson; Rik J. Williams

    2000-03-22

    We present JHKs photometry, far red spectra, and spectral classifications for an additional 67 L dwarfs discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey. One of the goals of this new search was to locate more examples of the latest L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 17 have types of L6 or later. Analysis of these new discoveries shows that H-alpha emission has yet to be convincingly detected in any L dwarf later than type L4.5, indicating a decline or absence of chromospheric activity in the latest L dwarfs. Further analysis shows that 16 (and possibly 4 more) of the new L dwarfs are lithium brown dwarfs and that the average line strength for those L dwarfs showing lithium increases until roughly type L6.5 V then declines for later types. This disappearance may be the first sign of depletion of atomic lithium as it begins to form into lithium-bearing molecules. Another goal of the search was to locate nearer, brighter L dwarfs of all subtypes. Using absolute magnitudes for 17 L dwarf systems with trigonometric parallax measurements, we develop spectrophotometric relations to estimate distances to the other L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 21 have photometric distances placing them within 25 parsecs of the Sun. A table of all known L and T dwarfs believed to lie within 25 parsecs - 53 in total - is also presented. Using the distance measurement of the coolest L dwarf known, we calculate that the gap in temperature between L8 and the warmest known T dwarfs is less than 350K and probably much less. If the transition region between the two classes spans a very small temperature interval, this would explain why no transition objects have yet been uncovered. This evidence, combined with model fits to low-resolution spectra of late-M and early-L dwarfs, indicates that L dwarfs span the range 1300K < Teff < 2000K.

  5. SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, D.; York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A.; Dalal, N. Paravastu; Cohen, A. S.; Erickson, W. C.

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

  6. A Survey of Document Image Retrieval in Digital Libraries Simone Marinai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Survey of Document Image Retrieval in Digital Libraries Simone Marinai Dipartimento di Sistemi e. Keywords : Digital Library, Document Image Retrieval, Handwriting, Layout Analysis, OCR. 1 Introduction In the last few years, Digital Libraries (DL) became one im- portant application area for Document Image

  7. CRATES: An All-Sky Survey of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources Healey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of interesting sources, especially high energy blazars. Comparison of CRATES with other high-frequency surveys also provides unique opportunities for identification of high-power...

  8. CRATES: An All-Sky Survey of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of interesting sources, especially high energy blazars. Comparison of CRATES with other high-frequency surveys also provides unique opportunities for identification of high-power...

  9. MACHETE: A transit Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope to survey half of the Very High Energy $\\gamma$-ray sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortina, J; Moralejo, A

    2015-01-01

    Current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for Very High Energy $\\gamma$-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a Field of View up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5$\\times$60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Montecarlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of $\\sim$0.77\\% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of $\\sim$150 GeV and an angular resolution of $\\sim$0.1$^{\\circ}$. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12\\% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other w...

  10. Scientometrics of big science: a case study of research in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaomei

    -scale scientific project Introduction Large-scale scientific projects, such as the Human Genome Project (HGP of dollars of funding (for example, HGP has cost three billion dollars1 ), have a large number of members eight countries, www.sdss.org), and last more than 5 years or even longer (HGP is a 13-year project

  11. Spectral Classification of Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Eigenspectra; Redshift and Luminosity Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. Yip; A. J. Connolly; D. E. Vanden Berk; Z. Ma; J. A. Frieman; M. SubbaRao; A. S. Szalay; G. T. Richards; P. B. Hall; D. P. Schneider; A. M. Hopkins; J. Trump; J. Brinkmann

    2004-08-31

    We study 16,707 quasar spectra from the SDSS using the Karhunen-Lo\\`eve (KL) transform (or Principal Component Analysis, PCA). The quasar eigenspectra of the full catalog reveal the following: 1st order - the mean spectrum; 2nd order - a host-galaxy component; 3rd order - the UV-optical continuum slope; 4th order - the correlations of Balmer emission lines. We find that the spectral classification of quasars is redshift and luminosity dependent, as such there does not exist a compact set ( 95%) of the entire catalog. We therefore construct several sets of eigenspectra in different redshift and luminosity bins. From these eigenspectra we find that quasar spectra can be classified (by the first two eigenspectra) into a sequence that is defined by a simple progression in the steepness of the slope of the continuum. We also find a dependence on redshift and luminosity in the eigencoefficients. The dominant redshift effect is a result of the evolution of the blended FeII emission (optical) and the Balmer continuum (the ``small bump''). A luminosity dependence is also present in the eigencoefficients and is related to the Baldwin effect. The eigenspectra constructed from the wavelength-selected SDSS spectra are found to agree with the principal components by Francis et al. (1992) and the well-known ``Eigenvector-1'' (Boroson and Green 1992). (Abridged)

  12. Dozens of compact and high dispersion early-type galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saulder, Christoph; Mieske, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim at finding candidates of potential survivors of high-redshift compact galaxies in SDSS, as targets for more detailed follow-up observations. Methods. From the virial theorem it is expected that for a given mass, compact galaxies have stellar velocity dispersion higher than the mean due to their smaller sizes. Therefore velocity dispersion coupled with size (or mass) is an appropriate method to select relics, independent of the stellar population properties. Based on these consideration we design a set of criteria using distribution of early-type galaxies from SDSS on the log$_{10}$(R$_{0}$)-log$_{10}$($\\sigma_{0}$) plane to find the most extreme objects on it. Results. We find 76 galaxies at 0.05 < z < 0.2, which have properties similar to the typical quiescent galaxies at high redshift. We study how well these galaxies fit on well-known local universe relations of early-type galaxies such as the fundamental plane, the red sequence or mass-size relations. As expected from the selection crit...

  13. Evolution of environment dependent galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Laura O'Mill; Nelson Padilla; Diego Garcia Lambas

    2008-06-26

    We use photometric redshifts to analyse the effect of local environment on galaxy colours at redshifts z < 0.63 in the SDSS data release 6. We construct mock SDSS-DR6 catalogues using semi-analytic galaxies to study possible systematic effects on the characterisation of environment and colour statistics due to the uncertainty in the determination of redshifts. We use the projected galaxy density derived from the distance to the nearest neighbours with a suitable radial velocity threshold to take into account the uncertainties in the photometric redshift estimates. Our findings indicate that the use of photometric redshifts greatly improves estimates of projected local galaxy density when galaxy spectra are not available. We find a tight relationship between spectroscopic and photometric derived densities, both in the SDSS-DR6 data (up to z=0.3) and mock catalogues (up to z=0.63). At z=0, faint galaxies show a clear increase of the red galaxy fraction as the local density increases. Bright galaxies, on the other hand, show a constant red galaxy fraction. We are able to track the evolution of this fraction to z=0.55 for galaxies brighter than M_r=-21.5 and find that the fraction of blue galaxies with respect to the total population progressively becomes higher as the redshift increases, at a rate of 15% Gyr. Also, at any given redshift, bright galaxies show a larger red population, indicating that the star-formation activity shifts towards smaller objects as the redshift decreases.

  14. Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent) |(Journal Article)doping (JournalArticle) |

  15. Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent) |(Journal Article)doping (JournalArticle)

  16. SEARCH FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech Connect RobustConnect S-waveTechnical Report: SC

  17. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaled X-Ray Head (Journal Article)Article)DATA FROM

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport) |SciTech

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport) |SciTechSample from the Fifth

  20. TeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to search the entire northern hemisphere for such objects. The search for short bursts of TeV gamma rays hasTeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2 W) are presented. The data have been searched for steady point sources of TeV gamma rays between declinations of 1

  1. The BANYAN All-Sky Survey for Brown Dwarf Members of Young Moving Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Malo, Lison; Cruz, Kelle L; Artigau, Étienne; Burgasser, Adam J; Naud, Marie-Eve; Bouchard, Sandie; Gizis, John E; Albert, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    We describe in this work the BASS survey for brown dwarfs in young moving groups of the solar neighborhood, and summarize the results that it generated. These include the discovery of the 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b and 2MASS J02192210-3925225 B young companions near the deuterium-burning limit as well as 44 new low-mass stars and 69 new brown dwarfs with a spectroscopically confirmed low gravity. Among those, ~20 have estimated masses within the planetary regime, one is a new L4 $\\gamma$ bona fide member of AB Doradus, three are TW Hydrae candidates with later spectral types (L1-L4) than all of its previously known members and six are among the first contenders to low-gravity $\\geq$ L5 $\\beta$/$\\gamma$ brown dwarfs, reminiscent of WISEP J004701.06+680352.1, PSO J318.5338-22.8603 and VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b. Finally, we describe a future version of this survey, BASS-Ultracool, that will specifically target $\\geq$ L5 candidate members of young moving groups. First experimentations in designing the survey h...

  2. Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

    2012-01-01

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

  3. The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey:II. Gravitational lens candidate selection and follow-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. W. A. Browne; P. N. Wilkinson; N. J. F. Jackson; S. T. Myers; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; M. Norbury; D. Rusin; C. M. Sykes; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; A. G. de Bruyn; K-H. Chae; P. Helbig; L. J. King; J. P. McKean; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; E. Xanthopoulos; T. York

    2002-11-11

    We report the final results of the search for gravitationally lensed flat-spectrum radio sources found in the combination of CLASS (Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey) and JVAS (Jodrell-Bank VLA Astrometric Survey). VLA observations of 16,503 sources have been made, resulting in the largest sample of arcsec-scale lens systems available. Contained within the 16,503 sources is a complete sample of 11,685 sources having two-point spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz flatter than -0.5 and 5 GHz flux densities $\\geq$30 mJy. A subset of 8,958 sources form a well-defined statistical sample suitable for analysis of the lens statistics. We describe the systematic process by which 149 candidate lensed sources were picked from the statistical sample on the basis of possessing multiple compact components in the 0.2 arcsec-resolution VLA maps. Candidates were followed up with 0.05 arcsec resolution MERLIN and 0.003 arcsec VLBA observations at 5 GHz and rejected as lens systems if they failed well-defined surface brightness and/or morphological tests. Maps for all the candidates can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/research/gravlens/index.html We summarize the properties of each of the 22 gravitational lens systems in JVAS/CLASS. Twelve are double-image systems, nine are four-image systems and one is a six-image system. Thirteen constitute a statistically well-defined sample giving a point-source lensing rate of 1:690$\\pm$190. The interpretation of the results in terms of the properties of the lensing galaxy population and cosmological parameters will be published elsewhere. (Abridged)

  4. The UV (GALEX) and FIR (ASTRO-F) All Sky Surveys: the measure of the dust extinction in the local universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Buat; T. T. Takeuchi; A. Boselli; D. Burgarella; H. Hirashita; A. Tomita; H. Shibai; B. Milliard; J. Donas; K. Yoshikawa; A. K. Inoue; Y. Y. Tajiri

    2002-09-12

    Before the end of 2002 will be launched the GALEX satellite (a NASA/SMEX project) which will observe all the sky in Ultraviolet (UV) through filters at 1500 and 2300 A down to m(AB) 21. In 2004 will be launched the ASTRO-F satellite which will perform an all sky survey at Far-Infrared (FIR) wavelengths. The cross-correlation of both surveys will lead to very large samples of galaxies for which FIR and UV fluxes will be available. Using the FIR to UV flux ratio as a quantitative tracer of the dust extinction we will be able to measure the extinction in the nearby universe (zUV selected samples for which the extinction will be measured as templates for the observation of high redshift galaxies.

  5. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsuhara, Hideo [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata-cho, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)] [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata-cho, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Mueller, Thomas G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ootsubo, Takafumi, E-mail: usui@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)] [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the abundance of P-types increases beyond 3 AU. This distribution is similar to that of C- or D-types.

  6. Survey on Failure Modes and Failure Mechanisms in Digital Components and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Korsah, Kofi; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a survey on the operating experience of a broad range of digital components and systems deployed in various industries. The primary objective of this survey is to identify principal modes and mechanisms of failure in field-deployed digital systems. Earlier works have sought to determine the failure rates of various classes of digital devices with the intent to integrate this information into the risk analysis calculations though still immature for such systems. Failure rates of individual components or systems are not taken into account in this evaluation; only failure modes and their respective probabilistic distribution are considered. Preliminary results from two data sources, SPIDR and FARADIP, are presented.

  7. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  8. The radio luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio for quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Hao. Bian; Yan-Mei. Chen; Chen. Hu; Kai. Huang; Yan. Xu

    2008-03-24

    We investigate the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation for radio-loud quasars with redshift $zradio luminosity, including 306 radio-loud quasars, 3466 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity or upper-limit of radio luminosity (181 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity). The virial supermassive black hole mass (\\mbh) is calculated from the broad \\hb line, the host stellar velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_*$) is traced by the core \\oiii gaseous velocity dispersion, and the radio luminosity and the radio loudness are derived from the FIRST catalog. Our results are follows: (1) For radio-quiet quasars, we confirm that there is no obvious deviation from the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation defined in inactive galaxies when \\mbh uncertainties and luminosity bias are concerned. (2) We find that radio-loud quasars deviate much from the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation respect to that for radio-quiet quasars. This deviation is only partly due to the possible cosmology evolution of the $\\mbh- \\sigma_*$ relation and the luminosity bias. (3) The radio luminosity is proportional to $\\mbh^{1.28^{+0.23}_{-0.16}}(\\lb/\\ledd)^{1.29^{+0.31}_{-0.24}}$ for radio-quiet quasars and $\\mbh^{3.10^{+0.60}_{-0.70}}(\\lb/\\ledd)^{4.18^{+1.40}_{-1.10}}$ for radio-loud quasars. The weaker correlation of the radio luminosity dependence upon the mass and the Eddington ratio for radio-loud quasars shows that other physical effects would account for their radio luminosities, such as the black hole spin.

  9. H I-SELECTED GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. II. THE COLORS OF GAS-RICH GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Andrew A.

    We utilize color information for an H I-selected sample of 195 galaxies to explore the star formation histories and physical conditions that produce the observed colors. We show that the H I selection creates a significant ...

  10. Radio-loud Active Galaxies in the Northern ROSAT All-Sky Survey III: New Spectroscopic Identifications from the RGB BL Lac Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. I. Kollgaard; R. B. Ciardullo; E. D. Feigelson; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert

    1997-11-22

    We present new spectroscopic identifications for 169 objects in the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog of radio- and X-ray-emitting AGN. These data significantly increase the fraction of bright RGB objects with classifications. Specifically, we report and discuss the classification of 66 radio-loud quasars, 53 BL Lacs, 33 Broad Line Radio Galaxies, 5 Narrow Line Radio Galaxies, 1 Seyfert I galaxy and 11 galaxies or galaxies in clusters. Over 78% of the identifications we present here are new. The observations we report were undertaken as part of our targeted search program to identify a new, large unbiased sample of BL Lac Objects and we therefore discuss the BL Lac sample extensively. Unlike many previous surveys, we impose no selection criteria based on optical morphology, color or broadband spectral energy distribution. Our classifications are based solely on a carefully defined set of self-consistent spectroscopic classification criteria. We show the 53 RGB presented here exhibit transitional properties between normal galaxies and BL Lacs discovered previously. We show there is no clear separation in CaII break strength between RGB BL Lacs and galaxies, with the distribution of break strengths varying smoothly between 0% and 50%. We also show that the newly discovered RGB BL Lacs reside in a "zone of avoidance" in the log(S_x/S_r) vs. log(S_o/S_r) diagram. This has important implications for BL Lac search strategies since it shows that RASS BL Lac samples will be severely incomplete if candidates are chosen only from among those objects with the highest S_x/S_r flux ratios.

  11. Cosmological Simulations for Sky Surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture |Cosmic

  12. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  13. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  14. RIDL Working paper NBK/AEB A survey of user studies for digital libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    , it is not just a case of entering a search term and viewing a list of results. Furnas and Rauch (1998) studied libraries in terms of how searching is supported ­ according to Furnas and Rauch there needs of digital libraries in terms of interaction and its properties. Before drawing broader design implications

  15. Transformation from SDSS Photometric System to Johnson-Morgan-Cousins System in HK Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chongshan Zhao; Heidi Jo Newberg

    2006-12-01

    We calculate the transformation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric system to the Johnson-Morgan-Cousins System in the HK Survey. This research was done in late 2001, so the SDSS photometry was taken from the database prior to the release of DR1. This paper is being posted because it is referenced in other papers in the literature, but will not be submitted to a refereed journal because it uses unpublished versions of the catalogs.

  16. Mapping the Heavens: Probing Cosmology with Large Surveys

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Frieman, Joshua [Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    This talk will provide an overview of recent and on-going sky surveys, focusing on their implications for cosmology. I will place particular emphasis on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the most ambitious mapping of the Universe yet undertaken, showing a virtual fly-through of the survey that reveals the large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution. Recent measurements of this large-scale structure, in combination with observations of the cosmic microwave background, have provided independent evidence for a Universe dominated by dark matter and dark energy as well as insights into how galaxies and larger-scale structures formed. Future planned surveys will build on these foundations to probe the history of the cosmic expansion--and thereby the dark energy--with greater precision.

  17. Digging deeper into the Southern skies: a compact Milky-Way companion discovered in first-year Dark Energy Survey data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luque, E; Santiago, B; Pieres, A; Balbinot, E; Bechtol, K; Drlica-Wagner, A; Neto, A Fausti; da Costa, L N; Maia, M A G; Yanny, B; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Eifler, T F; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Walker, A R; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 sq. degree survey in the southern hemisphere, which is rapidly reducing the existing north-south asymmetry in the census of MW satellites and other stellar substructure. We use the first-year DES data down to previously unprobed photometric depths to search for stellar systems in the Galactic halo, therefore complementing the previous analysis of the same data carried out by our group earlier this year. Our search is based on a matched filter algorithm that produces stellar density maps consistent with stellar population models of various ages, metallicities, and distances over the survey area. The most conspicuous density peaks in these maps have been identified automatically and ranked according to their significance and recurrence for different input models. We report the discovery of one additional stellar system besides those previously found by several authors using the same first-year DES data. The object is compact, and consistent with being dominated by an old a...

  18. A Spectroscopic Study of the Ancient Milky Way: F- and G-Type Stars in the Third Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Allende Prieto; T. C. Beers; R. Wilhelm; H. J. Newberg; C. M. Rockosi; B. Yanny; Y. S. Lee

    2005-09-27

    (Abridged) We perform an analysis of spectra and photometry for 22,770 stars included in the third data release (DR3) of the SDSS. We measure radial velocities and, based on a model-atmosphere analysis, derive estimates ofthe atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and [Fe/H]) for each star. Stellar evolution models are then used to estimate distances. The SDSS sample covers a range in stellar brightness of 14 < V < 22, and comprises large numbers of F- and G-type stars from the thick-disk and halo populations (up to 100 kpc from the galactic plane), therefore including some of the oldest stars in the Milky Way. In agreement with previous results from the literature, we find that halo stars exhibit a broad range of iron abundances, with a peak at [Fe/H] ~ -1.4. This population exhibits essentially no galactic rotation. Thick-disk G-dwarf stars at distances from the galactic plane in the range 1<|z|<3 kpc show a much more compact metallicity distribution, with a maximum at [Fe/H] ~ -0.7, and a median galactic rotation velocity at that metallicity of 157 +/- 4 km/s (a lag relative to the thin disk of 63 km/s). A comparison of color indices and metal abundances with isochrones indicates that no significant star formation has taken place in the halo in the last ~ 11 Gyr, but there are thick-disk stars which are at least 2 Gyr younger. We find the metallicities of thick-disk stars to be nearly independent of galactocentric distance between 5 and 14 kpc, in contrast with the marked gradients found in the literature for the thin disk. No vertical metallicity gradient is apparent for the thick disk, but we detect a gradient inits rotational velocity of -16 +/- 4 km/s/kpc between 1 and 3 kpc from the plane.

  19. Modelling narrow-line regions of active galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - I.Sample selection and physical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhitai; Hammer, François; 10.1093/mnras/sts713

    2013-01-01

    We systematically determine the electron density and electron temperature of active galaxies and star-forming galaxies using spectroscopy from the SDSS DR7, while mainly focusing on the NLRs. Density and temperature are determined through the I[S II] 6716/6731 and I[O III] 5007/4363 ratios, respectively, in our [O III] 4363 emission sample of 15 019 galaxies. We find two sequences and the typical range of density in the NLRs of AGNs is 100-1000 /cm3. The temperatures in the NLRs range from 10 000 to 20 000 K for Seyferts, and the ranges were even higher and wider for LINERs and composites. We also propose that Y_LINER ~ Y_Seyfert > Y_composite > Y_star-forming, where Y is the characteristic present-day star-formation time-scale. While in the AGN case, we find several strong lines of evidence suggest that some supplementary energy source(s) should be responsible for high ionization potential.

  20. Using Multipoles of the Correlation Function to Measure H(z), D_A(z), and \\beta(z) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clustering data can be used to measure H(z), D_A(z), and \\beta(z). Here we present a method for using effective multipoles of the galaxy two-point correlation function (\\xi_0(s), \\xi_2(s), \\xi_4(s), and \\xi_6(s), with s denoting the comoving separation) to measure H(z), D_A(z), and \\beta(z), and validate it using LasDamas mock galaxy catalogs. Our definition of effective multipoles explicitly incorporates the discreteness of measurements, and treats the measured correlation function and its theoretical model on the same footing. We find that for the mock data, \\xi_0 + \\xi_2 + \\xi_4 captures nearly all the information, and gives significantly stronger constraints on H(z), D_A(z), and \\beta(z), compared to using only \\xi_0 + \\xi_2. We apply our method to the sample of LRGs from the SDSS DR7 without assuming a dark energy model or a flat Universe. We find that \\xi_4(s) deviates on scales of s<60\\,Mpc/h from the measurement from mock data (in contrast to \\xi_0(s), \\xi_2(s), and \\xi_6(s)), leading to a s...

  1. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  2. Wide Blue Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Caroline Imani

    2011-01-01

    dressed neatly in a dark blue dress, its high neck trimmedIt was covered in a light blue fabric embellished with softOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Wide Blue Sky A Thesis submitted in

  3. Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

    2006-07-23

    Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

  4. Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surveys can be a useful way to gauge the opinions of your readers and learn more about your website's audiences, but you'll often need approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to run...

  5. SURVEYING THE TEV SKY WITH SABRINA CASANOVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    clusters, and EGRET unidentified sources. Solar energetic particles from coronal mass ejec- tions have been located near Los Alamos, in New Mexico at 2630 m above sea level, consisting of a 5, 000 m2 central (pond

  6. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. III. CLASSIFICATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaversa, Lovro; Eyer, Laurent; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ivezi?, Željko; Loebman, Sarah; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Boži?, Hrvoje; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesari?, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott; Srdo?, Gregor; and others

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ?7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg{sup 2} of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ?0.03 mag at r = 15 to ?0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ?200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ?7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (? Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the median period increases from 5.9 hr to 8.8 hr. These large samples of robustly classified variable stars will enable detailed statistical studies of the Galactic structure and physics of binary and other stars and we make these samples publicly available.

  7. Hacking the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R J

    2009-01-01

    In this article I present some special astronomical scripts created for Google Earth, Google Sky and Twitter. These 'hacks' are examples of the ways in which such tools can be used either alone, in on conjunction with online services. The result of a combination of multiple, online services to form a new facility is called a mash-up. Some of what follows falls into that definition. As we move into an era of online data and tools, it is the network as a whole that becomes important. Tools emerging from this network can be capable of more than the sum of their parts.

  8. NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal June 4, 2015 Legacy highres 1400x800 Courtesy of DECam Legacy Survey Even non-scientists can now browse...

  9. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Spokane, WA 99203 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kessler, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, John [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2FX (United Kingdom); Richmond, Michael [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: cinabro@physics.wayne.edu [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  10. Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

  11. Use and Users of Digital Resources: A Focus on Undergraduate Education in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Diane; Henke, Jonathan; Lawrence, Shannon; Miller, Ian; Perciali, Irene; Nasatir, David

    2006-01-01

    2003. A survey of digital library aggregation services.Digital Library Federation, Washington, D.C. Available atAmerican Literature. Digital Library Federation, Washington,

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  13. Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations Marjorie Palmer Spring 2008 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides Road, Room 101 Athens, GA 30602-1510 (706) 583-0373 · Fax (706) 583-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;Lighting......................................................................................................................................1 II. Approaches to Lighting Regulation

  14. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  15. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump

  16. Milagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, and all sky surveys are diÆcult. A new type of TeV -ray observatoryMilagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky B.L. Dingus 1 , R. Atkins 1 , W type of very high energy (> a few 100 GeV) gamma-ray observatory, Milagro, has been built with a large

  17. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  18. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  19. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  20. Night-sky brightness monitoring in Hong Kong - a city-wide light pollution assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason

    2011-01-01

    Results of the first comprehensive light pollution survey in Hong Kong are presented. The night-sky brightness was measured and monitored around the city using a portable light sensing device called the Sky Quality Meter over a 15-month period beginning in March 2008. A total of 1,957 data sets were taken at 199 distinct locations, including urban and rural sites covering all 18 Administrative Districts of Hong Kong. The survey shows that the environmental light pollution problem in Hong Kong is severe - the urban night-skies (sky brightness at 15.0 mag per arcsec square) are on average ~100 times brighter than at the darkest rural sites (20.1 mag per arcsec square), indicating that the high lighting densities in the densely populated residential and commercial areas lead to light pollution. In the worst polluted urban location studied, the night-sky at 13.2 mag per arcsec square can be over 500 times brighter than the darkest sites in Hong Kong. The observed night-sky brightness is found to be affected by hu...

  1. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design of Debugging6DecodingDeep Sky

  2. Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy Place:

  3. BIGGER AND BETTER BANGS IN THE SKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIMBLE, V

    1982-01-01

    better hangs in the sky Supernovae are massive stars thatthe traditional prototype of supernovae; and its‘ remains,applicable to other supernovae and remnants. What do we know

  4. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-01-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements of the night sky brightness (NSB). The Hong Kong Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (NSN) was established to monitor in detail the conditions of light pollution in Hong Kong. Monitoring stations were set up throughout the city covering a wide range of urban and rural settings to continuously measure the variations of the NSB. Over 4.6 million night sky measurements were collected from 18 distinct locations between May 2010 and March 2013. This huge dataset, over two thousand times larger than our previous survey, for...

  5. Digital redaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coquelin, Valerie

    1997-01-01

    be of high interest to many scholars or journalists. These documents may also contain confidential information. One solution to these problems is to create digital proxies of these original documents. Opportunities for manipulation and access of digital...

  6. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Ivezic; D. Schlegel; A. Uomoto; N. Bond; T. Beers; C. Allende Prieto; R. Wilhelm; Y. Sun Lee; T. Sivarani; M. Juric; R. Lupton; C. Rockosi; G. Knapp; J. Gunn; B. Yanny; S. Jester; S. Kent; J. Pier; J. Munn; G. Richards; H. Newberg; M. Blanton; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; S. Anderson; H. Harris; F. Kiuchi; A. Chen; J. Bushong; H. Sohi; D. Haggard; A. Kimball; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. Snedden; for the SDSS Collaboration

    2007-01-17

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the ~10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

  7. Film vs. magnetic tape recording for IRLS AN/AAD-5 for open skies imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V.; Saatzer, P.; Goede, W.

    1996-11-01

    The United States Government (USG) Full Operational Capability (FOC) Open Skies aircraft (OC-135) will be equipped with an Infrared Line Scanner AN/AAD-5, fully compliant with the treaty requirements. An extensive trade study is conducted to explore the possibility of switching from film recording to either analog or digital magnetic tape recording when the AAD-5 IRLS is flown in the Open Skies Aircraft. This paper presents preliminary trade study results and the overall conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis. A flight measurement program is now being carried out under the Follow On Sensor Evaluation Program (FOSEP) to evaluate the digital magnetic recording as compared to the film recording and the results of these fight measurement will be presented at a later date. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  9. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  10. MULTI-SCALE MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SDSS DR5 SURVEY USING THE METRIC SPACE TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Yongfeng; Batuski, David J.; Khalil, Andre

    2009-12-20

    Following the novel development and adaptation of the Metric Space Technique (MST), a multi-scale morphological analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) was performed. The technique was adapted to perform a space-scale morphological analysis by filtering the galaxy point distributions with a smoothing Gaussian function, thus giving quantitative structural information on all size scales between 5 and 250 Mpc. The analysis was performed on a dozen slices of a volume of space containing many newly measured galaxies from the SDSS DR5 survey. Using the MST, observational data were compared to galaxy samples taken from N-body simulations with current best estimates of cosmological parameters and from random catalogs. By using the maximal ranking method among MST output functions, we also develop a way to quantify the overall similarity of the observed samples with the simulated samples.

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  12. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of...

  13. Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community...

  14. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on all HPC systems. In particular, on the IBM BGQ system, HACC has reached very high levels of performance-almost 14 petaflops (the highest ever recorded by a science code)...

  15. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture |Cosmic FrontierComputing

  16. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  19. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  20. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: coupon@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  1. Digital Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, Kurt; Stuurman, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs): These are a type of SLMmany computer projectors. A DMD consists of rows and columnscontrol. By orienting the DMD and incident light path such

  2. Extragalactic HI Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We review the results of HI line surveys of extragalactic sources in the local Universe. In the last two decades major efforts have been made in establishing on firm statistical grounds the properties of the HI source population, the two most prominent being the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We review the choices of technical parameters in the design and optimization of spectro-photometric "blind" HI surveys, which for the first time produced extensive HI-selected data sets. Particular attention is given to the relationship between optical and HI populations, the differences in their clustering properties and the importance of HI-selected samples in contributing to the understanding of apparent conflicts between observation and theory on the abundance of low mass halos. The last section of this paper provides an overview of currently ongoing and planned surveys which will explore the cosmic evolution of properties of the HI population.

  3. 13 Dec 1997 ESF VEG Digital Data for Engineering Geology; Disaster or Benefit 1 Digital Data for EngineeringDigital Data for Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    13 Dec 1997 ESF VEG Digital Data for Engineering Geology; Disaster or Benefit 1 Digital Data for EngineeringDigital Data for Engineering Geology: Disaster or BenefitGeology: Disaster or Benefit Robert Hack Section Engineering Geology Centre for Technical Geosciences International Institute for Aerospace Survey

  4. SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel Inc

  5. SkyPilot Networks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel

  6. Digital diorama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spikol, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Digital Diorama may be briefly presented as: a historical exploration of the vision devices, performances, and installations of the nineteenth century, and their influences on the project. These histories of the magic ...

  7. Digital Music Research UK Roadmap www.dmrn.org/roadmap Developed by the Digital Music Research Network 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    Digital Music Research ­ UK Roadmap www.dmrn.org/roadmap Developed by the Digital Music Research the development of knowledge and the development of the field. The DMRN Roadmap project made two surveys recognition of audio; machine recognition of music) #12;Digital Music Research ­ UK Roadmap www.dmrn.org/roadmap

  8. Automated Sky Search Max Doppke (RET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of reliable software programs, a quality telescope, and a compatible CCD (charged coupling device) camera. My introductory period was spent working with the `SKY6' astronomy software by Software Bisque, Inc. This software an additional piece of software, called `Orchestrate'. Designed by #12;Software Bisque, it fully integrates

  9. Sublime endeavours : connecting earth to sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kain, Jacob E. (Jacob Evelyn), 1974-

    2000-01-01

    We live in an era in which we come closer everyday to conquering the elements, to a degree that earlier humans could scarcely dream of. Nearly one hundred years ago, we took to the skies, and learned to fly. Today the act ...

  10. Influence of sky conditions on carbon dioxide uptake by forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dengel, Sigrid

    2009-01-01

    Sky conditions play an important role in the Earth’s climate system, altering the solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface and determining the fraction of incoming direct and diffuse radiation. Sky conditions dictate ...

  11. Energy Efficient Digital Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzisera, Steven

    2014-01-01

    equipment, market transformation for digital networks iimarket transformation of energy efficient digital networks.transformation activities. Table 7: Transforming the Network for Digital

  12. THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meirong

    THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE Weigu Li and Meirong Zhang Department of Mathematics orbit, the so-called blue sky catastrophe. Let's begin with the definition. Definition 1 One-parameter family of vector fields on a compact manifold has a blue sky catastrophe if for all parameter values from

  13. Designing Surveys for HCI Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Mountain View, CA 94041, US asedley@gmail.com Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation. in Mountain View, focused on tracking and analyzing user attitudes via surveys. He currently leads survey

  14. A survey of satellite galaxies around NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Meghin; Loebman, Sarah; Yoachim, Peter

    2014-06-20

    We conduct a survey of satellite galaxies around the nearby spiral NGC 4258 by combining spectroscopic observations from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. New spectroscopy is obtained for 15 galaxies. Of the 47 observed objects, we categorize 8 of them as probable satellites, 8 as possible satellites, and 17 as unlikely to be satellites. We do not speculate on the membership of the remaining 14 galaxies due to a lack of velocity and distance information. Radially integrating our best-fit NFW profile for NGC 4258 yields a total mass of 1.8 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} within 200 kpc. We find that the angular distribution of the satellites appears to be random, and not preferentially aligned with the disk of NGC 4258. In addition, many of the probable satellite galaxies have blue u–r colors and appear to be star-forming irregulars in SDSS images; this stands in contrast to the low number of blue satellites in the Milky Way and M31 systems at comparable distances.

  15. Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sako, Masao; Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce; Kunz, Martin [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, 7945 (South Africa); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett L. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Campbell, Heather [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB4 0HA (United Kingdom); D'Andrea, Chris B.; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Galbany, Lluís [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysics, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W., E-mail: olmstead@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  16. ECE 412: Digital Control and Digital Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Design Digital Controller Design State Space Representation Classical Closed-Loop Analysis Concepts and closed loop digital and sampled-data systems - Digital feedback controller design - Numerical - Understand basic approaches to direct digital design - Can design lag, lead, and lag-lead controllers, PI, PD

  17. Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidates Discovered in Year Two of the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The DES Collaboration; A. Drlica-Wagner; K. Bechtol; E. S. Rykoff; E. Luque; A. Queiroz; Y. -Y. Mao; R. H. Wechsler; J. D. Simon; B. Santiago; B. Yanny; E. Balbinot; S. Dodelson; A. Fausti Neto; D. J. James; T. S. Li; M. A. G. Maia; J. L. Marshall; A. Pieres; K. Stringer; A. R. Walker; T. M. C. Abbott; F. B. Abdalla; S. Allam; A. Benoit-Levy; G. M. Bernstein; E. Bertin; D. Brooks; E. Buckley-Geer; D. L. Burke; A. Carnero Rosell; M. Carrasco Kind; J. Carretero; M. Crocce; L. N. da Costa; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; J. P. Dietrich; P. Doel; T. F. Eifler; A. E. Evrard; D. A. Finley; P. Fosalba; J. Frieman; E. Gaztanaga; D. W. Gerdes; D. Gruen; R. A. Gruendl; G. Gutierrez; K. Honscheid; K. Kuehn; N. Kuropatkin; O. Lahav; P. Martini; R. Miquel; B. Nord; R. Ogando; A. A. Plazas; K. Reil; A. Roodman; M. Sako; E. Sanchez; V. Scarpine; M. Schubnell; I. Sevilla-Noarbe; R. C. Smith; M. Soares-Santos; F. Sobreira; E. Suchyta; M. E. C. Swanson; G. Tarle; D. Tucker; V. Vikram; W. Wester; Y. Zhang; J. Zuntz

    2015-08-14

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two additional lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of incomplete or non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found using three independent automated search techniques, and are identified as statistically significant overdensities of individually resolved stars consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (Mv > -4.7 mag) and span a broad range of physical sizes (17 pc 27.5 mag arcsec$^2$) consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies, and would have had a low probability of detection if observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A large fraction of satellite candidates are found in the southern half of the DES footprint in proximity to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 0.001) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites, and that this distribution can be well, although not uniquely, explained by a model in which several of the observed DES satellites are associated with the Magellanic system. Including the current sample, our model predicts that ~100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites might exist over the full sky and that 20-30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.

  18. American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump to:

  19. Sky Solar Global SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy

  20. SolarSkies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSloughInfraSolarSkies Jump to: navigation,

  1. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen GeothermalSky

  2. New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,NationalJersey/Incentives <EnergyOrleansSky Energy Jump

  3. North Sky River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd| OpenInformation 9thNorthNewton SchoolNorthSky

  4. Green Skies of Brazil |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— We want USDOE to vitrify allfromGreenGreen Skies

  5. The Dartmouth Digital Library Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    The Dartmouth Digital Library Program A Report from Dartmouth Digital Library Program 2 DIGITAL PROJECTS Resources Anthony Helm, Head of Digital Media and Library Technologies Wess

  6. Deep radio imaging of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field : the nature of the faint radio population, and the star-formation history of the Universe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Vinodiran

    2013-07-01

    The centrepiece of this thesis is a deep, new, high-resolution 1.4-GHz image covering the United Kingdom Infrared (IR) Telescope IR Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) legacy field. Deep pseudo-continuum ...

  7. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  8. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  9. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  10. NREL Success Stories - SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randy

    2013-05-29

    NREL Scientists and SkyFuel share a story about how their partnership has resulted in a revolutionary concentrating solar power technology ReflecTech Mirror Film.

  11. Cosmology with Photometrically-Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05

  12. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  13. JGI Digital Scavenger Hunt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JGI Digital Scavenger Hunt JGI Digital Scavenger Hunt The NERSC webpages are a great resource for New and Old users, so this is the first stop on the JGI Digital Scavenger Hunt....

  14. Digital Data Management Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Digital Data Management Plans Digital Data Management Plans Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of...

  15. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of longer-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Here, we analyse spectrally resolved measurements of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  16. Definitions of Clear-sky Fluxes and Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Abhishek

    2012-02-14

    .2 Clear-sky Fluxes : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 2. SATELLITE-INFERRED CLEAR-SKY FLUXES : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1 CERES Instrument : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1.1 CERES... observation systems such as satellite system, radiosonde, solar panels etc. and simulation results from model generated scenarios including climate-model, reanalysis with assimilation system, radiative transfer models, to name a few, have helped...

  17. The Night Sky A Super Full Moon & Meteor Shower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    and the morning of August 13. The moon phase is a thin crescent that night leaving a very dark sky, but can appear anywhere in the sky. The new moon in August will occur on the 14th , thus aiding with dark for our Astronomy open houses can be found on the web at http

  18. Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education Courtney K. Blackwell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence early childhood educators' digital technology use. Survey data from 1234 early childhood educators indicate that attitudes toward the value of technology to aid

  19. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obenberger, K S; Hartman, J M; Clarke, T E; Dowell, J; Dubois, A; Dubois, D; Henning, P A; Lazio, J; Michalak, S; Schinzel, F K

    2015-01-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 13,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz, for pulse widths of 5 s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of $>2.7\\times 10^{-23}$, $>1.1\\times 10^{-23}$, and $>2.8\\times 10^{-23}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ to have rate densities $<1.2\\times10^{-4}$, $<5.6\\times10^{-4}$, and $<7.2\\times10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$

  20. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  1. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassell, Justine

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (MCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001) © 2001 Marc Prensky It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate

  2. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II: Do They Really Think Differently? By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vo 6, December 2001)l. 9 No. © 2001 Marc Prensky Different kinds

  3. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001) © 2001 Marc Prensky It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate these days

  4. Prototyping Tangible Input Devices with Digital Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Björn

    . Aside from 3D printers, other classes of digital fabrication hardware, like vinyl cutters, have also have previously investigated the benefits of tangibility in How Bodies Matter. 3D printing holds users of 3D printing can currently create such objects. For example, we surveyed the the online

  5. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project II: Global Properties and the Luminosity Function of Field Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Michael J. Kurtz; Carlos Allende Prieto; Timothy C. Beers; Ronald Wilhelm

    2005-05-16

    We discuss a 175 deg^2 spectroscopic survey for blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the Galactic halo. We use the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to select BHB candidates, and find that the 2MASS and SDSS color-selection is 38% and 50% efficient, respectively, for BHB stars. Our samples include one likely run-away B7 star 6 kpc below the Galactic plane. The global properties of the BHB samples are consistent with membership in the halo population: the median metallicity is [Fe/H]=-1.7, the velocity dispersion is 108 km/s, and the mean Galactic rotation of the BHB stars 3<|z|<15 kpc is -4 +- 30 km/s. We discuss the theoretical basis of the Preston, Shectman & Beers M_V-color relation for BHB stars, and conclude that intrinsic shape of the BHB M_V-color relation results from the physics of stars on the horizontal branch. We calculate the luminosity function for the field BHB star samples using the Efstathiou, Ellis, & Peterson maximum-likelihood method which is unbiased by density variations. The field BHB luminosity function exhibits a steep rise at bright luminosities, a peak between 0.8 < M_V < 1.0, and a tail at faint luminosities. We compare the field BHB luminosity functions with the luminosity functions derived from sixteen different globular cluster BHBs. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests suggest that field BHB stars and BHB stars in globular clusters share a common distribution of luminosities, with the exception of globular clusters with extended BHBs.

  6. DETECTION OF A NEARBY HALO DEBRIS STREAM IN THE WISE AND 2MASS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grillmair, Carl J. [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cutri, Roc; Masci, Frank J.; Conrow, Tim [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, Edward L., E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: roc@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: fmasci@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: tim@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: peter.r.eisenhardt@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Combining the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky Release with the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog, we detect a nearby, moderately metal-poor stellar debris stream spanning 24° across the southern sky. The stream, which we designate Alpheus, is at an estimated distance of ?1.9 kpc. Its position, orientation, width, estimated metallicity, and, to some extent, its distance, are in approximate agreement with what one might expect of the leading tidal tail of the southern globular cluster NGC 288.

  7. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  8. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  9. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  10. Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Lahav

    2004-11-03

    Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of cosmic structure in the on-going redshift surveys.

  11. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Curation: Cost of Digital Migration Ulla Bøgvad Kejser, Thefocus especially on costing digital migration activities. Inof the OAIS Model digital migration includes both transfer (

  12. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. Y.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low-redshift universe using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M {sub r} = -21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog of Yang et al. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalog of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power-law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross-correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M {sub r} = -21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 mag. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way (MW) and M31 shows that the MW/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.

  13. Chronopolis: Preserving our Digital Heritage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minor, David; Sutton, Don; Kozbial, Ardys; Burek, Michael; Smorul, Michael

    2009-01-01

    from the California Digital Library (CDL), geospatial databy the California Digital Library (CDL) and the Library ofby the Library of Congress' National Digital Information

  14. Neutrino mass limits: robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta, Antonio J; Verde, Licia

    2015-01-01

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.43 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses improves to 0.17 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a $\\Lambda$CDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.11 eV (0.15 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence o...

  15. Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidates Discovered in Year Two of the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drlica-Wagner, A; Rykoff, E S; Luque, E; Queiroz, A; Mao, Y -Y; Wechsler, R H; Simon, J D; Santiago, B; Yanny, B; Balbinot, E; Dodelson, S; Neto, A Fausti; James, D J; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Pieres, A; Stringer, K; Walker, A R; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Finley, D A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Wester, W; Zhang, Y; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two additional lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of incomplete or non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found using three independent automated search techniques, and are identified as statistically significant overdensities of individually resolved stars consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (Mv > -4.7 mag) and span a broad range of physical sizes (17 pc 27.5 mag arcsec$^2$) consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies, and would have had a low probability of detection if observed by the Sloan Digital Sky S...

  16. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Adriano; Ostrovski, Fernanda; Schechter, Paul L; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J; Lin, Huan; Auger, Matthew W; Courbin, Frederic; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Frieman, Josh; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Marshall, Philip J; McMahon, Richard G; Meylan, Georges; More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H; Rusu, Cristian E; Finley, David; Abbott, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe B; Allam, Sahar; Annis, James; Banerji, Manda; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Burke, David L; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; Cunha, Carlos E; D'Andrea, Chris B; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg P; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Estrada, Juan; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gerdes, David W; Gruen, Daniel; Gutierrez, Gaston; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Lahav, Ofer; Lima, Marco; Maia, Marcio A G; March, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Miller, Christopher J; Miquel, Ramon; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres A; Reil, Kevin; Romer, A Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Sako, Masao; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basilio; Scarpine, Vic; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, R Chris; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Thaler, Jon; Tucker, Douglas; Walker, Alistair R; Wechsler, Risa H; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an e...

  17. New H-band Stellar Spectral Libraries for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora, O; Prieto, C Allende; Carrera, R; Koesterke, L; Edvardsson, B; Castelli, F; Plez, B; Bizyaev, D; Cunha, K; Perez, A E Garcia; Gustafsson, B; Holtzman, J A; Lawler, J E; Majewski, S R; Manchado, A; Meszaros, Sz; Shane, N; Shetrone, M; Smith, V V; Zasowski, G

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band spectral region ($\\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed specific spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analysis of the survey data. The spectral libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of stellar spectral libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\\epsilon$T ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids of synthetic spectra cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\\leq...

  18. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the samemore »sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per ?z = 0.1 bin at z –2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M? have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter ? (f = ??m), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy ?(?) ? 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M?. We also find that the ?(?) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M?, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by > 0.5%.« less

  19. South African night sky brightness during high aerosol epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Hartmut; Marang, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Sky conditions in the remote, dry north-western interior of South Africa are now the subject of considerable interest in view of the imminent construction of numerous solar power plants in this area. Furthermore, the part of this region in which the core of the SKA is to be located (which includes SALT) has been declared an Astronomical Advantage Zone, for which sky brightness monitoring will now be mandatory. In this project we seek to characterise the sky brightness profile under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Key factors are of course the lunar phase and altitude, but in addition the sky brightness is also significantly affected by the atmospheric aerosol loading, as that influences light beam scattering. In this paper we chose to investigate the sky characteristics soon after the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991, which resulted in huge ash masses reaching the stratosphere (where they affected solar irradiance for several years). We re-reduced photometric sky measurements from the South Afric...

  20. Error analysis in cross-correlation of sky maps: application to the ISW detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Cabre; Pablo Fosalba; Enrique Gaztanaga; Marc Manera

    2007-01-15

    Constraining cosmological parameters from measurements of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect requires developing robust and accurate methods for computing statistical errors in the cross-correlation between maps. This paper presents a detailed comparison of such error estimation applied to the case of cross-correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and large-scale structure data. We compare theoretical models for error estimation with montecarlo simulations where both the galaxy and the CMB maps vary around a fiducial auto-correlation and cross-correlation model which agrees well with the current concordance LCDM cosmology. Our analysis compares estimators both in harmonic and configuration (or real) space, quantifies the accuracy of the error analysis and discuss the impact of partial sky survey area and the choice of input fiducial model on dark-energy constraints. We show that purely analytic approaches yield accurate errors even in surveys that cover only 10% of the sky and that parameter constraints strongly depend on the fiducial model employed. Alternatively, we discuss the advantages and limitations of error estimators that can be directly applied to data. In particular, we show that errors and covariances from the Jack-Knife method agree well with the theoretical approaches and simulations. We also introduce a novel method in real space that is computationally efficient and can be applied to real data and realistic survey geometries. Finally, we present a number of new findings and prescriptions that can be useful for analysis of real data and forecasts, and present a critical summary of the analyses done to date.

  1. Digital Library Initiative Rice University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digital Library Initiative Rice University Project Management General guidelines for digital projects Contact: dli (at) rice (dot) edu October, 2007 #12;Digital Library Initiative, Rice University................................................................................................8 #12;Guidelines for managing digital projects Page 2 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE We recognized

  2. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  3. Keck/Deimos Spectroscopy of a GALEX UV Selecte Sample from the Medium Imaging Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan P. Mallery; R. Michael Rich; Samir Salim; Todd Small; Stephane Charlot; Mark Seibert; Ted Wyder; Tom A. Barlow; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Christopher Martin; Patrick Morissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovivich; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Timothy M. Heckman; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Bruno Milliard; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Suk Young Yi

    2007-06-23

    We report results from a pilot program to obtain spectroscopy for objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS). Our study examines the properties of galaxies detected by GALEX fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic survey. This is the first study to extend the techinques of Salim et al. 2005 to estimate stellar masses, star formation rates (SFR) and the b (star formation history) parameter for star-forming galaxies out to z~0.7. We obtain redshifts for 50 GALEX MIS sources reaching NUV=23.9 (AB mag), having counterparts in the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). Of our sample, 43 are starforming galaxies with z<0.7, 3 have emission line ratios indicative of AGN with z<0.7, and 4 objects with z~1 are QSOs, 3 of which are not previously cataloged. We compare our sample to a much larger sample of ~50,000 matched GALEX/SDSS galaxies with SDSS spectroscopy; while our survey is shallow, the optical counterparts to our sources reach ~3 magnitudes fainter in SDSS r magnitude than the SDSS spectroscopic sample. We use emission line diagnostics for the galaxies to determine that the sample contains mostly star-forming galaxies. The galaxies in the sample populate the blue sequence in the NUV-r vs M_r color-magnitude diagram. Our sample has SFRs, luminosities, and velocity dispersions that are similar to the samples of faint compact blue galaxies studied previously in the same redshift range by Koo et. al 1995, Guzman et. al 1996 & Phillips et. al 1997. However, our sample is ~2 mag fainter in surface brightness than the compact blue galaxies. We find that the star-formation histories for a majority of the galaxies are consistent with a recent starburst within the last 100 Myr.

  4. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  5. HAWC: A Next Generation All-Sky VHE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sinnis; A. Smith; J. E. McEnery

    2004-03-03

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients ($\\sim$15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude ($>$ 4km) and have a large area ($\\sim$40,000 m$^2$). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  6. HAWC: a next generation all-sky VHE gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinnis, G. (Gus); Smith, A.; McEnery, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect shorthransients ({approx}15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude (> 4km) and have a large area ({approx}40,000 m{sup 2}). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  7. Large Kuiper Belt Objects: The Mauna Kea 8k CCD Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    Large Kuiper Belt Objects: The Mauna Kea 8k CCD Survey David Jewitt Institute for Astronomy, 2680 1998 January 14 #12; Large Kuiper Belt Objects Page 2 Abstract We describe a large­area ecliptic survey designed to assess the sky­plane surface density of bright Kuiper Belt Objects. We used a 8192 x 8192 pixel

  8. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ?2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ?100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m s{sup –1} for bright M dwarfs. With three or more epochs, this precision is adequate to detect substellar companions, including giant planets with short orbital periods, and flag them for higher-cadence followup. We present preliminary, and promising, results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.

  9. Astronomical Surveys and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickaelian, A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from Gamma-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in Gamma-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics play a...

  10. Digital Libraries - Meeting the Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Beth Forrest

    2001-02-27

    Digital Libraries – Meeting the Challenges Beth Forrest Warner Digital Library Challenges Are … … not just Digital Library challenges They are many of the same challenges facing libraries and scholarly communication in general... learning contexts In short, change … … leading to new organizational structures Challenges of Definition and Purpose What are Digital Libraries?? What’s their purpose?? A Digital Library Is: Selected and managed...

  11. Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Raymond L.

    Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky Raymond L. Lee, Jr.,1, * Wolfgang Meyer absorption at longer wavelengths by ozone's Chappuis bands. Because stratospheric ozone is greatly depleted correlations between ozone concentration and twilight colors. We also used a spectroradiometer at a midlatitude

  12. The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July Although some may mistakenly believe it is the Earth's distance from the Sun that creates the seasons, we are actually farthest from the Sun in early July during summer. This year, the Earth reaches the point when it is most distant from the Sun, the aphelion of its

  13. Pre-publication review. Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giullian, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Reviews the book "Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives," the first major work to address the issue of technology and Cyrillic language resources, thus providing an important “snapshot of Slavic digital librarianship...

  14. Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion's Belt in Great Basin Mythology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Catherine S

    1995-01-01

    2, pp. 146-152 (1995). Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion'sNevada, Reno, NV 89557-0006. Mountain Sheep in the Sky is ain the great himt for the Mountain Sheep. Muhwinti, Leader (

  15. Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held Oct. 28, 29 | ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... meeting of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... science policy and technology of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Panels ...

  16. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  17. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    an ecosystem that lives and breathes on information about us. We are grateful to others who have been thinking, and interact with the information, products, and industries of tomorrow. MediaX is located at Stanford stakeholders in the digital data ecosystem, including service providers of digital technologies, consumers

  18. Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lab ­ Building Kit S 20 2Summer 2012 Integrated Systems ­ Programming Surfaces a) Exterior -Water production with integrated digital fabrication." Automation in Construction, Vol. 16, No. 3, 298­310, 2007Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery through Kitsthrough Kits Lawrence Sass Associate Professor

  19. Digital Product Services Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    link physical products with digital services. By using Internet of Things technologies we try to help and at the University of St. Gallen conducts research in the field of Internet of Things. Our research focus is on next Internet of Things technologies and mobile devices make it feasible to "attach" digital product services

  20. AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL RADIANCE OF CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2012-01-01

    exposed to the sky. thermal Solar energy applications ofSolar Energy AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL

  1. The Digital Library Shell Yael Dubinsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehudai, Amiram

    repositories DSpace Fedora #12;8 Agenda Digital Libraries The Digital Library (DL) Shell The project

  2. Press Pass - Press Release Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Sloan Digital Sky Survey press releases Science News from Department of Energy national laboratories Return to...

  3. Four New BL Lac Surveys: Sampling New Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. H. Becker; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert; E. D. Feigelson; R. I. Kollgaard; G. D. Schmidt; P. S. Smith

    1998-10-15

    The advent of large area deep radio and X-ray surveys is leading to the creation of many new BL Lac samples. In particular, the ROSAT All-Sky, Green Bank and FIRST surveys are proving to be rich sources of new BL Lacs. We will discuss the methods used in four independent BL Lac searches based on these surveys. Comparison of the broadband spectral energy distributions of these BL Lacs with those of previously known objects clearly points to the existence of a large previously unrecognized population of objects with characteristics intermediate between those exhibited by Low and High energy peaked BL Lacs.

  4. Clear sky atmosphere at cm-wavelengths from climatology data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    We utilise ground-based, balloon-born and satellite climatology data to reconstruct site and season-dependent vertical profiles of precipitable water vapour (PWV). We use these profiles to numerically solve radiative transfer through the atmosphere, and derive atmospheric brightness temperature ($T_{\\rm atm}$) and optical depth ($\\tau$) at the centimetre wavelengths. We validate the reconstruction by comparing the model column PWV, with photometric measurements of PWV, performed in the clear sky conditions towards the Sun. Based on the measurements, we devise a selection criteria to filter the climatology data to match the PWV levels to the expectations of the clear sky conditions. We apply the reconstruction to the location of the Polish 32-metre radio telescope, and characterise $T_{\\rm atm}$ and $\\tau$ year-round, at selected frequencies. We also derive the zenith distance dependence for these parameters, and discuss shortcomings of using planar, single-layer, and optically thin atmospheric model approxima...

  5. Digital sonar system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, K.K.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1995-11-21

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal. 4 figs.

  6. Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivative Classifiers Should KnowLandfillBright Skies

  7. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN HUBBLE VOLUME SIMULATIONS: COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SKY SURVEY POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter

    Consortium) Received 2001 October 26; accepted 2002 March 7 ABSTRACT We use gigaparticle N-body simulations to study galaxy cluster populations in Hubble volumes of ÃCDM (m ¼ 0:3, Ã ¼ 0:7) and CDM (m ¼ 1) world; of specific thermal energies in dark matter and intracluster gas. We derive a scaling with power spectrum

  8. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Madejski, G.M. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard ; Burlon, D. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Publication Date: 2012-04-02...

  9. Surveying the TeV Sky with Milagro C.P. Lansdell for the Milagro Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V emitters of gamma-ray bursts, galaxy clusters, and EGRET unidentified sources. Based on the success 87545 Abstract. A wide field of view, high duty factor, TeV gamma-ray observatory is essential of Milagro, a second generation water Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory is planned which will give an increase

  10. EXTENDED HOT HALOS AROUND ISOLATED GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dai, Xinyu, E-mail: michevan@umich.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    We place general constraints on the luminosity and mass of hot X-ray-emitting gas residing in extended 'hot halos' around nearby massive galaxies. We examine stacked images of 2165 galaxies from the 2MASS Isolated Galaxy Catalog as well as subsets of this sample based on galaxy morphology and K-band luminosity. We detect X-ray emission at high confidence (ranging up to nearly 10{sigma}) for each subsample of galaxies. The average L{sub X} within 50 kpc is 1.0 {+-} 0.1 (statistical) {+-}0.2 (systematic) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, although the early-type galaxies are more than twice as luminous as the late-type galaxies. Using a spatial analysis, we also find evidence for extended emission around five out of seven subsamples (the full sample, the luminous galaxies, early-type galaxies, luminous late-type galaxies, and luminous early-type galaxies) at 92.7%, 99.3%, 89.3%, 98.7%, and 92.1% confidence, respectively. Several additional lines of evidence also support this conclusion and suggest that about 1/2 of the total emission is extended, and about 1/3 of the extended emission comes from hot gas. For the sample of luminous galaxies, which has the strongest evidence for extended emission, the average hot gas mass is 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} within 50 kpc and the implied accretion rate is 0.4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  11. Astro2010 Decadal Survey Whitepaper: Coordinated Science in the Gravitational and Electromagnetic Skies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua S. Bloom; Daniel E. Holz; Scott A. Hughes; Kristen Menou; Allan Adams; Scott F. Anderson; Andy Becker; Geoffrey C. Bower; Niel Brandt; Bethany Cobb; Kem Cook; Alessandra Corsi; Stefano Covino; Derek Fox; Andrew Fruchter; Chris Fryer; Jonathan Grindlay; Dieter Hartmann; Zoltan Haiman; Bence Kocsis; Lynne Jones; Abraham Loeb; Szabolcs Marka; Brian Metzger; Ehud Nakar; Samaya Nissanke; Daniel A. Perley; Tsvi Piran; Dovi Poznanski; Tom Prince; Jeremy Schnittman; Alicia Soderberg; Michael Strauss; Peter S. Shawhan; David H. Shoemaker; Jonathan Sievers; Christopher Stubbs; Gianpiero Tagliaferri; Pietro Ubertini; Przemyslaw Wozniak

    2009-02-10

    It is widely expected that the coming decade will witness the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs). The ground-based LIGO and Virgo GW observatories are being upgraded to advanced sensitivity, and are expected to observe a significant binary merger rate. The launch of The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) would extend the GW window to low frequencies, opening new vistas on dynamical processes involving massive (M >~ 10^5 M_Sun) black holes. GW events are likely to be accompanied by electromagnetic (EM) counterparts and, since information carried electromagnetically is complementary to that carried gravitationally, a great deal can be learned about an event and its environment if it becomes possible to measure both forms of radiation in concert. Measurements of this kind will mark the dawn of trans-spectral astrophysics, bridging two distinct spectral bands of information. The aim of this whitepaper is to articulate future directions in both theory and observation that are likely to impact broad astrophysical inquiries of general interest. What will EM observations reflect on the nature and diversity of GW sources? Can GW sources be exploited as complementary probes of cosmology? What cross-facility coordination will expand the science returns of gravitational and electromagnetic observations?

  12. CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLE CONSTANT (Journal Article)|

  13. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2)Article)SciTechon MPASReport) |Article) |Secondary

  14. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2)Article)SciTechon MPASReport) |Article)

  15. Prospects for future very high-energy gamma-ray sky survey: impact of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2)Article)SciTechon MPASReport)Lujansecondary gamma

  16. Prospects for future very high-energy gamma-ray sky survey: impact of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2)Article)SciTechon MPASReport)Lujansecondary

  17. VIRTUAL OBSERVATORY: Plate Content Digitization, Archive Mining & Image Sequence Processing edited by M. Tsvetkov, V. Golev, F. Murtagh, and R. Molina, Heron Press, Soa, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project D. Mink1 , A. Doane2 R. Simcoe2 E. Los2 J. Grindlay3 1 Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory digitizing the catalog of plates, constructing an automatic pipeline to make the scanned images useful. Telescopes in the United States, South America, New Zealand, and South Africa gave complete sky coverage over

  18. Digital Technology and Culture Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Digital Technology and Culture Program College of Arts and Sciences Degree Options Bachelor of Arts in Digital Technology and Culture Minors Digital Technology and Culture Program Strengths · Demonstrate competency with technology for designing and distributing digital works in various mediums. · Demonstrate

  19. Digital ac monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, George W. (Natick, MA); Kern, Jr., Edward C. (Lincoln, MA)

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  20. Digital ac monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  1. Digital Wireless Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath Jr., - Robert W.

    Digital Wireless Communication: Physical Layer Exploitation Wireless Networking and Communications 30, 12 #12;Wireless is Everywhere cellular networks local area networks personal area networks emerging applications Thursday, August 30, 12 #12;Where is Wireless Taught? 3 Undergraduate Graduate

  2. Discovery of Two Gravitationally Lensed Quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agnello, A.

    2015-08-05

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64. The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51'' . DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloanmore »Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. Furthermore, the Einstein Radius is 0.68'' corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M?. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.« less

  3. Neutrino mass limits: robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio J. Cuesta; Viviana Niro; Licia Verde

    2015-11-18

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.43 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses improves to 0.17 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a $\\Lambda$CDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.11 eV (0.15 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.11 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  4. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ? 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ? 10{sup 9} M {sub ?} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  5. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  6. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  7. The Analytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larive, Cynthia K.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical Sciences Digital Library (http://www.asdlib.org).Analytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL) Cynthia K. LariveAnalytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL) is a collection

  8. Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

    2000-12-08

    Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

  9. American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump

  10. SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to:Idaho-Utah |RenovablesSixthPowerSkySails

  11. Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s BiodieselSky, Montana:

  12. Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:ClayBurnVitaCleanstar EnergyClearLake,Skies

  13. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2003-02-03

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  14. Cloudy Skies: Assessing Public Understanding of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterman, John

    2002-06-07

    Surveys show most Americans believe global warming is real. But many advocate delaying action until there is more evidence that warming is harmful. The stock and ...

  15. Digital optical conversion module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  16. Design and analysis of redshift surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens; A. N. Taylor

    1997-05-27

    In this paper we consider methods of analysis and optimal design of redshift surveys. In the first part, we develop a formalism for analysing galaxy redshift surveys which are essentially two-dimensional, such as thin declination slices. The formalism is a power spectrum method, using spherical coordinates, allowing the distorting effects of galaxy peculiar velocities to be calculated to linear order on the assumption of statistical isotropy but without further approximation. In this paper, we calculate the measured two-dimensional power for a constant declination strip, widely used in redshift surveys. We present a likelihood method for estimating the three-dimensional real-space power spectrum and the redshift distortion simultaneously, and show that for thin surveys of reasonable depth, the large-scale 3D power cannot be measured with high accuracy. The redshift distortion may be estimated successfully, and with higher accuracy if the 3D power spectrum can be measured independently, for example from a large-scale sky-projected catalogue. In the second part, we show how a 3D survey design can be optimized to measure the power spectrum, considering whether areal coverage is more important than depth, and whether the survey should be sampled sparsely or not. We show quite generally that width is better than depth, and show how the optimal sparse-sampling fraction, f, depends on the power, P, to be measured. For a Schechter luminosity function, a simple optimization fP \\simeq 500 h^{-3} Mpc^3 is found.

  17. The stellar content of the Hamburg/ESO survey. III. Field horizontal-branch stars in the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Christlieb; T. C. Beers; C. Thom; R. Wilhelm; S. Rossi; C. Flynn; L. Wisotzki; D. Reimers

    2004-11-11

    We present a sample of 8321 candidate Field Horizontal-Branch (FHB) stars selected by automatic spectral classification in the digital data base of the Hamburg/ESO objective-prism survey. The stars are distributed over 8225 square degrees of the southern sky, at |b| > 30 deg. The average distance of the sample, assuming that they are all FHB stars, is 9.8 kpc, and distances of up to ~30 kpc are reached. Moderate-resolution spectroscopic follow-up observations and UBV photometry of 125 test sample stars demonstrate that the contamination of the full candidate sample with main-sequence A-type stars is < 16%, while it would be up to 50% in a flux-limited sample at high galactic latitudes. Hence more than ~6800 of our FHB candidates are expected to be genuine FHB stars. The candidates are being used as distance probes for high-velocity clouds and for studies of the structure and kinematics of the Galactic halo.

  18. The CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey I: The Survey and the Catalog for the Patch CNOC 0223+00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee; S. L. Morris; H. Lin; R. G. Carlberg; P. B. Hall; M. Sawicki; D. R. Patton; G. D. Wirth; E. Ellingson; C. W. Shepherd

    2000-04-03

    The Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC2) Field Galaxy Redshift Survey is a spectroscopic/photometric survey of faint galaxies over 1.5 square degrees of sky with a nominal spectroscopic limit of R_c=21.5 mag. The primary goals of the survey are to investigate the evolution of galaxy clustering and galaxy populations over the redshift range of approximately 0.1 to 0.6. The survey area contains four widely separated patches on the sky with a total spectroscopic sample of over 6000 redshifts and a photometric sample of over 40,000 galaxies with 5-color photometry. We describe the survey and observational strategies, multi-object spectroscopy mask design procedure, and data reduction techniques for creating the spectroscopic-photometric catalogs. We also discuss the derivations of various statistical weights for the redshift sample which allow it to be used as a complete sample. As the initial release of the survey data, we present the data set and some statistics for the Patch CNOC0223+00.

  19. Alexandria Digital Library Project The ADEPT Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Library Project The ADEPT Digital Library Architecture Greg Janée gjanee@alexandria.ucsb.edu James Frew frew@bren.ucsb.edu #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project 2Greg Janée, James Frew · JCDL 2002-level metadata: buckets constraint types metadata mapping standard buckets Collection discovery Current

  20. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  1. Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization in Digital Libraries Greg Janée · James Frew · David Valentine University of California, Santa Barbara #12;Alexandria Digital Library environments e.g., GIS #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project Janée, Frew, Valentine · Content Access

  2. Survey Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Knowledge of surface sediment distribution in Galveston Bay is important because it allows us to better understand how the bay works and how human activities impact the bay and its ecosystems. In this project, six areas of bay bottom were surveyed...

  3. THE H i PARKES ZONE OF AVOIDANCE SURVEY: THE NORTHERN EXTENSION J. L. Donley,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraan-Korteweg, Renée C.

    -Smith,1 R. C. Kraan-Korteweg,3 J. M. Islas-Islas,3 A. Schro¨der,4 P. A. Henning,5 B. Koribalski,1 S. Mader (DENIS; Schro¨der et al. 1999), the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; Jarrett et al. 2000

  4. Inter-Faculty Digital Journalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inter-Faculty Digital Journalism As media migrate to digital platforms, this has created a need about a career in journalism? UWindsor offers a combined honours journalism degree that is unique, alternative and citizen media. A Rigorous, Enriching Program UWindsor's Digital Journalism program unites

  5. COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    2011-2012 Survey Instrument Theme Benchmark Question Responses Historic Data Available EligibleCOACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey SURVEY INSTRUMENT 2011-12 © 2011 President & Fellows in Higher Education Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey 2011-2012 Survey Instrument Theme Benchmark Question

  6. Probing dark energy with baryonic oscillations and future radio surveys of neutral Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. B. Abdalla; S. Rawlings

    2004-11-12

    Current surveys may be on the verge of measuring the baryonic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum which are clearly seen imprinted on the Cosmic Microwave Background. It has recently been proposed that these oscillations allow a `standard ruler' method of probing the equation of state of dark energy. In this paper we present a new calculation of the number of galaxies future adio telescopes will detect in surveys of the sky in neutral Hydrogen (HI). We estimate the likely statistical errors if the standard ruler method were to be applied to such surveys. We emphasise uncertainties in our calculations, and pinpoint the most important features of future HI surveys if they are to provide new constraints on dark energy via baryonic oscillations. Designs of future radio telescopes are required to have a large bandwidth (characterised by \\beta$, the ratio of the instantaneous bandwidth to the bandwidth required by survey) and to have the widest instantaneous (1.4 GHz) field of view ($FOV$) possible. Given the expected sensitivity of a future Square Kilometre Array (SKA), given that half of its collecting area will be concentrated in a core of diameter $\\sim 5 ~ \\rm km$, and given a reasonable survey duration ($T_0$ $\\sim$ 1 yr), we show that there will be negligible shot noise on a power spectrum derived from HI galaxies out to redshift $z \\simeq 1.5$. To access the largest cosmic volume possible by surveying all the sky available, we argue that $\\beta$, $T_0$ and $FOV$ must obey the relation $\\beta FOV T_0 \\gtsimeq 10 \\rm deg^2$ yr. An $\\sim$1-yr SKA survey would then contain $\\gtsimeq 10^{9} (f_{\\rm sky}/0.5)$ HI galaxies and provide constraints on the dark-energy parameter $w$ of order $\\Delta w \\simeq 0.01 (f_{\\rm sky}/0.5)^{-0.5}$.

  7. The Fourth VLBA Calibrator Survey - VCS4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Petrov; Y. Y. Kovalev; E. Fomalont; D. Gordon

    2005-10-24

    This paper presents the fourth extension to the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey, containing 258 new sources not previously observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). This survey, based on three 24 hour VLBA observing sessions, fills remaining areas on the sky above declination -40 degrees where the calibrator density is less than one source within a 4 degree radius disk at any given direction. The share of these area was reduced from 4.6% to 1.9%. Source positions were derived from astrometric analysis of group delays determined at 2.3 and 8.6 GHz frequency bands using the Calc/Solve software package. The VCS4 catalogue of source positions, plots of correlated flux density versus projected baseline length, contour plots and fits files of naturally weighted CLEAN images, as well as calibrated visibility function files are available on the Web at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/vcs4 .

  8. GALEX DIFFUSE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SKY: THE DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2014-08-01

    I present tabulations of the diffuse observations made by the GALEX spacecraft in two UV bands (FUV: 1539 Å and NUV: 2316 Å) from the (almost) final data release of the GALEX spacecraft (GR6/GR7). This data release includes all the FUV observations and the majority of the NUV observations. I discuss overall trends in the data but the primary purpose of this paper is to make the data available to the public. The data files described in this paper are hosted by the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at the Space Telescope Science Insitute from whence they may be downloaded. For ease of use, I have also created maps of the diffuse radiation in both bands over the entire observed sky at 6' resolution.

  9. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone; Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Buljan, Marina

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  10. Ancient peoples had the benefit of dark skies and experienced the full spectacle of the starry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the sky in winter and high in summer, as well as giving the daily alternation of day and night. Some area low in the southern sky up to a few centuries before the digging of the ditch and bank. Ancient

  11. Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky Aldo Morselli INFN Roma Tor Vergata 14 Jun 2012 Dark Side of the Univers 2012 Buzios 10-15 June #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma press/web releases. #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 10 The Fermi LAT gamma-ray sky 3-year all

  12. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-10-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 {sup 12}C{sup 16}O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z {sub max}; e.g., for z {sub max} = 10, the field of view yields approx4 x 4 deg{sup 2}. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a LAMBDA cold dark matter (LAMBDACDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z approx> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  13. Citizen Science Case Study: Galaxy Zoo / Zooniverse Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    with the classification of galaxies. Ground and space-based observation platforms such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to collect 50 million classifications within its first year of operation; though the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to allow individuals to aid with scientific inquiry through annotating various astronomical photographs

  14. Metrological digital audio reconstruction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fadeyev; Vitaliy (Berkeley, CA), Haber; Carl (Berkeley, CA)

    2004-02-19

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with little or no contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods coupled with digital image processing and numerical analysis. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Two examples used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record and a commercial confocal scanning probe to study a 1920's celluloid Edison cylinder. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the samples and with a digitally re-mastered version of an original magnetic recording. There is also a more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software.

  15. **This is a two year term appointment with the possibility of extension.** The MIT Libraries is seeking a production and serviceoriented individual to join the Digital/MIT Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This position provides the opportunity to contribute to the work of building the Libraries' digital production assistance related to the Libraries digital collections. S/he will create, edit, and maintain of digital collections preparation and project work, the Associate will survey the Libraries collections

  16. The National Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaboration to Achieve National Digital Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Martha; Gallinger, Michelle; Potter, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    made in creating digital library services and content. ThePersistent Digital Archives & Library System. Presented atchallenge of digital preservation, the Library of Congress

  17. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Steece, B. 2000. Software cost estimation with COCOMO II.Developing a Framework of Cost Elements for PreservingAshley, K. 1999. Digital archive costs: Facts and fallacies.

  18. SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management Complexity Input Output Input Output Compare #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights available) · Repair/Recovery #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08

  19. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ? 6 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ? 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ? 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Ly? emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman ? emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ? 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ? 6.

  20. Star Formation and Metallicity History of the SDSS galaxy survey: unlocking the fossil record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Panter; Alan F. Heavens; Raul Jimenez

    2003-08-12

    Using MOPED we determine non-parametrically the star-formation and metallicity history of over 37,000 high-quality galaxy spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early data release. We use the entire spectral range, rather than concentrating on specific features, and we estimate the complete star formation history without prior assumptions about its form (by constructing so-called `population boxes'). The main results of this initial study are that the star formation rate in SDSS galaxies has been in decline for ~6 Gyr; a metallicity distribution for star-forming gas which is peaked ~3 Gyr ago at about solar metallicity, inconsistent with closed-box models, but consistent with infall models. We also determine the infall rate of gas in SDSS and show that it has been significant for the last 3 Gyr. We investigate errors using a Monte-Carlo Markov Chain algorithm. Further, we demonstrate that recovering star formation and metallicity histories for such a large sample becomes intractable without data compression methods, particularly the exploration of the likelihood surface. By exploring the whole likelihood surface we show that age-metallicity degeneracies are not as severe as by using only a few spectral features. We find that 65% of galaxies contain a significant old population (with an age of at least 8 Gyr), including recent starburst galaxies, and that over 97% have some stars older than 2 Gyr. It is the first time that the past star formation history has been determined from the fossil record of the present-day spectra of galaxies.

  1. Environmental Digital Library Project: Playa Lakes and the Ogallala Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Bill; Oliver, Marina

    1999-01-01

    Building the Sci/Tech Digital Library, part 2: Filling the1995) Copyright and Digital Libraries. Communications of theand Practice of Digital Libraries, Digital Libraries '94 in

  2. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy ($\\gtrsim5\\times10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  3. The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.; Coil, A.L.; Conselice, C.; Cooper, M.; Croton,; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R.; Faber, S.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, B.; Goss, W.M.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-07-21

    In this the first of a series of ''Letters'', we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z {approx} 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS{sup 30} X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX{sup 31} ultraviolet (1200-2500 A), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey{sup 32} optical (3600-9000 {angstrom}), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 {angstrom}), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS{sup 33} optical (4400-8500 {angstrom}), Palomar/WIRC{sup 34} near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC{sup 35} mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA{sup 36} radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope{sup 37}. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  4. DALSA Digital Cinema 03-70-00218-01 Image Sensor Architectures for Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    DALSA Digital Cinema 03-70-00218-01 Image Sensor Architectures for Digital Cinematography Architectures for Digital Cinematography 2 DALSA Digital Cinema 03-70-00218-01 photosensitive layer without

  5. DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE PROJECT PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an industry consensus document on how to scope and implement the underlying information technology infrastructure that is needed to support a vast array of real-time digital technologies to improve NPP work efficiency, to reduce human error, to increase production reliability and to enhance nuclear safety. A consensus approach is needed because: • There is currently a wide disparity in nuclear utility perspectives and positions on what is prudent and regulatory-compliant for introducing certain digital technologies into the plant environment. For example, there is a variety of implementation policies throughout the industry concerning electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), cyber security, wireless communication coverage, mobile devices for workers, mobile technology in the control room, and so forth. • There is a need to effectively share among the nuclear operating companies the early experience with these technologies and other forms of lessons-learned. There is also the opportunity to take advantage of international experience with these technologies. • There is a need to provide the industry with a sense of what other companies are implementing, so that each respective company can factor this into their own development plans and position themselves to take advantage of new work methods as they are validated by the initial implementing companies. In the nuclear power industry, once a better work practice has been proven, there is a general expectation that the rest of the industry will adopt it. However, the long-lead time of information technology infrastructure could prove to be a delaying factor. A secondary objective of this effort is to provide a general understanding of the incremental investment that would be required to support the targeted digital technologies, in terms of an incremental investment over current infrastructure. This will be required for business cases to support the adoption of these new technologies.

  6. ECE 468 Digital Signal Processing 1. History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying "Ada"

    , digital image processing, signal processing for communications, biomedical signal processing, seismic dataECE 468 Digital Signal Processing 1. History: · Digital signal processing has its roots in 17th and Gauss and as new as digital computers and integrated circuits 2. Definition: · Digital signal processing

  7. Digital Preservation Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences Between Tropical andDigital

  8. A digital tachometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSutter, David H

    1952-01-01

    . The Reset Circuit Figure 9. The Time Dividing Circuit Figure 10. Input Amplifier and Pulse Source 20 22 28 I. INTRODUCTION The measurement of the speed of rotating mach1nery has been accomplished in a great variety of ways. One of the more corn... techniaues recently developed for use in electronic digital c omputers it 1s possible to count pulses produced by a device on the rotating shaft over a controlled period of time and thereby arrive at the speed of the shaft. Th1s has the advantages...

  9. The green bank northern celestial cap pulsar survey. I. Survey description, data analysis, and initial results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, K.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A. J.; Garcia, A.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Leake, S.; Lynch, R. S.; Archibald, A. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Day, D.; Flanigan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Boyles, J.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I.; and others

    2014-08-10

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts, at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4096 channels every 81.92 ?s. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope (? > –40°, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure (<30 pc cm{sup –3}) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of –1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214+5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit and has an optical counterpart identified in archival data. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very short-period (96 minutes) orbit with a very low mass companion (8 M{sub J}). PSR J0645+5158 is an isolated MSP with a timing residual RMS of 500 ns and has been added to pulsar timing array experiments. PSR J1434+7257 is an isolated, intermediate-period pulsar that has been partially recycled. PSR J1816+4510 is an eclipsing MSP in a short-period orbit (8.7 hr) and may have recently completed its spin-up phase.

  10. THE MASSIVE AND DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY. III. SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH MASSES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AT z ~ 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodwin, M.

    We present CARMA 30 GHz Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) observations of five high-redshift (z [> over ~] 1), infrared-selected galaxy clusters discovered as part of the all-sky Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). ...

  11. Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

  12. Special Topics: Digital Preservation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    of preservation. It explores the levels of control and decision making that need to be addressed in digital, it will discuss longevity as a design concern in Information Systems. Goals and Objectives Students having demonstrated in assignments 2 and 4) conducting a practical analysis and assessment of a given digital

  13. A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Peter William

    We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

  14. A SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE EFFECTS OF DAYLIGHT FROM CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Reflected Component or IRC). The total for these threeDaylight Factor SC + ERC + IRC The Sky Component: The skycomponent is given as: Average IRC where T Transmittance of

  15. OT 060420: A Seemingly Optical Transient Recorded by All-Sky Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff

    2006-07-03

    We report on a ~5th magnitude flash detected for approximately 10 minutes by two CONCAM all-sky cameras located in Cerro Pachon - Chile and La Palma - Spain. A third all-sky camera, located in Cerro Paranal - Chile did not detect the flash, and therefore the authors of this paper suggest that the flash was a series of cosmic-ray hits, meteors, or satellite glints. Another proposed hypothesis is that the flash was an astronomical transient with variable luminosity. In this paper we discuss bright optical transient detection using fish-eye all-sky monitors, analyze the apparently false-positive optical transient, and propose possible causes to false optical transient detection in all-sky cameras.

  16. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  17. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  18. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  19. The WSRT virgo filament survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Popping; Robert Braun

    2007-03-27

    In the last few years the realization has emerged that the universal baryons are almost equally distributed by mass in three components: (1) galactic concentrations, (2) a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and (3) a diffuse intergalactic medium. These three components are predicted by hydrodynamical simulations and are probed by QSO absorption lines. To observe the WHIM in neutral hydrogen, observations are needed which are deeper than log(N$_{HI}$)=18. The WHIM should appear as a Cosmic Web, underlying the galaxies with higher column densities. We have used the WSRT, to simulate a filled aperture by observing at very high hour angles, to reach very high column density sensitivity. To achieve even higher image fidelity, an accurate model of the WSRT primary beam was developed. This will be used in the joint deconvolution of the observations. To get a good overview of the distribution and kinematics of the Cosmic Web, a deep survey of 1500 square degrees of sky was undertaken, containing the galaxy filament extending between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster. The auto-correlation data has been reduced and has an RMS of $\\Delta N_{HI} = 4.2\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ over 20 kms$^{-1}$. Several sources have been tentatively detected, which were previously unknown, as well as an indication for diffuse intergalactic filaments.

  20. Lake Survey DETROIT, MICH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · Lake Survey Center DETROIT, MICH. NOAA TM NOS LSC 06 NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS LSC 06 U. S Winter 1971_72 R. A. Ass.,i Lake Survey Center National Ocean Survey, NOAA Detroit, Michigan I ABSTRACT

  1. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  2. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  3. A Cluster Deficit in the ROSAT NEP Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Gioia

    1999-11-29

    We have used data from the deepest region of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region, to produce a complete and unbiased X-ray selected sample of distant clusters to understand the nature of cluster evolution and determine implications for large scale structure models. In this contribution results are presented from a comparison between the number of the observed clusters in the NEP survey and the number of expected clusters assuming no-evolution models. There is a deficit by a factor of 2.5-4 of high luminosity, high redshift clusters with respect to the present. The evolution goes in the same direction as the original EMSS result, and the results from the CfA-IfA 160 deg^{2} survey by Vikhlini et al. 1998.

  4. Wide-field surveys from the SNAP mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    agkim@lbl.gov

    2002-07-23

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/NIR imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. Two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days over 16 months to a magnitude depth of AB = 27.7 in each of nine filters. Co-adding images over all epochs will give an AB = 30.3 per filter. A 300 square-degree field will be surveyed with no repeat visits to AB = 28 per filter. The nine filters span 3500-17000 {angstrom}. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data supports a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  5. DCC Digital Curation Manual: Preservation Strategies for Digital Libraries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdsworth, David

    2007-11-01

    Ensuring that digital data remain accessible and reusable over time requires the implementation of proactive, scalable and sustainable preservation strategies. To be of greatest effect, preservation issues must be ...

  6. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  7. Wide Angle Effects in Galaxy Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2013-01-01

    Current and future galaxy surveys cover a large fraction of the entire sky with a significant redshift range, and the recent theoretical development shows that general relativistic effects are present in galaxy clustering on very large scales. This trend has renewed interest in the wide angle effect in galaxy clustering measurements, in which the distant-observer approximation is often adopted. Using the full wide-angle formula for computing the redshift-space correlation function, we show that compared to the sample variance, the deviation in the redshift-space correlation function from the simple Kaiser formula with the distant-observer approximation is negligible in the SDSS and is completely irrelevant in future galaxy surveys such as Euclid and the BigBOSS, if the theoretical prediction from the Kaiser formula is averaged over the survey volume and the non-uniform distribution of cosine angle between the line-of-sight and the pair separation directions is properly considered. We also find small correctio...

  8. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Joseph J; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Cai, Y Dora; da Costa, Luiz; Darnell, J Anthony; Daues, Gregory E; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; Martelli, leandro; Neilsen, Eric; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ogando, Ricardo; Parga, Alex; Sheldon, Erin; Tucker, Douglas; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Stoughton, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at NCSA and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our appr...

  9. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Beldica, Cristina; Bertin, Emmanuel; Dora Cai, Y.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; Darnell, J.Anthony; Daues, Gregory E.; Jarvis, Michael; Gower, Michelle; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  10. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph J. Mohr; Wayne Barkhouse; Cristina Beldica; Emmanuel Bertin; Y. Dora Cai; Luiz da Costa; J. Anthony Darnell; Gregory E. Daues; Michael Jarvis; Michelle Gower; Huan Lin; leandro Martelli; Eric Neilsen; Chow-Choong Ngeow; Ricardo Ogando; Alex Parga; Erin Sheldon; Douglas Tucker; Nikolay Kuropatkin; Chris Stoughton

    2008-07-16

    The Dark Energy Survey collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at NCSA and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used Teragrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  11. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF DIGITAL LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furht, Borko

    Chapter 18 DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF DIGITAL LIBRARIES Xiuqi Li and Borko Furht Abstract As the Internet and the World Wide Web expanded so fast, digital libraries has become a very hot topic. Since 1992 of these studies. We first discuss designing digital libraries, including definition of digital libraries

  12. Title: Digital Map of Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Digital Map of Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Publisher: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Edition: N/A Versions: N/A Publication Date: 2003 Coverage Date(s): N/A Updates: N/A Abstract: The Digital Map of Ontario is a digital product digitized from

  13. Chapter XLIII USGS Digital Libraries for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter XLIII USGS Digital Libraries for Coastal and Marine Science Frances L. Lightsom U three related digital libraries providing access to topical and georeferenced information for coastal Digital Library and Coastal Change Hazards Digital Library. These three members of the MRIB family run

  14. A framework for digital watercolor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Patrick Michael

    2008-10-10

    This research develops an extendible framework for reproducing watercolor in a digital environment, with a focus on interactivity using the GPU. The framework uses the lattice Boltzmann method, a relatively new approach to fluid dynamics...

  15. Digital compositing with traditional artwork 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Michael Leighton

    2005-11-01

    This thesis presents a general method and guidelines for compositing digital characters into traditional artwork by matching a character to the perspective, lighting, style, and complexity of the particular work of art. ...

  16. Digitizing neurons | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with big computing resources BigNeuron, a new project led by the Allen Institute for Brain Science, aims to streamline scientist's ability to create 3-D digital models of...

  17. Digital holographic imaging of microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Michael Trevor

    2006-01-01

    Imaging aquatic microorganisms in 3D space is of interest to biologists and ocean scientists seeking to understand the behavior of these organisms in their natural environments. In this research, digital holographic imaging ...

  18. GEODETIC SURVEY SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . SP #4 OUT OF PRINT U.S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY. ... GEODESY. THE TRANSCONTINENTAL TRIANGULATION

  19. STEP Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  20. Roadmap: Digital Sciences Digital Systems Analysis Bachelor of Science [DS-BS-DS-DSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Digital Sciences ­ Digital Systems Analysis ­ Bachelor of Science [DS-BS-DS-DSA] School of Digital Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 16-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap (lower or upper division) 6 #12;Roadmap: Digital Sciences ­ Digital Systems Analysis ­ Bachelor

  1. Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY Digital library nouvelle 1 hal-00718385,version1-16Jul2012 Author manuscript, published in "Digital library as a controversy: Gallica vs Google, Dubrovnik : Croatia (2009)" #12;Digital library as a controversy Abstract

  2. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  3. INTEGRAL high energy sky: The keV to MeV cosmic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ubertini; A. De Rosa; A. Bazzano; L. Bassani; V. Sguera

    2008-02-03

    After almost 5 years of operation, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Space Observatory has unveiled a new soft Gamma ray sky and produced a remarkable harvest of results, ranging from identification of new high energy sources, to the discovery of dozens of variable sources to the mapping of the Aluminum emission from the Galaxy Plane to the presence of electrons and positrons generating the annihilation line in the Galaxy central radian. INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS gamma ray catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected above 20 keV. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting at high energy, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), HESS/MAGIC counterparts and new view of the cosmic gamma ray diffuse background.

  4. Apparatus and method for managing digital resources by passing digital resource tokens between queues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, H.J.; Lindenstruth, V.

    1999-06-29

    A method of managing digital resources of a digital system includes the step of reserving token values for certain digital resources in the digital system. A selected token value in a free-buffer-queue is then matched to an incoming digital resource request. The selected token value is then moved to a valid-request-queue. The selected token is subsequently removed from the valid-request-queue to allow a digital agent in the digital system to process the incoming digital resource request associated with the selected token. Thereafter, the selected token is returned to the free-buffer-queue. 6 figs.

  5. The National Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaboration to Achieve National Digital Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Martha; Gallinger, Michelle; Potter, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    is great. The time for an alliance is now. References Gantz,Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaborationforming a national stewardship alliance of committed digital

  6. HOME OF THE ILLINOIS STATE SCIENTIFIC SURVEYS Illinois Natural History Survey Illinois State Archaeological Survey Illinois State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Archaeological Survey · Illinois State Geological Survey · Illinois State Water Survey · Illinois Sustainable

  7. A Survey on Mining Software Survey Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    · Software Metrics IDEA ! · Easy evaluation / validation · Stimulate idea 13 / 39 #12;Research Trend (3/4) 14 ­ Apache and Mozilla 2005 Impact of Software Engineering Research on the Practice of SCM 2007 RepresentingA Survey on Mining Software Archives Survey Presentation Jin Ung, Oh ­ 2007.07.11 #12;Contents

  8. LIFE3: Predicting Long Term Digital Preservation Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Paul; Hole, Brian

    2009-01-01

    dedicated Digital Preservation Team, the British Library hasthe Digital Preservation Team at the British Library isLibrary, which studied and compared both analogue and digital

  9. An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Stephen; Kunze, John; Loy, David

    2009-01-01

    Making of HathiTrust Digital Library. Archiving 2009 FinalLoy California Digital Library, University of California 415the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-

  10. Using Digital Images of the Zebra Finch Song System as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    barriers by creating a library of digital images of the birdcreating digital tools, including an image library of songlibrary, students not only repeat an Bird Song System Digital

  11. Center for Music Experiment: Creating a Digital Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Spitz, Cristela; Kesner, David; Reser, Greg

    2011-01-01

    available through the Digital Library Collections websiteBrad Westbrook • Digital Library Program: Robin Chandler,Stanonik, Huawei Weng • Digital Library Steering Committee:

  12. The Dartmouth Digital Library Program, Priorities, and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    The Dartmouth Digital Library Program, Priorities, and Policies #12;The Dartmouth Digital Library: Program, Priorities, and Policies 2 Librarian for Information Resources; Jennifer Kortfelt, Digital Library Technologies

  13. Digital Materiality: Preserving Access to Computers as Complete Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    engineering to digital libraries. MARBL’s 2006 acquisitionUniversity Libraries (EUL) emerging Born-Digital Archives (and Rare Book Library (MARBL) and from Digital Systems,

  14. Mass digitization and its impact on interlending and document supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Perry

    2009-01-01

    Microsoft, Joining Growing Digital-Library Effort, Will PayManager at the California Digital Library since 2008.the Head of the Digital Library Production Service at the

  15. Distributed Digital Preservation: Technical, Sustainability, and Organizational Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Tyler; Bishoff, Liz; Gore, Emily B.; Jordan, Mark; Wilson, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Strategies for Sustaining Digital Libraries. (Atlanta: Emoryand the California Digital Library, has been the focus ofPersistent Digital Archives and Library System (PeDALS)

  16. Distributed Digital Preservation: Technical, Sustainability, and Organizational Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Tyler; Bishoff, Liz; Gore, Emily B.; Jordan, Mark; Wilson, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    to PLNs from digital asset management systems (DAMS) likeinstitution’s digital assets management workflow, however.systems, digital asset management systems, and content

  17. Deep Extragalactic Surveys around the Ecliptic Poles with AKARI (ASTRO-F)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Matsuhara; Takehiko Wada; Shuji Matsuura; Takao Nakagawa; Mitsunobu Kawada; Youichi Oyama; Chris P. Pearson; Shinki Oyabu; Toshinobu Takagi; Stephen Serjeant; Glenn J. White; Hitoshi Hanami; Hidenori Watarai; Tsutomu T. Takeuchi; Tadayuki Kodama; Nobuo Arimoto; Sadanori Okamura; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Myung Shin Im; Myung Gyoon Lee; Woojung Kim; Woong Seob Jeong; Koji Imai; Naofumi Fujishiro; Mai Shirahata; Toyoaki Suzuki; Chiaki Ihara; Itsuki Sakon

    2006-05-23

    AKARI (formerly ASTRO-F) is an infrared space telescope designed for an all-sky survey at 10-180 (mu)m, and deep pointed surveys of selected areas at 2-180 (mu)m. The deep pointed surveys with AKARI will significantly advance our understanding of galaxy evolution, the structure formation of the Universe, the nature of the buried AGNs, and the cosmic infrared background. Here we describe the important characteristics of the AKARI mission: the orbit, and the attitude control system, and investigate the optimum survey area based on the updated pre-flight sensitivities of AKARI, taking into account the cirrus confusion noise as well as the surface density of bright stars. The North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) is concluded to be the best area for 2-26 (mu)m deep surveys, while the low-cirrus noise regions around the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) are worth considering for 50-180 (mu)m pointed surveys to high sensitivities limited by the galaxy confusion noise. Current observational plans of these pointed surveys are described in detail. Comparing these surveys with the deep surveys with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the AKARI deep surveys are particularly unique in respect of their continuous wavelength coverage over the 2-26 (mu)m range in broad-band deep imaging, and their slitless spectroscopy mode over the same wavelength range.

  18. The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT): A Small Robotic Telescope for Large-Area Synoptic Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua Pepper; Richard W. Pogge; D. L. DePoy; J. L. Marshall; K. Z. Stanek; Amelia M. Stutz; Shawn Poindexter; Robert Siverd; Thomas P. O'Brien; Mark Trueblood; Patricia Trueblood

    2007-07-30

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for planetary transits of bright stars. It consists of a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Winer Observatory near Sonoita, Arizona. The telescope surveys a set of 26 x 26 degree fields, together covering about 25% of the Northern sky, targeting stars in the range of 8

  19. Mesofluidic two stage digital valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J; Lind, Randall F; Richardson, Bradley S

    2013-12-31

    A mesofluidic scale digital valve system includes a first mesofluidic scale valve having a valve body including a bore, wherein the valve body is configured to cooperate with a solenoid disposed substantially adjacent to the valve body to translate a poppet carried within the bore. The mesofluidic scale digital valve system also includes a second mesofluidic scale valve disposed substantially perpendicular to the first mesofluidic scale valve. The mesofluidic scale digital valve system further includes a control element in communication with the solenoid, wherein the control element is configured to maintain the solenoid in an energized state for a fixed period of time to provide a desired flow rate through an orifice of the second mesofluidic valve.

  20. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-08-17

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  1. NEPA Litigation Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead...

  2. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ?0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  3. ESO Imaging Survey. Deep Public Survey: Infrared Data for the Chandra Deep Field South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Vandame; L. F. Olsen; H. E. Jorgensen; M. A. T. Groenewegen; M. Schirmer; S. Arnouts; C. Benoist; L. da Costa; R. P. Mignani; C. Rite'; R. Slijkhuis; E. Hatziminaoglou; R. Hook; R. Madejsky; A. Wicenec

    2001-02-19

    This paper presents new J and Ks near-infrared data obtained from observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) conducted at the ESO 3.5m New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ongoing Deep Public Survey (DPS) being carried out by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, extending the EIS-DEEP survey. Combined these surveys now provide a contiguous coverage over an area of 400 square arcmin in the near-infrared, nearly matching that covered by the deep X-ray observations of Chandra, four times the area of the original EIS-DEEP survey. The paper briefly describes the observations and the new techniques being employed for pipeline processing jittered infrared observations, which include unbiased de-fringing and sky-background subtraction, pixel-based astrometry and stacking and pixel registration based on a multi-resolution decomposition of the images. The astrometric solution is based on a pre-release of the GSC-II catalog and has an accuracy of < 0.15 arcsec. The final images for 12 pointings presented here reach median 5 sigma limiting magnitudes of J_AB~23.4 and K_AB~22.6 as measured within an aperture 2xFWHM. The frame to frame variation of the photometric zero-point is estimated to be <0.09 mag. The data are publicly available in the form of fully calibrated J and Ks pixel maps and source lists extracted for each pointing. These data can be requested through the URL ``http://www.eso.org/eis''.

  4. Roadmap: Digital Sciences Bachelor of Arts School of Digital Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Geographic Information Science (4) COMM 43000 Communication Technology and Human Interaction (3) GEOG 49076 [15 Credits] ! DSCI 10410 Information Ethics and Social Responsibility 3 3 ! DSCI 13210 Design Information Science (3) COMT 21200 Ethical Hacking (3) ITEC 47413 Digital Video in Education (3) COMT 36308

  5. All-weather calibration of wide-field optical and NIR surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, David L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Saha, Abhijit; Claver, Jenna; Claver, Chuck [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); DePoy, Darren [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ivezi?, Željko; Jones, Lynne [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Smith, R. Chris [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Stubbs, Christopher W., E-mail: daveb@slac.stanford.edu [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a percent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than 'photometric' conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities ?1 arcmin{sup –2} and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision ?0.5% (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1% in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25% of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1% is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.

  6. Fire in the sky: The southern lights in Indigenous oral traditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2015-01-01

    Parts of Australia have been privileged to see dazzling lights in the night sky as the Aurora Australis (known as the southern lights) puts on a show this year. Aurorae are significant in Australian Indigenous astronomical traditions. Aboriginal people associate aurorae with fire, death, blood, and omens, sharing many similarities with Native American communities.

  7. SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Frank

    SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration Teddy Seyed, Mario}@ucalgary.ca ABSTRACT The process of oil and gas exploration and its result, the decision to drill for oil in a specific show in this paper, many of the existing technologies and practices that support the oil and gas

  8. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Isabelle Grenier

    2010-01-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  9. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    community for a variety of applications and domains, such as aviation, weather prediction, and solar energy Dev,a Florian M. Savoy,b Yee Hui Lee,a Stefan Winklerb aSchool of Electrical and Electronic of automatic whole sky imagers have been developed at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University

  10. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

  11. Digital cellular solids : reconfigurable composite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Kenneth Chun-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Digital materials are comprised of a small number of types of discrete physical building blocks, which assemble to form constructions that meet the versatility and scalability of digital computation and communication ...

  12. The institutional repository in the digital library 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacColl, John; Jones, Richard D; Andrew, Theo

    We begin by looking at the concept of institutional repositories within the broader context of digital libraries. ‘Digital libraries’ can mean many things, but we consider them to be libraries first and foremost, and ...

  13. Cornucopia: The Concept of Digital Gastronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoran, Amit Shlomo

    The authors present a new concept of digital gastronomy—Cornucopia, a futuristic cooking methodology based on digital technologies. They discuss how they have merged kitchen tools with science fiction and actual technologies ...

  14. Digital Preservation: A Campus-Wide Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fyffe, Richard; Ludwig, Deborah; Warner, Beth Forrest

    2005-08-30

    Preservation of digital content is an emerging aspect of the academy's stewardship responsibility. It requires more than simply extending traditional preservation practices to digital information or assuming that media backups are sufficient...

  15. Understanding human mobility patterns from digital traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yingxiang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Our current digital age is characterized by the shift from traditional industry to an economy based on the information computerization. The sweeping changes brought about by digital computing have provided new data sources ...

  16. A UNIFIED NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR T DWARFS Adam J. Burgasser,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgasser, Adam J.

    A UNIFIED NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR T DWARFS Adam J. Burgasser,1,2 T. R 2005 October 3 ABSTRACT A revised near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is presented, based identified largely in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two Micron All Sky Survey, nine primary spectral

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. 1 Interaction modelling for digital libraries. C@Mdx 2000 Interaction Modelling for Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    1 Interaction modelling for digital libraries. C@Mdx 2000 Interaction Modelling for Digital specifically to the design and evaluation of digital libraries. This work is at an early stage of development about the quality of the interaction between users and devices, using digital libraries as a test domain

  19. Digital Libraries `95 Proceedings 147 June 11-13, 1995 Digital Libraries: Issues and Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redmiles, David F.

    Digital Libraries `95 Proceedings 147 June 11-13, 1995 Digital Libraries: Issues and Architectures for the Study of Digital Libraries Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3112 USA {pnuern, furuta, leggett, marshall, shipman}@bush.cs.tamu.edu ABSTRACT The research field of digital libraries must

  20. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  1. DIGITAL Visual Fortran Programmer's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digital Equipment Corporation makes no representations that the use of its products in the manner Line n Compiler and Linker Options n Debugging Fortran Programs n Performance: Making Programs Run and Automation Objects n Programming with Mixed Languages n Creating Multithread Applications Topics related

  2. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H E

    2002-01-01

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  3. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding E. Smith

    2002-03-06

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  4. Impact Schedule Building Interactive Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Ideas Impact Schedule Building Interactive Digital Libraries of Formal Algorithmic Knowledge Winter 2002 Elaborate conceptual basis for FDL Implement Prototype Formal Digital Library Add content in formal digital libraries § The project is testing these mechanisms and tools in a prototype formal

  5. Geoffrey R Weller Library Digital Initiatives Librarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Geoffrey R Weller Library Digital Initiatives Librarian (Two Year Term Position) The Geoffrey R information technology as well as to manage, maintain, and develop the library's digital infrastructure in Libraryand Information Studies. Experience with the delivery of digital library services is required

  6. Digital image library development in academic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corran, Ruth

    1 Digital image library development in academic environment: designing and testing usability@aup.fr Keywords: Digital image library, usability, student projects, participatory design Abstract Case study Purpose By reporting the experience gained in the development of a digital image library in academic

  7. Access Digital Library, Search, News and more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    [General] Access Digital Library, Search, News and more [Education] Access MyCourses content [Research] Access Digital Library, NCBI Blast and more [Personal] Access your portable bookmarks using My and 500 textbooks via the Digital Library, one click access to NCBI Blast sequence databases. [General

  8. Isocam deep surveys unveiling star formation in the mid-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Elbaz; H. Aussel; C. J. Cesarsky; F. X. Desert; D. Fadda; A. Franceschini; J. L. Puget; J. L. Starck

    1998-08-04

    Before having exhausted the helium in its tank on April 8, 1998, the Infrared Space Observatory had time to perform several complementary surveys at various depths and areas within selected regions of the sky. We present the results of some of the surveys done with the mid-infrared camera, ISOCAM, on-board ISO, and more specifically those surveys which were performed using the broad-band filter LW3 (12-18 microns). We show that mid-infrared allows to discriminate starburst and post-starburst galaxies among galaxies which present similar optical-UV morphological and colour signatures. Furthermore, the strong evolution found in the surveys indicates that more star formation is hidden in the infrared at higher redshifts.

  9. Isocam deep surveys unveiling star formation in the mid-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elbaz, D; Césarsky, C J; Désert, F X; Fadda, D; Franceschini, A; Puget, J L; Starck, J L

    1998-01-01

    Before having exhausted the helium in its tank on April 8, 1998, the Infrared Space Observatory had time to perform several complementary surveys at various depths and areas within selected regions of the sky. We present the results of some of the surveys done with the mid-infrared camera, ISOCAM, on-board ISO, and more specifically those surveys which were performed using the broad-band filter LW3 (12-18 microns). We show that mid-infrared allows to discriminate starburst and post-starburst galaxies among galaxies which present similar optical-UV morphological and colour signatures. Furthermore, the strong evolution found in the surveys indicates that more star formation is hidden in the infrared at higher redshifts.

  10. Automatica, Vol. 12, pp. 601-611. Pergamon Press, 1976. Printed in Great Britain A Survey of Design Methods for Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    are beyond the capabilities of conventional aircraft control system design techniques, and the use of digital of sophisticated digital system design techniques that can greatly improve overall system performance. A good of systems. The methods surveyed range from the design of specific failure-sensitive filters, to the use

  11. On digital plane preimage structure D. Coeurjolly a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivignon, Isabelle

    : digital plane preimage, digital straight line, dual transformation. 1 Introduction Digital straightnessOn digital plane preimage structure D. Coeurjolly a , I. Sivignon b , F. Dupont a , F. Feschet c´ezeaux, B.P.86 F-63172 AUBIERE Cedex, France Abstract In digital geometry, digital straightness

  12. BASF's Energy Survey Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T. R.

    2005-01-01

    Methodology Thomas R. Theising BASF Corporation operates several dozen manufacturing Sites within NAFTA and periodically conducts Energy Surveys at each Site. Although these manufacturing sites represent a variety of industries, BASF has found success.... The discovery phase is the ?Energy Survey? itself. These Surveys involve plant personnel from various functions within Site operations. BASF applies the Pareto Principle in a variety of fashions: 20% of the operation consumes 80% of the energy, lets focus...

  13. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental...

  14. IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING MAGAZINE [16] MARCH 2009 Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/MSP.2008.931079

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING MAGAZINE [16] MARCH 2009 Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/MSP.2008.931079 © BRAND X PICTURES Image Forgery Detection [A survey] [Hany Farid] 1053-5888/09/$25.00©2009IEEE e anomalies in the three-dimen- sional interaction between physical objects, light, and the IEEE SIGNAL

  15. Digital Games and Biodiversity Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandbrook, Chris; Adams, William M.; Monteferri, Bruno

    2014-06-16

    contributions and associated risks of using digital games for conservation Contribution to Target Hoped-for impact conservation audience on audience Advantages Risks 1. Education and behavior change General public Changed personal habits (e.g., sustainable... - signed to enthuse children about the importance of pol- lination is unlikely to have the same effect on decision makers in the ministry of agriculture: the underpinning science might be the same, but the message, game envi- ronment, and game architecture...

  16. Asteroid Discovery and Characterization with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, R Lynne; Ivezic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a ground-based, optical, all-sky, rapid cadence survey project with tremendous potential for discovering and characterizing asteroids. With LSST's large 6.5m diameter primary mirror, a wide 9.6 square degree field of view 3.2 Gigapixel camera, and rapid observational cadence, LSST will discover more than 5 million asteroids over its ten year survey lifetime. With a single visit limiting magnitude of 24.5 in r-band, LSST will be able to detect asteroids in the Main Belt down to sub-kilometer sizes. The current strawman for the LSST survey strategy is to obtain two visits (each visit being a pair of back-to-back 15s exposures) per field, separated by about 30 minutes, covering the entire visible sky every 3-4 days throughout the observing season, for ten years. The catalogs generated by LSST will increase the known number of small bodies in the Solar System by a factor of 10-100 times, among all populations. The median number of observations for Main Belt aster...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    can effectively isolate quasars at z 6 from MLT dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to zsub R < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    al No abstract prepared. August 2007 The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline Tucker, D.L. ; Kent, S. ; Richmond, M.W. ; Annis, J. ; Smith, J.A. ; Allam, S.S. ;...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with SNe Ia from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These Hubble diagrams provide useful new constraints on the nature of the dark energy that is accelerating the expansion...

  20. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with SNe Ia from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These Hubble diagrams provide useful new constraints on the nature of the dark energy that is accelerating the expansion...

  1. Activity and kinematics of low mass stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pineda, John Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the magnetic activity, photometry and kinematics of approximately 70000 M dwarfs from the Sloan digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. This new analysis explores the spatial distribution of ...

  2. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lower metallicities relative to the M-Z relation defined by the general star-forming galaxy (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS) population. The nature of this offset is consistent...

  3. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor projected onto the sky with reduced focal anisoplanatism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Butterley; G. D. Love; R. W. Wilson; R. M. Myers; T. J. Morris

    2006-02-10

    A method for producing a laser guide star wavefront sensor for adaptive optics with reduced focal anisoplanatism is presented. A theoretical analysis and numerical simulations have been carried out and the results are presented. The technique, named SPLASH (Sky-Projected Laser Array Shack-Hartmann), is shown to suffer considerably less from focal anisoplanatism than a conventional laser guide star system. The method is potentially suitable for large telescope apertures (~8m), and possibly for extremely large telescopes.

  4. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  5. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-23

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  6. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  7. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  8. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  9. ANTISYMMETRY IN THE FARADAY ROTATION SKY CAUSED BY A NEARBY MAGNETIZED BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolleben, M.; Landecker, T. L.; Fletcher, A.; Carretti, E.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Reich, W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2010-11-20

    Rotation measures (RMs) of pulsars and extragalactic point sources have been known to reveal large-scale antisymmetries in the Faraday rotation sky with respect to the Galactic plane and halo that have been interpreted as signatures of the mean magnetic field in the Galactic halo. We describe Faraday rotation measurements of the diffuse Galactic polarized radio emission over a large region in the northern Galactic hemisphere. Through application of RM synthesis we achieve sensitive Faraday rotation maps with high angular resolution, capable of revealing fine-scale structures of {approx}1{sup 0} in the Faraday rotation sky. Our analysis suggests that the observed antisymmetry in the Faraday rotation sky at b>0{sup 0} is dominated by the magnetic field around a local H I bubble at a distance of 100 pc, and not by the magnetic field of the Galactic halo. We derive physical properties of the magnetic field of this shell, which we find to be 20-34 {mu}G strong. It is clear that the diffuse polarized radio emission contains important information about the local magneto-ionic medium, which cannot yet be derived from Faraday RMs of extragalactic sources or pulsars alone.

  10. Lattice template placement for coherent all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2014-12-22

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are restricted by limited computational resources. Minimizing the number of templates required to cover the search parameter space, of sky position and frequency evolution, is one important way to reduce the computational cost of a search. We demonstrate a practical algorithm which, for the first time, achieves template placement with a minimal number of templates for an all-sky search, using the reduced supersky parameter-space metric of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)]. The metric prescribes a constant template density in the signal parameters, which permits that templates be placed at the vertices of a lattice. We demonstrate how to ensure complete coverage of the parameter space, including in particular at its boundaries. The number of templates generated by the algorithm is compared to theoretical estimates, and to previous predictions by Brady et al. [Phys. Rev. D 57, 2101 (1998)]. The algorithm may be applied to any search parameter space with a constant template density, which includes semicoherent searches and searches targeting known low-mass X-ray binaries.

  11. On the recovery of the local group motion from galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu

    2014-06-20

    There is an ?150 km s{sup –1} discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s{sup –1} in amplitude and within ?10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the K{sub s} = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ?100 h {sup –1} Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the 'convergence scale' of ?250 h {sup –1} Mpc in a ?CDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the 'Kaiser rocket' which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ?90 km s{sup –1}. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  12. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  13. Building Digital Libraries for Scientific Data: An Exploratory Study of Data Pratices in Habitat Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgman, C L; Wallis, J C; Enyedy, N

    2006-01-01

    Building Digital Libraries for Scientific Data: Anscientific capital, digital libraries of data become morecollaborative research [1]. Digital libraries are essential

  14. 2013 REPORT ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    2013 REPORT ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE State Geological Survey Illinois State Water Survey Illinois Sustainable Technology Center Awards GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE WATER SURVEY ILLINOIS SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY CENTER #12;#12;PRAIRIE RESEARCH

  15. OC_IC_DIGITAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclear andTwo-Phase Flow

  16. Exploring Variety in Digital Collections and the Implications for Digital Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, MacKenzie

    2005-01-01

    The amount of digital content produced at academic research institutions is large, and libraries and archives at these institutions have a responsibility to bring this digital material under curatorial control in order to ...

  17. Preservation Planning for Digital Information: Final Report of the HVC2 Digital Preservation Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fyffe, Richard; Ludwig, Deborah; Roach, Mary; Schulte, Becky; Warner, Beth Forrest

    2004-11-11

    Digital preservation is the ongoing process of managing data for continuing access and use. The University of Kansas Digital Preservation Task Force was charged in October 2003 to explore the implications of a University commitment...

  18. Behavioral modeling and digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilhan, Erkan

    2001-01-01

    This research focuses on digital calibration of pipeline analog to digital converters (ADCs) and also modeling of error sources and design parameters of pipeline ADCs. Modern applications such as communications systems require high resolution ADCs...

  19. Digital Immersive Virtual Environments and Instructional Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Immersive virtual environment technology as a research toolimmersive virtual environment technology (IVET) is the mostthat digital virtual environment technology permits and that

  20. Digital signal generation for wireless communication systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rode, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Switching Amplifiers and Aperiodic Drive ..23 Figures of Merit and Metrics to Address Digital Amplifier Design.24 Drain Efficiency..24 Multistage Efficiency and Power-

  1. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01

    DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONARY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDFRSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May I979 Ma jor Subject: Meteorology DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONAFY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDERSON Approved...

  2. Key Factors for Digital Collections August 7, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Fondren's Digital Library Initiative We evaluate digital projects on a case by case basis. There is no oneKey Factors for Digital Collections August 7, 2007 Rice University Digital Repository Supported formula for this process and in fact welcome open discussion on potential digital projects

  3. Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PAGE 1 Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report #12;Environmental Credit Marketing Survey, Program Coordinator Yanshu Li, Forest Economist Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report © 2010 Texas to determine interest in these emerging environmental credit markets, as well as identify potential

  4. Digital Identities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us|of EnergySmall- Report to CongressDigital

  5. Clear Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t D e s iSitesA. A. lacis

  6. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j

  7. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o jJ. linn Space Science and

  8. Motivation Literature survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    6/19/14 1 #12;Outline 6/19/14 2 Motivation Literature survey System Model Analysis of BLER Capacity analysis Results and Discussion Conclusion and Future Work #12;Introduction & motivation 6

  9. HI shells in the Leiden/Argentina/Bonn HI survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehlerova, S

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the all-sky Leiden/Argentina/Bonn HI survey, where we identify shells belonging to the Milky Way. We used an identification method based on the search of continuous regions of a low brightness temperature that are compatible with given properties of HI shells. We found 333 shells in the whole Galaxy. The size distribution of shells in the outer Galaxy is fitted by a power law with the coefficient of 2.6 corresponding to the index 1.8 in the distribution of energy sources. Their surface density decreases exponentially with a scale length of 2.8 kpc. The surface density of shells with radii >= 100 pc in the solar neighbourhood is around 4 per kpc^2 and the 2D porosity is approximately 0.7.

  10. Interstellar HI Shells Identified in the SETHI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sallmen, Shauna M; Bellehumeur, Brooke; Tennyson, Elizabeth M; Grunwald, Kurt; Lo, Cheuk Man

    2015-01-01

    Galactic HI (neutral hydrogen) shells are central to our understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM), which plays a key role in the development and evolution of galaxies, including our own. Several models involving supernovae and stellar winds have contributed to our broad understanding, but a complete, detailed picture remains elusive. To extend existing Galactic shell catalogs, we visually examined the SETHI (Search for Extraterrestrial HI) database to identify shell-like structures. This high-sensitivity 21-cm radio survey covering the Arecibo sky uniquely provides high-resolution data on shells at a wide range of Galactic latitudes. We present basic information (location, radial velocity, angular size, shape) for 74 previously unidentified HI shells. Due to limitations of coverage and data quality, and the biases inherent in search techniques, our catalog is not a complete sample of Galactic shells. We discuss the catalog completeness, and comment on the new shells' relationship with known interstellar...

  11. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  12. Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravano, Luis

    Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec Michelle Baldonado, Chen / Accepted: 14 January 1997 Abstract. The overall goal of the Stanford Digital Library project is to provide an infrastructure that aords interoperability among heterogeneous, autono- mous digital library services

  13. A Digital Microphone Array for Distant Speech Recognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwyssig, Erich; Lincoln, Mike; Renals, Steve

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the design, implementation and testing of a digital microphone array is presented. The array uses digital MEMS microphones which integrate the microphone, amplifier and analogue to digital converter on a single chip in place...

  14. Digitally Assisted and Hybrid Architectures for RF Transceivers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel

    ! #12;15 Digitally assisted CFB, part I · Slowly step through all symbols, and fill LUT. #12;16 Digitally assisted CFB, part II · Transmit using open-loop digital predistortion. · Retrain as needed. #12

  15. From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoy, Meredith Anne

    2010-01-01

    From Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics byFrom Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics byFrom Point to Pixel: A Genealogy of Digital Aesthetics, I

  16. The Dark Energy Survey: more than dark energy - an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, T; Allam, S; Aleksic, J; Amara, A; Bacon, D; Balbinot, E; Banerji, M; Bechtol, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Blazek, J; Dodelson, S; Bonnett, C; Brooks, D; Bridle, S; Brunner, R J; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Caminha, G B; Carlsen, J; Carnero-Rosell, A; Carollo, M; Carrasco-Kind, M; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Clerkin, L; Collett, T; Conselice, C; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Davis, T M; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Drlica-Wagner, A; Etherington, J; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Giannantonio, T; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Guarnieri, P; Gutierrez, G; Hartley, W; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D J; Jeltema, T; Jouvel, S; Kessler, R; King, A; Kirk, D; Kron, R; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lima, M; Lin, H; Maia, M A G; Manera, M; Maraston, C; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; McMahon, R G; Melchior, P; Merson, A; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Morice-Atkinson, X; Naidoo, K; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Ostrovski, F; Palmese, A; Papadopoulos, A; Peiris, H; Peoples, J; Plazas, A A; Percival, W J; Reed, S L; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Ross, A; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sadeh, I; Sako, M; Sanchez, C; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Sheldon, E; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Soumagnac, M; Suchyta, E; Sullivan, M; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D; Vieira, J D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Weller, J; Whiteway, L; Wilcox, H; Yanny, B; Zhang, Y; Zuntz, J

    2016-01-01

    This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae and other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterise dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper we focus on additional science with DES, emphasi...

  17. Organizing Digital Libraries by Automated Text Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    Classification Scheme. When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first impression was oneOrganizing Digital Libraries by Automated Text Categorization Henri Avancini1 , Andreas Rauber2, that is of direct concern to organizing digital libraries. We exemplify this class of applications by discussing

  18. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Patrick H. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  19. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  20. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    sources that once could be considered as distinct primary (original works), secondary (indexingCollection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications Linda L. Hill and Greg Jane´ e Alexandria Digital Library Project, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1205 Girvetz, Santa Barbara, CA

  1. Addressable Advertising on Digital Television Vincent Dureau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masthoff, Judith

    Addressable Advertising on Digital Television Vincent Dureau Chief Technology Officer, OpenTV 275 of digital technology is having a profound effect on television advertising. While television advertising costs are increasing, its efficiency is decreasing. The traditional models for advertising on television

  2. MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator 1290-D Reamwood Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 U.S.A. Phone/2000 #12;i DG535 DIGITAL DELAY / PULSE GENERATOR OPERATION AND SERVICE MANUAL Table of Contents CONDENSED Sequence Sheet #4 Rate Generators Sheet #5 Power Supply and Dropout Detection Sheet #6 System Connectors

  3. MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN 4.1 Introduction Once a decision rule has been developed, a disposition survey can be designed for the impacted materials and equipment (M costly and time-consuming development of redundant survey designs. The evaluation of existing SOPs

  4. Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonnecke, Blair

    Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

  5. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey

    2015-10-13

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer FFTs followed by a further incoherent analysis. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90$\\%$ confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about $10^{-24}$ and $2\\times 10^{-23}$ at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of $\\sim$2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below $80~\\mathrm{Hz}$.

  6. The CNOC2 Field Galaxy Redshift Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; S. L Morris; H. Lin; M. Sawicki; G. Wirth; D. Patton; C. W. Shepherd; E. Ellingson; D. Schade; C. J. Pritchet; F. D. A. Hartwick

    1998-05-11

    The CNOC2 field galaxy redshift survey is designed to provide measurements of the evolution of galaxies and their clustering over the redshift range 0 to 0.7. The sample is spread over four sky patches with a total area of about 1.5 square degrees. Here we report preliminary results based on two of the sky patches, and the redshift range of 0.15 to 0.55. We find that galaxy evolution can be statistically described as nearly pure luminosity evolution of early and intermediate SED types, and nearly pure density evolution of the late SED types. The correlation of blue galaxies relative to red galaxies is similar on large scales but drops by a factor of three on scales less than about 0.3/h mpc, approximately the mean scale of virialization. There is a clear, but small, 60%, change in clustering with 1.4 mag of luminosity. To minimize these population effects in our measurement of clustering evolution, we choose galaxies with M_r^{k,e}<= -20 mag as a population whose members are most likely to be conserved with redshift. Remarkably, the evolution of the clustered density in proper co-ordinates at r < 10/h Mpc, proportional to r_0^gamma (1+z)^3, is best described as a ``de-clustering'', (1+z)^{0.6+/-0.4}. Or equivalently, there is a weak growth of clustering in co-moving co-ordinates, x_0~ (1+z)^{-0.3 +/- 0.2}. This conclusion is supported by the pairwise peculiar velocities which rise slightly, but not significantly, into the past. The Cosmic Virial Theorem applied to the CNOC2 data gives Q Omega_M/b=0.11 +/- 0.04$, where Q is the three point correlation parameter and b the bias. Similarly, galaxy groups have a virial mass-to-light ratio (evolution corrected) of M_{virial}/L_R^{k,e} = 215h Lsun/Msun, or Omega_M=0.15 +/- 0.05.

  7. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM); Raring, James (Goleta, CA); Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-07-21

    An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

  8. The 408 MHz B3.1 Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pedani; G. Grueff

    1999-08-26

    We present a new 408 MHz survey (B3.1) carried out with the ''Croce del Nord'' radiotelescope in Bologna. The survey coordinates limits are $-2^\\circ 00^\\prime$ to $+2^\\circ 15^\\prime$ in Dec. and 21h to 24h, 00h to 17h in R.A., equivalent to 0.388 sr. The B3.1 is complete to 0.15 Jy but many sources down to 0.1 Jy are included. Our aim was to select a new and complete sample of Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources, as they proved to be good candidates to find high-z radiogalaxies and their surrounding protoclusters. The observations and the reduction procedure are described and the observational errors are discussed. A cross-identification with the NVSS survey was performed to obtain the spectral index $\\alpha_{408}^{1400}$ and radio size of the sources. We found no evidence of a change of the spectral index distribution as radio flux decreases. The B3.1 USS sample contains 185 sources down to 0.1 Jy and it is about one order of magnitude deeper in flux with respect to the 4C USS sample. For 146 B3.1 USS sources no optical counterpart was found on the POSS-I sky survey. A cross-correlation with the FIRST survey gave maps for a subset of 50 USS sources, and their optical ID search was also made on the POSS-II, resulting in 39 empty fields

  9. Born Broken: Fonts and Information Loss in Legacy Digital Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Geoffrey; Woods, Kam

    2009-01-01

    ACM conference on Digital libraries, 152–161. New York, NY,joint conference on Digital libraries, 86–94. New York, NY,

  10. Improved Engine Control Strategies Enabled by Digital Signal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Control Strategies Enabled by Digital Signal-Processing Method for Zirconia Exhaust Sensors Improved Engine Control Strategies Enabled by Digital Signal-Processing Method...

  11. STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  12. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Appendix A: Survey Instrument; Appendix B: Detailed Responses; Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations

  13. The Digital Revolution in Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2013-02-27

    This paper considers what it means to make a measurement, and the changes in measurement technology over the years. The impact of the latest changes, which have resulted in most electrical measurements being done digitally, is explored. It is argued that the process of measurement can be considered equivalent to one of data compression. The smart grid will certainly result in many more signals being made available, and therefore a great deal of data compression will be taking place. Measurements will be made in parts of the power system presently unmonitored, as well as parts that are already well covered by instrumentation. The smart grid engineer must decide what it means to have “useful” information. Unless care is taken, the signal processing may furnish information that is not useful, and may not even make sense. The paper concludes by examining the possibilities of data compression from multiple separate signals.

  14. Evidence of cross-correlation between the CMB lensing and the gamma-ray sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fornengo; L. Perotto; M. Regis; S. Camera

    2015-03-02

    We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of cross-correlation between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sky-maps and the CMB lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the Universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to gamma-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of gamma-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the cross-correlation measurement is in agreement with current models of the gamma-ray luminosity function for AGN and star forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0$\\sigma$. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extra-galactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic gamma-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward a direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.

  15. Far-IR Detection Limits I: Sky Confusion Due to Galactic Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Takao Nakagawa; Suk Minn Kwon; Chris P. Pearson; Glenn J. White

    2004-11-16

    Fluctuations in the brightness of the background radiation can lead to confusion with real point sources. Such background emission confusion will be important for infrared observations with relatively large beam sizes since the amount of fluctuation tends to increase with angular scale. In order to quantitively assess the effect of the background emission on the detection of point sources for current and future far-infrared observations by space-borne missions such as Spitzer, ASTRO-F, Herschel and SPICA, we have extended the Galactic emission map to higher angular resolution than the currently available data. Using this high resolution map, we estimate the sky confusion noise due to the emission from interstellar dust clouds or cirrus, based on fluctuation analysis and detailed photometry over realistically simulated images. We find that the confusion noise derived by simple fluctuation analysis agrees well with the result from realistic simulations. Although the sky confusion noise becomes dominant in long wavelength bands (> 100 um) with 60 - 90cm aperture missions, it is expected to be two order of magnitude smaller for the next generation space missions with larger aperture sizes such as Herschel and SPICA.

  16. First ground-based 200-um observing with THUMPER on JCMT - sky characterisation and planet maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ward-Thompson; P. A. R. Ade; H. Araujo; I. Coulson; J. Cox; G. R. Davis; Rh. Evans; M. J. Griffin; W. K. Gear; P. Hargrave; P. Hargreaves; D. Hayton; B. J. Kiernan; S. J. Leeks; P. Mauskopf; D. Naylor; N. Potter; S. A. Rinehart; R. Sudiwala; C. R. Tucker; R. J. Walker; S. L. Watkin

    2005-09-22

    We present observations that were carried out with the Two HUndred Micron PhotometER (THUMPER) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii, at a wavelength of 200 um (frequency 1.5 THz). The observations utilise a small atmospheric window that opens up at this wavelength under very dry conditions at high-altitude observing sites. The atmosphere was calibrated using the sky-dipping method and a relation was established between the optical depth, tau, at 1.5 THz and that at 225 GHz: tau_1.5THz = (95 +/- 10)*tau_225GHz. Mars and Jupiter were mapped from the ground at this wavelength for the first time, and the system characteristics measured. A noise equivalent flux density (NEFD) of ~65 +/- 10 Jy (1 sigma 1 second) was measured for the THUMPER-JCMT combination, consistent with predictions based upon our laboratory measurements. The main-beam resolution of 14 arcsec was confirmed and an extended error-beam detected at roughly two-thirds of the magnitude of the main beam. Measurements of the Sun allow us to estimate that the fraction of the power in the main beam is ~15%, consistent with predictions based on modelling the dish surface accuracy. It is therefore shown that the sky over Mauna Kea is suitable for astronomy at this wavelength under the best conditions. However, higher or drier sites should have a larger number of useable nights per year.

  17. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2015-10-28

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semicoherent all-sky searches require orders of magnitude more templates than previously predicted.

  18. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  19. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  20. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  1. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  2. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. An Automated Method for Digitizing Color Thematic Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    was to capture analog maps in three color bands using a digital camera and perform a su- pervised classification on the resulting digital images to pro- duce digital thematic maps for GIS analysis. Post classification proceduresAn Automated Method for Digitizing Color Thematic Maps Rick L. Lawrence, Joseph E. Means

  5. Some thoughts on the near-future Digital Mathematics Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Some thoughts on the near-future Digital Mathematics Library Thierry Bouche Université de Grenoble. The mathematicians' Digital mathematics library (DML) summarises the generous project that all mathematics ever literature is already available in some digital format, nothing looking like one digital mathematics library

  6. Workshop report: Usability of Digital Libraries @ JCDL'02 Ann Blandford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    Workshop report: Usability of Digital Libraries @ JCDL'02 Ann Blandford UCL Interaction Centre a workshop on "Usability of Digital Libraries" at JCDL'02 was the recognition that digital libraries. An interviewee in one of our earlier studies on experiences of working with digital libraries commented that "It

  7. Concurrent signal combining and channel estimation in digital communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Mason, John J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-30

    In the reception of digital information transmitted on a communication channel, a characteristic exhibited by the communication channel during transmission of the digital information is estimated based on a communication signal that represents the digital information and has been received via the communication channel. Concurrently with the estimating, the communication signal is used to decide what digital information was transmitted.

  8. A COST-EFFECTIVE DIGITAL FORENSICS INVESTIGATION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overill, Richard E.

    i #12;ii #12;Chapter 1 A COST-EFFECTIVE DIGITAL FORENSICS INVESTIGATION MODEL R.E. Overill, M. Kwan, K.P. Chow, P. Lai and F. Law Abstract Computers operate at discrete points in time and hence digital the perspective of a digital investigation, it is the duty of digital investigators or forensic examiners

  9. International Journal on Digital ISSN 1432-5012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Jürgen P.

    library infra- structure such as Fedora. Keywords Digital preservation · Policy-driven system · Policy

  10. Everything Digital: Converting the world in 2 Exabytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesk, Michael

    2003-11-05

    Nearly everything created today is in digital format: music is on digital CDs, documents come from word processing, still photography is switching to digital cameras and even movies are now edited digitally. What about the past? We have projects like the Million Book Project scanning one million books, and we know technically how to convert everything: the problems are legal, economic and organizational.

  11. BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS OF DIGITAL AUTORADIOGRAPHY WITH A MWPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellazzini, R.

    2010-01-01

    LBL-13772 Biomedical Applications of Digital Autoradiographya very useful detector for biomedical applications. Compared

  12. Title: Canadian Digital Elevation Model (DEM) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Yukon Keywords (Subject): Contours, Digital Elevation

  13. Interactive Document Processing and Digital Libraries George Nagy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    Interactive Document Processing and Digital Libraries George Nagy Electrical, Computer and Systems explore connections between digital libraries and in- teractive document image analysis. Digital libraries in digital libraries to target problems whose solu- tion would automate, or partially automate, tasks cur

  14. Status of the NDLTD Networked Digital Library of Theses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Status of the NDLTD Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations Gail McMillan Digital;The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations www.NDLTD.org Leader of the Worldwide ETD? · Help graduate students learn about e- publishing and digital libraries · Apply that knowledge

  15. Intellectual Property Rights For Digital Library And Hypertext Publishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glushko, Robert J.

    Intellectual Property Rights For Digital Library And Hypertext Publishing Systems: An Analysis of digital media will inevitably require some adjustments in the copyright model if digital libraries. By far the most ambitious proposal for a digital library and hypertext publishing environment is Ted

  16. Solar Site Survey Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

  17. Operations Improvement Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976...

  18. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensing data used in CPRM geologic projects Future perspective: the Spectral Library of Geological Survey Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM) is a state-owned company that carries out the functions of Brazil ­ CPRM #12;Examples of use of LANDSAT imagery in CPRM projects Field works planning ­ Enhancement

  19. Aerial Photo: P. velutina cover derived from June 1996 color-infrared digital ortho-photographs and classified with Maximum Likelihood supervised classification algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    ·· Aerial Photo: P. velutina cover derived from June 1996 color-infrared digital ortho- photographs relationships were then used in conjunction with field surveys and aerial photos to ascertain the extent these to the stand-level using standard vegetation sampling protocols was problematic. · The GIS / aerial photo

  20. Digital fabrication in the architectural design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seely, Jennifer C. K., 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Digital fabrication is affecting the architectural design process due to the increasingly important role it has in the fabrication of architectural models. Many design professionals, professors, and students have experienced ...