National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for digester cxs applied

  1. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

  2. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Microaeration pretreatment was effective for brown water and food waste mixture. ? The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms. ? Enhanced solubilization, acidification and breakdown of SCFAs to acetate. ? Microaeration pretreatment improved methane yield by 10–21%. ? Nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration. - Abstract: Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was applied to inoculated substrates, and substrates without inoculum, respectively.

  3. Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply Application Process Bringing together top, space science students with internationally recognized researchers at Los Alamos in an educational and collaborative atmosphere. Contacts Director Misa Cowee Email Administrative Assistant Mary Wubbena Email Request more information Email Applications for the 2016 summer school are now closed. Applications were due on February 5, 2016. PLEASE NOTE: After the 2016 session, the program will not be offered again until 2018. Before applying Check your

  4. The anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartung, H.A.

    1996-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion offers many advantages in the processing of organic solid wastes, using a closed system to convert the waste to combustible gas and a stabilized organic residue.Odors are contained while digestion removes their source and gas is collected for energy recovery as heat or electricity. The stabilized residue is less than the starting waste by the mass of gas produced, and it can be disposed of by land application, land filling, incineration or composting. The stimulation of digesters and the phenomenon of co-digestion are two ways the performance of anaerobic digesters can be enhanced. Data from farm digesters and municipal wastewater treatment plants illustrate the present venue of the process; laboratory studies of the anaerobic digestion of a variety of solid wastes show that the process can be applied to these materials as well. About two thirds of municipal solid waste is shown to be amenable to anaerobic digestion in a substrate from an active municipal sewage plant digester.

  5. Anaerobic Digestion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anaerobic Digestion (Redirected from - Anaerobic Digestion) Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Retrieved from "http:...

  6. RCM Digesters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RCM Digesters Jump to: navigation, search Name: RCM Digesters Place: Berkeley, California Zip: CA 94704 Product: Manufactures anaerobic manure digesters which process animal waste...

  7. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  8. On-farm anaerobic digester and fuel alcohol plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    An anaerobic digestion system was constructed and set up on a southern Illinois farm. The anaerobic digestion system was designed to be coupled with a fuel alcohol plant constructed by the farm family as part of an integrated farm energy system. The digester heating can be done using waste hot water from the alcohol plant and biogas from the digester can be used as fuel for the alcohol production. The anaerobic digestion system is made up of the following components. A hog finishing house, which already had a slotted floor and manure pit beneath it, was fitted with a system to scrape the manure into a feed slurry pit constructed at one end of the hog house. A solids handling pump feeds the manure from the feed slurry pit into the digester, a 13,000 gallon tank car body which has been insulated with styrofoam and buried underground. Another pump transfers effluent (digested manure) from the digester to a 150,000 gallon storage tank. The digested manure is then applied to cropland at appropriate times of the year. The digester temperature is maintained at the required level by automated hot water circulation through an internal heat exchanger. The biogas produced in the digester is pumped into a 32,000 gallon gas storage tank.

  9. Biofuels Digest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Digest Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biofuels Digest Address: 801 Brickell Avenue Suite 900 Place: Miami, Florida Zip: 33131 Sector: Services Product: Information Year Founded:...

  10. Steam Digest 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  11. Anaerobic Digestion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat.

  12. Steam Digest Volume IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  13. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  14. Refeeding biogas digester solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licht, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    Biosolid, the digester residue from a biogas plant, must be of economical use to ensure the financial feasibility of biogas facilities. This paper sumarizes work performed for a Department of Energy study in the Imperial Valley of California. Feeding trials show that biosolid can only be used as a small proportion of feed rations. Apart from bacterial debris, biosolid is composed larely of non-nutritive residues. 5 refs.

  15. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  16. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellinger, A.

    1995-11-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters-type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates-define the investment and operating costs of anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters in somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 11/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  17. Enzymatic Digestibility and Pretreatment Degradation Products...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enzymatic Digestibility and Pretreatment Degradation Products of AFEX-Treated Hardwoods (Populus nigra) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enzymatic Digestibility and ...

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  19. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  20. Continuous Digester Control Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuous Digester Control Technology Continuous Digester Control Technology Pulp Process Model Identifies Improvements that Save Energy and Improve Productivity The pulp digester is known as the bottleneck unit in the pulp mill flow sheet because it can require 5% to 50% of typical on-line operation time, making this component of the pulping process very capital intensive. Improving digester performance can significantly reduce production losses, operating costs, and negative environmental

  1. Manure digester and power generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santina, P.F.; Chatterjee, A.K.

    1988-06-14

    A manure digester and power generating system is described comprising: a mixing tank for receiving manure, and for mixing water with the manure to produce a manure slurry of desired consistency; a closed anaerobic digester tank of fixed volume; the mixing tank being separate from and spaced from the digester tank; pumping and conduit means for transferring the contents of the mixing tank to the digester tank; automatic control means, associated with the pumping means, for monitoring and controlling temperature and volume of the contents of the mixing tank before transfer to the digester tank; means for discharging effluent by-products out the outflow end of the digester tank; a gas-fueled engine and a generator coupled to the engine, for generating electrical power; heater means; means for drawing off biogas from the digester tank and for conducting it to the engine as fuel, and wherein the manure slurry is heated sufficiently, prior to introduction into the digester tank and separately from the digester tank, to prevent temperature shock of already digesting slurry in the digester tank when the slurry is introduced into the digester tank.

  2. Arizona Geological Society Digest 22

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Arizona Geological Society Digest 22 2008 437 Tectonic infuences on the spatial and temporal evolution of the Walker Lane: An incipient transform fault along the evolving Pacifc - North American plate boundary James E. Faulds and Christopher D. Henry Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, 89557, USA ABSTRACT Since ~30 Ma, western North America has been evolving from an Andean type mar- gin to a dextral transform boundary. Transform growth has been marked by

  3. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production Presentation by Meltem Urgun-Demirtas, Argonne National Laboratory, during the "Targeting High-Value Challenges" panel at the Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters Workshop held March 18-19, 2015. PDF icon Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production More Documents &

  4. CX-008211: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cedar Grove Composting High Solids Anaerobic Digestion Permitting CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-011470: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Digestion analysis of copper foil and silicon carbide samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-008574: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.20 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. Definition:Digester Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    digestion is a biological process that produces a gas principally composed of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) otherwise known as biogas. These gases are produced...

  8. Steam Digest 2001: Office of Industrial Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles Best Practices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  9. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production from Sewage Sludge EA-1628: Final Environmental Assessment Biogas Markets and ...

  10. Feasibility of a digester gas fuel production facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakes, G.; Greene, D.S.; Sheehan, J.F.

    1982-03-01

    Results of studies on the feasibility of using digester gas produced from wastewater sludge to fuel vehicles are reported. Availability and suitability of digester gas as well as digester gas production records and test analyses on digester gas were reviewed. The feasibility of the project based on economic and environmental considerations is reported and compared to possible alternative uses of the digester gas.

  11. Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2006-10-12

    This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

  12. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  13. Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at...

  14. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  15. T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct Bypass Attacks T-728: Apache Tomcat HTTP DIGEST Authentication Weaknesses Let Remote Users Conduct...

  16. A Digest of Nonproliferation Literature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggan, Ruth A.

    2006-04-01

    In preparation for the 2005 US/Russian Weapons Laboratories Directors Meeting, the six laboratories participating in the meeting endeavored to develop a strategy for nonproliferation technology research and development. A literature review was conducted to identify possible areas of technical collaboration and technology opportunities associated with improving nonproliferation associated with the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The issue of multinationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle was also researched. This digest is the compilation of one-page summaries used by management of the three US nuclear weapons laboratories in preparation for strategy development. Where possible, the Web site address of the complete paper is referenced.3 AcknowledgementsThe author wishes to thank Jessica Ruyle, Nancy Orlando-Gay, and Barbara Dry for their research assistance and contributions.4

  17. Applied combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    From the title, the reader is led to expect a broad practical treatise on combustion and combustion devices. Remarkably, for a book of modest dimension, the author is able to deliver. The text is organized into 12 Chapters, broadly treating three major areas: combustion fundamentals -- introduction (Ch. 1), thermodynamics (Ch. 2), fluid mechanics (Ch. 7), and kinetics (Ch. 8); fuels -- coal, municipal solid waste, and other solid fuels (Ch. 4), liquid (Ch. 5) and gaseous (Ch. 6) fuels; and combustion devices -- fuel cells (Ch. 3), boilers (Ch. 4), Otto (Ch. 10), diesel (Ch. 11), and Wankel (Ch. 10) engines and gas turbines (Ch. 12). Although each topic could warrant a complete text on its own, the author addresses each of these major themes with reasonable thoroughness. Also, the book is well documented with a bibliography, references, a good index, and many helpful tables and appendices. In short, Applied Combustion does admirably fulfill the author`s goal for a wide engineering science introduction to the general subject of combustion.

  18. Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

  19. Enzymatic Digestibility and Pretreatment Degradation Products of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFEX-Treated Hardwoods (Populus nigra) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enzymatic Digestibility and Pretreatment Degradation Products of AFEX-Treated Hardwoods (Populus nigra) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enzymatic Digestibility and Pretreatment Degradation Products of AFEX-Treated Hardwoods (Populus nigra) Authors: Balan, Venkatesh ; Sousa, Leonardo da Costa ; Chundawat, Shishir P. S. ; Marshall, Derek ; Sharma, Lekh N. ; Chambliss, C. Kevin ; Dale, Bruce E. Publication

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  1. CO{sub 2} level control by anthropogenic peat: The anaerobic digestion of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartung, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    Anthropogenic Peat (AP) has been described as an effective and economical way to control the level of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere without adverse effect on economic activity and development. All elements of the proposal are separately at work, but one, anaerobic digestion, is not widely known nor has it been applied to biomass as AP requires. Anaerobic digestion is described here, with some of its current large-scale applications. Results of lab studies of the digestion of other materials, including biomass especially grown for this purpose are presented, and the methods used to find them are explained. The preferred biomass source for AP is sugar cane, and extended studies have been run on a close relative, sorghum; preliminary work on cane itself and on various sugar sources is also reported.

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olive, K L

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. mhtml:file://H:\CATX\APPROVED-CXS\EERE FOA 1201 - Rankine Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eaton Corporation STATE: WI PROJECT TITLE : Affordable Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery for Heavy Duty Trucks Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0001201 DE-EE0007286 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Small-scale research and

  4. Anaerobic digestion for energy production and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettinga, G.; Haandel, A.C. Vaan

    1993-12-31

    Anaerobic digestion is the decomposition of complex molecules into simpler substances by micro-organisms in the absence of oxygen. Anaerobic digestion processes can be employed for resource conservation, for the production of biogas and other useful end products from biomass, and for environmental protection through waste and wastewater treatment. Modern high-rate anaerobic wastewater-treatment processes can effectively remove organic pollutants from wastewater at a cost far below that of conventional aerobic processes. These anaerobic wastewater treatment processes can also be profitably applied for the generation of biogas from energy crops such as sugarcane. In fact, these methods might even be an attractive alternative for the alcohol fermentation extensively employed in Brazil for the production of fuel alcohol from sugarcane. The potential of modern anaerobic processes for this purpose has not yet been widely recognized. This paper describes the principles and use of these processes and demonstrates their prospects for producing energy from sugarcane (1) by treating vinasse, the wastewater generated during the production of ethanol from sugarcane, and (2) as a direct method for producing biogas from sugarcane juice.

  5. Extractability of heavy metals in wastewater solids undergoing anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The extractability of heavy metals in wastewater sludge undergoing anaerobic digestion was investigated. Using batch laboratory digesters, raw wastewater sludge was anaerobically digested at different raw sludge solids loadings and two temperatures. From each of the laboratory digesters, wastewater sludge was sampled at three day intervals and sequentially separated into seven extraction fractions and analyzed for the metals Cu, Cr, Cd, Fe, Ni, and Pb. The seven step sequential extraction was for metal species: (a) soluble, (b) displaced-exchangeable, (c) adsorbed, (d) organic, (e) carbonate, (f) sulfide-acid soluble, and (g) residual. At the 35/sup 0/C digestion temperature the distribution of metals in the extractant fractions between the raw and anaerobically digested sludges were significantly different. For the 45/sup 0/C digestion temperature the distribution of metals in the raw and digested sludge extractant fractions were different and different compared to the 35/sup 0/C system. The 45/sup 0/C raw sludge showed greater percent metal in the organic and sulfide-acid soluble fraction than the digested sludge. At the 45/sup 0/C anaerobic digestion temperature the percent of raw sludge solids loading in the digester had a greater effect on changes in metal extractability and proposed metal species than the 35/sup 0/C.

  6. Evaluating anaerobic digestion for reduction of organic wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartung, H.A.

    1994-12-31

    A small-scale anaerobic digestion test has been developed for monitoring start-up work with inoperative digesters. The test is described and variables critical to its consistent operation are detailed. The method has been used in many anaerobic digestion studies, including evaluation of the digestibility of various municipal solid wastes like grass and hedge clippings, garbage and newspapers. Digestion rates are expressed in terms of the rate of production of combustible gas and the retention time needed for a fixed degree of volatile solids destruction. An example shows the advantage of digesting selected combined charges, and it is suggested that this approach might be fruitful with many toxic organic materials. Application of this test to find the digestion rates of some high-yield biomass crops is also described.

  7. Hog farm in California uses anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes a system of covered lagoons which help address the waste management problems of hog farmers as well as producing methane used to power generators. Four advantages of anaerobic digestion are described along with the system: energy production from methane; fertilizer for fields; economic development in rural areas; and improved water quality through reduction of nonpoint source pollution. Address for full report is given.

  8. Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

  9. Long-term thermophilic mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion with potato pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayr, S. Ojanperä, M.; Kaparaju, P.; Rintala, J.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Rendering wastes’ mono-digestion and co-digestion with potato pulp were studied. • CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was unstable in mono-digestion. • Free NH{sub 3} inhibited mono-digestion of rendering wastes. • CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was stable in co-digestion. • Co-digestion increased methane yield somewhat compared to mono-digestion. - Abstract: In this study, mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp were studied for the first time in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) experiments at 55 °C. Rendering wastes have high protein and lipid contents and are considered good substrates for methane production. However, accumulation of digestion intermediate products viz., volatile fatty acids (VFAs), long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 4}-N and/or free NH{sub 3}) can cause process imbalance during the digestion. Mono-digestion of rendering wastes at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.5 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 d was unstable and resulted in methane yields of 450 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}. On the other hand, co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp (60% wet weight, WW) at the same OLR and HRT improved the process stability and increased methane yields (500–680 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}). Thus, it can be concluded that co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp could improve the process stability and methane yields from these difficult to treat industrial waste materials.

  10. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potawatomi Community - A Case Study | Department of Energy A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar. PDF icon mironconstruction_rieth.pdf More Documents & Publications

  11. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sewage Sludge | Department of Energy Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production from Sewage Sludge Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production from Sewage Sludge Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste Feedstocks Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production from Sewage Sludge Meltem Urgun-Demirtas, Principal Environmental Engineer, Argonne National Laboratory

  12. Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption Colorado State University Contact...

  13. Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover Ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) ...

  14. Kenaf Bast Fibers—Part I: Hermetical Alkali Digestion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Jinshu; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Barnes, H. Michael; Horstemeyer, Mark; Wang, Jinwu; Hassan, El-Barbary M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a hermetical alkali digestion process to obtain single cellulosic fibers from kenaf bast. Kenaf bast were hermetically digested into single fiber using a 5% sodium hydroxide solution for one hour at four different temperatures (80 ° C, 110 ° C, 130 ° C, and 160 ° C). The hermetical digestion process used in this study produced fibers with high cellulose content (84.2–92.3%) due to the removal of lignin and hemicelluloses. The surface hardness and elastic modulus of the fibers digested at 130 ° C and 160 ° C were improved significantlymore » compared with those digested at 80 ° C. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of the individual fibers reduced as the digestion temperature increased from 110 ° C to 160 ° C. Micropores were generated in fiber cell wall when the fibers were digested at 130 ° C and 160 ° C. The studies on the composites that were made from polypropylene reinforced with the digested fibers indicated that the compatibility between the digested fibers and polypropylene matrix was poor.« less

  15. Current State of Anaerobic Digestion of Organic Wastes in North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10012015 ISSN 2196-3010 Keywords anaerobic digestion, biogas, biosolids, fertilizer, food waste, manure, organic waste, renewable energy Abstract With the large volumes of...

  16. How To Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSCNSI How To Apply How to Apply for Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Emphasizes practical skills development Contact Leader Stephan Eidenbenz (505)...

  17. A mixed plug flow anaerobic digester for dairy manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.S.; Delisle, U.; Ferland, D.; Chagnon, R.

    1985-01-01

    In 1982, a ''mixed plug-flow'' anaerobic digester has been built to produce biogas from the manure of 350 dairy cows and, subsequently, to produce electricity for on-farm use only. This paper describes the digester and presents the main results of one year of technical follow-up.

  18. Applied Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARC Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation Search the JLab Site Applied Research Center Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? Applied Research Center ARC Home Consortium News EH&S Reports print version ARC Resources Commercial Tenants ARC Brochure Library Conference Room Applied Research Center Applied Research Center front view Applied Research

  19. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  20. Kinetic model for anaerobic digestion of biogas biological sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Gossett, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was the development and evaluation of a comprehensive kinetic model capable of predicting digester performance when fed biological sludge. Preliminary conversion mechanisms such as cell deaths, lysis, and hydrolysis responsible for rendering viable biological sludge organisms to available substrate were studied in depth. The results of this study indicate that hydrolysis of the dead, particulate biomass - primarily consisting of protein - is the slowest step, and therefore kinetically controls the overall process of an anaerobic digestion of biological sludge. A kinetic model was developed which could accurately describe digester performance and predict effluent quality.

  1. Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maranon, E.; Castrillon, L.; Quiroga, G.; Fernandez-Nava, Y.; Gomez, L.; Garcia, M.M.

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small increase in methane production was observed applying sonication pretreatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas productions between 720 and 1100 mL/Lreactor day were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volatile solids removal efficiencies ranged between 53% and 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower methane yields were obtained when operating under thermophilic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum OLR in lab-scale CSTR was 1.2-1.3 g VS/L day (HRT: 20 days). - Abstract: Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH{sub 4}/kg VS{sub feed} for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36 Degree-Sign C, for an OLR of 1.2 g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5 g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55 Degree-Sign C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment.

  2. Applied Energy Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 665-0896 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to

  3. Applied & Computational Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Computational Math - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Applied & Computational Math HomeEnergy ...

  4. Applied Math & Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math & Software - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Applied Math & Software HomeTransportation ...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

  6. Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to be eligible for the exemption, methane digester equipment must be certified by the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) and the farm must be verified as compliant under the Michig...

  7. Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity program is designed to support small-sized electricity generation where the energy generated is used primarily at the electric customer's location (third...

  8. Producing pipeline-quality biomethane via anaerobic digestion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and <5 ppb H2S), facilitated CO2 removal by up to 86.3%, boosted average CH4 content in biogas by up to 42.4% compared with the control digester, close to fungibility of natural...

  9. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooley, Carl R.; Lerch, Ronald E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

  10. Anaerobic Digestion (AD): not only methane | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD): not only methane Anaerobic Digestion (AD): not only methane Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-C: Beyond Biofuels Larry Baresi, Professor of Biology, California State University, Northridge PDF icon b13_baresi_1-C.pdf More Documents & Publications Electrobiocommodities from Carbon Dioxide: Enhancing Microbial Electrosynthesis with Synthetic Electromicrobiology and System Design Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental

  11. Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

  12. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  13. How To Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How To Apply How to Apply for Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Emphasizes practical skills development Contacts Program Lead Carolyn Connor (505) 665-9891 Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email The 2016 application process will commence January 5 through February 13, 2016. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Required Materials Current resume Official university transcript (with Spring courses posted and/or a copy of Spring 2016

  14. Effect of particle size reduction on anaerobic sludge digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsospyros, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of organic pollutants in primary sludge are suspended in the form of particulate rather than soluble matter. Microbial organisms cannot assimilate this material without initial solubilization. In anaerobic digestion, the initial size breakdown is accomplished by hydrolytic bacteria. The extent of solubilization is limited by the size of particulate matter. Thus, size reduction prior to digestion is a sound alternative. Size reduction pretreatment was achieved by means of ultrasonic waves. Sonication proved an effective method for size reduction of particulate matter in primary sludge. In addition, although the method produced relatively high amounts of finely dispered solids, the filtration properties of resulting sludges were not affected. Chemical characteristics of sludge, important in anaerobic digestion, were not affected, at least within the attempted range of sonication time and amplitude. The effect of size reduction of primary sludge solids was studied under batch and semi-continuous feed conditions. Preliminary batch digestion experiments were conducted in five 1.5 liter reactors that accepted sonicated feeds of varying pretreatment at four different feed loads (3.3-13.3% by volume). The digestion efficiency and gas production were increased by as much as 30 percent as a result of sonication without any deterioration in the filtration properties of the digester effluent. At higher feed loads the digester efficiency dropped drastically and significant deterioration of the effluent filtration properties from all reactors was evident. Semi-continuous runs were conducted in four reactors. Solids retention time (SRT) was varied from 8 to 20 days. Process efficiency and gas production were enhanced as a result of sonication. Process improvement was more evident under short SRT (8-10 days).

  15. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.R. . E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

  16. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  17. Apply for Beamtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Beamtime Apply for Beamtime Print Friday, 28 August 2009 13:23 Available Beamlines Determine which ALS beamlines are suitable for your experiment. To do this, you can review the ALS Beamlines Directory, contact the appropriate beamline scientist listed on the Directory, and/or contact the This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Log In to the ALSHub user portal ALSHub Login For More Information About the Types of Proposals To learn

  18. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction of short-chain organic acids from anaerobic digesters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wene, E.G.; Antonopoulos, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic digesters with glucose or municipal solid waste (MSW) feed were operated to maximize production of short-chain organic acids. Digester effluent was extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or trioctylamine (TOA) in heptane or 2-heptanone as the water immiscible phase. Digester effluent was recycled to digesters after extraction. Both TOPO and TOA in organic solvents effectively extract organic acids from anaerobic digester fluid. Longer chain acids have a higher distribution coefficient than shorter-chain acids. Long term extraction of digester fluid with recycle was not toxic to the anaerobic production of short-chain acids.

  20. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima makes an ideal substrate for anaerobic digestion because it is easy to harvest, it can use carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as its carbon source, and its fermentability is higher than that of other small algae. Digestion experiments demonstrated that S. maxima can serve as the sole nutrient for biogas production and that municipal sewage sludge, when adapted to this new substrate, is very stable. During semicontinuous daily-fed trials under non-optimal conditions at an 0.06 lb volatile solids (VS)/ft/sup 3/ (0.97 kg VS/m/sup 3/) loading rate, 33-day retention time, and 86/sup 0/F (30/sup 0/C) digestion temperature, the daily methane yield was 4.2 CF/lb (0.26 m/sup 3//kg) VS added, which represents 47% of the maximum theoretical yield. Studies on optimizing the process are underway.

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1994 edition. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, L.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRCs regulatory responsibility the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear-and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1993, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  2. Discussion of ``The anaerobic digestion of organic waste``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    With respect to economics, the presenter indicated that anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) may not be economical based on the value of the energy produced. This will most likely be the case, partly because of the low energy prices in this country. These facilities would have to rely on tipping fees paid for receiving and processing the waste. As stated earlier, the high solids process will help improve the economics. While there are said to be 20 plants operating in Europe on MSW, there seems to be none in the US, and that is the condition this paper addresses. It was hoped that by exploring the benefits of co-digestion and stimulation, and showing how digestible certain components of MSW can be, more operators of existing anaerobic facilities would consider expanding their operations to include at least some elements of MSW.

  3. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rejean Samson; Anh LeDuy

    1982-08-01

    Spirulina maxima algal biomass could be used as the sole nutrient for the production of biogas by anaerobic digestion process. It is relatively simple to adapt the municipal sewage sludge to this new substrate. The adapted sludge is very stable. Under nonoptimal conditions, the methane yield and productivity obtained were 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day) and 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day), respectively, with the semicontinuous, daily fed, anaerobic digestion having loading rate of 0.97 kg VS/(m/sup 3/ day), retention time of 33 days and temperature of 30/sup 0/C.

  4. EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

  5. An adaptive strategy to control anaerobic digesters for wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroy, O.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Cuervo, F.; Femat, R.

    1996-10-01

    The design and implementation of a new adaptive controller for anaerobic digesters is presented using a general nonlinear model and an uncertainties estimation scheme. The primary advantage of this controller over standard adaptive controllers is that biogas flow rate measurements are not required. The resulting controller is similar in form to standard adaptive controllers and can be tuned analogously. The adaptive control strategy has been implemented in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester showing good performance and robustness against changes in the feed load.

  6. CX-007434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program- American Recovery and Reinvestment Act · Washington State University Anaerobic Digester - Nutrient Recovery Technology - Vander Haak Dairy CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Information Science, Computing, Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security ...

  8. Apply for Technical Assistance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Apply for Technical Assistance Use this online form to request technical assistance from the DOE Offce of Indian Energy for planning and implementing energy projects on tribal lands. To help us determine whether your request fts within the program's scope and can be addressed with available resources, please provide the information below and then click on "Submit Request." Only requests from federally recognized Indian Tribes, bands, nations, tribal energy resource develop- ment

  9. Applied Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADTSC » CCS » CCS-7 Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable scientific simulations at extreme scale Leadership Group Leader Linn Collins Email Deputy Group Leader (Acting) Bryan Lally Email Climate modeling visualization Results from a climate simulation computed using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) code. This visualization shows the temperature of ocean currents using a green and blue color scale. These

  10. Applied Modern Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Applied Modern Physics From the first bionic eye to airport scanners that detect liquid explosives, our expertise in developing advanced diagnostics results in real-world innovations. Contact Us Group Leader (acting) Larry Schultz Email Deputy Group Leader John George Email Group Office (505) 665-2545 QkarD Quantum key distribution technology could ensure truly secure commerce, banking, communications and data transfer. Read more... A history of excellence in the development and use of

  11. On-farm anaerobic digester and fuel-alcohol plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtson, H.H.

    1985-12-01

    An anaerobic-digestion system, coupled with a fuel-alcohol plant, was constructed and set up on a southern Illinois farm as part of an integrated farm-energy system. The digester heating can be done using waste hot water from the alcohol plant and biogas from the digester can be used as fuel for the alcohol production. The anaerobic digestion system is made up of the following components; a hog finishing house with a manure pit; a solids handling pump to feed the manure; and a 13,000-gallon railroad tank car as the main digester vessel and pump to transfer effluent from the digester to a 150,000 gallon storage tank. The digester was operated for sufficient time to demonstrate the use of hot water in an automated digester temperature control system. Sufficient biogas was produced to demonstrate the use of biogas in a converted propane boiler.

  12. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 10, Appendix H: Anaerobic digestion of MSW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-01

    While municipal solid waste (MSW) thermoconversion and recycling technologies have been described in Appendices A through E, this appendix addresses the role of bioconversion technologies in handling the organic fraction in MSW and sewage sludge. Much of the organic matter in MSW, consisting mainly of paper, food waste, and yard waste, has potential for conversion, along with sewage sludge, through biochemical processes to methane and carbon dioxide providing a measurable, renewable energy resource potential. The gas produced may be treated for removal of carbon dioxide and water, leaving pipeline quality gas. The process also has the potential for producing a stabilized solid product that may be suitable as a fuel for combustion or used as a compost fertilizer. Anaerobic digestion can occur naturally in an uncontrolled environment such as a landfill, or it can occur in a controlled environment such as a confined vessel. Landfill gas production is discussed in Appendix F. This appendix provides information on the anaerobic digestion process as it has been applied to produce methane from the organic fraction of MSW in enclosed, controlled reactors.

  13. Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013.

  14. Pulse power enhancement of the anaerobic digester process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot study of the effects of Pulse Power Processing on an anaerobic digester system was completed at the Decatur Utilities Dry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, in Decatur Alabama, in September, 1995. This patented method generates several significant effects when all biosolids material is treated as it enters the anaerobic system. Intense, high peak-power plasma arcs are created, one at each end of the parabolic processing chamber, to produce an amplified synergy of alterations to the digester sludge flowing between them. The millisecond electric discharges generate localized temperatures as high as 30,000 K{degrees}, followed by a rapid cooling of the flowing liquid, which produces acoustic shock waves with pressures approaching 5,000 atmospheres. This destructive force: ruptures many of the cell walls of the bacteria and other single-cell organisms, releasing their vacuole fluids; breaks carbon bonds to form smaller organic compounds; and pulverizes large particle conglomerates, increasing the overall surface area of the solids. These beneficial results serve to boost the nutrient source for the anaerobes in the digester. In conjunction with LTV radiation, the formation of excited chemical radicals (including OH{sup -}), and the changes in ionic charge through alteration of the zeta potential, the bioreactor system is turbocharged to enhance the conversion of volatile biosolids to methane gas, which is the natural respiratory by-product of anaerobic digestion.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

  16. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of screened dairy manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, K.V.; Liao, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the operating results of a two-phase process that separate the acid-phase and methane-phase digestion of screened dairy manure under mesophilic temperature. Acidogenesis pretreatment prior to the methanogenic fixed-film reactor phase resulted in a significant increase in methane yield.

  17. Apply for Beamtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Beamtime Print Available Beamlines Determine which ALS beamlines are suitable for your experiment. To do this, you can review the ALS Beamlines Directory, contact the appropriate beamline scientist listed on the Directory, and/or contact the This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Log In to the ALSHub user portal ALSHub Login For More Information About the Types of Proposals To learn more about the three different types of

  18. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing

  19. Apply for Beamtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Beamtime Print Available Beamlines Determine which ALS beamlines are suitable for your experiment. To do this, you can review the ALS Beamlines Directory, contact the appropriate beamline scientist listed on the Directory, and/or contact the This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Log In to the ALSHub user portal ALSHub Login For More Information About the Types of Proposals To learn more about the three different types of

  20. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support ...

  1. Cayuga County Regional Digester - Vision Becomes Reality - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamyar V. Zadeh, Ph.D.; Blue Electron Technology Solutions International LLC

    2013-03-12

    With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at mesophilic temperatures, is designed to process the daily feedstock and produce 220,000 SCF2 of biogas per day. The digester also produces 44,000 gallons of digested slurry per day. 3. Biogas Conditioning System: The plant employs a biological biogas conditioning system to remove the H2S and moisture contents of the biogas and prepare it to be used by the plant generation system. 4. Combined Heat and Power System (CHP): This is a 633kW high efficiency biogas-fired GE-Jenbacher model JMS-312 GS-NL reciprocating engine cogeneration system. The heat recovery system incorporated into the package is designed to capture the waste heat from the engine exhaust, the jacket cooling water and the engine oil circuit. 5. Electrical Substation and Power Distribution Systems: An electrical distribution system has been constructed on-site that aggregates the electrical service of the different county buildings on the District campus into a county owned electric distribution system that is interconnected with the CHP and the local electric grid. The electrical system is designed, in accordance with the utility guidelines, to allow grid-parallel operation of CHP and provide for import and export of electric power. 6. Thermal Energy Distribution System: The heat recovery system has been integrated into a high temperature water distribution system that distributes the heat to the thermal circuits for the anaerobic digester facility. Additional piping has also been installed to transfer the remaining thermal energy to other county buildings on the campus. On a daily basis, the plant will co-process 35,000 gallons of manure from local dairy farms, 8,500 gallons of food-processor waste and 1,200 gallons of brown grease to produce 200,000 ft3/d of biogas and 44,000 gallons of pathogen-free nutrient-rich digested slurry for agricultural use by farms and in the local area. The biogas fueled CHP produces 5,157,000 kWh of electricity and 19,506 dekatherms of thermal energy per year. Electrical power generated by the cogeneration system powers all the buildings on the Cayuga County campus and any surplus power is exported to the grid under a power purchase agreement. Heat recovered from the cogeneration system will be used to maintain the temperature of the process equipment and the excess will be transported to the Cayuga County Public Safety Building to offset purchase of fossil fuel to fuel the boilers. The majority of plant operations are unmanned and automated. However, the plant will have a small staff of well-trained personnel to coordinate the feedstock deliveries and shipments, supervise the day-to-day operation, monitor the systems and perform maintenance, maintain a safe and reliable operation and to respond to emergencies.

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olive, K

    1992-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste potential market implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoberg, H.T.D.; Mooij, H.P.

    1985-08-01

    A 10-day retention time experiment determined digester biogas production and overall digester performance for comparison with previous experiments using 12- and 18-day retention. The authors describe the experiments, compare the results, and discuss general operation and start-up of the three experiments. The results show that the 10-day retention time produces a high level of biogas with substantially lower retention times. The data suggest that as sludge is used and the problem of leaks is addressed, gas production rate can be increased as well as the extent of bio-conversion. They also suggest that a seven-day retention time is physically feasible, and that similar values for gas production and bio-conversion can be maintained. 3 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Anaerobic digestion of hog wastes: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleszkiewicz, J.A.; Bujoczek, G.

    1996-12-31

    The principles and overview of research, development and implementation of anaerobic digestion for hog wastes are discussed. Based on economic evaluations, an anaerobic technology is cost-effective, especially for a larger herd and becomes more competitive with aerobic treatment. Nevertheless, the rate of treatment is more sensitive and dependent on the particular fraction of manure being processed. Considering the different factors affecting anaerobic digestion, a complete mixed reactor with solids recycle (having high solids retention time and low hydraulic retention time) was found to be the more reliable system with regards to methane generation and manure stabilization. By solids recycle one can obtain significant saving in the reactor volume required, while still achieving the expected degree of treatment. It was also found that even though treatment using advanced anaerobic systems when compared with simple anaerobic systems is more expensive, the rate of return on investment and efficiency of the process are higher.

  5. Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant biomass represents a vast and renewable source of energy. However, harnessing this energy requires breaking down tough lignin and cellulose cell walls. In nature, certain microbes can deconstruct biomass into simple sugars by secreting combinations of enzymes. Two organisms that utilize cellulose are Clostridium thermocellum -

  6. Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia - Energy Innovation Portal Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia Inventors: Shishir Chundawat, Leonardo Sousa, Albert Cheh, Venkatesh Balan, Bruce Dale Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryIn the continuing push to develop alternative fuels, bioethanol is clearly a viable option. However, if it is to become a truly economical

  7. Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved and untreated food waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Autoclaving decreased the formation of NH4-N and H{sub 2}S during food waste digestion. • Stable digestion was achieved with untreated and autoclaved FW at OLR 6 kg VS/m{sup 3}day. • Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. • Highest CH{sub 4} yields were observed at OLR 3 kg VS/m{sup 3}day with untreated FW. • Autoclaved FW produced highest CH{sub 4} yields during OLR 4 kgVS/m{sup 3}day. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved (160 °C, 6.2 bar) and untreated source segregated food waste (FW) was compared over 473 days in semi-continuously fed mesophilic reactors with trace elements supplementation, at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2, 3, 4 and 6 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d. Methane yields at all OLR were 5–10% higher for untreated FW (maximum 0.483 ± 0.013 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 3 kg VS/m{sup 3} d) than autoclaved FW (maximum 0.439 ± 0.020 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 4 kg VS/m{sup 3} d). The residual methane potential of both digestates at all OLRs was less than 0.110 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS, indicating efficient methanation in all cases. Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. Reactors fed on autoclaved FW showed lower ammonium and hydrogen sulphide concentrations, probably due to reduced protein hydrolysis as a result of formation of Maillard compounds. In the current study this reduced biodegradability appears to outweigh any benefit due to thermal hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic components.

  8. Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C

    1993-01-01

    Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

  9. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  10. Biogasification of sorghum in a novel anaerobic digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, V.J.; Biljetina, R.; Isaacson, H.R.; Hayes, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) conducted pilot-scale anaerobic digestion experiments with ensiled sorghum in a 160 ft/sup 3/ digester at the experimental test unit (ETU) facility at the Walt Disney World Resort Complex in Florida. The study focused on improving bioconversion efficiencies and process stability by employing a novel reactor concept developed at IGT. Steady-state performance data were collected from the ETU as well as from a laboratory-scale conventional stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at loading rates of 0.25 and 0.50 lb organic matter/ft/sup 3/-day at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures, respectively. This paper will describe the ETU facility, novel digester design and operating techniques, and the results obtained during 12 months of stable and uninterrupted operation of the ETU and the CSTR which showed that methane yields anad rates from the ETU were 20% to 50% higher than those of the CSTR. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

    1994-08-01

    The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

  12. Nanoscale Molecules Under Thermodynamic Control:" Digestive Ripening" or " Nanomachining"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klabunde, Kenneth J.

    2015-06-04

    Overall Research Goals and Specific Objectives: Nanoscale materials are becoming ubiquitous in science and engineering, and are found widely in nature. However, their formation processes and uniquely high chemical reactivities are not understood well, indeed are often mysterious. Over recent years, a number of research teams have described nanoparticle synthesis, and aging, thermal treatment, or etching times have been mentioned. We have used the terms “digestive ripening” and “nanomachining” and have suggested that thermodynamics plays an important part in the size adjustment to monodisperse arrays being formed. Since there is scant theoretical understanding of digestive ripening, the overall goal in our research is to learn what experimental parameters (ligand used, temperature, solvent, time) are most important, how to control nanoparticle size and shape after initial crude nanoparticles have been synthesized, and gain better understanding of the chemical mechanism details. Specific objectives for the past twentynine months since the grant began have been to (1) Secure and train personnel;as of 2011, a postdoc Deepa Jose, female from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India; Yijun Sun, a second year graduate student, female from China; and Jessica Changstrom, female from the USA, GK12 fellow (program for enhancing teaching ability) are actively carrying out research. (2) Find out what happens to sulfur bound hydrogen of thiol when it interacts with gold nanoparticles. Our findings are discussed in detail later. (3) Determine the effect of particle size, shape, and temperature on dodecyl thiol assited digestive ripening of gold nanoparticles. See our discussions later. (4) To understand in detail the ligand interaction in molecular clusters and nanoparticles (5) Determine the effect of chain length of amines on Au nanoparticle size under digestive ripening conditions (carbon chain length varied from 4-18). (6) Determine the catalytic activity of gold superlattices obtained by digestive ripening for oxidation of CO to CO2 at room temperature. (7) Determine the photocatalytic activity of metal nanoparticles like Au, Ag,Cu, and Pd supported on TiO2 toward photocatalytic hydrogen production.

  13. Applied Optoelectronics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    optical semiconductor devices, packaged optical components, optical subsystems, laser transmitters, and fiber optic transceivers. References: Applied Optoelectronics1...

  14. NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the

  15. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy February 6, 2015 - 4:18pm Addthis Biofuels Digest recently released its "Top 125 in the Advanced Bioeconomy," ranking Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Dr. Jonathan Male, Deputy Director Dr. Valerie Reed, Technology Manager Dr. Joyce Yang, and Lead Analyst Zia Haq at number 20. Other Energy Department leaders

  16. Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

    2011-12-30

    One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

  17. Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Gonzalez, L.; Colturato, L.F.; Font, X.; Vicent, T.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

  18. BETO Ranks High in Biofuels Digest's Top 125 in the Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO partners with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Biomass Research and Development. Each year, Biofuels Digest, a widely read online biofuels trade publication, and its ...

  19. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  20. Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

  1. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  2. Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unofficial transcripts are acceptable. If transcripts are not in English, provide a translation. If grades are not in the U.S.-traditional lettered (A,B,C), or GPA (out of 4.0)...

  3. Applied Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Materials Address: 3050 Bowers Avenue Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Sector: Solar Website: www.appliedmaterials.com...

  4. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab1-300x218 Complementary burner facilities with...

  5. Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

  6. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  7. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion with the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  8. Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Guangyin; Zheng Zheng; Yang Shiguan; Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

  9. Applied Sedimentology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sedimentology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book: Applied Sedimentology Author R.C. Salley Published Academic Press, 2000 DOI Not Provided...

  10. ORISE: Applied health physics projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support for decommissioning projects. Whether the need is assistance with the development of technical basis documents or advice on how to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials, ORISE can help determine the best course for an environmental cleanup project. Our key areas of expertise include fuel

  11. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities » Information Science, Computing, Applied Math /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences (CCS)» High Performance Computing (HPC)» Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design»

  12. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    YrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  13. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    YrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  14. Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Biomass Program perspective on anaerobic digestion and fuel cell integratin at biorefineries. Presented by Brian Duff, DOE Biomass Program, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

  16. Natural Gas Market Digest (formerly Year in Review) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Natural Gas Reports Market Digest: Natural Gas (2013-2014) Updated: June 12, 2014 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Market Digest highlights the latest information and analyses on all aspects of the natural gas markets. Storage Record winter withdrawals create summer storage challenges, June 12, 2014 Natural gas storage working capacity grows 2% in 2012 - Today in Energy, July 24, 2013 High natural gas inventory last

  17. Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover Ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatments were studied to develop the first direct side-by-side comparative assessment on their

  18. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheradmand, S.; Karimi-Jashni, A.; Sartaj, M.

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

  19. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production March 24, 2015 Biochemical Conversion Area Review Meltem Urgun-Demirtas, Ph. D. Argonne National Laboratory Goal Statement  Ultimate Goal: Transform negative-value or low-value biosolids into high- energy-density, fungible hydrocarbon precursors through targeted research, development and demonstration. - Enhance anaerobic digestion of biosolids to produce biogas with ~90% methane content and hydrogen sulfide at

  20. Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Program eere.energy.gov Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop NREL June 11,2012 Brian Duff DOE Biomass Program 2 | Biomass Program eere.energy.gov Outline * The Importance of Anaerobic Digestion for Fuels, Products, and Power * Biomass Program Perspective * The Potential for Biogas/Fuel Cell Integration at Biorefineries o Retrofit Applications for 1st-Generation Biofuels Plants o Integration

  1. Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nopharatana, Annop; Pullammanappallil, Pratap C.; Clarke, William P.

    2007-07-01

    A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

  2. Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) 2016 - Our 34 rd Year! SAGE is a 3-4 week research and education program in exploration geophysics for graduate, undergraduate students, and working professionals based in Santa Fe, NM, U.S.A. Application deadline March 27, 2016, 5:00pm MDT SAGE students, faculty, teaching assistants, and visiting scientists acquire, process and interpret reflection/refraction seismic, magnetotelluric (MT)/electromagnetic (EM), ground penetrating radar (GPR),

  3. Design of a large-scale anaerobic digestion facility for the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayhanian, M.; Jones, D.

    1996-12-31

    The California Prison Industry Authority, in conjunction with the City of Folsom, operates a 100 ton/d municipal solid waste (MSW) recovery facility using inmate labor. Through manual sorting, all useful organic and inorganic materials are recycled for marketing. The remaining organic material will be further processed to remove hazardous and inert material and prepared as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion process. The clean organic waste (approximately 78 ton/d) will then be shredded and completely mixed with sewage water prior feeding to the digester. Off gas from the digester will be collected as a fuel for the steam boiler or combusted in a waste gas burner. Steam will be injected directly into the digester for heating. The anaerobically digested material will be moved to compost area where it will be mixed with wood faction of yard waste and processed aerobically for the production of compost material as a soil amendment. Anaerobic digesters will be constructed in two phases. The first phase consists of the construction of one 26 ton/d digester to confirm the suitability of feeding and mixing equipment. Modifications will be made to the second and third digesters, in the second phase, based on operating experience of the first digester. This paper discusses important design features of the anaerobic digestion facility.

  4. Semi-continuous anaerobic co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge and fat, oil and grease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan Caixia; Zhou Quancheng; Fu Guiming

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) with fat, oil and grease (FOG). > Co-digestion of TWAS and FOG at 64% VS increased biogas production by 137%. > FOG addition ratio at 74% of total VS caused inhibition of the anaerobic digestion process. > Micronutrients addition did not significantly improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. - Abstract: Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and fat, oil and grease (FOG) was conducted semi-continuously under mesophilic conditions. The results showed that daily methane yield at the steady state was 598 L/kg VS{sub added} when TWAS and FOG (64% of total VS) were co-digested, which was 137% higher than that obtained from digestion of TWAS alone. The biogas composition was stabilized at a CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} content of 66.8% and 29.5%, respectively. Micronutrients added to co-digestion did not improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. With a higher addition of FOG (74% of total VS), the digester initially failed but was slowly self-recovered; however, the methane yield was only about 50% of a healthy reactor with the same organic loading rate.

  5. CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    294: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell- Based Combined Heat and Power Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Golden, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Develop an expendable, high capacity sorbent to remove sulfur species from anaerobic digester gas, providing an essentially sulfur-free

  6. International combustion engines; Applied thermosciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on thermodynamic analysis - from the requisite first law to more sophisticated applications - and engine design, this book is an introduction to internal combustion engines and their mechanics. It covers the many types of internal combustion engines, including spark ignition, compression ignition, and stratified charge engines, and examines processes, keeping equations of state simple by assuming constant specific heats. Equations are limited to heat engines and later applied to combustion engines. Topics include realistic equations of state, stroichiometry, predictions of chemical equilibrium, engine performance criteria, and friction, which is discussed in terms of the hydrodynamic theory of lubrication and experimental methods such as dimensional analysis.

  7. Methane enrichment digestion experiments at the anaerobic experimental test unit at Walt Disney World. Final report, March 1989-August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, V.J.; Hill, A.H.

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the technical feasibility of utilizing a novel concept in anaerobic digestion, in-situ methane enrichment digestion or MED for producing utility-grade gas from a pilot-scale anaerobic digester. MED tests conducted during this program consistently achieved digester product gas with a methane (CH4) content of greater than 90% (on a dry-, nitrogen-free basis). The MED concept, because it requires relatively simple equipment and modest energy input, has the potential to simplify gas cleanup requirements and substantially reduce the cost of converting wastes and biomass to pipeline quality gas.

  8. Biogas management by controlled feeding and heating of a dairy manure digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chayovan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Gas production dynamics were investigated using laboratory scale digesters fed daily with dairy manure and operated both at constant temperature and with imposed temperature fluctuations of +/-3.3/sup 0/C about a mean of 35.8/sup 0/C. At constant temperature, a 14-liter control digester with a detention time of 19 days, fed with manure diluted to 25% and blended, behaved similarly to two 3-liter digesters fed hole manure at a detection time of 15 days. A second 14-liter digester fed with the diluted manure was operated with three phase relations between the 24 hour temperature cycle and the pulse feeding time. The higher the temperature at the time of feeding, the higher the peak gas production, up to 1.8 times the control. Gradually increasing the temperature after feeding results in sustained high gas production until the most rapidly degradable material is consumed. In all cases digester operation was stable as indicated by pH, alkalinity and total daily gas production. A mathematical model based on three substrate fractions having each first order kinetics and the Arrhenius temperature relationship successfully predicted gas production dynamics as long as hydrolysis remained the rate limiting step and the volatile acid pool did not change rapidly. Results show that gas storage can be reduced as much as 52% using managed heating and feeding for a situation in which gas is productively utilized for only eight hours of the day.

  9. Rural biogas technology: effect of digester pressure on gas rate and composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamad, M.A.; Abdel, Dayem, A.M.; El-Halwagi, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of digester pressure on gas rate and composition was studied using an experimental Chinese-type digester of 5 m/sup 3/ volume. Water buffalo dung was used as feedstock and was fermented at 40 days retention time. The increase in digester pressure was accompanied by a decrease in the amount of biogas produced. However, this decrease was partially compensated for by the increase in methane content. The latter may be attributed to the transfer of carbon dioxide from the gas phase to the liquid phase. The remainder of the noted decrease in the obtained gas amount was related to the increase of the nonconfined amount of slurry in the outlet chamber. Thus, it can be concluded that the initial amount of gas liberated was not a direct consequence of varying the digester pressure. A modified design for the outlet chamber is proposed. Such modification is anticipated to decrease the gas losses, partially stabilize the gas pressure and accordingly increase the efficiency of the digester operation as well as the gas combustion process.

  10. Anaerobic waste-activated sludge digestion - A bioconversion mechanism and kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Tatsuo; Kudo, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshikazu )

    1993-05-01

    The anaerobic bioconversion of raw and mechanically lysed waste-activated sludge was kinetically investigated. The hydrolysis of the biopolymers, such as protein, which leaked out from the biological sludge with ultrasonic lysis, was a first-order reaction in anaerobic digestion and the rate constant was much higher than the decay rate constant of the raw waste activated sludge. An anaerobic digestion model that is capable of evaluating the effect of the mechanical sludge lysis on digestive performance was developed. The present model includes four major biological processes - the release of intracellular matter with sludge lysis; hydrolysis of biopolymers to volatile acids; the degradation of various volatile acids to acetate; and the conversion of acetate and hydrogen to methane. Each process was assumed to follow first-order kinetics. The model approximately simulated the overall process performance of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. The model suggested that when the lysed waste-activated sludge was fed, the overall digestive performance remarkably increased in the two-phase system consisting of an acid forming process and a methanogenic process, which ensured the symbiotic growth of acetogenic and methanogenic bacteria.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of municipal, industrial, and livestock wastes for energy recovery and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sax, R.I.; Lusk, P.D.

    1995-11-01

    The degradation of carbonaceous organic material by anaerobic bacteria leads to the production of methane gas (biogas) at the theoretical stoichiometric conversion rate of 0.35-cubic meters of methane per kilogram of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) reasonably close proximity to the site of this digestion process. The untreated biogas generated from anaerobic digestion typically contains from 55% to 75% methane content, with the balance consisting mainly of carbon dioxide and a small, but important, amount of hydrogen sulfide. The untreated biogas is normally saturated with water vapor at the temperature of the digestion process which typically is in the mesophilic range 25 to 38 degrees Celsius. This overview paper describes the types of anaerobic technologies which are presently used for the digestion of various type of municipal, industrial and livestock manure wastes, summarizes the principal developments which have taken place in the field during the past several years, and discusses the energy recovery economics for each of the three usage applications. The paper stratifies the use of anaerobic digestion technology for the treatment of wastewaters from industry (an application which has increased dramatically during the past decade) by geographical region, by industry type, very various categories of food processing, and by technology type, in all cases taking account of system size to emphasize the economics of energy production.

  12. Study of the operational conditions for anaerobic digestion of urban solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo M, Edgar Fernando . E-mail: efcastil@uis.edu.co; Cristancho, Diego Edison; Victor Arellano, A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion technology as an option for the management of organic solid waste in developing countries. As raw material, a real and heterogeneous organic waste from urban solid wastes was used. In the first experimental phase, seed selection was achieved through an evaluation of three different anaerobic sludges coming from wastewater treatment plants. The methanization potential of these sludges was assessed in three different batch digesters of 500 mL, at two temperature levels. The results showed that by increasing the temperature to 15 deg. C above room temperature, the methane production increases to three times. So, the best results were obtained in the digester fed with a mixed sludge, working at mesophilic conditions (38-40 deg. C). Then, this selected seed was used at the next experimental phase, testing at different digestion times (DT) of 25, 20 and 18 days in a bigger batch digester of 20 L with a reaction volume of 13 L. The conversion rates were registered at the lowest DT (18 days), reaching 44.9 L/kg{sup -1} of wet waste day{sup -1}. Moreover, DT also has a strong influence over COD removal, because there is a direct relationship between solids removal inside the reactor and DT.

  13. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  14. Applied Materials Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Wind Turbine Facility Applied Materials Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service...

  15. Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in ...

  16. Applied Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applied Ventures LLC Name: Applied Ventures LLC Address: 3050 Bowers Avenue Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Region: Southern CA Area Product: Venture capital. Number...

  17. Applied Intellectual Capital AIC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Intellectual Capital AIC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Intellectual Capital (AIC) Place: California Zip: 94501-1010 Product: Applied Intellectual Capital (AIC) was...

  18. Improved efficiency and stable digestion of biomass in non-mixed upflow solids reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, V.J.; Fannin, K.F.; Chynoweth, D.P.; Frank, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A non-mixed upflow solids reactor (USR), which permitted longer solids than hydraulic retention times, was used to study the anaerobic digestion performance of sea kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). The performance of the USR was compared to that of the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at different organic loading rates in terms of methane yield, methane production rate, and process stability. Results showed that, although digester performance was markedly affected by kelp compositional variability, methane yields and production rates in the USR were significantly higher than those observed with the CSTR. Results also showed that volatile acid concentrations, which are generally inversely related to digester stability, were significantly lower in the USR than in the CSTR. 8 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

  20. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Sheldon T. (Augusta, GA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  1. Evaluating a model of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes through system identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anex, R.P.; Kiely, G.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), on its own or co-digested with primary sewage sludge (PSS), produces high quality biogas, suitable as renewable energy. Parameter estimation and evaluation of a two-stage mathematical model of the anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of MSW and PSS are described. Measured data are from a bench scale laboratory experiment using a continuously stirred tank reactor and operated at 36 C for 115 days. The two-stage model simulates acidogenesis and methanogenesis, including ammonia inhibition. Model parameters are estimated using an output error, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Sensitivity of the estimated parameter values and the model outputs to non-estimated model parameters and measurement errors are evaluated. The estimated mathematical model successfully predicts the performance of the anaerobic reactor. Sensitivity results provide guidance for improving the model structure and experimental procedures.

  2. Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, G.; Frunzo, L.; Panico, A.; Pirozzi, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

  3. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  4. Research on Anaerobic Digestion: Optimization and Scalability of Mixed High-strength Food Processing Wastes for Renewable Biogas Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Zhongtang; Hitzhusen, Fredrick

    2012-12-27

    This research project developed and improved anaerobic digestion technologies, created a comprehensive Inventory of Ohio Biomass and a database of microorganisms of anaerobic digesters, and advanced knowledge and understanding of the underpinning microbiology of the anaerobic digestion process. The results and finding of this research project may be useful for future development and implementation of anaerobic digesters, especially at livestock farms. Policy makers and investors may also find the information on the biomass availability in Ohio and valuation of energy projects useful in policy making and making of investment decisions. The public may benefit from the information on biogas as an energy source and the potential impact of anaerobic digester projects on their neighborhoods.

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  6. Influence of H/sub 2/ stripping on methane production in conventional digesters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poels, J.; Van Assche, P.; Verstraete, W.

    1985-12-01

    Hydrogen is a central metabolite in the methanization process. In this study the partial pressure of hydrogen in the gas phase of laboratory manure digesters was monitored over extensive periods of time and found to vary between 50 and 100.10/sup -6/ atm. By sparging the gas phase of the digester through an auxiliary reactor, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were allowed to develop at the expense of hydrogen and carbon dioxide present in the biogas, independently of the liquid or cell residence time in the main reactor. By scrubbing ca. 100 volumes of biogas per liter reactor per day through an auxiliary reactor, hydrogen concentration could be decreased maximally 25%. This resulted in an increase in the gas production rate of the main digester of ca. 10% and a concomitant improved removal of volatile fatty acids from the mixed liquor. The results obtained indicate that considerable stripping of hydrogen from the digester could be achieved at acceptable energy expenditure. However, the microbial removal of the hydrogen at these low concentrations is extremely slow and limits the applicability of this approach.

  7. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, IckTae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ? MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ? Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ? In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ? Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  8. Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All About Proposals Users Home Apply for Beam Time Deadlines Proposal Types Concepts, Definitions, and Help My APS Portal My APS Portal Apply for Beam Time Next Proposal Deadline...

  9. How to Apply for the ENERGY STAR®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us to learn about applying for ENERGY STAR Certification in Portfolio Manager. Understand the value of the ENERGY STAR certification, see the step-by-step process of applying, and gain tips to...

  10. Applied geodesy (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Applied geodesy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Applied geodesy This volume is based on the proceedings of the CERN Accelerator School's course on Applied Geodesy for Particle Accelerators held in April 1986. The purpose was to record and disseminate the knowledge gained in recent years on the geodesy of accelerators and other large systems. The latest methods for positioning equipment to sub-millimetric accuracy in deep underground tunnels several tens of kilometers long are

  11. Apply for Your First NERSC Allocation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Your First Allocation Apply for Your First NERSC Allocation Initial Steps Needed to Apply for Your First NERSC Allocation All work done at NERSC must be within the DOE Office of Science mission. See the Mission descriptions for each office at Allocations Overview and Eligibility. Prospective Principal Investigators without a NERSC login need to fill out two forms: The online ERCAP Access Request Form. If you wish to designate another person to fill out the request form you may

  12. Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory (SRNL), the initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE invest- ments in applied research and basic science and the work of the site contractors to...

  13. Applied Materials Inc AMAT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    manufacturer of equipment used in solar (silicon, thin-film, BIPV), semiconductor, and LCD markets. References: Applied Materials Inc (AMAT)1 This article is a stub. You can...

  14. Applied Quantum Technology AQT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quantum Technology AQT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Quantum Technology (AQT) Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Product: California-based manufacturer of CIGS...

  15. Applied Energy Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Energy Management Place: Huntersville, North Carolina Zip: 28078 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: North...

  16. Improved biogas production from rice straw by co-digestion with kitchen waste and pig manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jingqing; Li, Dong; Sun, Yongming; Wang, Guohui; Yuan, Zhenhong; Zhen, Feng; Wang, Yao

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Biogas production was enhanced by co-digestion of rice straw with other materials. • The optimal ratio of kitchen waste, pig manure and rice straw is 0.4:1.6:1. • The maximum biogas yield of 674.4 L/kg VS was obtained. • VFA inhibition occurred when kitchen waste content was more than 26%. • The dominant VFA were propionate and acetate in successful reactors. - Abstract: In order to investigate the effect of feedstock ratios in biogas production, anaerobic co-digestions of rice straw with kitchen waste and pig manure were carried out. A series of single-stage batch mesophilic (37 ± 1 °C) anaerobic digestions were performed at a substrate concentration of 54 g/L based on volatile solids (VS). The results showed that the optimal ratio of kitchen waste, pig manure, and rice straw was 0.4:1.6:1, for which the C/N ratio was 21.7. The methane content was 45.9–70.0% and rate of VS reduction was 55.8%. The biogas yield of 674.4 L/kg VS was higher than that of the digestion of rice straw or pig manure alone by 71.67% and 10.41%, respectively. Inhibition of biogas production by volatile fatty acids (VFA) occurred when the addition of kitchen waste was greater than 26%. The VFA analysis showed that, in the reactors that successfully produced biogas, the dominant intermediate metabolites were propionate and acetate, while they were lactic acid, acetate, and propionate in the others.

  17. High temperature pre-digestion of corn stover biomass for improved product yields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brunecky, Roman; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Taylor, Larry E.; Tao, Ling; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.

    2014-12-03

    Introduction: The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks remains a key step in the commercialization of biofuels. One of the barriers to cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars remains the enzymatic saccharification process step. Here, we describe a novel hybrid processing approach comprising enzymatic pre-digestion with newly characterized hyperthermophilic enzyme cocktails followed by conventional saccharification with commercial enzyme preparations. Dilute acid pretreated corn stover was subjected to this new procedure to test its efficacy. Thermal tolerant enzymes from Acidothermus cellulolyticus and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii were used to pre-digest pretreated biomass at elevated temperatures prior to saccharification by the commercial cellulase formulation.more » Results: We report that pre-digestion of biomass with these enzymes at elevated temperatures prior to addition of the commercial cellulase formulation increased conversion rates and yields when compared to commercial cellulase formulation alone under low solids conditions. In conclusion, Our results demonstrating improvements in rates and yields of conversion point the way forward for hybrid biomass conversion schemes utilizing catalytic amounts of hyperthermophilic enzymes.« less

  18. A novel plug-flow digester for biogasification of conventional and hazardous organics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Kato, Y.; Liu, T.; Fukushi, K.

    1996-12-31

    A novel plug-flow digestion system of simple construction was designed, fabricated and operated for several years with a synthetic mixture of solid and liquid wastes simulating conditions south of the US-Mexican border and other developing countries. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene (BTX) were mixed with the synthetic feed in several phases of this research to simulate field conditions where these solvents are discharged to public sewers and mixed with non-hazardous pollutants. The mesophilic plug-flow digester exhibited a high gas yield of 0.46 SCM /kg VS added, a methane content of 77 mol%, and a VS reduction of 75% at an HRT of 13 days with a 96% biodegradation of the feed toluene. At a feed concentration of 50 mg/l, toluene did not inhibit anaerobic fermentation. Gas and methane yields, and VS and COD conversion efficiencies were about the same with or without toluene present in the feed. At a reduced HRT of 8 days, a high feed COD concentration of 50,000 mg/l, and a loading rate of 0.48 kg VS/m{sup 3}-day, the digester afforded a gas yield of 3.1 SCM /kg VS added, and a methane content of 67 mol%. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene were biodegraded at efficiencies of 94%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The degradation kinetics of the xenobiotic compound could be described by a model based on cometabolic degradation of these secondary substrates.

  19. Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illmer, P. Gstraunthaler, G.

    2009-01-15

    A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

  20. Reduced gas pressure operation of sludge digesters: Expanded studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Previous investigations strongly suggested that the municipal anaerobic sludge digestion process could be enhanced by reactor operation with subatmospheric headspace pressures. Enhanced solids destruction and methane production along with increased process stability were observed in these earlier studies. However, due to the small scale of the anaerobic reactors used ( {approx}1.5 L), definitive steady-state measurements could not be obtained. These expanded studies were undertaken to verify and define the magnitude of the benefits that might be obtained with vacuum operation of sludge digesters. Four reactors ({approx}15.0 L) were fed municipal sludge at three different organic loading rates while being maintained with a 15-day solids retention time. One reactor had a constant headspace pressure of 1.02 atm; a second was maintained at 0.75 atm; and the remaining two reactors were operated for the majority of the day at 1.02 atm, and for part of the day with a 0.75 atm headspace pressure. Additional small-scale, batch experiments were performed to help identify controlling digestion mechanisms. The results of these expanded studies indicate that vacuum operation did not yield significant advantages over the organic loading range investigated (0.088 to 0.352 lb VSS/ft{sup 3}{center_dot}d).

  1. Anaerobic co-digestion of aquatic flora and quinoa with manures from Bolivian Altiplano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Rene Liden, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Quinoa stalk (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from agricultural crop residue, totora (Schoenoplectus tatora) and o-macrophytes (aquatic flora) from Lake Titicaca (on the Bolivian Altiplano) were studied in a wet anaerobic co-digestion process together with manure from llama, cow and sheep. Anaerobic semi-continuous experiments were performed in (10) 2-l reactors at a temperature of 25 deg. C with 30 days of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.8 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. Totora was found to be the best co-substrate. In mixture ratios of 1:1 (VS basis), it increased the biogas productivity by 130% for llama manure, 60% for cow manure, and 40% for sheep manure. It was possible to use up to 58% (VS basis) of totora in the substrate. Higher concentrations (including pure totora) could not be digested, as that caused acidification problems similar to those caused by other lignocellulosic materials. When quinoa and o-macrophytes were used as co-substrates, the increase in biogas productivity was slightly less. However, these co-substrates did not cause any operational problems. An additional advantage of quinoa and o-macrophytes was that they could be used in any proportion (even in pure form) without causing any destabilization problems in the anaerobic digestion process.

  2. Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies at Sandia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Dave; Kaiser, Krista; Martin, Lonnie; Hanson, Don; Harms, Gary; Quirk, Tom

    2014-11-28

    The Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories’ Technical Area Five (TA-V) is the leader in advancing nuclear technologies through applied radiation science and unique nuclear environments. This video describes the organization’s capabilities, facilities, and culture.

  3. Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

  4. Pi in Applied Optics | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inside the Applied Optics Lab II Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share...

  5. Apply to the Cyclotron Institute REU Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an advanced physicschemistry course. To apply for the REU Program, complete the 3 steps below: Fill out the on-line 2016 Cyclotron Institute REU Application Note: You will be...

  6. Applying computationally efficient schemes for biogeochemical cycles

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (ACES4BGC) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Applying computationally efficient schemes for biogeochemical cycles (ACES4BGC) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Applying computationally efficient schemes for biogeochemical cycles (ACES4BGC) NCAR contributed to the ACES4BGC project through software engineering work on aerosol model implementation, build system and script changes, coupler enhancements for biogeochemical tracers, improvements to the Community Land Model (CLM) code and

  7. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Apply Who Qualifies Special Undergrad Information Contributors Faculty Past Programs Photo Gallery NSEC » CSES » SAGE SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Application deadline: March 27, 2016, 5:00 pm MDT Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Application process for SAGE 2016 is now open. U.S.

  8. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Apply for Beamtime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Beamtime LANSCE User Resources Tips for a Successful Proposal Step 1: Apply for Beam Time 1. Select an Instrument and a Local Contact 2. Submit Your Proposal Step 2: Before You Arrive 1. Complete the LANSCE User Facility Agreement Questionnaire 2. Arrange for Site Access 3. Prepare for Your Experiment: Contact Lujan Experiment Coordinator to arrange shipping of your samples. Talk to the beamline scientist about any electrical equipment you might bring. 4. Complete your training Step 3:

  9. How to Apply | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Postdoctoral Research Awards » How to Apply How to Apply Online Application Available at www.zintellect.com/Posting/Details/853 Application deadline May 7, 2015. Familiarize yourself with the benefits, obligations, eligibility requirements, and evaluation criteria. Familiarize yourself with the requirements and obligations to determine whether your education and professional goals are well aligned with the EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards. Read the Evaluation Criteria that will be used to

  10. Effects of lipid concentration on anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yifei; Wang, Dian; Yan, Jiao; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Tianle

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Lipid in municipal biomass would not inhibited the anaerobic digestion process. • A lipid concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. • The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with the increasing of the lipid contents. • Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process. - Abstract: The influence of the lipid concentration on the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste-activated sludge was assessed by biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests and by bench-scale tests in a mesophilic semi-continuous stirred tank reactor. The effect of increasing the volatile solid (VS) concentration of lipid from 0% to 75% was investigated. BMP tests showed that lipids in municipal biomass waste could enhance the methane production. The results of bench-scale tests showed that a lipids concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. Methane yields increased with increasing lipid concentration when lipid concentrations were below 60%, but when lipid concentration was set as 65% or higher, methane yields decreased sharply. When lipid concentrations were below 60%, the pH values were in the optimum range for the growth of methanogenic bacteria and the ratios of volatile fatty acid (VFA)/alkalinity were in the range of 0.2–0.6. When lipid concentrations exceeded 65%, the pH values were below 5.2, the reactor was acidized and the values of VFA/alkalinity rose to 2.0. The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with increasing lipid content. Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process, thereby inhibiting anaerobic digestion.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayono, Satoto E.; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

  12. Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stabnikova, O. Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y.

    2008-07-01

    The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

  13. Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles Official Use Only Pre-decisional Draft R. A. Pierce K. M. Fox June 2014 SRNL-RP-2014-00464, Revision 0 SRNL-RP-2014-00464 Revision 0 -- Official Use Only -- ii DISCLAIMER This work was prepared under an agreement with and funded by the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government or its employees, nor any of its contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any express or implied: 1. warranty or assumes any legal liability

  14. Effects of nickel on biological methane generation from a laboratory poultry waste digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.M.; Shih, J.C.H.; Spears, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Nickel added in concentrations as low as 10..mu..M significantly increased biogas production in a laboratory poultry waste digester utilizing excreta from laying hens as the organic energy source. It was shown that the initial rate of biogas production increased as early as 4 h after the addition of nickel to the laboratory cultures. Analysis of the excreta for nickel content prior to addition of exogenous NiCl/sub 2/ showed appreciable amounts of nickel present. The data indicate that nickel naturally present in layer excreta is suboptimal or unavailable to the bacteria for biogas production purposes.

  15. Energy and economic assessment of anaerobic digester and biofuels for waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A history of biogas production in the USA is presented. Recent systems approaches to biogas are considered. Technological problems that have interfered with the routine operation of biogas digesters are the barriers to feed-material handling, inadequate feed material preparation, irregular gas production of current designs of small-scale systems, and the capital- and maintenance-intensive nature of the conversion of biogas to electricity. Finally, it was noted that so far no work has been carried out to study alternative uses for biogas, as for example the production of methanol or ammonia.

  16. Science Digests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of mini-articles that provide a context for our historical approach, current problem solving and our vision for the future. Spatial partitioning for the ocean simulation data set. ...

  17. Increasing biogas yield of rural biogas digester by addition of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, G.C.; Chen, G.Q.; Chen, M.; Liu, K.X.; Zhou, S.Y.

    1983-12-01

    By addition of 0.3% NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ instead of animal manure into rural biogas digester in which the rotted rice straw was the major feedstock, the biogas yield doubled in comparison with the check digester (0.1 m/sup 3//m/sup 3//d) and the fertility of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ did not decrease because of biogas fermentation. Many digesters have been built in China. But, owing to the problems of improper management, unsuitable influent mixing, etc., neither digesters nor feedstock were fully utilized. In order to solve these problems, adding NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ into digester instead of animal manure was tried. Its results showed that the suitable C/N ratio of influent mixing was obtained, the fertility of effluent went up, and biogas producing rate increased. The concentration of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ is 0.2-0.6%, but the optimal is 0.3%.

  18. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  19. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  20. How to Apply for Senior Executive positions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To apply vacancies for SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) , SENIOR LEVEL (SL), SCIENTIFIC AND PROFESSIONAL (ST) positions within the Department of Energy please visit OPM's website: http://www.usajobs.gov. From this site, you may download announcements for vacancies of interest to you.

  1. Biogas from refuse via an earth-sheltered passive solar digester. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    As originally conceived, the project involved the design, construction and operation of a test-scale refuse digestion system and alternative energy technology, as an integral component of a planned comprehensive waste management system based on the concept of recycling and resource recovery. Specific technologies employed in the digestion system included aerobic composting and anaerobic fermentation. System inputs included non-recycleable organic refuse (paper, food wastes, etc.) and septage (septic tank sludge), both of which represent disposal problems for many North American communities, and heat. Anticipated system outputs were biogas (50 to 60% methane), a premium fuel, and compostable sludge, a potential soil amendment-fertilizer. Projected net energy output was enhanced by incorporating biological feedstock preheating, earth sheltering, passive solar heating, and sludge heat recovery into the project design. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of this system versus competing waste-to-energy technologies. Due primarily to institutional barriers and related factors, the project did not progress to the point of enabling the stated purpose to be demonstrated.

  2. Co-digestion of sewage sludge with glycerol to boost biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountoulakis, M.S.; Petousi, I.; Manios, T.

    2010-10-15

    The feasibility of adding crude glycerol from the biodiesel industry to the anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants was studied in both batch and continuous experiments at 35 {sup o}C. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if it does not exceed a limiting 1% (v/v) concentration in the feed. Any further increase of glycerol causes a high imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. The reactor treating the sewage sludge produced 1106 {+-} 36 ml CH{sub 4}/d before the addition of glycerol and 2353 {+-} 94 ml CH{sub 4}/d after the addition of glycerol (1% v/v in the feed). The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on reactor performance, but seemed to increase the active biomass (volatile solids) concentration in the system. Batch kinetic experiments showed that the maximum specific utilization rate ({mu}{sub max}) and the saturation constant (K{sub S}) of glycerol were 0.149 {+-} 0.015 h{sup -1} and 0.276 {+-} 0.095 g/l, respectively. Comparing the estimated values with the kinetics constants for propionate reported in the literature, it can be concluded that glycerol uptake is not the rate-limiting step during the process.

  3. Mechanism, Kinetics and Microbiology of Inhibition Caused by Long-Chain Fatty Acids in Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Laurens, Lieve L.; Jarvis, Eric E.; Nagle, Nick J.; Chen, Shulin; Frear, Craig S.

    2015-09-15

    Oleaginous microalgae contain a high level of lipids, which can be extracted and converted to biofuel. The lipid-extracted residue can then be further utilized through anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. However, long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) have been identified as the main inhibitory factor on microbial activity of anaerobic consortium. In this study, the mechanism of LCFA inhibition on anaerobic digestion of whole and lipid-extracted algal biomass was investigated with a range of calcium concentrations against various inoculum to substrate ratios as a means to alleviate the LCFA inhibition.

  4. Applied Cathode Enhancement and Robustness Technologies (ACERT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerators, Electrodynamics » ACERT Applied Cathode Enhancement and Robustness Technologies (ACERT) World leading experts from fields of accelerator design & testing, chemical synthesis of nanomaterials, and shielding application of nanomaterials. thumbnail of Nathan Moody Nathan Moody Principal Investigator (PI) Email ACERT Logo Team Our project team, a part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) comprised of world leading experts from fields of accelerator design & testing,

  5. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  6. Investigation into the effect of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion on methanogenic communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H.; Walter, Andreas; Ebner, Christian; Insam, Heribert

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Different methanogenic communities in mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. • High VFA levels do not cause major changes in archaeal communities. • Real-time PCR indicated greater diversity than ANAEROCHIP microarray. - Abstract: A study was conducted to determine whether differences in the levels of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic digester plants could result in variations in the indigenous methanogenic communities. Two digesters (one operated under mesophilic conditions, the other under thermophilic conditions) were monitored, and sampled at points where VFA levels were high, as well as when VFA levels were low. Physical and chemical parameters were measured, and the methanogenic diversity was screened using the phylogenetic microarray ANAEROCHIP. In addition, real-time PCR was used to quantify the presence of the different methanogenic genera in the sludge samples. Array results indicated that the archaeal communities in the different reactors were stable, and that changes in the VFA levels of the anaerobic digesters did not greatly alter the dominating methanogenic organisms. In contrast, the two digesters were found to harbour different dominating methanogenic communities, which appeared to remain stable over time. Real-time PCR results were inline with those of microarray analysis indicating only minimal changes in methanogen numbers during periods of high VFAs, however, revealed a greater diversity in methanogens than found with the array.

  7. Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu Dongjie; Huang Hui; Dai Xiaohu; Zhao Youcai

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

  8. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  9. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  10. Applied Energy Programs, SPO-AE: LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin Ott 505-663-5537 Program Administrator Jutta Kayser 505-663-5649 Program Manager Karl Jonietz 505-663-5539 Program Manager Melissa Fox 505-663-5538 Budget Analyst Fawn Gore 505-665-0224 The Applied Energy Program Office (SPO-AE) manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the world, Los

  11. Apply for a Job | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAQs Answers to frequently asked questions about applying for a job at Argonne A Note About Privacy We do not ask you for personally identifiable information such as birthdate, social security number, or driver's license number. To ensure your privacy, please do not include such information in the documents that you upload to the system A Note About File Size Our application system has a file size limit of 820KB. While this is sufficient for the vast majority of documents, we have found that

  12. 2009 Applied and Environmental Microbiology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicole Dubilier

    2009-07-12

    The topic of the 2009 Gordon Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology is: From Single Cells to the Environment. The Conference will present and discuss cutting-edge research on applied and environmental microbiology with a focus on understanding interactions between microorganisms and the environment at levels ranging from single cells to complex communities. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics such as single cell techniques (including genomics, imaging, and NanoSIMS), microbial diversity at scales ranging from clonal to global, environmental 'meta-omics', biodegradation and bioremediation, metal - microbe interactions, animal microbiomes and symbioses. The Conference will bring together investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with extensive discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an ideal setting for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas, brainstorm and discuss cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  13. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  15. Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation ...

  16. Energy Department Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance to May 22, 2015 Energy Department Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable...

  17. Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR)...

  18. James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director,...

  19. Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Slides from the Building...

  20. Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science

  1. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 2. Applied Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Applied Battery Research 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 2. Applied Battery Research DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008meritreview2.pdf...

  2. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. No...

  3. Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime and Degradation Science Statistical and Domain Analytics Applied to PV Module Lifetime and Degradation Science...

  4. Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Engine...

  5. Magnetic relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection and localization Title: Magnetic relaxometry as applied to sensitive cancer detection and localization Here we describe ...

  6. Applying the Battery Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applying the Battery Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery Use Strategies Applying the Battery Ownership Model in Pursuit of Optimal Battery Use Strategies 2012 DOE ...

  7. Artificial intelligence technologies applied to terrain analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J.C. ); Powell, D.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The US Army Training and Doctrine Command is currently developing, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Corps level combat simulation to support military analytical studies. This model emphasizes high resolution modeling of the command and control processes, with particular attention to architectural considerations that enable extension of the model. A planned future extension is the inclusion of an computer based planning capability for command echelons that can be dynamical invoked during the execution of then model. Command and control is the process through which the activities of military forces are directed, coordinated, and controlled to achieve the stated mission. To perform command and control the commander must understand the mission, perform terrain analysis, understand his own situation and capabilities as well as the enemy situation and his probable actions. To support computer based planning, data structures must be available to support the computer's ability to understand'' the mission, terrain, own capabilities, and enemy situation. The availability of digitized terrain makes it feasible to apply artificial intelligence technologies to emulate the terrain analysis process, producing data structures for uses in planning. The work derived thus for to support the understanding of terrain is the topic of this paper. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. CX-009418: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electron Beam Melting CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  9. CX-009420: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Additive Manufacturing Using EOSINT M280 CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  10. CX-009419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magnetic Pulser CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  11. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tansel, Berrin Surita, Sharon C.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the 62% and 27% if siloxanes, respectively. • In landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were TMSOH (58%) followed by D4 (17%). • Methane utilization may be a possible mechanism for TMSOH formation in the landfills. • The geometric configurations of D4 and D5 molecules make them very stable. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si–O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si–O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups.

  12. Utilisation of single added fatty acids by consortia of digester sludge in batch culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Gstrauntaler, Gudrun; Illmer, Paul

    2010-10-15

    Inocula derived from an anaerobic digester were used to study (i) their potential for methane production and (ii) the utilisation rates of different short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by the microbial community in defined media with mono-carbon sources (formic-, acetetic-, propionic-, butyric acid) in batch culture. It could be demonstrated that the microbial reactor population could be transferred successfully to the lab, and its ability to build up methane was present even with deteriorating biogas plant performance. Therefore, this reduction in performance of the biogas plant was not due to a decrease in abundance, but due to an inactivity of the microbial community. Generally, the physico-chemical properties of the biogas plant seemed to favour hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as seen by the high metabolisation rates of formate compared with all other carbon sources. In contrast, acetoclastic methanogenesis could be shown to play a minor role in the methane production of the investigated biogas plant, although the origin of up to 66% of methane is generally suggested to be generated through acetoclastic pathway.

  13. Demonstration of anaerobic biogas digesters in developing countries. Part III. The Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.H.; Morales, E.C.

    1980-03-01

    The main theme of this series of articles is that ours is now a world-wide society, short on meeting needs for energy yet long on waste from our industrial, agricultural and human consumption processes. This is a study report about developments in the Philippines where waste management has been recognized and considered as an important practical source of energy. This is revealed by several reports of the number of biogas plants in operation in this country. According to the July 31, 1977 survey made by the Philippines Bureau of Animal Industries, 200 biogas plants were then installed and in operation of which 46 were government-owned and 154 privately-owned. More have been installed since then. This report presents some of the operating observations and developments from the joint engineering analyses project of the Philippines Bureau of Animal Industry, Man and the Biosphere Inter-Agency Committee on Ecological Studies, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the National Institute of Science and Technology. The project's main objective was to show that establishing a biogas plant involves not only the production of a methane gas mixture but the integration of its other products as part of a system (i.e., using effluent water from the biogas digester for production of algae chlorell sp. for livestock and poultry feed, production of fish and fertilizing-irrigating of pasture and vegetable plots.). Housing development sewer systems with added biogas generators are also discussed.

  14. Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Gioannis, G.; Diaz, L.F.; Muntoni, A. Pisanu, A.

    2008-07-01

    A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

  15. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzcinski, Antoine P.; Stuckey, David C.

    2011-07-15

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  16. Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govasmark, Espen; Staeb, Jessica; Holen, Borge; Hoornstra, Douwe; Nesbakk, Tommy; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

  17. Archaeal community composition affects the function of anaerobic co-digesters in response to organic overload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerm, S.; Kleyboecker, A.; Miethling-Graff, R.; Alawi, M.; Kasina, M.; Liebrich, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of methanogens are necessary to respond successfully to perturbation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diversity of methanogens correlates with the VFA concentration and methane yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aggregates indicate tight spatial relationship between minerals and microorganisms. - Abstract: Microbial community diversity in two thermophilic laboratory-scale and three full-scale anaerobic co-digesters was analysed by genetic profiling based on PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. In parallel operated laboratory reactors a stepwise increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) resulted in a decrease of methane production and an accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). However, almost threefold different OLRs were necessary to inhibit the gas production in the reactors. During stable reactor performance, no significant differences in the bacterial community structures were detected, except for in the archaeal communities. Sequencing of archaeal PCR products revealed a dominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens were of minor importance and differed additionally in their abundance between reactors. As a consequence of the perturbation, changes in bacterial and archaeal populations were observed. After organic overload, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei and Methanoculleus receptaculi) became more dominant, especially in the reactor attributed by a higher OLR capacity. In addition, aggregates composed of mineral and organic layers formed during organic overload and indicated tight spatial relationships between minerals and microbial processes that may support de-acidification processes in over-acidified sludge. Comparative analyses of mesophilic stationary phase full-scale reactors additionally indicated a correlation between the diversity of methanogens and the VFA concentration combined with the methane yield. This study demonstrates that the coexistence of two types of methanogens, i.e. hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens is necessary to respond successfully to perturbation and leads to stable process performance.

  18. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What It Can Do for You X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What It Can Do for You Presentation given at DEER...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Case School of Applied Science...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Case School of Applied Science Ohio State University - OH 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University (OH.0-01 ) Eliminated from...

  20. Oregon Learning About and Applying for Water Rights Webpage ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Learning About and Applying for Water Rights Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Learning About and Applying for Water...

  1. Aachen University of Applied Sciences | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aachen University of Applied Sciences Place: Germany Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation ) References: Aachen...

  2. Applied Process Engineering Laborotory APEL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering Laborotory (APEL) Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Applied Process...

  3. Applying for PMCDP/FPD Certification (initial) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Career Development (PMCDP) » Applying for PMCDP/FPD Certification (initial) Applying for PMCDP/FPD Certification (initial) Certification applicants are nominated by their respective Program Secretarial Office (PSO) to apply for FPD certification - candidates may not apply without program sponsorship. Each participating program has a dedicated point of contact (POC) whose role is to support the FPD applicant in preparing their certification package. First time applicants, as well as

  4. Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Initiative (ABRS AFRI) | Department of Energy Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Applied Battery Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research Applied battery research addresses the barriers facing the lithium-ion systems that are closest to meeting the technical energy and power requirements for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and electric vehicle (EV) applications. In addition, applied battery research concentrates on technology transfer to ensure that the research results and lessons learned are effectively provided to U.S. automotive and battery

  6. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) | Department of Energy Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) By:

  7. Overview of Applied Battery Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es014_henriksen_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Applied Battery Research Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity

  8. Applied Mathematics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Applied Mathematics Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Applied Mathematics Conferences And Workshops Computer Science Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of

  9. High rate mesophilic, thermophilic, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge: A pilot scale study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolzonella, David; Cavinato, Cristina; Fatone, Francesco; Pavan, Paolo; Cecchi, Franco

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperatures were tested in single and two-stage anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increased temperature demonstrated the possibility of improving typical yields of the conventional mesophilic process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature phased anaerobic digestion process (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) showed the best performances with yields of 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia and phosphate released from solids destruction determined the precipitation of struvite in the reactor. - Abstract: The paper reports the findings of a two-year pilot scale experimental trial for the mesophilic (35 Degree-Sign C), thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) and temperature phased (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. During the mesophilic and thermophilic runs, the reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In the temperature phased run, the first reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 15 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 2 days while the second reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 18 days (20 days for the whole temperature phased system). The performance of the reactor improved with increases in temperature. The COD removal increased from 35% in mesophilic conditions, to 45% in thermophilic conditions, and 55% in the two stage temperature phased system. As a consequence, the specific biogas production increased from 0.33 to 0.45 and to 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed} at 35, 55, and 65 + 55 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The extreme thermophilic reactor working at 65 Degree-Sign C showed a high hydrolytic capability and a specific yield of 0.33 gCOD (soluble) per gVS{sub fed}. The effluent of the extreme thermophilic reactor showed an average concentration of soluble COD and volatile fatty acids of 20 and 9 g/l, respectively. Acetic and propionic acids were the main compounds found in the acids mixture. Because of the improved digestion efficiency, organic nitrogen and phosphorus were solubilised in the bulk. Their concentration, however, did not increase as expected because of the formation of salts of hydroxyapatite and struvite inside the reactor.

  10. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A.; Alvarez-Gallego, C.; Sales, D.; Romero Garcia, L.I.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

  11. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  12. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A.; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

  13. Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Turney, Terence W.; Naidu, Ravi; Miller, Bradley W.; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2013-01-14

    The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/stockpiling, were also assessed. The results indicated that 'native' Zn and Zn added either as a soluble salt or as NPs was rapidly converted to sulfides in all treatments. The hydrophobicity of the commercial formulation retarded the conversion of ZnO-NP. However, at the end of the anaerobic digestion process and after postprocessing of the sewage sludge (which caused a significant change in Zn speciation), the speciation of Zn was similar across all treatments. This indicates that, at least for the material tested, the risk assessment of ZnO-NP through this exposure pathway can rely on the significant knowledge already available in regard to other 'conventional' forms of Zn present in sewage sludge.

  14. Tritium Permeation Activity at Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility | Department of Energy Permeation Activity at Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility Tritium Permeation Activity at Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014. PDF icon Tritium Permeation Activity at Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility More Documents & Publications Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial

  15. Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parallel Computing » How to Apply Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creating next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nicole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email Current application deadline is February 5, 2016 with notification by early March 2016. Who can apply? Upper division undergraduate

  16. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 2. Applied Battery Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2-1 2. Applied Battery Research Introduction Applied battery research focuses on addressing the cross-cutting barriers facing the lithium-ion systems that are closest to meeting all of the technical energy and power requirements for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and electric vehicle (EV) applications. In addition, the applied battery research activity concentrates on technology transfer to ensure that the research results and lessons learned are effectively provided to U.S. automotive and

  17. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace007_oefelein_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Low-Temperature and Diesel Engine Combustion Research

  18. El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss | Department of Energy El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Reosurce Potential at Fort Bliss presentation at the April 2013 peer

  19. Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar | Department of Energy Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Slides from the Building America webinar on November 11, 2011. PDF icon webinar_pcm_enclosures_20111111.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America Webinar: Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary

  20. Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems This expert meeting was conducted by Building Science Corporation on July 31, 2011 in Westford, Massachusetts ; the topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters

  1. Energy Department Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Project Development Assistance to May 22, 2015 | Department of Energy Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance to May 22, 2015 Energy Department Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance to May 22, 2015 April 30, 2015 - 4:05pm Addthis Energy Department Extends Deadline to Apply for START Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance to May 22, 2015 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S.

  2. APPLIED TECHNOLOGY R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development » APPLIED TECHNOLOGY R&D APPLIED TECHNOLOGY R&D rdplan-thumb.jpg Applied technology R&D projects monitor SSL technology advances and provide laboratory and field evaluations of emerging products. Impartial, trusted analysis from DOE identifies and characterizes technology problems early on, alerting manufacturers to needed improvements, and helping to put detailed information into the hands of buyers, which when used in discussions with manufacturers can

  3. Where to Apply for Weatherization Assistance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You are here Home » Weatherization Assistance Program » Where to Apply for Weatherization Assistance Where to Apply for Weatherization Assistance To apply for weatherization assistance you need to contact your state weatherization agency. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not provide weatherization services or services of any kind to individuals. DOE also does not process applications-this process is handled by each state. How to Determine if You Are Eligible for Weatherization

  4. Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricate PHEV Cells for Testing & Diagnostics Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity Current Research Activities in Electrode and Cell Prototyping...

  5. WEBINAR: UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING TM-30-15 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provided examples of how they can be applied by various users, and demonstrated the Excel tools that are distributed with the document. View the presentation slides View the ...

  6. Apply: Funding Opportunity - Advancing Solutions to Improve Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advancing Solutions to Improve Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Apply: Funding Opportunity - Advancing Solutions to Improve Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings ...

  7. Apply: Small Business Funding Opportunity for Lighting, Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Funding Opportunity for Lighting, Integrated Storage, and Distributed Generation Apply: Small Business Funding Opportunity for Lighting, Integrated Storage, and ...

  8. Crivelli, Silvia; Meza, Juan 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES Ernest...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    folding via divide-and-conquer optimization Oliva, Ricardo; Crivelli, Silvia; Meza, Juan 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA...

  9. Apply: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (DE-FOA-0001027) Apply: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (DE-FOA-0001027) February 4, 2014 - ...

  10. Solar Applied Materials Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Solar Applied Materials Technology Corp Place: Tainan, Taiwan Product: Taiwan's material process specialists with over 20 years experience and in the areas of sputtering...

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Applying...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs - Central Florida (Fact Sheet) Building America...

  12. ENERGY STAR Webinar: How to Apply for the ENERGY STAR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting a webinar on how to apply for ENERGY STAR certification in Portfolio Manager.

  13. The generalized finite element method applied to the dynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The generalized finite element method applied to the dynamic response of heterogeneous media. Authors: Robbins, Joshua ; Voth, Thomas E. Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI ...

  14. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  15. Applied Materials Switzerland SA Formerly HCT Shaping Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Switzerland SA Formerly HCT Shaping Systems SA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Materials Switzerland SA (Formerly HCT Shaping Systems SA) Place: Chezeaux, Switzerland...

  16. Building America Webinar: Opportunities to Apply Phase Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures This webinar, presented by research team Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy ...

  17. Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is ...

  18. Applied Solar LLC formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Solar LLC (formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc) Place: San Diego, California...

  19. BLM Manual 2804: Applying for FLPMA Grants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: BLM Manual 2804: Applying for FLPMA GrantsPermittingRegulatory...

  20. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the ...

  1. Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Related Tools CRiSTAL Forests MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model...

  2. Am Shav Technological Applied Development Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technological Applied Development Center Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Am-Shav...

  3. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for Improved Enhanced Oil Recovery Technique Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring

  4. CX-008179: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Building 09-056 Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  5. CX-007550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kearney - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-007549: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harrisonville - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-012310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sawmill Creek Stream Bank Erosion CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  8. CX-009423: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relay and Switchboard Panel Replacements CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/29/2012 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  9. CX-011626: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Line Yard Fence Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  10. CX-011628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Enclosure Modification Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  11. CX-011630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    9831 Wall Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  12. CX-009753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-012799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Malin-Hilltop Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-012805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brasada-Harney #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41908 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-012813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-010479: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Load Control System Reliability CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/29/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2011 CX-006459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08082011 Location(s): Albany, Oregon...

  18. CX-012619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chromatography and Analytical Sensor Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41799 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-007587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Chromatography CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-009202: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Port Angeles Substation Equipment Additions CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-012791: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grizzly Captain Jack Transmission Line Access Road Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41935 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-010772: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  3. CX-012706: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiochemistry Laboratory (RCL) Supply Intake Filter Housing CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-012433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computer Simulation and Prototype Construction and Testing CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 41878 Location(s): GeorgiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-008571: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Blue Energy CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/20/2012 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-009442: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cutters Grove, Anoka CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.19 Date: 07/31/2012 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigation of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity using Surfaced Engineered Thin Film Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09082011 Location(s): Pittsburgh,...

  8. CX-009543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sopogy Subcontract CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 11/28/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-012195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alfalfa Substation Control House Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 05/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-012512: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41848 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-008215: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Hydropower Research and Development Technology Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/03/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-012666: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carib Energy (USA) LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 05/30//2014 Location(s): FloridaOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  14. CX-012434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Titanium Casting Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-008700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natapoc Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-010727: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dayton Tap Line Retirement CX(s) Applied: B4.10 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-011173: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yaak Substation Transformer Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-008204: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Finch CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-008203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Demoret CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-008241: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Teter CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 05/15/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-008205: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Weaver CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-009132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landfill Gas Utilization Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.21 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-010618: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: 0 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-008438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-008282: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogas Reconditioning Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-010339: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flight's End Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/20/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-012311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Accelerator Test Facility II CX(s) Applied: B3.10 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Brookhaven Site Office

  8. CX-007866: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunShot Massachusetts CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-012570: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Install Elevated Fire Water Storage Tank CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. CX-012231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mica Peak Radio Station upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-009850: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pittsburgh Nanomaterials Preparation Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/29/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-011534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays River Confluence Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    North Bend Communication Site Engine Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41848 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-010195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Polymer Synthesis Lab - Modification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-007779: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Routine Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/13/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  16. CX-009159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana Formaul State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/06/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-007522: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Crane Removal Project CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 12/15/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  18. CX-012645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wenatchee District 2014 Transmission Line Maintenance - Multiple Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41862 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-010237: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pittsburgh Green Innovators Synergy Center CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/28/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-007650: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Control Room Consolidation CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-012653: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holcomb-Naselle #1 Access Road Improvements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-012643: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chehalis-Covington #1 Access Roads CX(s) Applied: B1.13Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012641: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mossy Rock-Chehalis #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-010514: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Center for Nanoscale Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/24/2013 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-007778: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 01/13/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  6. CX-010091: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration 2013-1 CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  7. CX-010398: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  8. CX-009312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-100159 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Pumps RIN: 1904-AC54 CX(s) Applied: B5.1

  10. CX-011065: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-011788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 02/10/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-007497: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clean Energy Coalition - Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-011712: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 01/08/2014 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-010938: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Kansas, Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-011271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-012722: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Conference Room Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-012189: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microbial Laboratory Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  18. CX-010797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Serration Behavior of High Entropy Alloys CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140456 - Salmon Creek Avenue Pathway Project CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41885 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-009203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Maintenance Headquarters Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-012788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bio-Aviation Fuel LCA with GREET CX(s) Applied: B5.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  2. CX-011069: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Induction Furnace Melting CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ZIRCEX Nuclear Fuel Dissolution Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-012002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Raver-Covington Conductor Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/24/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-007795: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Easement Acquisition, Carroll County, Arkansas CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 02/07/2011 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  6. CX-008161: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosser Hatchery Backup Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 04/16/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-012472: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.11Date: 41873 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-007613: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Next Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  10. CX-012495: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 6 Stack Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): West VirginiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-007428: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ralls Independent School District CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-007423: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highland Independent School District CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-007426: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sharyland Independent School District CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-010150: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Celilo Fiber System CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Houston, Texas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-012228: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deer Park Substation Connection Modifications CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/17/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-012333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support Buildings CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06/03/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  18. CX-006646: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Restoration South of 54-TPX-10CX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 02/09/2010Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  19. CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010...

  20. CX-012796: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Big Eddy-Redmond #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41919 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-008471: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Tree Planting Initiative - Rebuild Western Mass CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-012803: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sacajawea Substation Expansion and Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 41912 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012665: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheniere Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 06/04/2014 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  4. CX-011707: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laser Nanoparticle Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-008341: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A-6 Office Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 04/19/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

  6. CX-011177: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hebo Substation Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09012011 Location(s): Florida...

  8. CX-007873: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-007873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.14 Date: 01272012...

  9. CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.16 Date: 01272012...

  10. CX-012640: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lexington-Longview #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-011189: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Naselle Ridge Emergency Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-011237: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lightspeed Networks Inc. Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 10/24/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-010756: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Utility Network Deployment Acceleration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-011102: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A11 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-012790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Site Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41939 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-010426: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vista View Fields Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/19/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-008250: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/18/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  18. CX-010699: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Boulevard Annex Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07/11/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  19. CX-008251: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    International Way Office Building Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 03/21/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. CX-007793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonesboro Maintenance Facility Additions CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/10/2011 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  1. CX-007794: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grandview, Arkansas Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.12 Date: 04/08/2011 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  2. CX-007798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Springfield Maintenance Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  3. CX-009704: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pasco Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 12/17/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-008684: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Metaline Radio Station Upgrade Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-008989: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-012728: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BHP-3 Offsite Bump Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41885 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  7. CX-009786: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beck Road Substation Meter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/07/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-010742: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated Simulation Development and Decision Support CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-012730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace West Hackberry Radio Tower CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  10. CX-012531: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-012539: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-010019: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  13. CX-009295: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Regional Innovation Cluster CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/05/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-001856: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04282010 Location(s): Paisley, Oregon Office(s): Energy...

  15. CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-010763: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nevada Desert Research Institute- Photovoltaic Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 07172013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s):...

  16. CX-010258: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bangladesh Meteorological Instrumentation Installation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-012482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22Date: 41862 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-010057: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Substation Protective Relay Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-010338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Substation Fiber Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/21/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-010343: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bald Hill Farms Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/10/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-011214: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sensitive Instrument Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/10/2013 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): Ames Site Office

  2. CX-012222: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harney Substation Digital Communications Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06/30/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-008799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jack Case Showers Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  4. CX-008534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peter Wentz Geothermal CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 05/23/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-012054: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Catalyst Synthesis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/18/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-008691: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mason Substation Metering Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-011538: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Ninemile Creek Lower Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-011536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Aeneans Creek Spring Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/25/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-011537: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wanacut Creek Upper Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-010770: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildland Fire Chainsaw Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-010591: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Yamhill Floodplain Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/26/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-012654: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Red Hills Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 41850 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012224: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coyote Creek Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-012223: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Turtle Flats Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-010028: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flame Forming Proppants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. CX-003703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Florida Hydrogen Initiative - Florida Institute of Technology (Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09...

  17. CX-012463: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reliable SOFC Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 41877 Location(s): ConnecticutOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-012561: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Department of Energy Office Trailers CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41871 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-010578: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Celilo Converter Station Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 07/25/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-012795: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bonneville Substation 23- Kilovolt Line Retermination CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 41926 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Milling Machine Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05/14/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  2. CX-012822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santiam-Toledo Structure 39/7 Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Scientific Infrastructure Support for University of Wisconsin CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 41844 Location(s): WisconsinOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-012283: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    USC Autoclave CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/14/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-010587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mariah Wind CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 07/03/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-012583: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biofuels Production Experiment CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41841 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. CX-007792: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gore Substation Safety Lighting CX(s) Applied: B2.3 Date: 09/01/2011 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  8. CX-007517: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UPF Mock Wall Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/29/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  9. CX-009630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICP Routine Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/06/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. CX-012718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho State University Reactor Laboratory Modernization CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 41844 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-011642: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Lake Land Utilization CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  12. CX-008588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Petersburg Solar Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-011667: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generating Alginate Sorbents CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/11/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-012317: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Performance Computing Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 06/16/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  15. CX-012254: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Vanderbilt CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/28/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-012253: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - OSU CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/27/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-012118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Tufts CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/21/2014 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. CX-008724: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rexburg Bus Lot Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07/05/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  19. CX-009515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tide Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-011634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Closure Turf Installation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 08/27/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  1. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  2. CX-010342: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Luckiamute Meadows Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/15/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-010532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Demolition Jobs CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  4. CX-011215: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nepese Marsh Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 10/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  5. CX-012810: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Johns-Keeler Minor Access Road Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41901 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 CX-006298: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interconnection of the Letcher to Mitchell 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line to Western's Letcher Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.11...

  7. CX-010951: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Automotive Technology Analysis CX(s) Applied: A8 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-010341: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chandler Tap Line Reconductoring CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05/17/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-012498: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41852 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-007407: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Floating Turbine CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-010241: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Pathway Analyses CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/28/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-008701: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spring Basin Wilderness Land Exchange CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/05/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012807: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Action Substation Equipment Sale CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41906 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-009325: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microbiology Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/01/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-011194: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Particle Physics Division Outback Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  16. CX-011250: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Determination Transforming Photovoltaic Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Date: 10172013 Location(s): Oregon...

  17. CX-008695: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Munro Control Center Expansion CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06/21/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-011239: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Security Upgrades at Multiple Substations CX(s) Applied: ? Date: 10/02/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-008146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Formation Evaluator Tools (Haliburton) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 09/11/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  20. CX-012724: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Electronic Message Board Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7Date: 41830 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  1. CX-100160 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers RIN: 1904-AC81 CX(s) Applied: B5.1

  2. CX-012812: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemawa-Salem #1 & #2 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012636: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Woodward Meadows Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 41876 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX(s) Applied: DOEEA-1914 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 072815 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office July 21, 2015 CX-100313...

  5. CX-009005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Henderson Solar Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-008973: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Petrography Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-008545: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-008926: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Texas Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-008876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Railroad Island Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-008884: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rattlesnake Butte Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-011187: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minto Island Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-009206: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chahalpam Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09/12/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-010589: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nine Canyon Communication Tower Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-010590: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kalispell Shunt Cap Addition Project CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009617: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Mass Spectrometry CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. CX-010124: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/20/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  17. CX-010583: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Jocko River Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-012097: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microgrid Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: B5.15 Date: 03/24/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  19. CX-007939: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 02/16/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-008729: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reverse Osmosis System Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.26 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office