Sample records for diffuse irradiance purpose

  1. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Comparison of Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Diffuse Irradiance Study Planned for October

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  7. Purpose

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  8. EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

  9. X. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN DIFFUSE AND GLOBAL IRRADIANCE For numerous applications, particularly those

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    in the Pacific Northwest along with cor- responding data from the Solar Energy Mete- orological Research33 X. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN DIFFUSE AND GLOBAL IRRADIANCE For numerous applications, particularly the direct and diffuse components of the incident solar intensity. Because constant care is needed to measure

  10. Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Results of the Second Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. An Instrument Design Concept for Measuring Solar Diffuse Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Discrepancies in Shortwave Diffuse Measured and Modeled Irradiances in Antarctica

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. General Purpose Technologies and Economic Growth: Electricity Diffusion in the Manufacturing Sector Before WWII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ristuccia, Cristiano Andrea; Solomou, Solomos

    of growth are best described by the Kuznets swing literature (of 20-year cycles) and do not appear to be long-term retardations that can be attributed to the diffusion of electricity as a GPT. Evidence of a productivity bonus is mixed. The US case... lapalissade comes from ironical verses stating the utterly obvious referring to the French General Jacques de la Palice or la Palisse (1470 – 1525). 19 Bibliography Abramovitz, M. (1961), „The Nature and Significance of Kuznets Cycles?, Economic...

  15. Measurement of temperature-dependent defect diffusion in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Fleming, Robert M.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deuterated p-type GaN(Mg,{sup 2}H) films were irradiated at room temperature with 1 MeV protons to create native point defects with a concentration approximately equal to the Mg doping (5 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). The samples were then annealed isothermally at a succession of temperatures while monitoring the infrared absorption due to the H local mode of the MgH defect. As the samples were annealed, the MgH absorption signal decreased and a new mode at slightly higher frequency appeared, which has been associated with the approach of a mobile nitrogen interstitial. We used the time dependence of the MgH absorption to obtain a diffusion barrier of the nitrogen interstitial in p-type GaN of 1.99 eV. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations of nitrogen interstitial motion in GaN.

  16. Measurement of temperature-dependent defect diffusion in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1056 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deuterated p-type GaN(Mg,{sup 2}H) films were irradiated at room temperature with 1 MeV protons to create native point defects with a concentration approximately equal to the Mg doping (5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). The samples were then annealed isothermally at a succession of temperatures while monitoring the infrared absorption due to the H local mode of the MgH defect. As the samples were annealed, the MgH absorption signal decreased and a new mode at slightly higher frequency appeared, which has been associated with the approach of a mobile nitrogen interstitial. We used the time dependence of the MgH absorption to obtain a diffusion barrier of the nitrogen interstitial in p-type GaN of 1.99 eV. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations of nitrogen interstitial motion in GaN.

  17. First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

  18. Diffusion length and junction spectroscopy analysis of low-temperature annealing of electron irradiation-induced deep levels in 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Rigutti, L.; Pizzini, S.; Le Donne, A.; Binetti, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of low-temperature annealing in 8.2 MeV electron-irradiated 4H-SiC Schottky diodes were investigated. Deep-level transient spectroscopy and minority-carrier diffusion length (L{sub d}) measurements were carried out on not-irradiated samples and on irradiated samples before and after thermal treatments up to T=450 deg. C. We found that several deep levels in the upper half band gap (S1 with enthalpy E{sub T}=0.27 eV, S2 with E{sub T}=0.35 eV, S4 with E{sub T}=0.71 eV, and S5 with E{sub T}=0.96 eV) anneal out or modify at temperature values lower or equal to T=450 deg. C, whereby their progressive annealing out is accompanied by a net increase of L{sub d}, up to 50% of the value in the as-irradiated sample. We drew some conclusions regarding the microscopic nature of the defects related to the deep levels, according to their annealing behavior.

  19. I. Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  20. I. Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5 , 3004Guidance for

  1. I. Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5 , 3004Guidance

  2. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of diffuse solar radiation, Renew Energ, 33 (2008) [solar irradiance for analyzing areally- totalized PV systems, Sol Energsolar irradiance for analyzing areally- totalized PV systems, Sol Energ

  3. Hierarchical diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachas, C.P.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the solution and properties of the diffusion equation in a hierarchical or ultrametric space. 11 refs.

  4. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

  5. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  6. Systems Analysis Workshop Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on SAW purpose to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  7. Poster Presentation Purpose

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  8. Introduction and Purpose

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  9. Fit for Purpose Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. MENTORING PROGRAM Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. For Discussion Purposes Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Safer Food with Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Britta; Vestal, Andy; Van Laanen, Peggy

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication answers questions about food irradiation and how it helps prevent foodborne illnesses. Included are explanations of how irradiation works and its benefits. Irradiation is a safe method of preserving food quality and ensuring its...

  13. Effects of stress on microstructural evolution during irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many theories have been postulated to describe irradiation creep but few have been supported with microstructural evidence. The purpose of this paper is to review microstructural studies of the effects of stress during irradiation in order to assess the validity of the available irradiation creep theories. Microstructural studies based on high voltage electron, ion, proton and neutron irradiation will be described, with major emphasis placed on interpreting behavior demonstrated in austenitic steels. Special attention will be given to work on fast neutron irradiated Nimonic PE16, a precipitation strengthened superalloy.

  14. Comparison of Deuterium Retention for Ion-irradiated and Neutron-irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Makoto Kobayashi; Takuji Oda; Masanori Hara; Hideo Watanabe; Yuji Hatano; Pattrick Calderoni; Kenji Okuno

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of D retention for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten with a damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron-irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D{sub 2} thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 and 550 K, while that for neutron-irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and an addition desorption stage was found at 750 K. The desorption rate of the major desorption stage at 550K increased as the displacement damage increased due to Fe{sup 2+} irradiation increasing. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450K was found only for damaged samples. Therefore, the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe{sup 2+} irradiation, and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono-vacancy and the activation energy would be relatively reduced, where the dislocation loop and vacancy is produced. The third one was found only for neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by a void or vacancy cluster, and the diffusion effect is also contributed to by the high full-width at half-maximum of the TDS spectrum. Therefore, it can be said that the D{sub 2} TDS spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten cannot represent that for the neutron-irradiated one, indicating that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten is different from that for the ion-irradiated one.

  15. Use of OCA and APOLLO in Heliosat-4 method for the assessment of surface downwelling solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the German Aerospace Center (DLR), for the assessment of surface downwelling solar irradiance (SSI). Each-based assessments of surface downwelling solar irradiance (SSI) are more and more used in the domain of solar energy, diffuse and direct surface irradiance for use in various domains: solar energy, biomass, agriculture

  16. Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x x p p p l l l i i i c c c a a a c c c i i i n n n : La aerodinmica es la ciencia que estudia lo que ocurre cuando el aire o cualquier gas se mueve. Puede ser el aire...

  17. Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion Tensor Images Using the Known,2 Purpose: To correct eddy-current artifacts in diffusion ten- sor (DT) images without the need to obtain- tortions caused by eddy currents induced by large diffusion gradients. We propose a new postacquisition

  18. Is Arnold diffusion relevant to global diffusion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiichiro Honjo; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Global diffusion of Hamiltonian dynamical systems is investigated by using a coupled standard maps. Arnold web is visualized in the frequency space, using local rotation numbers, while Arnold diffusion and resonance overlaps are distinguished by the residence time distributions at resonance layers. Global diffusion in the phase space is shown to be accelerated by diffusion across overlapped resonances generated by the coupling term, rather than Arnold diffusion along the lower-order resonances. The former plays roles of hubs for transport in the phase space, and accelerate the diffusion.

  19. Shortwave, Clear-sky Diffuse Irradiance in the 350 to 1050 nm Range: Comparison of Models with RSS Measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM Site in September/October 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Magnetic phase formation in irradiated austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL] [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL] [ORNL; Tan, Lizhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Garner, Francis A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA] [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Austenitic alloys are often observed to develop magnetic properties during irradiation, possibly associated with radiation-induced acceleration of the ferrite phase. Some of the parametric sensitivities of this phenomenon have been addressed using a series of alloys irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at 593K. The rate of development of magnetic phase appears to be sensitive to alloy composition. To the first order, the largest sensitivities to accelerate ferrite formation, as explored in this experiment, are associated with silicon, carbon and manganese and chromium. Si, C, and Mn are thought to influence diffusion rates of point defects while Cr plays a prominent role in defining the chromium equivalent and therefore the amount of ferrite at equilibrium. Pre-irradiation cold working was found to accelerate ferrite formation, but it can play many roles including an effect on diffusion, but on the basis of these results the dominant role or roles of cold-work cannot be identified. Based on the data available, ferrite formation is most probably associated with diffusion.

  1. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  2. Analysis of tritium transport in irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the beryllium tritium release results with simple analytical models indicated that tritium behavior in Be is not dominated by one simple mechanism, but by a combination of several mechanisms including surface processes and helium bubbles. A model was developed and the initial version of the model included tritium diffusion in the beryllium and the beryllium oxide, second order desorption at the solid/gas interface and diffusion through interconnected porosity. Fundamental data, tritium diffusion and desorption coefficients for Be and BeO, were derived from experimental data using the model. Beryllium is a metal to which one can generally apply the concepts of diffusion, solubility, surface processes and traps. Tritium transport in the irradiated beryllium is affected by processes occurring in the bulk, He bubbles, the bulk/surface and surface/gas interfaces. There are two types of solid/gas surfaces in the irradiated Be. One is the surface at the pure Be/He bubble interface where no oxide layer exists and the other is the surface at the BeO layer/purge gas interface. Although the material characteristics of the Be and BeO layer are different and have different activation barriers, the surface processes can be applied to both interfaces.

  3. Informational Purposes Only - DOE Directives, Delegations, and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Weapon Surety Program (Informational Purposes Only) Acquisition Career Management Program (Informational Purposes Only) Facility Safety (For Informational Purposes Only)...

  4. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Drazic, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza 34012 (Italy); Holy, V. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic)

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  5. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyefa, Z.D. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria)] [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria); Holmgren, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. PURPOSE FORM INSTRUCTIONS Item Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO Website Directory PPPOLarson.Cheryl A -Chapter 32PURPOSE

  7. Irradiation response and stability of nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zepeda-Ruiz, L [Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory; Bringa, E. [CONICET, Universidad de Cuyo, Argentina; Nastasi, Mike [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous materials consist of a regular organic or inorganic framework supporting a regular, porous structure. Pores are by definition roughly in the nanometre range, that is between 0.2 nm and 100 nm. Nanoporous materials can be subdivided into 3 categories (IUPAC): (1) Microporous materials - 0.2-2 nm; (2) Mesoporous materials - 2-50 nm; and (3) Macroporous materials - 50-1000 nm. np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process. np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa. Stacking Fault Tetrahedra (SFTs) were observed in RT irradiated np-Au foams under the highest and intermediate fluxes, but not under the lowest flux. SFTs were not observed in LNT irradiated np-Au foams under all fluxes. The vacancy diffusivity in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and then collapse to form SFTs. The high ion flux creates more damage per unit time; vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed at high ion fluxes.

  8. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  9. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauer, Roger E. (Kennewick, WA); Straalsund, Jerry L. (Kennewick, WA); Chin, Bryan A. (Auburn, AL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  10. Thermo-quantum diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roumen Tsekov

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to thermo-quantum diffusion is proposed and a nonlinear quantum Smoluchowski equation is derived, which describes classical diffusion in the field of the Bohm quantum potential. A nonlinear thermo-quantum expression for the diffusion front is obtained, being a quantum generalization of the classical Einstein law. The quantum diffusion at zero temperature is also described and a new dependence of the position dispersion on time is derived. A stochastic Bohm-Langevin equation is also proposed.

  11. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  12. Standards of Ethical Conduct Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight:California  Standards of

  13. Purpose | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print ALSPurpose

  14. Beta Advection-Diffusion Model Columbia Basin Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Beta Advection-Diffusion Model Jim Norris Columbia Basin Research University of Washington Box Model (SSM) is loosely called a Beta Advection-Diffusion model. The SSM estimates a single parameter this single parameter characterized fish migration. The purpose of this note is to define the Beta Advection

  15. Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, E. Bruce

    Oxygen diffusion in titanite: Lattice diffusion and fast-path diffusion in single crystals X June 2006 Editor: P. Deines Abstract Oxygen diffusion in natural and synthetic single-crystal titanite be recognized as responsible for oxygen diffusion. The diffusion profiles showed two segments: a steep one close

  16. ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data

  17. ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiance ARM DatagovMeasurementsNet

  18. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwelling irradiance ARM

  19. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwelling irradiance

  20. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling irradiance ARM

  1. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling irradiance ARMnormal

  2. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Vittone, E. [Physics Department, NIS Excellence Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  3. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  4. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  5. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical to determine luminous efficacy under different sky conditions. A comparison between these empirical constants. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  6. Ion irradiation induced structural and electrical transition in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yangbo; Wang Yifan; Xu Jun; Fu Qiang; Wu Xiaosong; Yu Dapeng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liao Zhimin [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the electrical properties and structure evolution of single layer graphene was studied by gradually introducing the gallium ion irradiation. Raman spectrums show a structural transition from nano-crystalline graphene to amorphous carbon as escalating the degree of disorder of the graphene sample, which is in correspondence with the electrical transition from a Boltzmann diffusion transport to a carrier hopping transport. The results show a controllable method to tune the properties of graphene.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Moore, C.E. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Trimble, D.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Woods, J.J. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD {beta}-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination.

  8. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Moore, C.E. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Trimble, D.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Woods, J.J. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD {beta}-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination.

  9. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B. [Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP UMR 7334, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen - Case 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Portavoce, A., E-mail: alain.portavoce@im2np.fr [CNRS, IM2NP UMR 7334, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen - Case 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Grosjean, C. [STMicroelectronics, Rousset (France)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960?°C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  10. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Takanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Stoller, Roger E [ORNL] [ORNL; Odette, G.R. [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  11. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion ...

  12. Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

  13. Journal Diffusion Factors a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Journal Diffusion Factors ­ a measure of diffusion? Tove Faber Frandsen Royal School of Library In this paper we show that the measure of diffusion introduced by Ian Rowlands called the Journal Diffusion Factor (JDF) is highly negatively correlated with the number of citations, leading highly cited journals

  14. 24-hours ahead global irradiation forecasting using Multi-Layer Cyril Voyant1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ; it is shown that the most relevant is based on a multi- output MLP using endogenous and exogenous input data ahead. In the case of solar plants, the driving factor is the global solar irradiation (sum of direct and diffuse solar radiation projected on a plane (Wh/m²)). This paper focuses on the 24-hours ahead forecast

  15. Server Security Policy 1.0 Purpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Server Security Policy COE­SSP­01 1.0 Purpose The purpose of this policy is to establish standards configurations must be in accordance with approved College guidelines to ensure a significant level of security Wrappers or other security mechanisms. · The most recent security patches must be installed on the system

  16. OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kee Chul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Division OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC11905 -DISCLAIMER - OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRICc o n e e n i g woroxygen self-diffusion coefficient

  17. Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer for Examination of Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Various

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of the first series of fuel compacts for the current US tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification effort was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006. In November of 2009, after almost 3 years and 620 effective full power days of irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation test (AGR-1) was concluded. Compacts were irradiated at a calculated timeaveraged, volume-averaged temperature of 955–1136°C to a burnup ranging from 11.2–19.5% fissions per initial metal atom and a total fast fluence of 2.2–4.3·1025 n/m2 [1]. No indication of fission product release from TRISO coating failure was observed during the irradiation test, based on real-time monitoring of gaseous fission products. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) and hightemperature safety testing of the compacts has been in progress at both ORNL and INL since 2010, and have revealed small releases of a limited subset of fission products (such as silver, cesium, and europium). Past experience has shown that some elements can be released from TRISO particles when a defect forms in the SiC layer, even when one or more pyrocarbon layers remain intact and retain the gaseous fission products. Some volatile elements can also be released by diffusion through an intact SiC layer during safety testing if temperatures are high enough and the duration is long enough. In order to understand and quantify the release of certain radioactive fission products, it is sometimes necessary to individually examine each of the more than 4000 coated particles in a given compact. The Advanced Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (Advanced- IMGA) was designed to perform this task in a remote hot cell environment. This paper describes the Advanced- IMGA equipment and examination process and gives results for a typical full compact evaluation.

  18. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assembly Bill 178, adopted in June 2007, established efficacy* standards for general purpose lights sold in the state of Nevada. The bill set the required efficacy at 25 lumens per watt (lm/W) of...

  19. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oterkus, Selda [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Madenci, Erdogan, E-mail: madenci@email.arizona.edu [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Agwai, Abigail [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ 85226 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  20. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the understanding of fundamental scientific basis for the irradiation-induced self-organization processes. The fundamental physical mechanisms underlying ordered pattern formation, which include defect production and migration, ion sputtering, redeposition, viscous flow and diffusion, are investigated through a combination of modeling and in situ and ex-situ observations [3,9,11]. In addition, these nanostructured materials exhibit considerable improvement of optical properties [9,12,13]. For example, patterned Ge with a hexagonally ordered, honeycomb-like structure of nanoscale holes possesses a high surface area and a considerably blue-shifted energy gap [9], and oxidation of ordered Ga droplets shows noticeable enhancement of optical transmission [12]. This research has addressed nanopattern formation in a variety of materials under ion bombardment and provided a fundamental understanding of the dynamic mechanisms involved. In addition, have also stared to systematically investigate pattern formation under ion irradiation for more systems with varied experimental conditions and computation, including the collaboration with Dr. Veena Tikare of Sandia National Laboratory with a hybrid computation method at the ending this grant. A more detailed relationship between nanostructure formation and experimental conditions will be revealed with our continued efforts.

  1. Ultra high temperature diffusion apparatus and operating procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrick, S.B.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the purpose of this paper to present an experimental apparatus which is capable of measuring diffusion coefficients of interdiffusing gases in the temperature range 300K to 2500K. Because of the high temperatures which will be encountered, a special alloy of tantalum (T-111) is used to house the diffusion process. This T-111 diffusion cell is heated via radiation heat from a tungsten heating element powered by a Saban saturable reactor power supply. The diffusion cell heating element are encased in a nickel-plated copper cooling can. This entire assembly is enclosed in an Ultek vacuum chamber to prevent oxidation of the diffusion cell. This report covers the construction and calibration of the diffusion cell, details of the gas loading and sampling system, and complete information on the components required to operate the vacuum furnace. Thus far, several experiments have been run in the temperature range 600K to 800K and the resulting diffusion coefficients agree fairly well with previously published values. 21 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and {sup 28}Si enriched layers, enables the observation of {sup 30}Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the {sup 28}Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly positively charged P species. Additionally, the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of Si in Ge was measured over the temperature range of 550 C to 900 C using a buried Si layer in an epitaxially grown Ge layer.

  3. Pb+ irradiation of synthetic zircon (ZrSiO4): Infrared spectroscopic investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming [University of Cambridge; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Salje, Ekhard K.H. [University of Cambridge; Honda, Shin-ichi [ORNL; Ewing, Rodney C. [University of Michigan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural variations of synthetic zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated at room temperature by 280 keV Pb{sup +} ions (with fluences up to 1 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) were investigated using infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Like metamict zircon whose crystal structure is damaged and amorphized by naturally occurring {alpha}-decay events, the Pb{sup +}-irradiated zircon crystals show a dramatic decrease in reflectivity. However, no significant decrease in wavenumbers of the stretching vibrations of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra in zircon was detected. The Pb{sup +}-implanted zircon exhibits new IR bands, indicating irradiation-induced new vibrations or domains, clusters or phases in addition to SiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. IR features consistent with those of Pb silicates (with a divalent state, i.e., Pb{sup 2+}) are also found in the irradiated sample. This finding implies that some of the radiogenic Pb in natural zircon might not actually reside in the zircon lattice or in ZrSiO{sub 4} phases, but form new local domains or clusters. Infrared bands of OH-stretching vibrations were also detected in the irradiated synthetic zircon, which was originally free from OH features prior to the irradiation. These results indicate that H can easily diffuse into the irradiated layer or into irradiated-induced phases to form OH or and hydrous species after the irradiated material is damaged. The type and content of hydrous species vary with irradiation fluences.

  4. The Harrison Diffusion Kinetics Regimes in Solute Grain Boundary Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Fiedler, T [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the limits of the principal Harrison kinetics regimes (Type-A, B and C) for grain boundary diffusion is very important for the correct analysis of the depth profiles in a tracer diffusion experiment. These regimes for self-diffusion have been extensively studied in the past by making use of the phenomenological Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) method with the result that the limits are now well established. The relationship of those self-diffusion limits to the corresponding ones for solute diffusion in the presence of solute segregation to the grain boundaries remains unclear. In the present study, the influence of solute segregation on the limits is investigated with the LMC method for the well-known parallel grain boundary slab model by showing the equivalence of two diffusion models. It is shown which diffusion parameters are useful for identifying the limits of the Harrison kinetics regimes for solute grain boundary diffusion. It is also shown how the measured segregation factor from the diffusion experiment in the Harrison Type-B kinetics regime may differ from the global segregation factor.

  5. Our purpose and direction 2011 to 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was revised and re-launched in March 2009. We also contribute to WAG's targets for renewable energy, where year: this is our 2011/12 update. We hope you find it interesting and useful. Our purpose We. Woodland based learning & sector skills A competitive and integrated forest sector Environmental quality 5

  6. Electron Beam Irradiation for Improving Safety of Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adavi, Megha Sarthak

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to pathogens. Conventional techniques of sanitizing washes may not be effective since the organic matter released from the fresh produce use up the free chlorine thus reducing the sanitizing potential of wash water just when it is needed most and a heat... treatment step to kill pathogens cannot be applied if the purpose is to consume fresh produce. Electron beam (e-beam) irradiation was used to treat cut cantaloupe, cut roma tomatoes, baby spinach, romaine lettuce which were surface inoculated with a...

  7. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Ji Yang; Jing-Bin Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yong Chen; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Zheng-Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Xiao-Yan Liu; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Cheng-Kui Li; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Bo Lu; Yue Zhu; Ke-Yan Ma; Di Wu; Yan Liu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  8. Microviscometric studies on thermal diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyna, Eddie

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for its improvement. This in~estigation was supported in part by the Convsir Division of General Dynamics Corporation. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter III INTRODUCTION EXPERINENTAL NETHODS AND PROCEDUPJIS Thermal Diffusion Column Viscosity Measurements.... The main interest of 6 tais work was the molecular weight dependence of the thermal diffusion coefficient and the suitability of thermal diffusion as a method of frac- tionation of polymers. Since the work of Debye and Bueche, applications of thermal...

  9. National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

  10. Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

  11. Defect Structure and Evolution in Silicon Carbide Irradiated to 1 dpa-SiC at 1100 C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.J. Senor; G.E. Youngblood; L.R. Greenwood; D.V. Archer; D.L. Alexander; M.C. Chen; G.A. Newsome

    2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), swelling measurements, isochronal annealing, and thermal diffusivity testing were used to characterize the effects of radiation damage in SiC. Together, these techniques provided a comprehensive set of tools for observing and characterizing the structure and evolution of radiation-induced defects in SiC as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. In this study, two types of dense, crystalline, monolithic SiC were subjected to irradiation doses up to 1 dpa-SiC at a temperature of 1100 C, as well as post-irradiation annealing up to 1500 C. The microscopic defect structures observed by TEM were correlated to changes in the macroscopic dimensions, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. The results demonstrated the value of using ultrapure {beta}SiC as an effective reference material to characterize the nature of expected radiation damage in other, more complex, SiC-based materials such as SiC/SiC composites.

  12. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  13. DIFFUSION IN SOLIDSDIFFUSION IN SOLIDS FICK'S LAWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Diffusion bonding To comprehend many materials related phenomenon one must understand Diffusion. The focusDIFFUSION IN SOLIDSDIFFUSION IN SOLIDS FICK'S LAWS KIRKENDALL EFFECT ATOMIC MECHANISMS Diffusion in Solids P.G. Shewmon McGraw-Hill, New York (1963) #12;Oxidation Roles of Diffusion Creep Aging

  14. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  15. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  16. Pre-decisional - For Discussion Purposes Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEM SURVEY Applicant:Inside - For

  17. Pre-decisional - For Discussion Purposes Only

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEM SURVEY Applicant:Inside - For *

  18. Nano Vacancy Clusters and Trap Limited Diffusion of Si Interstitials in Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Wei-Kan Chu

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to characterize nano vacancy clusters and the dynamics of their formation in ion-irradiated silicon. It will impact (1) semiconductor device processing involving ion implantation, and (2) device design concerning irradiation hardness in harsh environments. It also aims to enhance minority participation in research and curricula on emerging materials and ion beam science. Vacancy defects are of scientific and technological importance since they are ubiquitous when the host materials are exposed to particle irradiation. Studies on vacancy clustering in the past decades were mainly theoretical and the approach heavily relied on the total-energy calculation methods. The lack of experimental data is mainly due to the formidable task in measuring the cluster size and density using modern metrological techniques, including transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy. To surmount these challenges, we proposed a novel approach to tackle the metrological problems on the nano vacancy clusters, especially in determining densities and sizes of the nano vacancies based on the premise that the vacancy-clusters act as diffusion-trapping centers. For a silicon substrate containing vacancyclusters, the diffusion of interstitials (from the surface) can be classified into three phases: (1) an ultrafast phase-I in which the trapping centers have little effect on the diffusion of interstitials; (2) a prolonged phase-II in which the loss rate of interstitials by trapping balances the influx of interstitials from the surface; and (3) a phase-III diffusion in which surface influx of interstitials depletes the trapping centers and interstitials consequently propagate deeper into the bulk. By measuring diffusion profiles of Si interstitials as a function of diffusion time, void sizes and void densities can be obtained through fitting. Experimentally, our approach to characterize voids is realized through three consecutive steps. (a) First, high energy self ion irradiation is used to create a wide vacancy-rich region, and to form voids by post implantation annealing. (b) In an additional annealing step in oxygen ambient, Si interstitials are injected in by surface oxidation. (c) Analyzing trap-limited diffusion of Si interstitials, which is experimentally detectable by studying the diffusion of multiple boron superlattices grown in Si, and enables us to characterize the nano voids, e.g. their sizes and densities.

  19. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  20. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Kenneth M. (North Bellmore, NY); Gilbert, Barry L. (Westbury, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  1. Laser irradiation of carbon nanotube films: Effects and heat dissipation probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialichi, J. R.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin,' Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-859 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verissimo, C.; Moshkalev, S. A. [Centro de Componentes Semicondutores, Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-870 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal properties of thin films formed by single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes submitted to laser irradiation using Raman scattering as a probe of both the tube morphology and the local temperature. The nanotubes were submitted to heating/cooling cycles attaining high laser intensities ({approx}1.4 MW/cm{sup 2}) under vacuum and in the presence of an atmosphere, with and without oxygen. We investigate the heat diffusion of the irradiated nanotubes to their surroundings and the effect of laser annealing on their properties. The presence of oxygen during laser irradiation gives rise to an irreversible increase of the Raman efficiency of the carbon nanotubes and to a remarkable increase of the thermal conductivity of multi-walled films. The second effect can be applied to design thermal conductive channels in devices based on carbon nanotube films using laser beams.

  2. Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si Dispersion to High Fission Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; J. W. Madden; P. G. Medvedev; D. M. Wachs

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel development program for research and test reactors calls for improved knowledge on the effect of microstructure on fuel performance in reactors. This work summarizes the recent TEM microstructural characterization of an irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plate (R3R050) irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to 5.2×1021 fissions/cm3. While a large fraction of the fuel grains is decorated with large bubbles, there is no evidence showing interlinking of these large bubbles at the specified fission density. The attachment of solid fission product precipitates to the bubbles is likely the result of fission product diffusion into these bubbles. The process of fission gas bubble superlattice collapse appears through bubble coalescence. The results are compared with the previous TEM work of the dispersion fuels irradiated to lower fission density from the same fuel plate.

  3. Structure and composition of phases occurring in austenitic stainless steels in thermal and irradiation environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission electron diffraction techniques coupled with quantitative x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phases which develop in austenitic stainless steels during exposure to thermal and to irradiation environments. In AISI 316 and Ti-modified stainless steels some thirteen phases have been identified and characterized in terms of their crystal structure and chemical composition. Irradiation does not produce any completely new phases. However, as a result of radiation-induced segregation principally of Ni and Si, and of enhanced diffusion rates, several major changes in phase relationships occur during irradiation. Firstly, phases characteristic of remote regions of the phase diagram appear unexpectedly and dissolve during postirradiation annealing (radiation-induced phases). Secondly, some phases develop with their compositions significantly altered by the incorporation of Ni or Si (radiation-modified phases).

  4. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  5. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control...

  7. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth...

  8. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E. [Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Lee, Yong Woo, E-mail: ywlee@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  9. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  10. Effects of turbulent diffusion on the chemistry of diffuse clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lesaffre; M. Gerin; P. Hennebelle

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. We probe the effect of turbulent diffusion on the chemistry at the interface between a cold neutral medium (CNM) cloudlet and the warm neutral medium (WNM). Methods. We perform moving grid, multifluid, 1D, hydrodynamical simulations with chemistry including thermal and chemical diffusion. The diffusion coefficients are enhanced to account for turbulent diffusion. We post-process the steady-states of our simulations with a crude model of radiative transfer to compute line profiles. Results. Turbulent diffusion spreads out the transition region between the CNM and the WNM. We find that the CNM slightly expands and heats up: its CH and H$_2$ content decreases due to the lower density. The change of physical conditions and diffusive transport increase the H$^+$ content in the CNM which results in increased OH and H$_2$O. Diffusion transports some CO out of the CNM. It also brings H$_2$ into contact with the warm gas with enhanced production of CH$^+$, H$_3^+$, OH and H$_2$O at the interface. O lines are sensitive to the spread of the thermal profile in the intermediate region between the CNM and the WNM. Enhanced molecular content at the interface of the cloud broadens the molecular line profiles and helps exciting transitions of intermediate energy. The relative molecular yield are found higher for bigger clouds. Conclusions. Turbulent diffusion can be the source of additional molecular production and should be included in chemical models of the interstellar medium (ISM). It also is a good candidate for the interpretation of observational problems such as warm H$_2$, CH$^+$ formation and presence of H$_3^+$.

  11. Low temperature irradiation tests on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

  12. sterilization by irradiation Arne Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1:2006 Equipment characterization (6) Product definition (7) Process definition (8) Installation Qualification (9.1) Operational Qualification (9.2) · Performance Qualification (9.3) - later #12;3 Equipment characterization samples shall be irradiated to defined and uniform doses. #12;9 9.1 Installation qualification (A.9

  13. Occlusion-Aware Hessians for Error Control in Irradiance Caching /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarzhaupt, Jorge Andres

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control for Irradiance Caching. ” In ACM Transactions on Graphics,Control for Irradiance Caching. ” In ACM Transactions on Graphics,

  14. Possibility for irradiated beryllium at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Possibility for irradiated beryllium at CERN RaDIATE meeting, 22nd July 2013 M. Calviani (CERN ­ Engineering Department ­ Sources, Target and Interactions Group) #12;Irradiated beryllium at CERN 2 Two possibilities exists at CERN to obtain irradiated beryllium for testing: beam windows, and in particular

  15. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

  16. Hot carrier diffusion in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Wang, Shuai; Werake, Lalani Kumari; Weintrub, Ben; Loh, Kian Ping; Zhao, Hui

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an optical study of charge transport in graphene. Diffusion of hot carriers in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene oxide samples are studied using an ultrafast pump-probe technique with a high spatial resolution. Spatiotemporal...

  17. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  18. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  19. Microviscometric studies on thermal diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyna, Eddie

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proportions until Clusiui and Dickel introduced a type of therrail diffusion column 4 which caused a thermal circul~tion in addition to thermal diffusion. With tni' equipment they were able to separate chlorine isotopes. Applying this same method..., it was decided to . onstruct equipment which could measure the viscosity and concentration of 0. 1 ml. samples. It was desired to have the reproduceability of the viscosimeter better than I'X since the dilute solutions to be studied had maximum viscosities...

  20. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet (Atlanta, GA); Kim, Dong Seop (Atlanta, GA); Nakayashiki, Kenta (Smyrna, GA); Rounsaville, Brian (Stockbridge, GA)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  1. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idris, Sarada, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Tajau, Rida, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Karim, Jamilah, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Jusoh, Suhaimi, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ghazali, Zulkafli, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Shamshad [School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  2. Correlation between shear punch and tensile data for neutron irradiated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Toloczko, M.B.; Lucas, G.E. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sommer, W.F.; Borden, M.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dunlap, J.A.; Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a study to determine the potential for using aluminum alloys as structural components in accelerators used to produce tritium, tensile specimens and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks of two aluminum alloys in two tempers were irradiated with neutrons from spallation reactions in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at 90 to 120 C to a fluence of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. Tensile and shear punch tests were performed on the irradiated alloys as well as on a similar unirradiated control matrix with a larger number of specimens, and a correlation between shear and tensile properties was developed for the unirradiated alloys and the irradiated alloys. Comparison of the correlations for the unirradiated and irradiated alloys showed that small differences in the correlations existed, however for purposes of estimation of uniaxial tensile properties, either correlation was found to be adequate.

  3. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  4. AEROPLT: A versatile general purpose plot program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.; Fuentes, M.K.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AEROPLT is an interactive, user-friendly, general purpose plot code for plotting tabular data from multiple files. This DISSPLA-based code is convenient and easy to use while permitting great flexibility for users who want to customize their plots. A series of questions leads the user through the program and permits a return to specific portions of the code for plot refinement. Multidevice capability permits the user to plot on the terminal, write to a file for hardcopy plots, or do both simultaneously. An easily modified Setup File is used to store the terminal and hardcopy type codes, plot and text dimensions, and default plot specifications. Parameters for individual plots are written to a Restart File which can easily be edited to change subsequent plots. Additional capabilities are: color plots; a convenient method (similar to TEX) to implement all DISSPLA fonts, character sets, and math alphabets; superscripts, subscripts, underline, and italicize; and plots of the results of mathematical functions of the input data. 12 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Faculty perceptions about attributes and barriers impacting diffusion of web-based distance education (WBDE) at the China Agricultural University 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yan

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    he purpose of this study was to examine faculty perceptions about attributes and barriers impacting diffusion of Web-based distance education (WBDE) at the China Agricultural University (CAU). Random and stratified sampling ...

  6. Nonlinear Data Transformation with Diffusion Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Others: Laplacian eigenmaps, Hessian eigenmaps, LTSA We apply the diffusion map (Coifman & Lafon 2006

  7. EVALUATION OF U10MO FUEL PLATE IRRADIATION BEHAVIOR VIA NUMERICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel J. Miller; Hakan Ozaltun

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article analyzes dimensional changes due to irradiation of monolithic plate-type nuclear fuel and compares results with finite element analysis of the plates during fabrication and irradiation. Monolithic fuel plates tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab (INL) are being used to benchmark proposed fuel performance for several high power research reactors. Post-irradiation metallographic images of plates sectioned at the midpoint were analyzed to determine dimensional changes of the fuel and the cladding response. A constitutive model of the fabrication process and irradiation behavior of the tested plates was developed using the general purpose commercial finite element analysis package, Abaqus. Using calculated burn-up profiles of irradiated plates to model the power distribution and including irradiation behaviors such as swelling and irradiation enhanced creep, model simulations allow analysis of plate parameters that are either impossible or infeasible in an experimental setting. The development and progression of fabrication induced stress concentrations at the plate edges was of primary interest, as these locations have a unique stress profile during irradiation. Additionally, comparison between 2D and 3D models was performed to optimize analysis methodology. In particular, the ability of 2D and 3D models account for out of plane stresses which result in 3-dimensional creep behavior that is a product of these components. Results show that assumptions made in 2D models for the out-of-plane stresses and strains cannot capture the 3-dimensional physics accurately and thus 2D approximations are not computationally accurate. Stress-strain fields are dependent on plate geometry and irradiation conditions, thus, if stress based criteria is used to predict plate behavior (as opposed to material impurities, fine micro-structural defects, or sharp power gradients), unique 3D finite element formulation for each plate is required.

  8. GTL-1 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Gas Test Loop (GTL-1) miniplate experiment is to confirm acceptable performance of high-density (i.e., 4.8 g-U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel plates clad in Al-6061 and irradiated under the relatively aggressive Booster Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) booster fuel conditions, namely a peak plate surface heat flux of 450 W/cm2. As secondary objectives, several design and fabrication variations were included in the test matrix that may have the potential to improve the high-heat flux, high-temperature performance of the base fuel plate design.1, 2 The following report summarizes the life of the GTL-1 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  9. Overlay welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanne, W.R.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overlay technique developed for welding irradiated stainless steel may be important for repair or modification of fusion reactor materials. Helium, present due to n,{alpha} reactions, is known to cause cracking using conventional welding methods. Stainless steel impregnated with 3 to 220 appm helium by decay of tritium was used to develop a welding process that could be used for repair. The result was a gas metal arc weld overlay technique with low-heat input and low-penetration into the helium-containing material. Extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of this technique demonstrated substantial reduction of helium embrittlement damage. The overlay technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel containing 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking, although greater than for tritium charged and aged material, was minimal compared to conventional welding methods.

  10. Radiation effects on microstructures and properties of irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of structural materials to withstand aggressive radiation environments has been carried out on an international scale over the past four decades. Major radiation-induced changes in properties include swelling, creep and embrittlement. The basic work, stimulated by technology, to understand and control these phenomena, has been heavily oriented toward the evolution of microstructures and their effects on properties. Microstructural research has coupled analyses by high resolution techniques with theoretical modeling to describe and predict microscopic features and the resulting macroscopic properties. A short summary is presented of key physical considerations that drive these changes during irradiation. Such processes begin with displacement cascades, and lead to property changes through the diffusion and clustering of defects.

  11. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  12. Nuclear plant irradiated steel handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M.; Lombrozo, P.M.; McConnell, P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference handbook presents selected information extracted from the EPRI reactor surveillance program database, which contains the results from surveillance program reports on 57 plants and 116 capsules. Tabulated data includes radiation induced temperature shifts, capsule irradiation conditions and statistical features of the Charpy V-notch curves. General information on the surveillance materials is provided and the Charpy V-notch energy results are presented graphically.

  13. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  14. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34102 Basovizza (Italy)

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  15. Low Dose Irradiation Facility | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinksLow Dose Irradiation Facility

  16. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor14,566Irradiation

  17. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron is the KeyIrradiation Effects

  18. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron is the KeyIrradiation

  19. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer ReviewIron is theIrradiation Effects on

  20. Proton Irradiation Study of GFR Candidate Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Yong Yang; Clayton Dickson; Todd Allen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigated the microstructural response of ZrC, ZrN, TiN, and SiC irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800ºC to a single dose in the range of 1.5 to 3.0 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed and is small when measured using XRD for the irradiated samples up to 1.5 dpa for 6H-SiC, and up to 3.0 dpa for ZrC and ZrN. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800ºC to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton-irradiated ceramics at 3.0 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. The irradiated ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 3.0 dpa consists of a black dot defect type at high density.

  1. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred [angstrom] in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by configurational'' or hindered diffusion,'' which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  2. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and analytical tool for investigating ventilation inside the system and thus to increase thermal comfort and improve indoor air quality. The room air supply diffuser flow rates can be reduced for less loading with the help of a variable air volume unit...

  3. Rsum -Les films amorphes GeSe-j vapors obliquement ont une structure colonnaire trs marque. La contraction induite par photo-irradiation a t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -induced contraction of a-GeSe3 films has been studied with small-angle neutron scattering and scanning electron/. On illumination the films densify, and a previous small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study /3/ showed. La contraction induite par photo-irradiation a été étudiée par diffusion des neutrons aux petits

  4. Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Tonks, Michael; Biner, Bullent; Millet, Paul; Tikare, Veena; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Andersson , David

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of different numerical methods used to represent microstructure behavior at the mesoscale for irradiated material using an idealized benchmark problem. The purpose of the mesoscale benchmark problem was to provide a common basis to assess several mesoscale methods with the objective of identifying the strengths and areas of improvement in the predictive modeling of microstructure evolution. In this work, mesoscale models (phase-field, Potts, and kinetic Monte Carlo) developed by PNNL, INL, SNL, and ORNL were used to calculate the evolution kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in UO2 fuel under post-irradiation thermal annealing conditions. The benchmark problem was constructed to include important microstructural evolution mechanisms on the kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubble behavior such as the atomic diffusion of Xe atoms, U vacancies, and O vacancies, the effect of vacancy capture and emission from defects, and the elastic interaction of non-equilibrium gas bubbles. An idealized set of assumptions was imposed on the benchmark problem to simplify the mechanisms considered. The capability and numerical efficiency of different models are compared against selected experimental and simulation results. These comparisons find that the phase-field methods, by the nature of the free energy formulation, are able to represent a larger subset of the mechanisms influencing the intra-granular bubble growth and coarsening mechanisms in the idealized benchmark problem as compared to the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. It is recognized that the mesoscale benchmark problem as formulated does not specifically highlight the strengths of the discrete particle modeling used in the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Future efforts are recommended to construct increasingly more complex mesoscale benchmark problems to further verify and validate the predictive capabilities of the mesoscale modeling methods used in this study.

  5. Lung Irradiation Increases Mortality After Influenza A Virus Challenge Occurring Late After Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Casey M. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Johnston, Carl J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Reed, Christina K. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Lawrence, B. Paige [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Finkelstein, Jacob N., E-mail: Jacob_Finkelstein@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To address whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure but before the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice received either lung alone or combined lung and whole-body irradiation (0-15 Gy). At 10 weeks after irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung after infection were assessed. Results: Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight after infection and exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions: Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death after infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not seem to be due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair.

  6. Void Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence in Irradiated Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel computational treatment of dense, stiff, coupled reaction rate equations is introduced to study the nucleation, growth, and possible coalescence of cavities during neutron irradiation of metals. Radiation damage is modeled by the creation of Frenkel pair defects and helium impurity atoms. A multi-dimensional cluster size distribution function allows independent evolution of the vacancy and helium content of cavities, distinguishing voids and bubbles. A model with sessile cavities and no cluster-cluster coalescence can result in a bimodal final cavity size distribution with coexistence of small, high-pressure bubbles and large, low-pressure voids. A model that includes unhindered cavity diffusion and coalescence ultimately removes the small helium bubbles from the system, leaving only large voids. The terminal void density is also reduced and the incubation period and terminal swelling rate can be greatly altered by cavity coalescence. Temperature-dependent trapping of voids/bubbles by precipitates and alterations in void surface diffusion from adsorbed impurities and internal gas pressure may give rise to intermediate swelling behavior through their effects on cavity mobility and coalescence.

  7. Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani CKH28@CAM.AC.UK David A. Knowles DAVIDKNOWLES Stanford University, Department of Computer Science, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract We define the beta structures over clusters of the particles. With the beta diffu- sion tree, however, multiple copies

  8. Irradiation Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline Ceria - Phase, lattice Stress, Grain Size and Boundaries. Irradiation Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline Ceria...

  9. Enterprise Assessments, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Irradiated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Health Assessments conducted an independent assessment of the safety-significant ventilation systems at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Irradiated Fuels...

  10. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  11. Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Preston

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Zoology SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

  12. Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II. Diffusion Limited Kinetics in Amorphous Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model Nanoporous Material: II. Diffusion Limited Kinetics in Amorphous Abstract:...

  13. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in...

  14. AGC-2 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence C. Hull

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment (AGC-2) began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 149A on April 12, 2011, and ended with ATR Cycle 151B on May 5, 2012. The purpose of this report is to qualify AGC-2 irradiation monitoring data following INL Management and Control Procedure 2691, Data Qualification. Data that are Qualified meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Data that do not meet the requirements are Failed. Some data may not quite meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. These data are labeled as Trend. No Trend data were identified for the AGC-2 experiment. All thermocouples functioned throughout the AGC-2 experiment. There was one instance where spurious signals or instrument power interruption resulted in a recorded temperature value being well outside physical reality. This value was identified and labeled as Failed data. All other temperature data are Qualified. All helium and argon gas flow data are within expected ranges. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during reactor shutdown. All gas flow data are Qualified. At the start of the experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line increased to 200 ppmv then declined to less than 10 ppmv over a period of 5 days. This increase in moisture coincides with the initial heating of the experiment and drying of the system. Moisture slightly exceeded 10 ppmv three other times during the experiment. While these moisture values exceed the 10 ppmv threshold value, the reported measurements are considered accurate and to reflect moisture conditions in the capsule. All moisture data are Qualified. Graphite creep specimens are subjected to one of three loads, 393 lbf, 491 lbf, or 589 lbf. Loads were consistently within 5% of the specified values throughout the experiment. Stack displacement increased consistently throughout the experiment with total displacement ranging from 1 to 1.5 inches. No anomalous values were identified. During reactor outages, a set of pneumatic rams are used to raise the stacks of graphite creep specimens to ensure the specimens have not become stuck within the test train. This stack raising was performed after all cycles when the capsule was in the reactor. All stacks were raised successfully after each cycle. The load and displacement data are Qualified

  15. Bioaugmentation for Reduction of Diffuse Pesticide Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioaugmentation for Reduction of Diffuse Pesticide Contamination A Bioprophylactic Concept Karin/Repro, Uppsala 2013 #12;Bioaugmentation for Reduction of Diffuse Pesticide Contamination. A Bioprophylactic Concept. Abstract Pesticides and their residues frequently contaminate surface waters and groundwater so

  16. Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

  17. OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN UO2-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ K.C. K:i.m, "Oxygen Diffusion in Hypostoichiometricsystem for enriching uo 2 in oxygen-18 or for stoichiometry+nal of Nuclear Materials OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN U0 2 _:x K.C.

  18. MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING Katarina Blagovi, Lily Y. Kim, Alison M cell differentiation. KEYWORDS: Embryonic stem cells, microfluidic perfusion, diffusible signaling; they secrete molecules to which they respond. Microfluidics offers a potential solution to this challenge

  19. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2 +/- x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovanni Pastore; Michael R. Tonks; Derek R. Gaston; Richard L. Williamson; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2x nonstoichiometrywere used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Risø fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility (FY14) R1 Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility (FY14) R1 Results continue to...

  1. Economics of dual purpose production alternatives in the Mexican tropics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochoa-Ochoa, Rene Federico

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological, marketing, and financial alternatives to the dual purpose production system in Central Veracruz, Mexico were analyzed to assess their economic viability. A large dual purpose production operation was ...

  2. Economics of dual purpose production alternatives in the Mexican tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochoa-Ochoa, Rene Federico

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological, marketing, and financial alternatives to the dual purpose production system in Central Veracruz, Mexico were analyzed to assess their economic viability. A large dual purpose production operation was characterized in a baseline...

  3. Heat Hyperbolic Diffusion in Planck Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslaw Kozlowski; Janina Marciak-Kozlowska

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the diffusion of the thermal pulse in Planck Gas. We show that the Fourier diffusion equation gives the speed of diffusion, v > c and breaks the causality of the thermal processes in Planck gas .For hyperbolic heat transport v

  4. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  5. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are extremely similar. The design of the experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  6. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  7. Phase formation in Zr/Fe multilayers during Kr ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, A. T.

    1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study has been conducted of the effect of Kr ion irradiation on phase formation in Zr-Fe metallic multilayers, using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Metallic multilayers were prepared with different overall compositions (near 50-50 and Fe-rich), and with different wavelengths (repetition thicknesses). These samples were irradiated with 300 keV Kr ions at various temperatures to investigate the final products, as well as the kinetics of phase formation. For the shorter wavelength samples, the final product was in all cases an amorphous Zr-Fe phase, in combination with Fe, while specially for the larger wavelength samples, in the Fe-rich samples the intermetallic compounds ZrFe{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Fe were formed in addition to the amorphous phase. The dose to full reaction decreases with temperature, and with wavelength in a manner consistent with a diffusion-controlled reaction.

  8. Service Promotion -Diffusion Raphale LOMBARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellier, Damien

    Service Promotion - Diffusion Raphaële LOMBARD Editions L'Harmattan - 5 Rue de l'Ecole Polytechnique ­ 75005 Paris Tél 01.40.46.79.23 ­ mail : raphaele.lombard@harmattan.fr La mondialisation avance à complémentaires BON DE COMMANDE A retourner à L'HARMATTAN, 7 rue de l'�cole Polytechnique 75005 Paris Veuillez me

  9. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  10. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell ironiron-oxide nanomaterials. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide...

  11. Direct Observation of Ion-irradiation-induced Chemical Mixing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ion-irradiation induced elemental mixing and dissolution of 25–50 nm titanium oxycarbonitrides in a nanostructured ferritic alloy irradiated at 173 K. The...

  12. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference large irradiator and reference sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffner, D.R.; Villelgas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to examine the decommissioning of large radioactive irradiators and their respective facilities, and a broad spectrum of sealed radioactive sources and their respective devices. Conceptual decommissioning activities are identified, and the technology, safety, and costs (in early 1993 dollars) associated with decommissioning the reference large irradiator and sealed source facilities are evaluated. The study provides bases and background data for possible future NRC rulemaking regarding decommissioning, for evaluation of the reasonableness of planned decommissioning actions, and for determining if adequate funds are reserved by the licensees for decommissioning of their large irradiator or sealed source facilities. Another purpose of this study is to provide background and information to assist licensees in planning and carrying out the decommissioning of their sealed radioactive sources and respective facilities.

  13. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

  14. Are Aftershocks of Large Californian Earthquakes Diffusing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmstetter, A; Sornette, D; Helmstetter, Agnes; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze 21 aftershock sequences of California to test for evidence of space-time diffusion. Aftershock diffusion may result from stress diffusion and is also predicted by any mechanism of stress weakening. Here, we test an alternative mechanism to explain aftershock diffusion, based on multiple cascades of triggering. In order to characterize aftershock diffusion, we develop two methods, one based on a suitable time and space windowing that has been calibrated on the ETAS model of triggered seismicity, the other using a wavelet transform adapted to the removal of background seismicity. Both methods confirm that diffusion of seismic activity is very weak, much weaker than reported in previous studies. A possible mechanism explaining the weakness of observed diffusion is the effect of geometry, including the localization of aftershocks on a fractal fault network and the impact of extended rupture lengths which control the typical distances of interaction between earthquakes.

  15. Group classification of systems of non-linear reaction-diffusion equations with general diffusion matrix. II. Generalized Turing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Nikitin

    2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Group classification of systems of two coupled nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation with a diagonal diffusion matrix is carried out. Symmetries of diffusion systems with singular diffusion matrix and additional first order derivative terms are described.

  16. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive layers of the TRISO-coated particle and potentially through the compact matrix. The release of these fission products was measured in PIE and modeled with PARFUME.

  17. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are very similar. The purpose and design of this experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  18. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  19. Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Measurements of IN Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |ContactFlow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC)

  20. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

  1. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Swank

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  2. Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

  3. RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  4. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  5. advanced general purpose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Virtual-Threading: Advanced General Purpose Processors Architecture CERN Preprints Summary: The paper describes the new computers architecture, the...

  6. Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purpose of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act...

  7. The Purpose and Value of Successful Technology Demonstrations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose and Value of Successful Technology Demonstrations - The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Demonstrations by Steve Bossart, NETL Senior Management and Technical...

  8. General purpose dynamic Monte Carlo with continuous energy for transient analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjenitzer, B. L.; Hoogenboom, J. E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclide and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For safety assessments transient analysis is an important tool. It can predict maximum temperatures during regular reactor operation or during an accident scenario. Despite the fact that this kind of analysis is very important, the state of the art still uses rather crude methods, like diffusion theory and point-kinetics. For reference calculations it is preferable to use the Monte Carlo method. In this paper the dynamic Monte Carlo method is implemented in the general purpose Monte Carlo code Tripoli4. Also, the method is extended for use with continuous energy. The first results of Dynamic Tripoli demonstrate that this kind of calculation is indeed accurate and the results are achieved in a reasonable amount of time. With the method implemented in Tripoli it is now possible to do an exact transient calculation in arbitrary geometry. (authors)

  9. Control of the local devitrification on oxyfluoride glass doped with Er{sup 3+} ions under diode laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Martin, I. R. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Jaque, D. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Haro-Gonzalez, P. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Capuj, N. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature control of the devitrification process in an erbium doped oxyfluoride glass under laser irradiation is reported. The green upconversion emissions around 525 and 545 nm originated from the thermalized {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} levels were studied when the glass structure changes to glass ceramic during irradiation with a laser beam. Power dependence of the fluorescence intensity ratio was used to determine the temperature of the irradiated zone. The transition from glass to glass ceramic takes place under 2300 mW of laser power with an estimated temperature around 783 K. This result agrees with the one obtained in the samples devitrified under conventional furnace treatment. Therefore, the estimation of the temperature of the irradiated zone through the fluorescence intensity ratio method allows a controlled devitrification. Moreover, an irradiated line has been written in the glass showing an important diffusion of the Pb{sup 2+} and F{sup -} ions. These results confirm that nanocrystals have been created due to the laser action.

  10. Characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography based on irradiation side sampling technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivetti, Stefano [Fisica Medica, Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy)] [Fisica Medica, Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy); Lanconelli, Nico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy)] [Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea [Medical Physics Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 42123 Reggio Emilia (Italy)] [Medical Physics Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 42123 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Burani, Aldo [Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy)] [Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography (FUJIFILM FDR D-EVO) is presented. This system is based on the irradiation side sampling (ISS) technology and can be equipped with two different scintillators: one traditional gadolinium-oxysulphide phosphor (GOS) and a needle structured cesium iodide (CsI) phosphor panel.Methods: The characterization was achieved in terms of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and psychophysical parameters (contrast-detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images). For both scintillation screens the authors accomplished the measurements with four standard beam conditions: RAQ3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9.Results: At the Nyquist frequency (3.33 lp/mm) the MTF is about 35% and 25% for CsI and GOS detectors, respectively. The CsI scintillator has better noise properties than the GOS screen in almost all the conditions. This is particularly true for low-energy beams, where the noise for the GOS system can go up to a factor 2 greater than that found for CsI. The DQE of the CsI detector reaches a peak of 60%, 60%, 58%, and 50% for the RQA3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9 beams, respectively, whereas for the GOS screen the maximum DQE is 40%, 44%, 44%, and 35%. The contrast-detail analysis confirms that in the majority of cases the CsI scintillator is able to provide improved outcomes to those obtained with the GOS screen.Conclusions: The limited diffusion of light produced by the ISS reading makes possible the achievement of very good spatial resolution. In fact, the MTF of the unit with the CsI panel is only slightly lower to that achieved with direct conversion detectors. The combination of very good spatial resolution, together with the good noise properties reached with the CsI screen, allows achieving DQE on average about 1.5 times greater than that obtained with GOS. In fact, the DQE of unit equipped with CsI is comparable to the best alternative methods available which are based on the same technology, and similar to others based on an a-Se direct conversion detectors.

  11. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuller, Bradley W

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a unique methodology to selectively irradiate the vascular endothelium in vivo to better understand the role of vascular damage in causing normal tissue radiation side-effects.The relationship between vascular ...

  12. Introduction The bay scallop, Argopecten irradi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    71(3) 17 Introduction The bay scallop, Argopecten irradi- ans amplicostatus, has been present (Garcia-Cubas, 1968). Historical Uses Mollusks were used by the pre-Co- lumbian cultures in Mexico as food

  13. Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

  14. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O. (Oriente Universidad, Cumana (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  15. Nonlinear diffusion in Acetone-Benzene Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obukhovsky, Vjacheslav V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear diffusion in multicomponent liquids under chemical reactions influence has been studied. The theory is applied to the analysis of mass transfer in a solution of acetone-benzene. It has been shown, that the creation of molecular complexes should be taken into account for the explanation of the experimental data on concentration dependence of diffusion coefficients. The matrix of mutual diffusivities has been found and effective parameters of the system have been computed.

  16. Neutron Irradiation Measurement for Superconducting Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    close to reactor core · Sample cool down by He gas loop: 10K ­ 20K · Fast neutron flux (En>0.1MeV): 1.4x. Materials, 49, p161 (1973&74) Reactor n on Al Reactor n on Cu fluence up to 2*1022 n/m2 (En>0.1MeV) RRR Irradiation at KUR · Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Institute · MW max. thermal power · Irradiation cryostat

  17. For discussion purposes only Biofuel and Poverty Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For discussion purposes only Biofuel and Poverty Nexus in Asia 13th Poverty and Environment Partnership Meeting Myo Thant Manila, 11 June 2008 #12;For discussion purposes only Interest in Biofuels has and policies · Number of countries · Different biofuel feedstock · Research on second generation technology #12

  18. University of Oxford Transgender Policy Purpose of this policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    University of Oxford Transgender Policy Purpose of this policy 1. The purpose of this policy the process of gender reassignment. The policy and associated guidance give more detail on how the Universitys Equality Policy applies to transgender people. 2. This policy also supports members of the University

  19. PREPARING FOR YOUR CONDUCT APPEAL PURPOSE OF THE APPEAL PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    PREPARING FOR YOUR CONDUCT APPEAL 9/15/11 PURPOSE OF THE APPEAL PROCESS The purpose of the appeal process is to ensure that students who engage in the University of Vermont's conduct process, through in and are treated fairly in this process. The appeal process is not a rehearing of the original conduct case

  20. A Rearrangement Inequality for Diffusion Processes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Teng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Rearrangement Inequality and its Proba- bilisticRearrangement Inequality . . . . . . 4.5 Some ObservationsSAN DIEGO A Rearrangement Inequality for Diffusion Processes

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

  2. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at...

  3. Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Modelling international wind energy diffusion: Are the patterns of induced diffusion `S' shaped datasets, the paper explores the patterns of international wind energy diffusion in OECD countries. The model employed in the paper predicted that wind energy, as a complex and expensive innovation, would

  4. Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elperin, Tov

    Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows M to the turbulent diffusion, and its potential impact on aerosol distribution. This phenomenon was predicted a nondiffusive flux of aerosols in the direction of the heat flux and results in formation of long-living aerosol

  5. The effects of continuous prenatal and postnatal low dose gamma irradiation on the hemopoietic system of immature Spanish goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeShaw, James Richard

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blood Cell Counts (RBC) 28 Irradiation period Post-irradiation period Hematocrit (Ht) 28 31 Irradiation period Post-irradiation period 34 38 Hemoglobin (Hg) 40 Irradiation period Post-irradiation period 40 43 Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV...) Irradiation period Post-irradiation period 44 47 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Chapter Page Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) Irradiation period Post-irradiation period 4B 51 White Blood Cells (WBC) 53 Irradiation period post-irradiation period 53...

  6. X-band EPR imaging as a tool for gradient dose reconstruction in irradiated bones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Philippe; Godechal, Quentin; Bol, Anne; Trompier, Francois; Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Institut de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection, F-92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Various tools are currently available for dose reconstruction in individuals after accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Among the available biological analyses, Monte Carlo simulations, and biophysical methods, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), the latter has proved its usefulness for retrospective dosimetry. Although EPR spectroscopy is probably the most sensitive technique, it does not provide spatial dosimetric data. This information is, however, highly desirable when steep dose gradient irradiations are involved. The purpose of this work was to explore the possibilities of EPR imaging (EPRI) for spatial dose reconstruction in irradiated biological material. Methods: X-band EPRI was used to reconstruct ex vivo the relative dose distribution in human bone samples and hydroxyapatite phantoms after irradiation with brachytherapy seeds or x rays. Three situations were investigated: Homogeneous, stepwise gradient, and continuous gradient irradiation. Results: EPRI gave a faithful relative spin density distribution in bone samples and in hydroxyapatite phantoms. Measured dose ratios were in close agreement with the actual delivered dose ratios. EPRI was able to distinguish the dose gradients induced by two different sources ({sup 125}I and {sup 192}Ir). However, the measured spatial resolution of the system was 1.9 mm and this appeared to be a limiting factor. The method could be improved by using new signal postprocessing strategies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EPRI can be used to assess the regional relative dose distribution in irradiated bone samples. The method is currently applicable to ex vivo measurements of small size samples with low variation in tissue density but is likely to be adapted for in vivo application using L-band EPRI.

  7. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Grebenkov

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

  8. DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 754

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)], E-mail: ruta@rri.res.in, E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.in

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a low-frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present a new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and discuss the detection of four diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330, and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upper limits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, {alpha}>2 (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}), for the new feature. The 'west relic' detected at 74 MHz is not detected at 150 MHz and is thus consistent with its nondetection at 1363 MHz and 330 MHz. Integrated spectra of all the diffuse features are presented. The fourth diffuse feature is located along the proposed merger axis in A754 and 0.7 Mpc away from the peak of X-ray emission; we refer to it as a relic. We have made use of the framework of the adiabatic compression model to obtain spectra. We show that the spectrum of the fourth diffuse feature is consistent with that of a cocoon of a radio galaxy lurking for about 9 x 10{sup 7} yr; no shock compression is required. The other three diffuse emission have spectra steeper than 1.5 and could be cocoons lurking for longer time. We discuss other possibilities such as shocks and turbulent reacceleration being responsible for the diffuse emission in A754.

  9. Diffusive limit for the random Lorentz gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessia Nota

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent results concerning the derivation of the diffusion equation and the validation of Fick's law for the microscopic model given by the random Lorentz Gas. These results are achieved by using a linear kinetic equation as an intermediate level of description between our original mechanical system and the diffusion equation.

  10. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: es@cwi.nl [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  11. CONVERTIBLE BONDS IN A DEFAULTABLE DIFFUSION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanblanc, Monique

    CONVERTIBLE BONDS IN A DEFAULTABLE DIFFUSION MODEL Tomasz R. Bielecki Department of Applied Research Grant PS12918. #12;2 Convertible Bonds in a Defaultable Diffusion Model 1 Introduction In [4), such as Convertible Bonds (CB), and we provided a rigorous decomposition of a CB into a bond component and a (game

  12. ON DIFFUSION IN HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA YOUXUE ZHANG*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Liping

    , heterogeneous media, multi-mineral rocks, multi-phase media, composite materials, kinetics, porous rocks to bulk diffusion, and porous materials (such as plants, soil, rock with partial melt or fluid, sediment of air and moisture in soils, drying of paint, wood, and concrete, diffusion of gases in rubber, movement

  13. 5 Inventory 5.1.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    154 5 Inventory 5.1.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The intent of the Inventory section, wildlife, and ecosystem resources. The third section is an inventory of past and ongoing restoration

  14. Regulation Indentifier Number Title/Subject/Purpose Rule Type

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a specific rule, please see the Federal Register at https:www.regulations.gov. Regulation Indentifier Number TitleSubjectPurpose Rule Type Status 1991-AB82 Acquisition...

  15. Evolution, biodiversity, taxonomy FTIR spectroscopy and taxonomic purpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evolution, biodiversity, taxonomy FTIR spectroscopy and taxonomic purpose: Contribution. taxonomy / FTIR spectroscopy / Streptococcus / Lactobacillus Résumé -- Apport de la spectroscopie infrarouge à transformée de Fourier en taxonomie : contribution à la classification de bactéries lactiques

  16. Job Position Description A. Main Purpose of the job

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    4/5/2011 Job Position Description Job Title: A. Main Purpose of the job: B. Primary responsibilities or key duties of the job (tasks performed regularly): 1. 2. 3. 4. C. Additional duties (tasks

  17. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

  18. Amorphization and recrystallization of single-crystalline hydrogen titanate nanowires by N{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Akshaya K.; Bandyopadyay, Malay K.; Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar 751007 (India); Facsko, Stefan [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the phase transformation of hydrogen titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}) nanowires induced by 50?keV N{sup +} ion irradiation at room temperature with fluences of 1?×?10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1?×?10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Using transmission electron microscopy, the internal structure of the ion irradiated nanowires is analyzed. At low fluence, a transformation from crystalline H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} to amorphous TiO{sub 2} is observed. However, at higher fluence, a remarkable crystalline-amorphous TiO{sub 2} core-shell structure is formed. At this higher fluence, the recrystallization occurs in the core of the nanowire and the outer layer remains amorphous. The phase transformation and formation of core-shell structure are explained using the thermal spike model, radiation enhanced diffusion, and classical theory of nucleation and growth under non-equilibrium thermodynamics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman scattering reveal further insight into the structure of the nanowires before and after ion irradiation.

  19. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jaeho [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  20. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebenkov, Denis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

  1. Inverse diffusion from knowledge of power densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume; Monard, Francois; Triki, Faouzi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of a diffusion coefficient in an elliptic equation from knowledge of several power densities. The power density is the product of the diffusion coefficient with the square of the modulus of the gradient of the elliptic solution. The derivation of such internal functionals comes from perturbing the medium of interest by acoustic (plane) waves, which results in small changes in the diffusion coefficient. After appropriate asymptotic expansions and (Fourier) transformation, this allow us to construct the power density of the equation point-wise inside the domain. Such a setting finds applications in ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography and ultrasound modulated optical tomography. We show that the diffusion coefficient can be uniquely and stably reconstructed from knowledge of a sufficient large number of power densities. Explicit expressions for the reconstruction of the diffusion coefficient are also provided. Such results hold for a large class of boundary...

  2. Time evolution of negative binomial optical field in diffusion channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu Tang-Kun; Wu Pan-Pan; Shan Chuan-Jia; Liu Ji-Bing; Fan Hong-Yi

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We find time evolution law of negative binomial optical field in diffusion channel. We reveal that by adjusting the diffusion parameter, photon number can controlled. Therefore, the diffusion process can be considered a quantum controlling scheme through photon addition.

  3. Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed...

  4. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  5. Laboratory for Characterization of Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center (IRC). The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research is in support of the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment — a major material irradiation experiment within the NGNP Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials.

  6. Irradiation effects on borosilicate waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, F.P.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of alpha decay on five borosilicate glasses containing simulated nuclear high-level waste oxides were studied. Irradiations carried out at room temperature were achieved by incorporating 1 to 8 wt % /sup 244/Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the glasses. Density changes and stored-energy build-up saturated at doses less than 2 x 10/sup 21/ alpha decays/kg. Damage manifested by stored energy was completely annealed at 633/sup 0/K. Positive and negative density changes were observed which never exceeded 1%. Irradiation had very little effect on mechanical strength or on chemical durability as measured by aqueous leach rates. Also, no effects were observed on the microstructure for vitreous waste glasses, although radiation-induced microcracking could be achieved on specimens that had been devitrified prior to irradiation.

  7. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  8. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  9. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, T.M.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established.

  10. ar diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion is examined. Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura 2014-02-05 4 Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv)...

  11. axial diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion is examined. Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura 2014-02-05 5 Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv)...

  12. Pore-Scale Simulation of Intragranular Diffusion: Effects of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation of Intragranular Diffusion: Effects of Incomplete Mixing on Macroscopic Manifestations. Pore-Scale Simulation of Intragranular Diffusion: Effects of Incomplete Mixing on...

  13. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning,...

  14. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion of hydrogen peroxide through teeth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Brenden Kyle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    activation  properties  of  hydrogen  peroxide  diffusion  the   transport   properties   of   hydrogen   peroxide  Hydrogen   peroxide   has   been   shown   to   readily   diffuse   through   both   enamel   and   dentin,   with   transport   properties  

  15. Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid...

  16. Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated Sediments at Hanford, United States. Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated Sediments at Hanford, United...

  17. Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium Oxygen Diffusion (OD) Dramatically Improves Wear-Resistance of Titanium 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

  18. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit)...

  19. Molecular diffusion in plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, M.A.; Buss, R.J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion of an array of molecules in micrometer-thick films of plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene has been measured using an optical interferometric technique. The diffusivity is approximately independent of molecular size up to a molar volume of about 100 cm{sup 3} and drops rapidly for larger molecules. For much larger molecules no penetration of the films is observed. These results suggest that plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene films are heavily cross linked and that this limits the size of the molecules that can penetrate the polymer. The temperature dependence and the molecular size dependence of the diffusivities are discussed in the context of free-volume theory.

  20. Effects of neutron flux and irradiation temperature on irradiation embrittlement of A533B steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Masahide; Onizawa, Kunio; Kizaki, Minoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation embrittlement of A533B steels with low copper contents were investigated from the point of dose rate and irradiation temperature effects. Change of neutron flux in the range from {minus}10{sup 12} to {minus}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/s (E > 1 MeV) did not have a significant effect on the embrittlement. Irradiation temperature change of 1 C resulted in the transition temperature shift ({Delta}T{sub 41J}) of about 1 C and yield stress change ({Delta}{sigma}{sub y}) of about 0.8 MPa. Factors that might affect the embrittlement of low copper steels are also discussed.

  1. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC- based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response (ZrC) by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation-induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

  2. Sandia Energy - Diffusion Bonding Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatings Initiated at PNNL's SequimReactors ToDecision SupportDesal

  3. Diffuse Shortwave Intensive Observation Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu,Energy Innovation Portal Solar31

  4. Diffusion of Small He Clusters in Bulk and Grain Boundaries in ?-Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Huiqiu; Hu, W. Y.; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion properties of He interstitials and He clusters in the bulk and grain boundaries (GBs) of ?-Fe have been studied using molecular dynamics with a newly developed Fe?He potential. The low migration energy barrier for a single He interstitial in the bulk is consistent with that obtained using ab initio methods. Small He clusters can migrate at low temperatures, but at higher temperatures they will kick out a self-interstitial atom (SIA) and become trapped by the vacancy, forming an He-vacancy complex. It is of great interest to note that small Henvacancy clusters (n<5) in the bulk are able to absorb an SIA, and the clusters become mobile again. Trapping and de-trapping of He clusters by emitting and absorbing an SIA represent an important dynamic process that provides a mechanism for the diffusion of He clusters and the nucleation of He bubbles in bulk Fe, particularly under irradiation in which numerous SIAs and vacancies are constantly being produced. A single He interstitial can migrate one-dimensionally or two-dimensionally within GBs, depending on the GB structure. Small interstitial Hen clusters 2 (n ~ 1 - 10) can easily kick out an SIA, and become trapped by the vacancy, while the SIA quickly diffuses away from the clusters, disappearing into the GB, such that de-trapping of the He clusters by absorbing an SIA is less likely to occur. This suggests that small He clusters may be treated as relatively immobile defects in GBs. The different behavior of He clusters in the bulk compared to their behavior in GBs may explain the different He bubble sizes experimentally observed in the bulk and in GBs in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels that have been simultaneously neutron irradiated and He implanted.

  5. Implementation Plan for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains details regarding the planned implementation of the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory at the INL.

  6. Fabrication Control Plan for ORNL RH-LOCA ATF Test Specimens to be Irradiated in the ATR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. Field; Richard Howard; Michael Teague

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this fabrication plan is (1) to summarize the design of a set of rodlets that will be fabricated and then irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and (2) provide requirements for fabrication and acceptance criteria for inspections of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) – Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) rodlet components. The functional and operational (F&OR) requirements for the ATF program are identified in the ATF Test Plan. The scope of this document only covers fabrication and inspections of rodlet components detailed in drawings 604496 and 604497. It does not cover the assembly of these items to form a completed test irradiation assembly or the inspection of the final assembly, which will be included in a separate INL final test assembly specification/inspection document. The controls support the requirements that the test irradiations must be performed safely and that subsequent examinations must provide valid results.

  7. Risk Management Policy INTERNAL AUDIT Purpose of this document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Risk Management Policy INTERNAL AUDIT SERVICE 1 Sept 2008 Purpose of this document 1. This risk. The policy explains the University's underlying approach to risk management, documents the roles aspects of the risk management process, and identifies the main reporting procedures. 3. In addition

  8. A CMOS GENERAL-PURPOSE SAMPLED-DATA ANALOGUE MICROPROCESSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Piotr

    A CMOS GENERAL-PURPOSE SAMPLED-DATA ANALOGUE MICROPROCESSOR Piotr Dudek and Peter J. Hicks functions as an analogue microprocessor (AµP). The AµP executes software programs, in a way akin to a digital microprocessor, while nevertheless operating on analogue sampled data values. This enables

  9. 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    162 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The inventory of the Wenatchee subbasin. The Inventory also identifies management programs and projects that target fish and wildlife or otherwise provide substantial benefit to fish and wildlife. The inventory includes programs and projects extant

  10. 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The inventory of the Entat subbasin summarizes. The Inventory also identifies management programs and projects that target fish and wildlife or otherwise provide substantial benefit to fish and wildlife. The inventory includes programs and projects extant

  11. ETSU Emergency Notification Systems Purpose of the Alert Warning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    ETSU Emergency Notification Systems Purpose of the Alert Warning System The alert warning system on the ETSU and VA Campuses. The system consists of strategically placed sirens that warn the university/voice message system acts in conjunction with other emergency information systems ETSU has in place (ETSU Gold

  12. A METHOD OF PREPARING FISHES FOR MUSEUM AND EXHIBITION PURPOSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    translucency. If the specimen is coated with wax the detail is lost, while the soft ness is only on the surface, the result would prove more satisfactory. It has been found that wax answers this purpose admirably of the mold until a thick coating of wax is formed, then allow it to cool. Before the wax has hardened wire

  13. PHOTOSWITCHR Photoelectric Sensors General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    (Sensor) DC Micro Ê Ê Ê For NPN type tie the load to Brown (+). For PNP type tie the load to Blue Beam Load Load Load Load Load Load Light Source Unit Protection Supply Voltage Current Consumption Photoelectric Sensors 42CA General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style R1­46 Typical Response Curve 100 1 0.1 0 1 (3

  14. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  15. Neutron Scattering Society of America Purpose and New Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    1 Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) Purpose and New Initiatives www.neutronscattering.org SNS/ANL School on Neutron and X-Ray Scattering June 2010 Visit us now on Facebook #12;2 What and provide a focal point for the neutron scattering community in the USA To identify the needs

  16. Neutron Scattering Society of America Purpose and New Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) Purpose and New Initiatives www.neutronscattering.org SNS/ANL School on Neutron and X-Ray Scattering June 2011 Visit us now on Facebook #12;2 What and provide a focal point for the neutron scattering community in the USA To identify the needs

  17. Job Position Description A. Main Purpose of the job

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    8/10/2012 Job Position Description Job Title: A. Main Purpose of the job: B. Primary responsibilities or key duties of the job (tasks performed regularly): 1. 2. 3. 4. C. Additional duties (tasks with preparation of job duties.4. #12;

  18. From philosophical questions of human purpose to practical ones on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Welcome From philosophical questions of human purpose to practical ones on oil spills and other fOr research NanoProfessorProvidesBig NumbersonOilSpill As a mechanical engineering professor in the Birck of oil that had been gushing into the Gulf of Mexico since the April 20 Deep- water Horizon blowout

  19. JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mocioalca, Oana

    JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS "non-systematic" risk, inclusive of transaction costs. We compute the total transac- tion costs and the turnover for different options, transaction costs, and revision intervals

  20. Determination of diffusion coefficient for unsaturated soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Eeshani

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    is non-linear but due to the complexity involved it has been simplified to a linear problem. The nonlinear behavior has been studied during this research. Therefore, certain refinements have been applied in the determination of the diffusion coefficient...

  1. Diffusion, dimensionality and noise in transcriptional regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasper Tkacik; William Bialek

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision of biochemical signaling is limited by randomness in the diffusive arrival of molecules at their targets. For proteins binding to the specific sites on the DNA and regulating transcription, the ability of the proteins to diffuse in one dimension by sliding along the length of the DNA, in addition to their diffusion in bulk solution, would seem to generate a larger target for DNA binding, consequently reducing the noise in the occupancy of the regulatory site. Here we show that this effect is largely cancelled by the enhanced temporal correlations in one dimensional diffusion. With realistic parameters, sliding along DNA has surprisingly little effect on the physical limits to the precision of transcriptional regulation.

  2. Diffuse reflectance imaging with astronomical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasinoff, Samuel W.

    Diffuse objects generally tell us little about the surrounding lighting, since the radiance they reflect blurs together incident lighting from many directions. In this paper we discuss how occlusion geometry can help invert ...

  3. Electrospray emitters For diffusion vacuum pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz Gómez Maqueo, Pablo (Pablo Ly)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following similar principles as regular diffusion vacuum pumps, an electrospray emitter is set to produce a jet of charged particles that will drag air molecules out of a volume. To be a feasible concept, the emitted ...

  4. Princeton University Diffusion of Networking Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Sharon

    Electronic Commerce (EC'12) Valencia, Spain June 7, 2012 ISP #12;Seedset: A set of nodes that can kick off, photovoltaics, fax, computers, Internet, video games, ... Source: Rogers. "The Diffusion of Home Computers Among

  5. DIFFUSION MEDIATED TRANSPORT AND THE BROWNIAN MOTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIFFUSION MEDIATED TRANSPORT AND THE BROWNIAN MOTOR David Kinderlehrer Center for Nonlinear in small viscous systems and provide brief illustrations to brownian motor or molecular rachet situations which are found in intracellular transport. Keywords: Brownian motor, molecular rachet, motor protein

  6. An AMR Capable Finite Element Diffusion Solver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rd. Berkeley, CA 94720, USA E-mail: fisher47@llnl.gov Abstract. We present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is...

  7. Novel applications of diffusion-driven flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allshouse, Michael R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion-driven flow is the result of a conflict between hydrostatic equilibrium in a density stratified fluid and the no-flux boundary condition that must be obeyed on impermeable boundaries that are sloping with respect ...

  8. The Sun and Climate Solar Irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Sun and Climate #12;Solar Irradiance The Solar Constant f = 1.4 x 106 erg/cm2/s. Over is higher when the Sun is more magnetically active. ·The Sun was magnetically active, and the climate the Sun Drive Climate? #12;The Temperature's Rising #12;Sunspots and CO2 What is Cause and What is Effect

  9. Low energy electron irradiation of an apple 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brescia, Giovanni Batista

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the need to achieve a uniform dose over the entire surface of convoluted shapes. The main goal of this research was to calculate the dose distribution produced by low energy electron irradiation of a typical complex shape, an apple, using Monte Carlo...

  10. Radiation damage in neutron irradiated boron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbak, V.I.; Bykov, V.N.; Rudenko, V.A.; Tarasikov, V.P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the fact that there is no information on the microstructure of specimens of boron carbide containing up to 60% B 10 isotope and irradiated at a temperature of 350-370 C, the authors undertook a detailed study of the radiation-induced defects in such material. The microstructure of unexposed boron carbide is characterized by the presence of pores originating during the technological process, dislocations, and twins. Irradiation of B/sub 4/C leads to the formation of defects measuring 3-20 nm and exhibiting a contrast that is characteristic of dislocation loops or two-dimensional second-phase precipitates and spherical pores measuring 1-4 nm in diameter. A specific microstructural feature of irradiated boron carbide is the formation of 30 nm wide zones that are free from pores and other radiation-induced defects near the gain boundaries. The obtained results indicate that irradiation of boron carbide in the 350-370 C range leads to the formation of several types of defects that can be detected by their image contrast under different conditions of photographing.

  11. Low energy electron irradiation of an apple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brescia, Giovanni Batista

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation. A software package, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), was used to simulate an electron beam irradiation with a 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MeV sources on an apple modeled by interconnecting two spheres. The apple radii were 4.4 cm (perpendicular to its axis...

  12. SIPS: Solar Irradiance Prediction System Stefan Achleitner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    SIPS: Solar Irradiance Prediction System Stefan Achleitner Computer Science and Engineering-scaling capacities of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. However, variability and uncertainty in power potentially limit the impact of fluctuations in solar power generation, specifically in cloudy days when

  13. Diffusion Preconditioner for Discontinuous Galerkin Transport Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbu, Anthony Petru

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    DIFFUSION PRECONDITIONER FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN TRANSPORT PROBLEMS A Thesis by ANTHONY PETRU BARBU Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DIFFUSION PRECONDITIONER FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN TRANSPORT PROBLEMS A Thesis by ANTHONY PETRU BARBU Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment...

  14. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  15. Response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels to thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the fracture toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes experimental results of work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response of several irradiated RPV steels.

  16. Total solar irradiance during the Holocene F. Steinhilber,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Total solar irradiance during the Holocene F. Steinhilber,1 J. Beer,1 and C. Fro¨hlich2 Received 20 solar irradiance covering 9300 years is presented, which covers almost the entire Holocene. This reconstruction is based on a recently observationally derived relationship between total solar irradiance

  17. Irradiation Embritlement in Alloy HT-­9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    HT-9 steel is a candidate structural and cladding material for high temperature lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. In typical advanced fast reactor designs fuel elements will be irradiated for an extended period of time, reaching up to 5-7 years. Significant displacement damage accumulation in the steel is expected (> 200 dpa) when exposed to dpa-rates of 20-30 dpa{sub Fe}/y and high fast flux (E > 0.1 MeV) {approx}4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s. Core temperatures could reach 400-560 C, with coolant temperatures at the inlet as low as 250 C, depending on the reactor design. Mechanical behavior in the presence of an intense fast flux and high dose is a concern. In particular, low temperature operation could be limited by irradiation embrittlement. Creep and corrosion effects in liquid metal coolants could set a limit to the upper operating temperature. In this report, we focus on the low temperature operating window limit and describe HT-9 embrittlement experimental findings reported in the literature that could provide supporting information to facilitate the consideration of a Code Case on irradiation effects for this class of steels in fast reactor environments. HT-9 has an extensive database available on irradiation performance, which makes it the best choice as a possible near-term candidate for clad, and ducts in future fast reactors. Still, as it is shown in this report, embrittlement data for very low irradiation temperatures (< 200 C) and very high radiation exposure (> 150 dpa) is scarce. Experimental findings indicate a saturation of DBTT shifts as a function of dose, which could allow for long lifetime cladding operation. However, a strong increase in DBTT shift with decreasing irradiation temperature could compromise operation at low service temperatures. Development of a deep understanding of the physics involved in the radiation damage mechanisms, together with multiscale computer simulation models of irradiation embrittlement will provide the basis to derive trendlines and quantitative engineering predictions.

  18. Thermal Analysis of a Uranium Silicide Miniplate Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the thermal analysis for the irradiation of high density uranium-silicide (U3Si2 dispersed in an aluminum matrix and clad in aluminum) booster fuel for a Boosted Fast Flux Loop designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. The purpose of this experiment (designated as Gas Test Loop-1 [GTL-1]) is two-fold: (1) to assess the adequacy of the U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel and the aluminum alloy 6061 cladding, and (2) to verify stability of the fuel cladding boehmite pre-treatment at nominal power levels in the 430 to 615 W/cm2 (2.63 to 3.76 Btu/s•in2) range. The GTL-1 experiment relies on a difficult balance between achieving a high heat flux, yet keeping fuel centerline temperature below a specified maximum value throughout an entire operating cycle of the reactor. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux levels and to reveal which experiment parameters place constraints on reactor operations. Analyses were performed to determine the bounding lobe power level at which the experiment could be safely irradiated, yet still provide meaningful data under nominal operating conditions. Then, simulations were conducted for nominal and bounding lobe power levels under steady-state and transient conditions with the experiment in the reactor. Reactivity changes due to a loss of commercial power with pump coast-down to emergency flow or a standard in-pile tube pump discharge break were evaluated. The time after shutdown for which the experiment can be adequately cooled by natural convection cooling was determined using a system thermal hydraulic model. An analysis was performed to establish the required in-reactor cooling time prior to removal of the experiment from the reactor. The inclusion of machining tolerances in the numerical model has a large effect on heat transfer.

  19. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M. [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu-shi, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  20. Seismic issues at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic expert workshop was held at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on March 13--15, 1989. the PGDP is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). During the last twenty years the design criteria for natural phenomenon hazards has steadily become more demanding at all of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) sites. The purpose of the two-day workshop was to review the seismic vulnerability issues of the PGDP facilities. Participants to the workshop included recognized experts in the fields of seismic engineering, seismology and geosciences, and probabilistic analysis, along with engineers and other personnel from Energy Systems. A complete list of the workshop participants is included in the front of this report. 29 refs.

  1. Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo of Lithium Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasch, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study lithium systems over a range of number of atoms, e.g., atomic anion, dimer, metallic cluster, and body-centered cubic crystal by the diffusion Monte Carlo method. The calculations include both core and valence electrons in order to avoid any possible impact by pseudo potentials. The focus of the study is the fixed-node errors, and for that purpose we test several orbital sets in order to provide the most accurate nodal hyper surfaces. We compare our results to other high accuracy calculations wherever available and to experimental results so as to quantify the the fixed-node errors. The results for these Li systems show that fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo achieves remarkably high accuracy total energies and recovers 97-99 % of the correlation energy.

  2. Concentration phenomena for neutronic multigroup diffusion in random environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott N. Armstrong; Panagiotis E. Souganidis

    2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the principal eigenvalue of a weakly coupled, cooperative linear elliptic system in a stationary ergodic heterogeneous medium. The system arises as the so-called multigroup diffusion model for neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores, the principal eigenvalue determining the criticality of the reactor in a stationary state. Such systems have been well-studied in recent years in the periodic setting, and the purpose of this work is to obtain results in random media. Our approach connects the linear eigenvalue problem to a system of quasilinear viscous Hamilton-Jacobi equations. By homogenizing the latter, we characterize the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue of the linear problem and exhibit some concentration behavior of the eigenfunctions.

  3. Monitoring detachment and diffusion of metallic species in polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bencomo, M. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M U. College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Castro-Colin, M. [Bruker AXS GmbH, 76187, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lopez, J. A.; Ramirez-Homs, E. [Department of Physics, U. of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon absorption is known to create peroxy radicals in polymers, in a process that entails the removal of hydrogen atoms and the subsequent breakage of bonds. Bond-breaking is found to free, from the polymeric matrix, metallic additives which are then able to diffuse out, as evidenced by the change in both the metallic fluorescence yield and the XPS profiles of C, N, and O. Polycarbonate was artificially weathered using UV radiation from mercury emission lines at 365, 405 and 435 nm, followed by thermal treatment. The UV wavelengths used have energies comparable to those of covalent bonds found in polymeric chains. Both processes, light exposure and thermal, have the purpose of stimulating the degradation of polycarbonate.

  4. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

  5. Sensitivity of ultrasonic nonlinearity to irradiated, annealed, and re-irradiated microstructure changes in RPV steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Kim, J-Y. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Wall, J.J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)] [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Jacobs, L.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned life extension of nuclear reactors throughout the US and abroad will cause reactor vessel and internals materials to be exposed to more neutron irradiation than was originally intended. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method to monitor radiation damage would enable safe and cost-effective continued operation of nuclear reactors. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes microstructural changes that leave the material in an embrittled state. Nonlinear ultrasound is an NDE technique quantified by the measurable acoustic nonlinearity parameter, which is sensitive to microstructural changes in metallic materials such as dislocations, precipitates and their combinations. Recent research has demonstrated the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing neutron fluence in representative RPV steels. The current work considers nonlinear ultrasonic experiments conducted on similar RPV steel samples that had a combination of irradiation, annealing, re-irradiation, and/or re-annealing to a total neutron fluence of 0.5 5 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 290 C. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter generally increased with increasing neutron fluence, and consistently decreased from the irradiated to the annealed state over different levels of neutron fluence. Results of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter are compared with those from previous measurements on other RPV steel samples. This comprehensive set of results illustrates the dependence of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter on neutron fluence, material composition, irradiation temperature and annealing.

  6. Faculty perceptions about attributes and barriers impacting the adoption and diffusion of Web-Based Educational Technologies (WBETs) at the University of Cape Coast and the University of Ghana, Legon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakah, Jemima Abena

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine faculty perceptions about factors impacting the adoption and diffusion of Web-Based Educational Technologies (WBETs) at the University of Cape Coast and the University of Ghana, ...

  7. Improvement of operational safety of dual-purpose transport packaging set for naval SNF in storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guskov, Vladimir; Korotkov, Gennady [JSC 'KBSM' (Russian Federation); Barnes, Ella [US Environmental Protection Agency - EPA (United States); Snipes, Randy [Oak Ridge National Laboratory - ORNL, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In recent ten years a new technology of management of irradiated nuclear fuel (SNF) at the final stage of fuel cycle has been intensely developing on a basis of a new type of casks used for interim storage of SNF and subsequent transportation therein to the place of processing, further storage or final disposal. This technology stems from the concept of a protective cask which provides preservation of its content (SNF) and fulfillment of all other safety requirements for storage and transportation of SNF. Radiation protection against emissions and non-distribution of activity outside the cask is ensured by physical barriers, i.e. all-metal or composite body, shells, inner cavities for irradiated fuel assemblies (SFA), lids with sealing systems. Residual heat release of SFA is discharged to the environment by natural way: through emission and convection of surrounding air. By now more than 100 dual purpose packaging sets TUK-108/1 are in operation in the mode of interim storage and transportation of SNF from decommissioned nuclear powered submarines (NPS). In accordance with certificate, spent fuel is stored in TUK-108/1 on the premises of plants involved in NPS dismantlement for 2 years, whereupon it is transported for processing to PO Mayak. At one Far Eastern plant Zvezda involved in NPS dismantlement there arose a complicated situation due to necessity to extend period of storage of SNF in TUK- 108/1. To ensure safety over a longer period of storage of SNF in TUK-108/1 it is essential to modify conditions of storage by removing of residual water and filling the inner cavity of the cask with an inert gas. Within implementation of the international 1.1- 2 project Development of drying technology for the cask TUK-108/1 intended for naval SNF under the Program, there has been developed the technology of preparation of the cask for long-term storage of SNF in TUK-108/1, the design of a mobile TUK-108/1 drying facility; a pilot facility has been manufactured. This report describes key issues of cask drying technology, justification of terms of dry storage of naval SNF in no-108/1, design features of the mobile drying facility, results of tests of the pilot facility at the Far Eastern plant Zvezda. (authors)

  8. Does Three-Dimensional External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation Spare Lung Tissue Compared With Standard Whole Breast Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Anudh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Vallow, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)], E-mail: vallow.laura@mayo.edu; Gale, Ashley A.; Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (3D-PBI) spares lung tissue compared with whole breast irradiation (WBI) and to include the biologically equivalent dose (BED) to account for differences in fractionation. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were devised for WBI and 3D-PBI for 25 consecutive patients randomized on the NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. WBI plans were for 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and 3D-PBI plans were for 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Gy was recorded for each plan. The linear quadratic equation was used to calculate the corresponding dose delivered in 10 fractions and volume of ipsilateral lung receiving these doses was recorded for PBI plans. Ipsilateral mean lung dose was recorded for each plan and converted to BED. Results: There was a significant decrease in volume of lung receiving 20 Gy with PBI (median, 4.4% vs. 7.5%; p < 0.001), which remained after correction for fractionation (median, 5.6% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.02). Mean lung dose was lower for PBI (median, 3.46 Gy vs. 4.57 Gy; p = 0.005), although this difference lost significance after conversion to BED (median, 3.86 Gy{sub 3} vs 4.85 Gy{sub 3}, p = 0.07). PBI plans exposed more lung to 2.5 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: 3D-PBI exposes greater volumes of lung tissue to low doses of radiation and spares the amount of lung receiving higher doses when compared with WBI.

  9. CRUSH TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 9977 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed in response to the adoption of the crush test requirement in the US regulations for packages for radioactive materials (10 CFR 71). This presentation on crush testing of the 9977 GPFP Reviews origins of Crush Test Requirements and implementation of crush test requirements in 10 CFR 71. SANDIA testing performed to support the rule making is reviewed. The differences in practice, on the part of the US Department of Energy from those required by the NRC for commercial purposes, are explained. The design features incorporated into the 9977 GPFP to enable it to withstand the crush test and the crush tests performed on the 9977 are described. Lessons learned from crush testing of GPFP packagings are given.

  10. Special Purpose Materials annual progress report, October 1, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (> 10-T) superconducting magnets. It is recognized that there will be numerous materials problems that will arise during the design and construction of large magnetic-fusion energy devices such as the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and Demonstration Reactor (DEMO). Most of these problems will be specific to a particular design or project and are the responsibility of the project, not the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch. Consequently, the Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits.

  11. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  12. diffusion-fundamentals The Open-Access Journal for the Basic Principles of Diffusion Theory, Experiment and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuck, Götz

    × 10­10 H+ -Diffusion, symmetr. H-bond (TD) ~0.3 4 × 10­09 The method allowing us to isolate specificdiffusion-fundamentals The Open-Access Journal for the Basic Principles of Diffusion Theory, Experiment and Application www.diffusion-fundamentals.org, ISSN 1862-4138; © 2005-2010 Diffusion Fundamentals

  13. A pumping system for measuring coastal diffusion coefficients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolen, Zane Kevin

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system was used to measure surface horizontal diffusion coefficients in the vicin- ity of the diffuser. These experiments were also used to develop tech- niques of underway sampling as well as measuring site specific horizon- tal diffusion... coefficients. Measurement of horizontal diffusion coef- ficients used a continuous point source of tracer material to produce a plume that could be profiled using the pumping system connected to a fluorometer. The resultant horizontal diffusion coefficients...

  14. Subsurface and surface oceanic diffusion experiments near Freeport, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Alan Dale

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The results indicate that a power law relationship between the dye distribution variance and the diffusion time is appropriate for horizontal diffusion and that Fickian diffusion adequately describes vertical diffusion. Recommended horizontal and vertical... as From Equations 2 and 3, it can be seen that K may not increase Y linearly with time, but instead by time raised to a power, which will be discussed later in this report. Harramoes (11) suggests that the Fickian diffusion equation is appropriate when...

  15. The Diffusive Finite State Projection Algorithm for Efficient Simulation of the Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petzold, Linda R.

    strategy. A novel formulation of the Finite State Projection (FSP) method, called the Diffusive FSP (DFSP (FSP) method [8], called the Diffusive FSP (DFSP) method, for the efficient and accurate simulation with DFSP and reactions with SSA. The dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic systems are governed

  16. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ruault, M.-O.; Henry, S.; Kaietasov, O. [CSNSM, Bat. 104, Orsay Campus (France); Trouslard, Ph. [INSTN, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM.

  17. Gamma irradiation in a saturated tuff environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.K.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of gamma irradiation on the reaction of actinide doped SRL 165 and PNL 76-68 glasses in a saturated tuff environment has been studied in a series of tests lasting up to 56 days. The reaction, and subsequent actinide release, of both glasses depends on the dynamic interaction between radiolysis effects which cause the solution pH to become more acidic and glass reaction which drives the pH more basic. The use of large gamma irradiation dose rates to accelerate reactions that would occur in an actual repository radiation field may affect this dynamic balance by unduly influencing the mechanism of the glass-water reaction. Comparisons are made between the present results and data obtained by reacting the same or similar glasses using MCC-1 and NNWSI rock cup procedures. 11 references, 3 figures.

  18. Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

  19. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate�¢����the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  20. Neutron irradiation of beryllium: Recent Russian results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results on postirradiation tensile and compression testing, swelling and bubble growth during annealing for various grades of beryllium are presented. It is shown that swelling at temperatures above 550{degrees}C is sensitive to material condition and response is correlated with oxygen content. Swelling on the order of 15% can be expected at 700{degrees}C for doses on the order of 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. Bubble growth response depends on irradiation fluence.

  1. Topology, finite time Lyapunov exponents, and barriers for diffusive transport in advection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xianzhu [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Boozer, A.H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of transport problems are of advection-diffusion type. Typical fluid problems of this type are the relaxation of temperature differences in a room or the spread of a contaminant in a river. Important examples in plasma include the relaxation of electrons in a region of stochastic magnetic field lines and the evolution of the magnetic field embedded in a conducting fluid. The archetypal model equation is the advection-diffusion equation. The quantity being transported is {phi}. The flow velocity of the medium, v(x, t), is assumed given and independent of {phi}. The diffusive flux is {Tau}{sub d} = -D{del}{phi}. If the flow is chaotic, the properties of the transport are determined by the spatial and time dependence of the finite time Lyapunov exponent {lambda}({xi}, t). The rapid diffusive transport occurs only along the field line (s line) of the vector s, which defines the stable direction in which neighboring points asymptotically converge. The topology of the s lines affects the diffusive transport through the finite time Lyapunov exponent. We discover that the spatial variation of the finite time Lyapunov exponent along the s lines is smooth and determined by the topology of the s lines. For example, the finite time Lyapunov exponent reaches local minima if the s line makes a sharp bend. These topological bends hinder the diffusive transport and act as a barrier for diffusive relaxation. Such barriers for diffusion reside inside the chaotic region and they persist even the flow is highly chaotic. In the case of the electron relaxation in a region of stochastic field lines, there is a rapid diffusive relaxation of the spatial inhomogeneity in the electron distribution function which is typical of the chaotic transport of a passive scalar. But the diffusive relaxation of the pitch angle distribution is much slower.

  2. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  3. I. GENERAL AUDIT PROGRAM A. PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5 , 3004 SIJI3JII( '-and

  4. Surplus NNSA equipment gets new purpose for STEM students | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  5. Regulation Indentifier Number Title/Subject/Purpose Rule Type

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  6. Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Chapter 1 - Introduction and Statement of Purpose and Need

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCeriumfor the 2012 CBECSMorgan1-1

  8. Remote Control of Laboratory Equipment for Educational Purposes | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access Ames

  9. Upgrade to the Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin- Reyes; Parker, K; Wilson, J; Baca, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Birmingham Irradiation Facility was developed in 2013 at the University of Birmingham using the Medical Physics MC40 cyclotron. It can achieve High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) fluences of 10^15 (1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq)) cm^-2 in 80 s with proton beam currents of 1 ?A and so can evaluate effectively the performance and durability of detector technologies and new components to be used for the HL-LHC. Irradiations of silicon sensors and passive materials can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box which moves continuously through the homogenous beamspot. This movement is provided by a pre-configured XY-axis Cartesian robot scanning system. In 2014 the cooling system and cold box were upgraded from a recirculating glycol chiller system to a liquid nitrogen evaporative system. The new cooling system achieves a stable temperature of 50 1C in 30 min and aims to maintain sub-0 1C temperatures on the sensors during irradiations. This paper reviews the design, development, commissioning and perform...

  10. Reverse-selective diffusion in nanocomposite membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reghan J. Hill

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The permeability of certain polymer membranes with impenetrable nanoinclusions increases with the particle volume fraction (Merkel et al., Science, 296, 2002). This intriguing observation contradicts even qualitative expectations based on Maxwell's classical theory of conduction/diffusion in composites with homogeneous phases. This letter presents a simple theoretical interpretation based on classical models of diffusion and polymer physics. An essential feature of the theory is a polymer-segment depletion layer at the inclusion-polymer interface. The accompanying increase in free volume leads to a significant increase in the local penetrant diffusivity, which, in turn, increases the bulk permeability while exhibiting reverse selectivity. This model captures the observed dependence of the bulk permeability on the inclusion size and volume fraction, providing a straightforward connection between membrane microstructure and performance.

  11. Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

  12. Diffusion in a rough potential revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Saikat; Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rugged energy landscapes find wide applications in diverse fields ranging from astrophysics to protein folding. We study the dependence of diffusion coefficient $(D)$ of a Brownian particle on the distribution width $(\\varepsilon)$ of randomness in a Gaussian random landscape by simulations and theoretical analysis. We first show that the elegant expression of Zwanzig [PNAS, 85, 2029 (1988)] for $D(\\varepsilon)$ can be reproduced exactly by using the Rosenfeld diffusion-entropy scaling relation. Our simulations show that Zwanzig's expression overestimates $D$ in an uncorrelated Gaussian random lattice - differing by almost an order of magnitude at moderately high ruggedness. The disparity originates from the presence of "three-site traps" (TST) on the landscape -- which are formed by the presence of deep minima flanked by high barriers on either side. Using mean first passage time formalism, we derive a general expression for the effective diffusion coefficient in the presence of TST, that quantitatively repr...

  13. Cosmic-ray diffusion in magnetized turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tautz, R C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of cosmic-ray scattering in the turbulent electromagnetic fields of the interstellar medium and the solar wind is of great importance due to the variety of applications of the resulting diffusion coefficients. Examples are diffusive shock acceleration, cosmic-ray observations, and, in the solar system, the propagation of coronal mass ejections. In recent years, it was found that the simple diffusive motion that had been assumed for decades is often in disagreement both with numerical and observational results. Here, an overview is given of the interaction processes of cosmic rays and turbulent electromagnetic fields. First, the formation of turbulent fields due to plasma instabilities is treated, where especially the non-linear behavior of the resulting unstable wave modes is discussed. Second, the analytical and the numerical side of high-energy particle propagation will be reviewed by presenting non-linear analytical theories and Monte-Carlo simulations. For the example of the solar wind, the im...

  14. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  15. Evaluation of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbide Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsome G, Snead L, Hinoki T, Katoh Y, Peters D

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on SiC and SiC composites have been studied. The materials used were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC and SiC/SiC composites reinforced with either Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic{trademark} fibers fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration. Statistically significant numbers of flexural samples were irradiated up to 4.6 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 300, 500 and 800 C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dimensions and weights of the flexural bars were measured before and after the neutron irradiation. Mechanical properties were evaluated by four point flexural testing. Volume increase was seen for all bend bars following neutron irradiation. Magnitude of swelling depended on irradiation temperature and material, while it was nearly independent of irradiation fluence over the fluence range studied. Flexural strength of CVD SiC increased following irradiation depending on irradiation temperature. Over the temperature range studied, no significant degradation in mechanical properties was seen for composites fabricated with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, while composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic fibers showed significant degradation. The effects of irradiation on the Weibull failure statistics are also presented suggesting a reduction in the Weibull modulus upon irradiation. The cause of this potential reduction is not known.

  16. Self- and zinc diffusion in gallium antimonide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicols, Samuel Piers

    2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The technological age has in large part been driven by the applications of semiconductors, and most notably by silicon. Our lives have been thoroughly changed by devices using the broad range of semiconductor technology developed over the past forty years. Much of the technological development has its foundation in research carried out on the different semiconductors whose properties can be exploited to make transistors, lasers, and many other devices. While the technological focus has largely been on silicon, many other semiconductor systems have applications in industry and offer formidable academic challenges. Diffusion studies belong to the most basic studies in semiconductors, important from both an application as well as research standpoint. Diffusion processes govern the junctions formed for device applications. As the device dimensions are decreased and the dopant concentrations increased, keeping pace with Moore's Law, a deeper understanding of diffusion is necessary to establish and maintain the sharp dopant profiles engineered for optimal device performance. From an academic viewpoint, diffusion in semiconductors allows for the study of point defects. Very few techniques exist which allow for the extraction of as much information of their properties. This study focuses on diffusion in the semiconductor gallium antimonide (GaSb). As will become clear, this compound semiconductor proves to be a powerful one for investigating both self- and foreign atom diffusion. While the results have direct applications for work on GaSb devices, the results should also be taken in the broader context of III-V semiconductors. Results here can be compared and contrasted to results in systems such as GaAs and even GaN, indicating trends within this common group of semiconductors. The results also have direct importance for ternary and quaternary semiconductor systems used in devices such as high speed InP/GaAsSb/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBT) [Dvorak, (2001)]. Many of the findings which will be reported here were previously published in three journal articles. Hartmut Bracht was the lead author on two articles on self-diffusion studies in GaSb [Bracht, (2001), (2000)], while this report's author was the lead author on Zn diffusion results [Nicols, (2001)]. Much of the information contained herein can be found in those articles, but a more detailed treatment is presented here.

  17. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cristadoro

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  18. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekäläinen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.kekalainen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  19. Effect of Diffusion on Bunched Beam Echo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.V.; Chao, A.W.; /SLAC

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a beam receives a dipole kick, its centroid signal decoheres due to the betatron tune spread in the beam. Long after the signal has decohered, however, a followup quadrupole kick to the beam brings a pronounced echo back to the centroid signal. This echo effect has been analyzed for the case of a bunched beam in Ref. [1]. In this work, the perturbation calculation of Ref. [1] is extended to include a diffusion in betatron amplitude. The effect of diffusion on the magnitude of the echo is then parameterized and studied.

  20. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser shock.

  1. X-Ray Energy Responses of Silicon Tomography Detectors Irradiated with Fusion Produced Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohagura, J. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirata, M. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Numakura, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yokoyama, N. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukai, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tomii, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tokioka, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyake, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kiminami, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shimizu, K. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyoshi, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan); Yoshida, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kondoh, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to clarify the effects of fusion-produced neutron irradiation on silicon semiconductor x-ray detectors, the x-ray energy responses of both n- and p-type silicon tomography detectors used in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak (n-type) and the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror (p-type) are studied using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The fusion neutronics source (FNS) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is employed as well-calibrated D-T neutron source with fluences from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto these semiconductor detectors. Different fluence dependence is found between these two types of detectors; that is, (i) for the n-type detector, the recovery of the degraded response is found after the neutron exposure beyond around 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto the detector. A further finding is followed as a 're-degradation' by a neutron irradiation level over about 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, (ii) the energy response of the p-type detector shows only a gradual decrease with increasing neutron fluences. These properties are interpreted by our proposed theory on semiconductor x-ray responses in terms of the effects of neutrons on the effective doping concentration and the diffusion length of a semiconductor detector.

  2. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Shinn, Michelle [Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Schaaf, Peter [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, FG Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 10 05 65, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  3. INTRACELLULAR COPPER ACCUMULATION ENHANCES THE GROWTH OF KINEOCOCCUS RADIOTOLERANS DURING CHRONIC IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagwell, C; Charles Milliken, C

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The actinobacteria Kineococcus radiotolerans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress; though the underlying biochemical mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore a possible linkage between the uptake of transition metals and extreme resistance to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. The effects of 6 different divalent cationic metals on growth were examined in the absence of ionizing radiation. None of the metals tested were stimulatory, though cobalt was inhibitory to growth. In contrast, copper supplementation dramatically increased cell growth during chronic irradiation. K. radiotolerans exhibited specific uptake and intracellular accumulation of copper compared to only a weak response to both iron and manganese supplementation. Copper accumulation sensitized cells to hydrogen peroxide. Acute irradiation induced DNA damage was similar between the copper-loaded culture as the age-synchronized no copper control culture, though low molecular weight DNA was more persistent during post-irradiation recovery in the Cu-loaded culture. Still, the estimated times for genome restoration differed by only 1 hr between treatments. While we cannot discount the possibility that copper fulfills an unexpectedly important biochemical role in a radioactive environment; K. radiotolerans has a high capacity for intracellular copper sequestration, and presumably efficiently coordinated oxidative stress defenses and detoxification systems, which confers cross-protection from the damaging affects ionizing radiation.

  4. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

  5. Parallel computation safety analysis irradiation targets fission product molybdenum in neutronic aspect using the successive over-relaxation algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susmikanti, Mike, E-mail: mike@batan.go.id [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Tangerang (Indonesia); Dewayatna, Winter, E-mail: winter@batan.go.id [Center for Nuclear Fuel Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Tangerang (Indonesia); Sulistyo, Yos, E-mail: soj@batan.go.id [Center for Nuclear Equipment and Engineering, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the research activities in support of commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research on target FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum) irradiation. FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel which contains nuclear-grade high-enrichment uranium. The FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission products. Fission materials such as Mo{sup 99} used widely the form of kits in the medical world. The neutronics problem is solved using first-order perturbation theory derived from the diffusion equation for four groups. In contrast, Mo isotopes have longer half-lives, about 3 days (66 hours), so the delivery of radioisotopes to consumer centers and storage is possible though still limited. The production of this isotope potentially gives significant economic value. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculated for various irradiation positions and uranium contents. This model involves complex computation, with large and sparse matrix system. Several parallel algorithms have been developed for the sparse and large matrix solution. In this paper, a successive over-relaxation (SOR) algorithm was implemented for the calculation of reactivity coefficients which can be done in parallel. Previous works performed reactivity calculations serially with Gauss-Seidel iteratives. The parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculate the criticality and reactivity coefficients. In this research a computer code was developed to exploit parallel processing to perform reactivity calculations which were to be used in safety analysis. The parallel processing in the multicore computer system allows the calculation to be performed more quickly. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated FPM targets containing highly enriched uranium. The results of calculations neutron show that for uranium contents of 1.7676 g and 6.1866 g (× 10{sup 6} cm{sup ?1}) in a tube, their delta reactivities are the still within safety limits; however, for 7.9542 g and 8.838 g (× 10{sup 6} cm{sup ?1}) the limits were exceeded.

  6. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control.

  7. Multi-purpose canister system evaluation: A systems engineering approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to investigate various container systems for handling, transporting, storing, and disposing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The primary goal of DOE`s investigations was to select a container technology that could handle the vast majority of commercial SNF at a reasonable cost, while ensuring the safety of the public and protecting the environment. Several alternative cask and canister concepts were evaluated for SNF assembly packaging to determine the most suitable concept. Of these alternatives, the multi-purpose canister (MPC) system was determined to be the most suitable. Based on the results of these evaluations, the decision was made to proceed with design and certification of the MPC system. A decision to fabricate and deploy MPCs will be made after further studies and preparation of an environmental impact statement.

  8. JOHNSON-MATTHEY DIFFUSER CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, P; James Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H; Gregg Morgan, G

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuser/permeator commercially fabricated by Johnson-Matthey was purchased for characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A test system was fabricated to not only feed and bleed flows and pressures, but also permeate pressure for flows up to 20 SLPM.

  9. Fluctuation bounds on charge and heat diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Kovtun

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermal fluctuation corrections to charge and heat conductivity in systems with locally conserved energy and charge, but without locally conserved momentum. Thermal fluctuations may naturally lead to a lower bound on diffusion constants for thermoelectric transport, and need to be taken into account when discussing potential bounds on transport coefficients.

  10. Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew G. Baring; Errol J. Summerlin

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-convection equation. In this theory/data comparison, it is demonstrated that diffusive acceleration theory can, to first order, successfully account for both the proton distribution data near the shock, and the observation of energetic protons farther upstream of this interplanetary shock than lower energy pick-up protons, using a single turbulence parameter. The principal conclusion is that diffusive acceleration of inflowing upstream ions can model this pick-up ion-rich event without the invoking any seed pre-acceleration mechanism, though this investigation does not rule out the action of such pre-acceleration.

  11. Magnetic flux diffusion through HTS shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Kai-Wai; Fan, C. X.; Havenhill, A. D.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow field leakage in a polycrystalline superconducting cupshield placed in an external axial field (H-ext) much weaker than H-C1 shows a diffusive time dependence with a time scale of 10(2) s. As the field strength increases but is still less than...

  12. Inverse Problems for Fractional Diffusion Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lihua

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    and preliminaries in Section 1 and 2, in the third section we consider our first inverse boundary problem. This is where an unknown boundary condition is to be determined from overposed data in a time- fractional diffusion equation. Based upon the fundamental...

  13. Ternary gas mixture for diffuse discharge switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hunter, Scott R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new diffuse discharge gas switch wherein a mixture of gases is used to take advantage of desirable properties of the respective gases. There is a conducting gas, an insulating gas, and a third gas that has low ionization energy resulting in a net increase in the number of electrons available to produce a current.

  14. Mathematical analysis for fractional diffusion equations: forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Franck

    or dumping WasteGroundwater flow Base rock Underground storage Soil gapsmicro scale about 100m Field: macro-Diffusion equation Result of Field Test (Adams& Gelhar, 1992) t0 t1 t2 t3 t0 Pollution source Model Prediction Univ. #12;· Determination of contamination source t u = u + F We need detailed mathematical researches

  15. Diffusion in Flexible Pipes Susanne Brogaard Kristensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 7.5.3 Carbon dioxide diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 7.5.4 52Effect of C it may cause the outer sheath to burst. Also if large amounts of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 1 . #12;7.3 Thermodynamic properties , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 7.4 First approach

  16. Forecasting Turbulent Modes with Nonparametric Diffusion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrus Berry; John Harlim

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a nonparametric diffusion modeling approach for forecasting partially observed noisy turbulent modes. The proposed forecast model uses a basis of smooth functions (constructed with the diffusion maps algorithm) to represent probability densities, so that the forecast model becomes a linear map in this basis. We estimate this linear map by exploiting a previously established rigorous connection between the discrete time shift map and the semi-group solution associated to the backward Kolmogorov equation. In order to smooth the noisy data, we apply diffusion maps to a delay embedding of the noisy data, which also helps to account for the interactions between the observed and unobserved modes. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most predictable component of the dynamics. The resulting model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and in the observation noise limit. We will show numerical examples on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Fourier modes of the energy conserving Truncated Burgers-Hopf (TBH) model, the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes, and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. In these examples, forecasting skills of the nonparametric diffusion model are compared to a wide-range of stochastic parametric modeling approaches, which account for the nonlinear interactions between the observed and unobserved modes with white and colored noises.

  17. Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booij, Wilfred Edwin

    Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation Wilfred Edwin Booij Gonville and Caius College Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge December 1997... Summary Josephson Junctions and Devices fabricated by Focused Electron Beam Irradiation The irradiation of high Tc superconducting thin films with a focused electron beam, such as that obtained in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), can...

  18. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zois, Christos E. [Department of Radiotherapy - Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece)] [Department of Radiotherapy - Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)] [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Kainulainen, Heikki [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Botaitis, Sotirios [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)] [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Torvinen, Sira [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Simopoulos, Constantinos [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)] [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Kortsaris, Alexandros [Department of Biochemistry, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)] [Department of Biochemistry, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)] [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy - Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. {yields} Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. {yields} The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. {yields} Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body {gamma}-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 mRNA levels significantly declined following irradiation (p < 0.01), whereas Bnip3 levels increased. Conclusions: It is suggested that irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. Whether this is due to defective maturation or to aberrant degradation of the autophagosomes requires further investigation.

  19. FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fiscal year 2013 are provided and include information derived from: 1) irradiation of hydrogen-doped zircaloy cladding in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); 2) mechanical...

  20. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Initial Activities Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material...

  1. au ion irradiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under laser irradiation of Au nanoparticles in the presence of Thorium aqua-ions CERN Preprints Summary: Initiation of nuclear reactions in Thorium nuclei is experimentally...

  2. acute uv irradiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    products, e.g., OH radicals, with the aid of UV irradiation by microwave discharge electrodeless lamp, photo-catalysts, and auxiliary oxidants. The results of...

  3. Photoinduced Formation of Zinc Nanoparticles by UV Laser Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metallic Zn nanoparticles growing on the exposed surface of the crystal. Higher fluence laser exposure generates accumulated surface metal just outside of the irradiated spot. We...

  4. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guidance on experimental approaches to reveal the onset of these processes. Citation: Weber WJ, and F Gao.2010."Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon...

  5. Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron Irradiation: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron...

  6. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation and Implications for Long-Term Immobilization of Actinides. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under...

  7. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and...

  8. apres irradiation globale: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary for the evaluation of global irradiance on inclined surface which is needed for photovoltaic Boyer, Edmond 7 Caractristiques lectriques de diodes Au-Si(N) ralises aprs...

  9. Response of Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interface under electron irradiation. Citation: Zhang Y, J Lian, Z Zhu, WD Bennett, LV Saraf, JL Rausch, CA Hendricks, RC Ewing, and WJ Weber.2009."Response of...

  10. Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 Environmental Assessment LEAD TEST ASSEMBLY IRRADIATION AND ANALYSIS WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT, TENNESSEE AND HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  11. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  12. alpha particle irradiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Incidence characteristics of...

  13. alpha particles irradiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Incidence characteristics of...

  14. alpha particle irradiated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Incidence characteristics of...

  15. apres irradiation alpha: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edmond 8 Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Incidence characteristics of...

  16. Probing the brain’s white matter with diffusion MRI and a tissue dependent diffusion model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piatkowski, Jakub Przemyslaw

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    While diffusion MRI promises an insight into white matter microstructure in vivo, the axonal pathways that connect different brain regions together can only partially be segmented using current methods. Here we present ...

  17. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netson, Kelli L. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of Medicine—Wichita, Kansas (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of Medicine—Wichita, Kansas (United States); Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample. Baseline differences in functional abilities before the initiation of irradiation suggested that other factors influence functional outcomes above and beyond the effects of irradiation.

  18. Microstructural examination of irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examination results are reported for a V-5Cr-5Ti unirradiated control specimens of heat BL-63 following annealing at 1050{degrees}C, and V-4Cr-4Ti heat BL-47 irradiated in three conditions from the DHCE experiment: at 425{degrees}C to 31 dpa and 0.39 appm He/dpa, at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 0.54 appm He/dpa and at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 4.17 appm He/dpa.

  19. Mitigation of irradiation embrittlement by annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amayev, A.D.; Kryukov, A.M.; Levit, V.I.; Platonov, P.A.; Sokolov, M.A. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main results of a complex investigation carried out in Russia of post irradiation annealing and reembrittlement of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel materials are presented. The dependence of the Charpy transition temperature recovery on annealing temperature and fluence was established. Charpy specimens were reirradiated after annealing at 340, 380, 420, and 460 C. Experimental values of the Charpy transition temperature after reirradiation are compared to that predicted by three methods. At annealing temperatures equal to or above 420 C, results of the analysis indicate that, of the methods investigated, the lateral shift method gives the best result for estimating the transition temperature shift due to reirradiation.

  20. A Diffusion Study of the Federally Mandated School Wellness Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Dinah Jane

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) in Organizations as a theoretical framework, this dissertation analyzed the diffusion process of the federally mandated School Wellness Policy (SWP) in three separate studies. Beginning with a content analysis...

  1. The effects of double-diffusion on a baroclinic vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Wendy Marie

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the combined effects of double-diffusion and rotation on an oceanic intrusion. Intrusions are driven across density-compensated fronts by the divergence of the double-diffusive ...

  2. Diapycnal advection by double diffusion and turbulence in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Laurent, Louis C

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of diapycnal mixing rates are examined and related to diapycnal advection for both double-diffusive and turbulent regimes. The role of double-diffusive mixing at the site of the North Atlantic Tracer Release ...

  3. Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed MnTi Oxides. Abstract: Mixed...

  4. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  5. Modelling of unidirectional thermal diffusers in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of the temperature field and velocity field induced by a unidirectional thermal diffuser in shallow water. A multiport thermal diffuser is essentially a pipe laid ...

  6. Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Imaging Intrinsic Diffusion of Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies on TiO2(110). Abstract: Since oxygen atom...

  7. CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas Mc FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas McCain Department of Electrical

  8. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, Andy; /Edinburgh U.; Butterworth, Jonathan; /University Coll. London; Gieseke, Stefan; /Karlsruhe U., ITP; Grellscheid, David; /Durham U., IPPP; Hoche, Stefan; /SLAC; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys. /CERN; Nurse, Emily; /University Coll. London; Richardson, Peter; /Durham U., IPPP; Schumann, Steffen; /Heidelberg U.; Seymour, Michael H.; /Manchester U.; Sjostrand, Torbjorn; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Skands, Peter; /CERN; Webber, Bryan; /Cambridge U.

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard-scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond-Standard-Model processes. We describe the principal features of the Ariadne, Herwig++, Pythia 8 and Sherpa generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists wanting a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  9. Spatial curvature effects on molecular transport by diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Balakrishnan

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For a substance diffusing on a curved surface, we obtain an explicit relation valid for very small values of the time, between the local concentration, the diffusion coefficient, the intrinsic spatial curvature and the time. We recover the known solution of Fick's law of diffusion in the flat space limit. In the biological context, this result would be useful in understanding the variations in the diffusion rates of integral proteins and other molecules on membranes.

  10. Investigation of porous media structures using NMR restricted diffusion measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Peizhi

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be observed in the literature. Woessner measured the apparent diffusion coefficients for three systems: water in silica suspensions; water in a sandstone core; and benzene- rubber. He employed a constant field gradient spin-echo technique and observed.... For the application of NMR technique to extract pore structure information from restricted diffusion measurements, we will follow a two-step scheme, 1) determine the distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient from NMR measurement of fluid diffusion in porous...

  11. LETTRES A LA RDACTION DIFFUSION LASTIQUE DES PHOTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    spectrometrie par scintillation 6choue, 6 cause des empilements de photons diffus6s de basse énergie. FIG. 1

  12. Evolution of the nanostructure OF VVER-1000 RPV materials under neutron irradiation and post irradiation annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Chernobaeva, A. A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Shtrombakh, Ya. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Erak, D. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Zabusov, Oleg O. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Russell, Kaye F [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high nickel VVER-1000 (15Kh2NMFAA) base metal (1.34 wt% Ni, 0.47% Mn, 0.29% Si and 0.05% Cu), and a high nickel (12Kh2N2MAA) weld metal (1.77 wt% Ni, 0.74% Mn, 0.26% Si and 0.07% Cu) have been characterized by atom probe tomography to determine the changes in the microstructure during neutron irradiation to high fluences. The base metal was studied in the unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to fluences between 2.4 and 14.9 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -2} (E > 0.5 MeV), and the weld metal was studied in the unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to fluences between 2.4 and 11.5 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -2} (E > 0.5 MeV). High number densities of 2-nm-diameter Ni-, Si- and Mn-enriched nanoclusters were found in the neutron irradiated base and weld metals. No significant copper enrichment was associated with these nanoclusters and no copper-enriched precipitates were observed. The number densities of these nanoclusters correlate with the shifts in the {Delta}T{sub 41 J} ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. These nanoclusters were present after a post irradiOffice of Science (US)C, but had dissolved into the matrix after 24 h at 450 C. Phosphorus, nickel, silicon and to a lesser extent manganese were found to be segregated to the dislocations.

  13. EFFECT OF BROWNIAN AND THERMOPHORETIC DIFFUSIONS OF NANOPARTICLES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    EFFECT OF BROWNIAN AND THERMOPHORETIC DIFFUSIONS OF NANOPARTICLES ON NONEQUILIBRIUM HEAT CONDUCTION of Brownian and thermophoretic diffusions on nonequilibrium heat conduction in a nanofluid layer with periodic, and period of the surface heat flux. Effects of Brownian and thermophoretic diffusions of nanoparticles

  14. New Monte Carlo schemes for simulating diffusions in discontinuous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    New Monte Carlo schemes for simulating diffusions in discontinuous media Antoine Lejay1,2,3,4,5 Sylvain Maire6,7 April 28, 2012 Abstract We introduce new Monte Carlo simulation schemes for diffusions in a dis- continuous media divided in subdomains with piecewise constant diffusivity. These schemes

  15. New Monte Carlo schemes for simulating diffusions in discontinuous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    New Monte Carlo schemes for simulating diffusions in discontinuous media Antoine Lejay1,2,3,4,5 Sylvain Maire6,7 December 13, 2012 Abstract We introduce new Monte Carlo simulation schemes for diffusions in a dis- continuous media divided in subdomains with piecewise constant diffusivity. These schemes

  16. Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yazhen

    Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price Jin-Chuan Duan National constructed GARCH model will weakly converge to a bi- variate diffusion. Naturally the European option price under the GARCH model will also converge to its bivariate diffusion counterpart. This paper investigates

  17. Nonlinear analysis of a reaction-diffusion system: Amplitude equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A reaction-diffusion system with a nonlinear diffusion term is considered. Based on nonlinear analysis, the amplitude equations are obtained in the cases of the Hopf and Turing instabilities in the system. Turing pattern-forming regions in the parameter space are determined for supercritical and subcritical instabilities in a two-component reaction-diffusion system.

  18. Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity, and coarsening N. Fujita and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia The growth of niobium carbide in austenite involves the diffusion of both niobium and carbon. These elements diffuse at very different rates. A model is presented

  19. Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Why Diffusion in Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    I - 1 Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Why Diffusion in Polymers Various industrial applications of polymers involve diffusion of gases through polymersi . Membrane separation of gases in the gas and oil involve impeding the diffusion of gases through thin polymer films, commonly used as packaging food

  20. A Diffusion Model in Population Genetics with Mutation and Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael

    A Diffusion Model in Population Genetics with Mutation and Dynamic Fitness Mike O'Leary Department of Mathematics Towson University May 24, 2008 Mike O'Leary (Towson University) A Diffusion Model in Genetics May Miller, Georgetown University Mike O'Leary (Towson University) A Diffusion Model in Genetics May 24, 2008

  1. Optimisation of buildings' solar irradiation availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaempf, Jerome Henri; Montavon, Marylene; Bunyesc, Josep; Robinson, Darren [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory, Station 18, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bolliger, Raffaele [Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory, Station 9, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve the sustainability of new and existing urban settlements it is desirable to maximise the utilisation of the solar energy incident on the building envelope, whether by passive or active means. To this end we have coupled a multi-objective optimisation algorithm with the backwards ray tracing program RADIANCE which itself uses a cumulative sky model for the computation of incident irradiation (W h/m{sup 2}) in a single simulation. The parameters to optimise are geometric (the height of buildings up to their facade and the height and orientation of roofs), but with the constraint of maintaining an overall built volume, and the objective function is heating season solar irradiation offset by envelope heat losses. This methodology has been applied to a range of urban typologies and produces readily interpretable results. The focus of this work is on the design of new urban forms but the method could equally be applied to examine the relative efficiency of existing urban settlements, by comparison of existing forms with the calculated optima derived from relevant specifications of the building envelope. (author)

  2. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  3. Effect of hydrogen plasma irradiation of catalyst films on growth of carbon nanotubes filled with iron nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Hideki, E-mail: sato@elec.mie-u.ac.jp; Kubonaka, Nobuo; Nagata, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yuji [Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya-cho, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes filled with iron (Fe-filled CNTs) show shape anisotropy on account of the high aspect ratio of magnetic nanowires, and are promising candidates for various applications, such as magnetic recording media, probes for scanning force microscopy, and medical treatment for cancer. The ability to appropriately control the magnetic properties of CNTs for those applications is desirable. In this study, the authors investigated magnetic properties of Fe-filled CNTs synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition for the purpose of tuning their coercivity. Here, the authors implemented hydrogen plasma irradiation of catalyst film that was previously deposited on a substrate as a catalyst layer. This treatment activates the catalyst film and thus enhances the growth of the Fe-filled CNTs. It was confirmed that the H{sub 2} plasma irradiation enhances the growth of the CNTs in terms of increasing their length and diameter compared to CNTs without irradiation. On the other hand, the coercivity of Fe-filled CNTs dropped to approximately half of those without H{sub 2} plasma irradiation. This is probably due to a decrease in the aspect ratio of the Fe nanowires, which results from the increase in their diameter. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the Fe nanowires may affect the coercivity.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamlah, Florentine, E-mail: Kamlah@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Haenze, Joerg [Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Arenz, Andrea [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Juricko, Janko; Bischoff, Birgit [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Gottschald, Oana R. [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Seeger, Werner [Department of Internal Medicine II/V, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen (Germany); Rose, Frank [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a phenomenon that could not be observed with carbon ion irradiation. Thus, in this model system evaluating angiogenesis, carbon ion irradiation may have a therapeutic advantage. This observation should be confirmed in orthotopic lung tumor models.

  5. Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. Abstract: Single crystalline 6H-SiC samples were irradiated at...

  6. Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, S.C.; Zeng, F.; Zhao, H.L.

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue. 58 figs.

  7. Methodology and apparatus for diffuse photon mimaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Shechao C. (Los Angeles, CA); Zeng, Fanan (Los Angeles, CA); Zhao, Hui-Lin (Los Angeles, CA)

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-invasive near infrared optical medical imaging devices for both hematoma detection in the brain and early tumor detection in the breast is achieved using image reconstruction which allows a mapping of the position dependent contrast diffusive propagation constants, which are related to the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient in the tissue, at near infrared wavelengths. Spatial resolutions in the range of 5 mm for adult brain sizes and breast sizes can be achieved. The image reconstruction utilizes WKB approximation on most probable diffusion paths which has as lowest order approximation the straight line-of-sight between the plurality of sources and the plurality of detectors. The WKB approximation yields a set of linear equations in which the contrast optical absorption coefficients are the unknowns and for which signals can be generated to produce a pixel map of the contrast optical resolution of the scanned tissue.

  8. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  9. Diffusive Shock Acceleration: the Fermi Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew G. Baring

    1997-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of diffusive Fermi acceleration at collisionless plasma shock waves is widely invoked in astrophysics to explain the appearance of non-thermal particle populations in a variety of environments, including sites of cosmic ray production, and is observed to operate at several sites in the heliosphere. This review outlines the principal results from the theory of diffusive shock acceleration, focusing first on how it produces power-law distributions in test-particle regimes, where the shock dynamics are dominated by the thermal populations that provide the seed particles for the acceleration process. Then the importance of non-linear modifications to the shock hydrodynamics by the accelerated particles is addressed, emphasizing how these subsequently influence non-thermal spectral formation.

  10. State protection under collective damping and diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponte, M. A. de [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Regional do Cariri, 63010-970 Juazeiro do Norte, CE (Brazil); Mizrahi, S. S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Moussa, M. H. Y. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we provide a recipe for state protection in a network of oscillators under collective damping and diffusion. Our strategy is to manipulate the network topology, i.e., the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings, and their natural frequencies, in order to create a relaxation-diffusion-free channel. This protected channel defines a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) for nonzero-temperature reservoirs. Our development also furnishes an alternative approach to build up DFSs that offers two advantages over the conventional method: it enables the derivation of all the network-protected states at once, and also reveals, through the network normal modes, the mechanism behind the emergence of these protected domains.

  11. Diffusion limited reactions in confined environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy D. Schmit; Ercan Kamber; Jané Kondev

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of confinement on diffusion limited bimolecular reactions within a lattice model where a small number of reactants diffuse amongst a much larger number of inert particles. When the number of inert particles is held constant the rate of the reaction is slow for small reaction volumes due to limited mobility from crowding, and for large reaction volumes due to the reduced concentration of the reactants. The reaction rate proceeds fastest at an intermediate confinement corresponding to volume fraction near 1/2 and 1/3 in two and three dimensions, respectively. We generalize the model to off-lattice systems with hydrodynamic coupling and predict that the optimal reaction rate for monodisperse colloidal systems occurs when the volume fraction is ~0.18. Finally, we discuss the application of our model to bimolecular reactions inside cells as well as the dynamics of confined polymers.

  12. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

  13. SHORT COMMUNICATION UV microspot irradiator at Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    available for radiation biology research at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Columbia: 26 May 2013 Ó Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University has recently added a UV microspot irradiator to a microbeam irradiation

  14. IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS - A CASE STUDY FOR THE GERMAN energy yield of a PV system,methods based on irradiance maps published by weather services or others-connected PV systems. DATA USED Hourly time series from ground and satellite-derived horizontal global

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION Microbeam irradiation of C. elegans nematode in microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Microbeam irradiation of C. elegans nematode in microfluidic channels M implemented a microfluidic tool for microbeam irradiation of Caenorhabditis elegans. The device allows into the microfluidic device through liquid flow between an inlet and an outlet, and the size of each microchannel

  16. Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Neutron Irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuji Hatano; Masashi Shimada; Yasuhisa Oya; Guoping Cao; Makoto Kobayashi; Masanori Hara; Brad J. Merrill; Kenji Okuno; Mikhail A. Sokolov; Yutai Katoh

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the effects of neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten, disk-type specimens of pure tungsten were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor in Oak Ridge National Laboratory followed by exposure to high flux deuterium (D) plasma in Idaho National Laboratory. The results obtained for low dose n-irradiated specimens (0.025 dpa for tungsten) are reviewed in this paper. Irradiation at coolant temperature of the reactor (around 50 degrees C) resulted in the formation of strong trapping sites for D atoms. The concentrations of D in n-irradiated specimens were ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 mol% after exposure to D plasma at 200 and 500 degrees C and significantly higher than those in non-irradiated specimens because of D-trapping by radiation defects. Deep penetration of D up to a depth of 50-100 µm was observed at 500 degrees C. Release of D in subsequent thermal desorption measurements continued up to 900 degrees C. These results were compared with the behaviour of D in ion-irradiated tungsten, and distinctive features of n-irradiation were discussed.

  17. 8. Particle Diffusion and Acceleration Proceedings of the Workshop: ``Diffuse Thermal and Relativistic Plasma in Galaxy Clusters''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehringer, Hans

    8. Particle Diffusion and Acceleration #12; #12; Proceedings of the Workshop: ``Diffuse Thermal. Feretti & P. Schuecker, MPE Report 271, pp. 249­253 Turbulent Particle Acceleration in the Diffuse Cluster Abstract. In situ particle acceleration is probably occur­ ing in cluster radio haloes. This is suggested

  18. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase DER adoption, and thus, shift building energy consumption to a more efficient alternative.

  19. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelby, James E. (Alfred Station, NY); Kenyon, Brian E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  20. Collective motion in quantum diffusive environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Kolomietz; S. Å berg; S. V. Radionov

    2007-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The general problem of dissipation in macroscopic large-amplitude collective motion and its relation to energy diffusion of intrinsic degrees of freedom of a nucleus is studied. By applying the cranking approach to the nuclear many-body system, a set of coupled dynamical equations for the collective classical variable and the quantum mechanical occupancies of the intrinsic nuclear states is derived. Different dynamical regimes of the intrinsic nuclear motion and its consequences on time properties of collective dissipation are discussed.

  1. Uranium enrichment export control guide: Gaseous diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to serve as a guide for export control officials in their interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws that relate to the Zangger International Trigger List for gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process components, equipment, and materials. Particular emphasis is focused on items that are especially designed or prepared since export controls are required for these by States that are party to the International Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  2. Metal Nitride Diffusion Barriers for Copper Interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, Roy A.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    nanocrystalline TiN film enhances grain boundary sliding and grain boundary diffusion related creep phenomena, and the ductility of the coatings is also improved. On the other hand, compositional designed TiN based alloys, such as cubic-phase Ti1-xAlxN thin... Nitrides ...................... 26 2.3 Composition and Structures of TiN, TaN and HfN ................. 33 2.4 Nitride Formation, Electronegativity, Atomic Radius and Bonding...

  3. Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, L.G.; Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF/sub 4/, C/sub 2/F/sub 6/, C/sub 3/F/sub 8/, n-C/sub 4/F/sub 10/, WF/sub 6/, (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/S and (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/O.

  4. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pontius, Rex B. (Rochester, NY)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  5. The influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18O exhanges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Biraud, S.C.; Noone, D.C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J.T.; Torn, M.S.; Welker, J.; White, J.W.C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G.D.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} isotope fluxes ('isofluxes') in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C{sub 4} grassland), in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model, ISOLSM. Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest canopy photosynthesis was substantially higher than on clear, sunny days, and the highest carbon uptake was achieved on the cloudiest day. This effect was driven by a large increase in light-limited shade leaf photosynthesis following an increase in the diffuse fraction of irradiance. Photosynthetic isofluxes, by contrast, were largest on partly cloudy days, as leaf water isotopic composition was only slightly depleted and photosynthesis was enhanced, as compared to adjacent clear sky days. On the cloudiest day, the forest exhibited intermediate isofluxes: although photosynthesis was highest on this day, leaf-to-atmosphere isofluxes were reduced from a feedback of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced in the C{sub 4} grass canopy with increasing cloud cover and diffuse fraction as a result of near-constant light limitation of photosynthesis. These results suggest that some of the unexplained variation in global mean {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} may be driven by large-scale changes in clouds and aerosols and their impacts on diffuse radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity.

  6. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua Univ. (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  7. Importance of Diffusion in Methanol Photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Acharya, Danda P.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Henderson, Michael A.

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoactivity of methanol on the rutile TiO2(110) surface is shown to depend on the ability of methanol to diffuse on the surface and find sites active for its thermal dissociation to methoxy. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) results show that the extent of methanol photodecomposition to formaldehyde is negligible on the clean TiO2(110) surface at 100 K due to a scarcity of sites that can convert (photoinactive) methanol to (photoactive) methoxy. The extent of photoactivity at 100 K significantly increases when methanol is coadsorbed with oxygen, however only those molecules able to adsorb near (next to) a coadsorbed oxygen species are active. Preannealing coadsorbed methanol and oxygen to above 200 K prior to UV irradiation results in a significant increase in photoactivity. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images clearly show that the advent of increased photoactivity in TPD correlates with the onset of methanol diffusion along the surface’s Ti4+ rows at ~200 K. These results demonstrate that optimizing thermal processes (such as diffusion or proton transfer reactions) can be critical to maximizing photocatalytic reactivity on TiO2 surfaces. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle under contract DEAC05-76RL01830. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  8. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

  9. Standard Guide for Packaging Materials for Foods to Be Irradiated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide provides a format to assist producers and users of food packaging materials in selecting materials that have the desirable characteristics for their intended use and comply with applicable standards or government authorizations. It outlines parameters that should be considered when selecting food-contact packaging materials intended for use during irradiation of prepackaged foods and it examines the criteria for fitness for their use. 1.2 This guide identifies known regulations and regulatory frameworks worldwide pertaining to packaging materials for holding foods during irradiation; but it does not address all regulatory issues associated with the selection and use of packaging materials for foods to be irradiated. It is the responsibility of the user of this guide to determine the pertinent regulatory issues in each country where foods are to be irradiated and where irradiated foods are distributed. 1.3 This guide does not address all of the food safety issues associated with the synergisti...

  10. Anisotropic diffusion of spherical particles in closely confining microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettmer, Simon L; Misiunas, Karolis; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here the measurement of the diffusivity of spherical particles closely confined by narrow microchannels. Our experiments yield a 2D map of the position-dependent diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the channel axis with a resolution down to 129 nm. The diffusivity was measured simultaneously in the channel interior, the bulk reservoirs as well as the channel entrance region. In the channel interior we found strongly anisotropic diffusion. While the perpendicular diffusion coefficient close to the confining walls decreased down to approximately 25 % of the value on the channel axis, the parallel diffusion coefficient remained constant throughout the entire channel width. In addition to the experiment, we performed finite element simulations for the diffusivity in the channel interior and found good agreement with the measurements. Our results reveal the distinctive influence of strong confinement on Brownian motion which is of significance to microfluidics as well as quantitative mo...

  11. Creep effects in diffusion bonding of oxygen-free copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moilanen, Antti

    Diffusion is the transport of atoms or particles through the surrounding material. Various microstructural changes in metals are based on the diffusion phenomena. In solid metals the diffusion is closely related to crystallographic defects. In single-component metals the dominant mechanism of diffusion is the vacancy mechanism. Diffusion bonding is a direct technological application of diffusion. It is an advanced solidstate joining process in which the surfaces of two components are brought to contact with each other and heated under a pressing load in a controlled environment. During the process, the contact surfaces are bonded by atomic diffusion across the interface and as a result, one solid piece is formed. The condition of high temperature and low applied stress combined with relatively long process duration enables the creep effects to take place in bonded metals. Furthermore, creep causes unwanted permanent deformations in the bonded components. Some authors suggest that there could be a threshold fo...

  12. System-Level Logistics for Dual Purpose Canister Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinina, Elena A.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis presented in this report investigated how the direct disposal of dual purpose canisters (DPCs) may be affected by the use of standard transportation aging and disposal canisters (STADs), early or late start of the repository, and the repository emplacement thermal power limits. The impacts were evaluated with regard to the availability of the DPCs for emplacement, achievable repository acceptance rates, additional storage required at an interim storage facility (ISF) and additional emplacement time compared to the corresponding repackaging scenarios, and fuel age at emplacement. The result of this analysis demonstrated that the biggest difference in the availability of UNF for emplacement between the DPC-only loading scenario and the DPCs and STADs loading scenario is for a repository start date of 2036 with a 6 kW thermal power limit. The differences are also seen in the availability of UNF for emplacement between the DPC-only loading scenario and the DPCs and STADs loading scenario for the alternative with a 6 kW thermal limit and a 2048 start date, and for the alternatives with a 10 kW thermal limit and 2036 and 2048 start dates. The alternatives with disposal of UNF in both DPCs and STADs did not require additional storage, regardless of the repository acceptance rate, as compared to the reference repackaging case. In comparison to the reference repackaging case, alternatives with the 18 kW emplacement thermal limit required little to no additional emplacement time, regardless of the repository start time, the fuel loading scenario, or the repository acceptance rate. Alternatives with the 10 kW emplacement thermal limit and the DPCs and STADs fuel loading scenario required some additional emplacement time. The most significant decrease in additional emplacement time occurred in the alternative with the 6 kW thermal limit and the 2036 repository starting date. The average fuel age at emplacement ranges from 46 to 88 years. The maximum fuel age at emplacement ranges from 81 to 146 years. The difference in the average and maximum age of fuel at emplacement between the DPC-only and the DPCs and STADs fuel loading scenarios becomes less significant as the repository thermal limit increases and as the repository start date increases. In general, the role of STADs is to store young (30 year or younger) high burnup (45 GWD/MTU or higher) fuel. Recommendations for future study include detailed evaluation of the feasible alternatives with regard to the costs and factors not considered in this analysis, such as worker dose, dose to members of the public, and economic benefits to host entities. It is also recommended to conduct an additional analysis to evaluate the assumption regarding the transportability and disposability of DPCs for the next iteration of the direct disposal of DPCs study.

  13. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  14. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985.

  15. Recovery of niobium from irradiated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Virginia T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selective separation of niobium from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected form the group consisting of molybdenum, biobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the cationic resin; adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 5.0 to about 6.0; contacting the pH adjusting second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material for a time to selectively separate niobium from the solution and recovering the niobium from the dextran-based material.

  16. Controlled doping of graphene using ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Zhengtang [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Pinto, Nicholas J.; Davila, Yarely [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Puerto Rico at Humacao, Humacao, 00792 (Puerto Rico); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 (United States)

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of graphene are tunable via doping, making it attractive in low dimensional organic electronics. Common methods of doping graphene, however, adversely affect charge mobility and degrade device performance. We demonstrate a facile shadow mask technique of defining electrodes on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thereby eliminating the use of detrimental chemicals needed in the corresponding lithographic process. Further, we report on the controlled, effective, and reversible doping of graphene via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with minimal impact on charge mobility. The change in charge concentration saturates at {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and the quantum yield is {approx}10{sup -5} e/photon upon initial UV exposure. This simple and controlled strategy opens the possibility of doping wafer-size CVD graphene for diverse applications.

  17. Irradiation embrittlement modelling of Linde 80 weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, R.J. [AEA Technology, Didcot (United Kingdom). Harwell Lab.; Lowe, A.L. Jr. [Lowe Associates, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Linde 80 weld metals are characterized by a narrow range of chemical compositions, except for copper content, which varies from 0.2--0.42 wt%. The surveillance database for Linde 80 weld metals constitutes a unique and large database on a single class of material for evaluating embrittlement models and property correlations used in the assessment of RPV embrittlement. The main purpose of the present study has been to obtain a simple two component barrier hardening model form which best describes the behavior of Linde 80 weld metal. To this end, the UK Magnox Embrittlement Model, often referred to as the Fisher Model, has been used and the key parameters, such as activation energies, dislocation densities and damage cross sections, were used as fitting parameters. Good agreement was found between model predictions and the surveillance yield strength data following optimization of model parameters. Applying the latter optimized form produced equally good prediction of HSSI results at a significantly higher damage rate demonstrating the rate effect inherent in the irradiation enhanced copper precipitation process. The best agreement was obtained assuming a matrix copper content of about 0.23 wt% which is consistent with recent solubility data for Linde 80 welds. For these materials an insensitivity to bulk copper content was demonstrated even though this varied from 0.21--0.42 wt%. Additionally, the parameters optimized for high copper welds provided a good prediction for low-copper materials indicating that the matrix hardening component was correctly specified. The low matrix hardening and predicted completion of copper precipitation by doses of about 1 {times} 10{sup 19} ncm{sup {minus}2} support the notion of embrittlement saturation at high doses.

  18. AGC-3 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence Hull

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The third experiment, Advanced Graphite Creep 3 (AGC 3), began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 152B on November 27, 2012, and ended with ATR Cycle 155B on April 23, 2014. This report documents qualification of AGC 3 experiment irradiation monitoring data for use by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Program for research and development activities required to design and license the first VHTR nuclear plant. Qualified data meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Failed data do not meet the requirements. Trend data may not meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. All thermocouples (TCs) functioned throughout the AGC 3 experiment. There was one interval between December 18, 2012, and December 20, 2012, where 10 NULL values were reported for various TCs. These NULL values were deleted from the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System database. All temperature data are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Argon, helium, and total gas flow data were within expected ranges and are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the AGC 3 experiment capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during ATR shutdowns. At the start of the AGC 3 experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line was stuck at a constant value of 335.6174 ppmv for the first cycle (Cycle 152B). When the AGC 3 experiment capsule was reinstalled in ATR for Cycle 154B, a new moisture filter was installed. Moisture data from Cycle 152B are Failed. All moisture data from the final three cycles (Cycles 154B, 155A, and 155B) are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program.

  19. Bioavailability study for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this plan is to assess the bioavailability of metals in the continuous and intermittent outfalls. The results may be used to determine alternative metal limits that more appropriately measure the portion of metal present necessary for toxicity to aquatic life. These limits must remain protective of in-stream aquatic life; thus, the highest concentration of metal in the water will be determined concurrently with an assessment of acute or chronic toxicity on laboratory tests. Using the method developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW), biomonitoring results and chemical data will be used to recommend alternative metal limits for the outfalls of concern. The data will be used to meet the objectives of the study: (1) evaluate the toxicity of continuous outfalls and intermittent outfalls at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; (2) determine the mean ratio of dissolved to Total Recoverable metal for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in the continuous and intermittent outfalls; (3) determine whether the concentration of total recoverable metal discharged causes toxicity to fathead minnows and /or Ceriodaphnia; and (4) determine alternative metal limits for each metal of concern (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn).

  20. Fire protection review revisit No. 2, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.H.; Keller, D.R.; Treece, S.D.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fire protection survey was conducted for the Department of Energy at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, from October 30--November 4, November 6--10, and December 4--8, 1989. The purpose of the survey was to review the facility fire protection program and to make recommendations. Surveys of other facilities resulted in a classification system for buildings which provide an indication of the importance of the building to the fulfillment of the mission of the facility. Recommendations in this report reflect to some degree the relative importance of the facility and the time to restore it to useful condition in the event a loss were to occur.

  1. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  2. ASCA Discovery of Diffuse 6.4 keV Emission Near the Sgr C Complex: A New X-ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda; M. Sakano

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ASCA discovery of diffuse hard X-ray emission from the Sgr C complex with its peak in the vicinity of the molecular cloud core. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a strong 6.4-keV line and large absorption. These properties suggest that Sgr C is a new X-ray reflection nebula which emits fluorescent and scattered X-rays via irradiation from an external X-ray source. We found no adequately bright source in the immediate Sgr C vicinity to fully account for the fluorescence. The irradiating source may be the Galactic nucleus Sgr A*, which was brighter in the past than it is now as is suggested from observations of the first X-ray reflection nebula Sgr B2.

  3. Surface Modification of Polymer Substrates by Oxygen Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Araki, R.; Yakushiji, T. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen cluster ions and/or monomer ions were used for the sputtering and the surface modification of polymers such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For the case of oxygen cluster ion irradiation, the sputtered depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the sputtering yield was much larger than that by the monomer ion irradiation. The sputtered particles represented the polymer structure, which indicated that the bond scission by the cluster ion irradiation resulted in an ejection of monomer molecule through the intermolecular collision. On the other hand, for the oxygen monomer ion irradiation, the implanted depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the bond scission occurred at the deep region through the binary collision with the high energetic ions. Therefore, the sputtering yield for the polymer surfaces decreased, and the sputtering effect became very small. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was more effective for oxidation of the PET surfaces rather than the monomer ion irradiation or the cluster ion irradiation. As a result, the contact angle measurement showed that the wettability of the PET surfaces irradiated by the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was much enhanced.

  4. AGC-1 Pre-Irradiation Data Report Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All samples in the experiment will be fully characterized before irradiation, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and then re-examined to determine the irradiation induced changes to key materials properties in the different graphite grades. The information generated during the AGC experiment will be utilized for NRC licensing of NGNP reactor designs, shared with international collaborators in the Generation IV Information Forum (GIF), and eventually utilized in ASME design code for graphite nuclear applications. This status report will describe the process the NGNP Graphite R&D program has developed to record the AGC1 pre-irradiation examination data.

  5. Causal Baryon Diffusion and Colored Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Kapusta; C. Young

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a model of baryon diffusion which has the desired properties of causality and analyticity. The model also has the desired property of colored noise, meaning that the noise correlation function is not a Dirac delta function in space and time; rather, it depends on multiple time and length constants. The model can readily be incorporated in 3+1 dimensional second order viscous hydro-dynamical models of heavy ion collisions, which is particularly important at beam energies where the baryon density is large.

  6. Thermo-quantum diffusion in periodic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tsekov

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Brownian motion in a periodic cosine potential is studied and a simple estimate of the tunneling effect is obtained in the frames of a quasi-equilibrium semiclassical approach. It is shown that the latter is applicable for heavy particles but electrons cannot be described properly since the quantum effects dominate over the thermal ones. The purely quantum electron diffusion is investigated at zero temperature and demonstrates that electrons do not obey the classical Einstein law of Brownian motion in the field of periodic potentials, since the dispersion of the wave packet increases logarithmically in time.

  7. How Nuclear Diffuseness Affects RHIC Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Werner

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact that nuclei have diffuse surfaces (rather than being simple spheres) has dramatic consequences on the interpretation of RHIC heavy-ion data. The effect is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. One may actually divide the collision zone into a central part ("core"), with expected high energy densities, and a peripheral part ("corona"), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We will discuss that many complicated "features" observed at RHIC become almost trivial after subtracting the corona background. We are focussing on AuAu collisions at 200 GeV.

  8. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  9. Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

    1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

  10. Diffusion Databases for ICME | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * SEnergyTemperatureDepartmentICME Diffusion

  11. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  12. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  13. Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

  14. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irene Tamborra; Shin'ichiro Ando

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that the GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin. The high-luminosity component gives the dominant contribution to the diffuse neutrino emission, while the fluxes from both the low-luminosity and the short-duration GRBs are significantly smaller. Our findings confirm the most-recent IceCube results on the GRB searches and suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect high-energy neutrinos from GRBs in the near future.

  15. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; HunterJr., Jerry [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Coffey, Kevin [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

  16. Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between tracer diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between J. P., Grenier J. C., Loup J. P. ABSTRACT Chemical oxygen diusion coecient ¯(D)was measured the oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding atmosphere of the sample. The consequent evolution

  17. Non-Fickian ionic diffusion across high-concentration gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, A.E.; Wheatcraft, S.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Glass, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others] [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-Fickian physico-chemical model for electrolyte transport in high-ionic strength systems is developed and tested with laboratory experiments with copper sulfate as an example electrolyte. The new model is based on irreversible thermodynamics and uses measured mutual diffusion coefficients, varying with concentration. Compared to a traditional Fickian model, the new model predicts less diffusion and asymmetric diffusion profiles. Laboratory experiments show diffusion rates even smaller than those predicted by our non-Fickian model, suggesting that there are additional, unaccounted for processes retarding diffusion. Ionic diffusion rates maybe a limiting factor in transporting salts whose effect on fluid density will in turn significantly affect the flow regime. These findings have important implications for understanding and predicting solute transport in geologic settings where dense, saline solutions occur. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  19. Diffusion and Interdiffusion in Binary Metallic Melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kuhn; J. Horbach; F. Kargl; A. Meyer; Th. Voigtmann

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dependence of self- and interdiffusion coefficients on temperature and composition for two prototypical binary metallic melts, Al-Ni and Zr-Ni, in molecular-dynamics (MD) computer simulations and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition (MCT). Dynamical processes that are mainly entropic in origin slow down mass transport (as expressed through self diffusion) in the mixture as compared to the ideal-mixing contribution. Interdiffusion of chemical species is a competition of slow kinetic modes with a strong thermodynamic driving force that is caused by non-entropic interactions. The combination of both dynamic and thermodynamic effects causes qualitative differences in the concentration dependence of self-diffusion and interdiffusion coefficients. At high temperatures, the thermodynamic enhancement of interdiffusion prevails, while at low temperatures, kinetic effects dominate the concentration dependence, rationalized within MCT as the approach to its ideal-glass transition temperature $T_c$. The Darken equation relating self- and interdiffusion qualitatively reproduces the concentration-dependence in both Zr-Ni and Al-Ni, but quantitatively, the kinetic contributions to interdiffusion can be slower than the lower bound suggested by the Darken equation. As temperature is decreased, the agreement with Darken's equation improves, due to a strong coupling of all kinetic modes that is a generic feature predicted by MCT.

  20. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  1. Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

  2. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  3. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  4. The modelling of irradiation-enhanced phosphorus segregation in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druce, S.G.; English, C.A.; Foreman, A.J.E.; McElroy, R.J.; Vatter, I.A. [AEA Technology, Didcot (United Kingdom). Harwell Lab.; Bolton, C.J.; Buswell, J.T.; Jones, R.B. [Nuclear Electric, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on neutron-irradiated RPV submerged-arc welds have revealed grain boundary segregation of phosphorus during irradiation, which may lead to intergranular fracture. However, the experimental database is insufficient to define the dependence of the process on variables such ad dose, dose-rate and temperature. This paper describes work in which two existing models of phosphorus segregation, under thermal or irradiation conditions, have been developed to obtain predictions of these dependencies. The critical parameters in the models have been adjusted to give consistency with the available reference data, and predictions have been made of the dependence of segregation on a number of variables.

  5. Respiratory Organ Motion and Dosimetric Impact on Breast and Nodal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Merrell, Kenneth; Sood, Amit; Bauer, Anderson; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the respiratory motion for target and normal structures during whole breast and nodal irradiation and the resulting dosimetric impact. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT data sets of 18 patients with early-stage breast cancer were analyzed retrospectively. A three-dimensional conformal dosimetric plan designed to irradiate the breast was generated on the basis of CT images at 20% respiratory phase (reference phase). The reference plans were copied to other respiratory phases at 0% (end of inspiration) and 50% (end of expiration) to simulate the effects of breathing motion on whole breast irradiation. Dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose, and normal tissue complication probability were evaluated and compared. Results: Organ motion of up to 8.8 mm was observed during free breathing. A large lung centroid movement was typically associated with a large shift of other organs. The variation of planning target volume coverage during a free breathing cycle is generally within 1%-5% (17 of 18 patients) compared with the reference plan. However, up to 28% of V{sub 45} variation for the internal mammary nodes was observed. Interphase mean dose variations of 2.2%, 1.2%, and 1.4% were observed for planning target volume, ipsilateral lung, and heart, respectively. Dose variations for the axillary nodes and brachial plexus were minimal. Conclusions: The doses delivered to the target and normal structures are different from the planned dose based on the reference phase. During normal breathing, the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion is clinically insignificant with the exception of internal mammary nodes. However, noticeable degradation in dosimetric plan quality may be expected for the patients with large respiratory motion.

  6. Solar irradiance forecasting at multiple time horizons and novel methods to evaluate uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar irradiance data . . . . . . . . . . . . .Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solar Resourcev Uncertainty In Solar Resource: Forecasting

  7. Lattice Boltzmann computations for reaction-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponce Dawson, S.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D. (Center for Nonlinear Studies and Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A lattice Boltzmann model for reaction-diffusion systems is developed. The method provides an efficient computational scheme for simulating a variety of problems described by the reaction-diffusion equations. Diffusion phenomena, the decay to a limit cycle, and the formation of Turing patterns are studied. The results of lattice Boltzmann calculations are compared with the lattice gas method and with theoretical predictions, showing quantitative agreement. The model is extended to include velocity convection in chemically reacting fluid flows.

  8. Diffusion in associated and non-associated homologous series 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhamid, Khalid A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) measured diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution in associated and non-associated solvents in order to determine the effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion coefficient and to predict a correlation for such systems. Of these solvents, water... number. Derlacki et al. (1985) determined the diffusion coefficients for the methanol ? water system over the entire concentration range. The measurements were made at 5 and 25 'C using the diaphragm cell from which velocity correlation coefficients...

  9. A study of diffusion in binary solutions using spin echoes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousseau, Cecil Clyde

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Experimentally Determined Diffusion Coefficients of Cyclohexane and Acetone with the Results of NcCall, Douglass, and Anderson . . . . . . . . . 23 INTRODUCTION The available descriptions of the liquid state form a continuous spectrum that extends from... the liquid with unit velocity. The intrinsic diffusion coefficient is now given by Di kT Equation (1-11) is known as the Einstein relation. Thus far, no explicit statement has been made concerning diffusion in binary systems. In addition to the intrinsic...

  10. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Diffusion of Fission Product Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAX phases, such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been suggested in the literature as a possible fuel cladding material. Prior to the application, it is necessary to investigate diffusivities of fission products in the ternary compound at elevated temperatures. This study attempts to obtain relevant data and make an initial assessment for Ti3SiC2. Ion implantation was used to introduce fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal (Au) in Ti3SiC2, SiC, and a dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/SiC synthesized at PNNL. Thermal annealing and in-situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to study the diffusivity of the various implanted species in the materials. In-situ RBS study of Ti3SiC2 implanted with Au ions at various temperatures was also performed. The experimental results indicate that the implanted Ag in SiC is immobile up to the highest temperature (1273 K) applied in this study; in contrast, significant out-diffusion of both Ag and Au in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 occurs during ion implantation at 873 K. Cs in Ti3SiC2 is found to diffuse during post-irradiation annealing at 973 K, and noticeable Cs release from the sample is observed. This study may suggest caution in using Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures. Further studies of the related materials are recommended.

  11. Diffusion Barrier Selection from Refractory Metals (Zr, Mo and Nb) via Interdiffusion Investigation for U-Mo RERTR Fuel Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Huang; C. Kammerer; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment monolithic fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Diffusional interactions between the U-Mo fuel alloy and Al-alloy cladding within the monolithic fuel plate construct necessitate incorporation of a barrier layer. Fundamentally, a diffusion barrier candidate must have good thermal conductivity, high melting point, minimal metallurgical interaction, and good irradiation performance. Refractory metals, Zr, Mo, and Nb are considered based on their physical properties, and the diffusion behavior must be carefully examined first with U-Mo fuel alloy. Solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Mo, Zr, or Nb diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C for various times. The interdiffusion microstructures and chemical composition were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. For all three systems, the growth rate of interdiffusion zone were calculated at 1000, 900 and 800 degrees C under the assumption of parabolic growth, and calculated for lower temperature of 700, 600 and 500 degrees C according to Arrhenius relationship. The growth rate was determined to be about 10 3 times slower for Zr, 10 5 times slower for Mo and 10 6 times slower for Nb, than the growth rates reported for the interaction between the U-Mo fuel alloy and pure Al or Al-Si cladding alloys. Zr, however was selected as the barrier metal due to a concern for thermo- mechanical behavior of UMo/Nb interface observed from diffusion couples, and for ductile-to-brittle transition of Mo near room temperature.

  12. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  13. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel 1985-

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various fields demands a thorough investigation of their stability under irradiation. Open structure, ability to reorganize and heal defects, and large surface-to-volume ratio of carbon nanotubes affect...

  14. Irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandberg, V.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation facilities for testing SSC components and detector systems are described. Very high intensity proton, neutron, and pion fluxes are available with beam kinetic energies of up to 800 MeV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. agr-1 irradiation experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Schwartz Department Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time Schwartz, Stephen E. 13 An Experiment at HiRadMat:...

  16. Niobium-based sputtered thin films for Corrosion Protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [18F] production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skliarova, H; Dousset, O; Johnson, R R; Palmieri, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemically inert Coatings on Havar entrance foils of the targets for [18F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar. In order to find the most effective protective coatings, the Nb-based coating microstructure and barrier properties have been correlated with deposition parameters as: substrate temperature, applied bias, deposition rate and sputtering gas pressure. Aluminated quartz used as a substrate allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. Pure Niobium coatings have been found less effective barriers than Niobium-titanium coatings. But Niobium oxide films, according to the corrosion tests performed, showed superior barrier properties. Therefore Multi-layered Niobium-Niobium oxide films have been suggested, since they...

  17. Post-irradiation Examination and Fission Product Inventory Analysis of AGR-1 Irradiation Capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J M Harp; P D Demkowicz; S A Ploger

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments designed to test TRISO fuel under High Temperature Gas Reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post-irradiation examination (PIE) at INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). The inventory and distribution of fission products, especially Ag-110m, was assessed and analyzed for all the components of the AGR-1 capsules. This data should help inform the study of fission product migration in coated particle fuel. Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the activity of various different fission products in the different components of the AGR-1 test train. Each capsule contained: 12 fuel compacts, a graphite holder that kept the fuel compacts in place, graphite spacers that were above and below the graphite holders and fuel compacts, gas lines through which a helium neon gas mixture flowed in and out of each capsule, and the stainless steel shell that contained the experiment. Gamma spectrometry results and the experimental techniques used to capture these results will be presented for all the capsule components. The components were assayed to determine the total activity of different fission products present in or on them. These totals are compared to the total expected activity of a particular fission product in the capsule based on predictions from physics simulation. Based on this metric, a significant fraction of the Ag-110m was detected outside the fuel compacts, but the amount varied highly between the 6 capsules. Very small fractions of Cs-137 (<2E-5), Cs-134 (<1e-5), and Eu-154 (<4e-4) were detected outside of the fuel compacts. Additionally, the distribution of select fission products in some of the components including the fuel compacts and the graphite holders were measured and will be discussed.

  18. aerospace knowledge diffusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to codify: Implications for the knowledge - based economy" Prometheus 19 Richards, Debbie 15 Inverse diffusion from knowledge of power densities Guillaume Bal Mathematics...

  19. adrenal diffuse large: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion is the effect of geometry, including the localization of aftershocks on a fractal fault network and the impact of extended rupture lengths which control the typical...

  20. advanced diffusion barriers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distances. O. A. Dvoretskaya; P. S. Kondratenko 2011-10-26 5 Anomalous transport in fractal media with randomly inhomogeneous diffusion barrier Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary:...

  1. anomalous diffusion dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport became a very important topic over the past couple Wright, Francis 5 Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey...

  2. Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas has been shown to be an effective probe of the diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol in the experimentally challenging regime near the glass transition temperature. The...

  3. Big Data Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Projects on Solar Technology Evolution and Diffusion: Kickoff Meeting Graphic showing a web of people with energy bolts connecting them. Through the SEEDS program, seven projects...

  4. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Abstract: Atomistic...

  5. Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. Surface Limited Desorption Kinetics in Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model Nanoporous Material: I. Surface Limited Desorption Kinetics in Abstract: The...

  6. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at temperatures just above the glass transition. The diffusivity near the glass transition is characterized by an activation energy and prefactor that are seven and 1030...

  7. Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis (DSA) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Category 2 Non-leased Facilities: X-345 Special Nuclear Material Storage Facility;...

  8. Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference...

  9. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Emily, E-mail: emily.moore@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Guéneau, Christine, E-mail: christine.gueneau@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crocombette, Jean-Paul, E-mail: jean-paul.crocombette@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the U–O system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation. - Graphical abstract: Complete description of Oxygen–Uranium diffusion as a function of composition at various temperatures according to the developed Dictra model. - Highlights: • Assessment of a uranium–oxygen diffusion model with Dictra. • Complete description of U–O diffusion over wide temperature and composition range. • Oxygen model includes terms for interstitial and vacancy migration. • Interaction terms between defects help describe non-stoichiometric domain of UO{sub 2±x}. • Uranium model is separated into mobility terms for the cationic species.

  10. 18.366 Random Walks and Diffusion, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Discrete and continuum modeling of diffusion processes in physics, chemistry, and economics. Topics include central limit theorems, continuous-time random walks, Levy flights, correlations, extreme events, mixing, ...

  11. altered water diffusivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geometry Hyperspectral Imagery Hyperspectral Imagery Material embedding Figure: Dark blue (0): Water. Blue (1): Clay. Light blue (2): Soil Hirn, Matthew 47 Cross-Diffusion...

  12. Radiogenic Source Identification for the Helium Production-Diffusion ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 18, 2012 ... Production-Diffusion Equation. Gang Bao1, Todd A. Ehlers2 and Peijun Li3,?. 1 Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou ...

  13. absorption diffusion physical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Low Temperature Physics, Vol. 72, Nos. 56, 1988 Pressure Diffusion and Sound Absorption in Physics Websites Summary: of the usual transport coefficients (viscosity...

  14. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Virginia T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  15. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  16. Use of laser extensometer for mechanical test on irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brillaud, C.; Meylogan, T.; Salathe, P. [Electricite de France, Avoine (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques have been developed by EDF`s hot laboratory in Chinon for performing mechanical tests on irradiated materials. Some of these techniques aim to facilitate strain measurements, which are particularly difficult to perform on irradiated specimens at high temperatures or on subsize specimens. Recent progress has been driven by laser technology combined with software development. The use of this technique, which allows strain measurements without contact on the specimen, is described for tensile (especially on subsize specimens), fatigue and creep tests.

  17. SUBJECT: Laser Safety Program Purpose: The purpose of this Laser Safety Manual is to insure the safe use of lasers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUBJECT: Laser Safety Program Purpose: The purpose of this Laser Safety Manual is to insure the safe use of lasers in research activities at the Colorado School of Mines (Mines or the School). This Laser Safety Manual outlines laser registration requirements, identifies hazards associated with using

  18. California Solar Initiative (CSI) Thermal Program Metering Installation Guide Purpose: The purpose of this metering installation guide is to provide participating eligible contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 California Solar Initiative (CSI) Thermal Program Metering Installation Guide Purpose and monitoring purposes: Customer Performance Monitoring (CPM), Opt-in Measurement and Evaluation (M&E) and 70 with interpreting the following schematics. 1. Customer Performance Monitoring (CPM) For CPM, metering either

  19. Liver Function After Irradiation Based on Computed Tomographic Portal Vein Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Knol, James A. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haken, Randall K. ten; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation could be assessed by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning. Methods and Materials: Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) before, during, and 1 month after treatment. We hoped to determine whether the residual functioning liver (i.e., those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results: Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undetectable regional portal vein perfusion 1 month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undetectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0 to 39% and depended both on the patient's sensitivity and on dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy.

  20. USE OF SILICON CARBIDE MONITORS IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; B. Chase; T. Unruh; D. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. For example, silicon carbide (SiC) monitors are now available to detect peak irradiation temperatures between 200°C and 800°C. Using a resistance measurement approach, specialized equipment installed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) and specialized procedures were developed to ensure that accurate peak irradiation temperature measurements are inferred from SiC monitors irradiated at the ATR. Comparison examinations were completed by INL to demonstrate this capability, and several programs currently rely on SiC monitors for peak temperature detection. This paper discusses the use of SiC monitors at the ATR, the process used to evaluate them at the HTTL, and presents representative measurements taken using SiC monitors.

  1. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Rocklan G. McDowell

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  2. ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,icegovMeasurementsLightning stroke

  3. ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband net irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,icegovMeasurementsLightning strokenet

  4. ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,icegovMeasurementsLightning

  5. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwellingtotal downwelling

  6. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total net irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwellingtotal

  7. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwellingtotalupwelling

  8. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling irradiancedownwelling

  9. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling

  10. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwellingdiffuse downwellingdirect

  11. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwellingdiffusetotal downwelling

  12. Investigation of gas-phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) was begun during World War 2 to produce enriched uranium for defense purposes. These plants, which utilized UF{sub 6} gas, were used primarily for this purpose through 1964. From 1959 through 1968, production shifted primarily to uranium enrichment to supply the nuclear power industry. Additional UF{sub 6}-handling facilities were built in feed and fuel-processing plants associated with the uranium enrichment process. Two of the five process buildings at Oak ridge were shut down in 1964. Uranium enrichment activities at Oak Ridge were discontinued altogether in 1985. In 1987, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to proceed with a permanent shutdown of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). DOE intends to begin decommissioning and decontamination (D D) of ORGDP early in the next century. The remaining two GDPs are expected to be shut down during the next 10 to 40 years and will also require D D, as will the other UF{sub 6}-handling facilities. This paper presents an investigation of gas- phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping using powerful fluorinating reagents that convert nonvolatile uranium compounds to volatile UF{sub 6}. These reagents include ClF{sub 3}, F{sub 2}, and other compounds. The scope of D D at the GDPs, previous work of gas-phase decontamination, four concepts for using gas-phase decontamination, plans for further study of gas-phase decontamination, and the current status of this work are discussed. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  13. A prototype compton camera for in-vivo dosimetry of ion beam cancer irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kormoll, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Fiedler, F. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Golnik, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Heidel, K.; Kempe, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Schoene, S.; Sobiella, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Inst. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Zellescher Weg 19, 013069 Dresden (Germany); Enghardt, W. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional in-vivo dose monitoring of ion beam cancer irradiation can improve the quality of treatment. For this purpose we investigate the feasibility of imaging the single photon emissions due to nuclear reactions of projectiles with target nuclei (in-beam SPECT). A suitable imaging technique in the energy range of the emitted gamma rays is the Compton camera. A prototype based on prior simulations is currently under construction. Te system comprises two CdZnTe cross-strip detectors with steering grid and depth-of-interaction capability and one segmented LSO scintillator crystal with modified Anger light readout. We present the concept of the system including the front-end and DAQ electronics as well as first measurements. (authors)

  14. I. Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    incentive payments in the past due to a lack of appropriations for the hydroelectric production incentive. The conference report to the Fiscal Year 2014 Omnibus Appropriations...

  15. I. Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion of hydropower energy development at existing dams and impoundments through an incentive payment...

  16. I. Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND DTechnologies |cents per

  17. Continuum Study of Heavy Quark Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Neuhaus

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a lattice investigation of heavy quark momentum diffusion within the pure SU(3) plasma above the deconfinement transition with the quarks treated to leading order in the heavy mass expansion. We measure the relevant "colour-electric" Euclidean correlator and based on several lattice spacing's perform the continuum extrapolation. This is necessary not only to remove cut-off effects but also the analytic continuation for the extraction of transport coefficients is well-defined only when a continuous function of the Euclidean time variable is available. We pay specific attention to scale setting in SU(3). In particular we present our determination for the critical temperature $T_c=1/({N_\\tau}a) $ at values of $N_\\tau \\le 22$.

  18. Mapping the geographical diffusion of new words

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, Jacob; Smith, Noah A; Xing, Eric P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Language in social media is rich with linguistic innovations, most strikingly in the new words and spellings that constantly enter the lexicon. Despite assertions about the power of social media to connect people across the world, we find that many of these neologisms are restricted to geographically compact areas. Even for words that become ubiquituous, their growth in popularity is often geographical, spreading from city to city. Thus, social media text offers a unique opportunity to study the diffusion of lexical change. In this paper, we show how an autoregressive model of word frequencies in social media can be used to induce a network of linguistic influence between American cities. By comparing the induced network with the geographical and demographic characteristics of each city, we can measure the factors that drive the spread of lexical innovation.

  19. Method to Assess the Radionuclide Inventory of Irradiated Graphite from Gas-Cooled Reactors - 13072

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poncet, Bernard [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)] [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 17,000 t of irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six French gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Determining the radionuclide (RN) content of this waste is of relevant importance for safety reasons and in order to determine the best way to manage them. For many reasons the impurity content that gave rise to the RNs in irradiated graphite by neutron activation during operation is not always well known and sometimes actually unknown. So, assessing the RN content by the use of traditional calculation activation, starting from assumed impurity content, leads to a false assessment. Moreover, radiochemical measurements exhibit very wide discrepancies especially on RN corresponding to precursor at the trace level such as natural chlorine corresponding to chlorine 36. This wide discrepancy is unavoidable and is due to very simple reasons. The level of impurity is very low because the uranium fuel used at that very moment was not enriched, so it was a necessity to have very pure nuclear grade graphite and the very low size of radiochemical sample is a simple technical constraint because device size used to get mineralization product for measurement purpose is limited. The assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements lead in most cases, to a gross over or under-estimation that is detrimental for graphite waste management. A method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess a radiological inventory for disposal sizing purpose as precise as possible while guaranteeing its upper character. This method present a closer approach to the reality of the main phenomenon at the origin of RNs in a reactor, while also incorporating the secondary effects that can alter this result such as RN (or its precursor) release during reactor operation. (authors)

  20. The Impact of Mathematical Modeling on the Production of Special Purpose Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    The Impact of Mathematical Modeling on the Production of Special Purpose Cement Domenico Lahaye in the production industry? Our partnership with Almatis B.V., a special purpose cement manufacturer, resulted with experts in various engineering disciplines. Production of Special Purpose Cement Commonly used cement