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1

energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

energy content, (weight) strength ? Arbeitsvermögen n (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen), Sprengenergie f (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen) [Mit 10 g Sprengstoff ermittelt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Surface-Induced Dissociation of Polyatomic Hydrocarbon Projectile Ions with Different Initial Internal Energy Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whereas projectile ions from the Colutron source are thermalized due to collisions in the high pressure environment and thus contained a negligible amount of internal energy, projectile ions from the Nier-type ion source resulting from direct electron impact ionization reactions have internal energies up to several eV. ... Results obtained here show that their different initial internal energy content had a considerable effect on the extent of fragmentation of the surface-excited projectile ions:? ions with initial internal energy fragmented at much lower collision energies than internally relaxed projectile ions. ... The difference is due to the fact that the ions produced in the Colutron source have low or negligible internal energies, whereas ions formed by electron impact ionization in the low-pressure Nier-type source contain some excitation energy, which can be estimated using the information from break-down curves and photoelectron spectra of the systems in question. ...

A. Qayyum; Z. Herman; T. Tepnual; C. Mair; S. Matt-Leubner; P. Scheier; T. D. Märk

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

The correlationship between the metabolizable energy content, chemical composition and color score in different sources of corn DDGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) and true metabolizable energy (TME) contents in 30 sources of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS)...

Yong-Z Jie; Jian-Y Zhang; Li-H Zhao…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy content of spider eggs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy content of spider eggs was determined on samples ... stages within the egg sac. Rates of energy expenditure of developing eggs and spiderlings within ... 19% of those of emerged spiderlings. The energy

John F. Anderson

5

Bomb calorimetry: The energy content of pizza  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bomb calorimetry: The energy content of pizza ... Determining the energy content and percent protein of pizza using bomb calorimetry. ...

Roland P. Stout; Faith E. Nettleton; Lynn M. Price

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy Efficient Content Distribution for VoD Services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy consumption of VoD services arising from storage and transport of video contents stored in different content placement locations is investigated. Our results provide insight...

Jayasundara, Chamil; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Wong, Elaine; Chan, Chien Aun

7

Patterns of energy content in plants from the venezuelan paramos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determinations of energy and ash content were made on the organs of some ... Venezuelan páramos. The results indicate differences in energy content among the life forms sampled. Giant rosette ... the roots while ...

Zdravko Baruch

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

On the energy content of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of the content of sensible heat, potential energy, and latent heat in the atmosphere between...

Stefan L. Hastenrath

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Content Developer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Content Developer Content Developer Jump to: navigation, search How to GET INVOLVED WITH OpenEI Get involved with OpenEI Scientist.jpg Content Developer Are you interested in adding, contributing, and editing content on OpenEI? Find out how to create and grow OpenEI's content. Frequently Added Information Some content can easily be added to OpenEI using forms, which means users can easily contribute information without necessarily learning to use the wiki markup format. Some of the most frequently added information is described below. Organizations Within OpenEI, there are numerous types of Organizations. Some are very broadly defined, such as Companies, and others are more specific, such as Utility Companies and Policy Organizations. The types of organizations are described below.

10

Energy Tradeoffs among Content Delivery Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Trade­offs among Content Delivery Architectures Anja Feldmann Andreas Gladisch Mario Kind to incorporate var­ ious home devices such as set­top boxes into content delivery architectures using the Peer­to­Peer (P2P) paradigm. The hope is to enhance the efficiency of content delivery, e.g., in terms

Smaragdakis, Georgios

11

Energy content: 43 to 47 KJ/gram not much different from candlewax or candybars (physical density of gasoline is about .73 times that of water (.73 g/cc...it floats!).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GASOLINE: Energy content: 43 to 47 KJ/gram not much different from candlewax or candybars (physical density of gasoline is about .73 times that of water (.73 g/cc...it floats!). Coal...15 to 19 KJ/gram H H-C-C-C-C-C-C-C-C-H Decane | | | | | | | | | | H H H H H H H H H H Typical molecules found in gasoline Rough Values of Power

12

Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ContentAssist ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the page, presenting their definitions to users on mouse-over. Additionally, the template will generate a list of recommended additional reading based on the content of the page. This template requires the ContentAssist widget to be functional. Parameters No parameters Dependencies Widget:ContentAssist Usage It should be called in the following format: {{ContentAssist}} Example In addition to highlighting extracted energy terms and presenting their definitions, this template will produce the following: Dictionary.png Error loading definition! OpenEI-ribbon.png Edit the page to see the template text.

13

ENERGY CONTENT OF WORLD TRADE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper constructs a comprehensive dataset of oil and total energy embedded in world trade of manufacturing goods for 73 countries from 1978 to 2000. Applying the data to debates on the dependency on foreign energy sources makes clear that achieving complete energy independence in the foreseeable future is unlikely to be feasible and may not be desirable. Applying it to the discussion of environmental Kuznets curves (EKCs) highlights an important distinction between production and consumption of energy. Richer countries use relatively less energy in their industrial production yet still consume relatively large amounts of energy indirectly. A further investigation largely excludes structural shifts of production in and out of the manufacturing sector as an explanation for the downward-sloping portion of the EKC. Country-level analyses add caveats but show tentative support for the cross-country conclusions.

Gernot Wagner

14

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

15

Genotype-Specific Abnormalities in Mitochondrial Function Associate with Distinct Profiles of Energy Metabolism and Catecholamine Content in Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Distinct Profiles of Energy Metabolism and Catecholamine Content in Pheochromocytoma...differences in high-energy phosphate content between the tumors...content of PGLs and energy metabolism. Catecholamine contents are particularly low...

Jyotsna U. Rao; Udo F.H. Engelke; Richard J.T. Rodenburg; Ron A. Wevers; Karel Pacak; Graeme Eisenhofer; Nan Qin; Benno Kusters; Angelina G. Goudswaard; Jacques W.M. Lenders; Ad R.M.M. Hermus; Arjen R. Mensenkamp; Henricus P.M. Kunst; Fred C.G.J. Sweep; and Henri J.L.M. Timmers

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Help:Contents | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contents Contents Jump to: navigation, search Open Energy Info is an open, collaborative platform based on the same MediaWiki software that drives the world's largest online reference, Wikipedia. To learn more about wikis and to get started contributing, use these helpful links. You can start with our useful video tutorials. Also, checkout our Quickstart Guide. Tutorials Getting Started Registration References Quotations The Reference Tag Uploading Images More... Reading Navigation Searching Tracking changes Watchlist Creating Creating a page Everything you need for starting a new page Editing Editing pages Upload file Formatting Links User pages Talk pages Signatures Deleting pages Advanced editing Images & Files Tables Math (Equations) Citations, References, and the tag

17

Classification of ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers in terms of the muon content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers detected at the Yakutsk ... are analyzed. Showers different in the muon content are revealed. Four classes of showers are...

A. A. Mikha?lov; N. N. Efremov…

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy efficiency measurement in agriculture with imprecise energy content information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Measuring energy efficiency is crucial when planning energy reduction policies. However, decision makers are understandably reluctant to act in the absence of solid data and results supporting a policy position. This paper proposes a methodology to measure the energy efficiency of farms based on the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach. In a manner similar to the cost framework, we decompose energy efficiency measurements into technical and allocative efficiencies in energy contents of inputs. In this study, we replace input prices used in traditional economic efficiency measurements by their energy content. We use the energy efficiency model to explore the optimal input-mix that produces the current outputs at minimum energy-consumption. We demonstrate that this decomposition can help policy makers design accurate energy policies. However, the uncertainty of the data and, more particularly, the energy content of the inputs leads us to recommend using the methodologies to calculate the bounds of efficiency to obtain more plausible and robust results. Based on our analysis, energy efficiency is not a fixed value, and policy-makers should consider it with caution. We use a 2007 database of French farms specialised in field crops for empirical illustration.

Stéphane Blancard; Elsa Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Office RPD relative percent difference RSD relative standard deviation TIC tentatively identified compound DOERL-96-68, HASQARD Table of Contents, Rev. 3 Volume...

20

Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

2013-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear symmetry energy at a given density measures the energy transferred in converting symmetric nuclear matter into the pure neutron matter. The density content of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly co...

B K AGRAWAL

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Widget:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No parameters Dependencies Template:ContentAssist The Reegle logo.png term extraction API. Usage This Widget assumes the existence of HTML elements created by the ContentAssist...

23

Coking of coal batch with different content of oxidized coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of oxidized coal in coking batch increases the analytical moisture content and ... increases the oxygen content; reduces the gross coke yield and the yield of tar, benzene ... of carbon dioxide, pyrogenet...

D. V. Miroshnichenko; I. D. Drozdnik; Yu. S. Kaftan; N. B. Bidolenko…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Remark on the energy content of a blast wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this note a comment is made on the total energy content of a blast wave in a stellar...et al. (1951).

G. Deb Ray

25

Energy Trade-offs among Content Delivery Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Trade-offs among Content Delivery Architectures Anja Feldmann Andreas Gladisch Mario Kind to incorporate var- ious home devices such as set-top boxes into content delivery architectures using the Peer-to-Peer (P2P) paradigm. The hope is to enhance the efficiency of content delivery, e.g., in terms

Smaragdakis, Georgios

26

A Pictorial Analogy for Energy Content and Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Pictorial Analogy for Energy Content and Temperature ... Situations involving high and low energy systems associated with both high and low temperature are presented using pictorial representations of briefcases of money. ...

Thomas D. Crute

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy content of young yellow perch and walleye in Saginaw Bay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We evaluated seasonal energy content of age-0 yellow perch Perca flavescens and walleye Sander vitreus in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron in 2009 and 2010. We also determined the energy content of age-1 fish from the 2009 and 2010 cohorts the following spring (i.e., for fish that had survived one winter) to evaluate overwinter energy losses. As expected, larger fish within each species had disproportionately higher energy content (i.e., slope relating length and energy > 3.0) than smaller conspecifics. By contrast to expectations, allometric slopes were > 3.0 in nearly all months, not just the fall, and were higher for age-0 yellow perch than for walleye, even though increased allocation to growth would have seemingly been beneficial to even the largest yellow perch during summer. Seasonal energy allocation patterns differed between years. In 2009, length specific energy content increased from late summer to fall for both species. However, for the 2010 cohorts of fish, length specific energy content decreased between late summer and fall for yellow perch and did not change for walleye. There were 13–17% overwinter declines in length specific energy content between the fall (October or November) and the spring (May) with no major differences between cohorts within a species or between species for a given year. Because young yellow perch and walleye are similar physiologically but differ in size (i.e., yellow perch are smaller), it is possible that overwinter energy losses are more important for yellow perch than for walleye.

Steven A. Pothoven; Tomas O. Höök; Charles R. Roswell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy-efficient networking for content distribution over telecom network infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of content-based services over telecom network infrastructures is growing rapidly as user-generated content, over-the-top videos, on-demand videos, personalized TV with CatchUp/PauseLive features, etc. are becoming increasingly popular. To meet the demands of such services, content-delivery networks (or content-distribution networks (CDN)) are being deployed over these telecom network infrastructures in a similar fashion as traditional CDNs. However, with the increasing energy consumption and carbon footprint of the information and communication technology (ICT) industry, these \\{CDNs\\} must be designed to include energy-efficiency measures. Our study presents energy-consumption models, analysis, and content-placement techniques for different types of \\{CDNs\\} over telecom networks to reduce energy usage. Our suggested content-placement strategies exploit variations between storage power consumption and transmission power consumption to achieve energy efficiency. Also, in dynamic traffic scenarios, our content-placement strategies utilize the time-varying traffic irregularities of content-based services. By creating more content replicas during peak load and less replicas during off-peak load, dynamic approaches can save substantial amount of energy. Illustrative numerical examples show a significant improvement in the CDN energy efficiency using these approaches.

Uttam Mandal; Pulak Chowdhury; Christoph Lange; Andreas Gladisch; Biswanath Mukherjee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Comparing the Energy Content of Batteries, Fuels, and Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparing the Energy Content of Batteries, Fuels, and Materials ... Whereas the literature contains numerous comparisons of the specific energy of battery technologies and hydrocarbons typically found in fuel, the methodology used to obtain these values is usually not specified. ... The calculated specific energies are based on standard Gibbs free energy of formation of the elements and compounds of interest. ...

Nitash P. Balsara; John Newman

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Recent content in Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Energy Data Jam Recent content in Energy Data Jam Home Name Post date sort icon Type Welcome New York City Data Jammers! Dbrodt 3 Jul 2012 - 14:49 Discussion New York City Data Jam Dbrodt 3 Jul 2012 - 14:52 Event Top Innovation Ideas from the New York Energy Data Jam Ianjkalin 14 Jul 2012 - 12:05 Blog entry Datapalooza Announcements Ianjkalin 23 Sep 2012 - 15:52 Blog entry IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18 Blog entry 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 19 Apr 2013 - 13:44 Discussion Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza Announcements Top Innovation Ideas from the New York Energy Data Jam

31

Recent content in Energy Systems Integration | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Energy Systems Integration Recent content in Energy Systems Integration Home Name Post date sort icon Type Energy Systems Integration: A Convergence of Ideas Aaronbeach 8 Aug 2012 - 11:44 Document Energy Forms or Energy Carriers(G, Herrmann et al. 1983) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 10:28 Document Optimal Power Flow of Multiple Energy Carriers(Geidl and Andersson 2007) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 13:04 Document Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment(LeMar 2002) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 13:05 Document Energy System Integration(Smith 2001) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 13:09 Document A Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems(Jain and Alleyne 2012) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 13:19 Document Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) Qinsun 15 Nov 2012 - 13:36 Document

32

Weighing the Cosmological Energy Contents with Weak Gravitational Lensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bernardeau et al. (1997), using perturbation theory, showed that the skewness of the large-scale lensing-convergence, or projected mass density, could be used to constrain $\\Omega_m$, the matter content of the universe. On the other hand, deep weak-lensing field surveys in the near future will likely measure the convergence on small angular scales (energy contents, through their influence on the global geometrical distances and fluctuation growth rate. Moreover, nonlinear clustering appears to enhance the differences between predictions of the convergence skewness for a range of models. Hence, in addition to constraining $\\Omega_m$, the small-scale convergence skewness from future deep several- degree-wide surveys can be used to differentiate between curvature dominated and cosmological constant ($\\Lambda$) dominated models, as well as to constrain the equation of state of a quintessence component, thereby distinguishing $\\Lambda$ from quintessence as well. Finally, our method can be easily generalized to other measures such as aperture mass statistics.

Lam Hui

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Structure, Thermodynamics, and Energy Content of Aluminum–Cyclopentadienyl Clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(11, 14) Currently very little is known about the stability or decomposition of the larger aluminum–cyclopentadienyl compounds that contain a significant mass fraction of aluminum. ... To analyze the relative bonding strength and possible unimolecular decomposition pathways in the systems, we next consider the bond dissociation energies (BDEs), defined as the reaction energy De for homolytic cleavage of the listed bond. ... We next consider the thermochemistry of these compounds, with particular focus on their energy content for propellant and energetic material applications. ...

Kristen S. Williams; Joseph P. Hooper

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

Energy Content of Colliding Plane Waves using Approximate Noether Symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to study the energy content of colliding plane waves using approximate Noether symmetries. For this purpose, we use approximate Lie symmetry method of Lagrangian for differential equations. We formulate the first-order perturbed Lagrangian for colliding plane electromagnetic and gravitational waves. It is shown that in both cases, there does not exist

M. Sharif; Saira Waheed

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy content of macrobenthic invertebrates: general conversion factors from weight to energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In ecological studies, especially in those dealing with energy circulation in nature, determinations of the energy content of organisms are inevitable. Energy determinations are, however, laborious and time-consuming. Average conversion factors based on different species form various areas and seasons may often be a shortcut for overcoming this problem. To establish general energy conversion factors for aquatic invertebrate groups, we used 376 values of J · mg?1 DW and 255 values of J · mg?1 AFDW, representing 308 and 229 species, respectively. The dry-weight-to-energy factors were highly variable both within and between taxonomic groups, e.g.: Porifera, 6.1 J · mg?1 DW; insect larvae, 22.4 J · mg?1 DW (median values). The energy-conversion factors related to AFDW showed a much smaller dispersion with a minimum median value of 19.7 J · mg?1 AFDW (Ascidiacea) and a maximum of 23.8 J · mg?1 AFDW (insect larvae). Within taxonomic groups, the 95% confidence intervals (AFDW) were only a few percent of the median values. The use of energy-conversion factors based on AFDW is preferable due to their lower dispersion. For aquatic macrobenthic invertebrates, a general conversion factor of 23 J · mg?1 AFDW can be used.

Thomas Brey; Heye Rumohr; Sven Ankar

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ESTIMATING THE ''DARK'' ENERGY CONTENT OF THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of ubiquitous low-frequency (3-5 mHz) Alfvenic waves in the solar chromosphere (with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope) and corona (with CoMP and SDO) has provided some insight into the non-thermal energy content of the outer solar atmosphere. However, many questions remain about the true magnitude of the energy flux carried by these waves. Here we explore the apparent discrepancy in the resolved coronal Alfvenic wave amplitude ({approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}) measured by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) compared to those of the Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) near the limb ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). We use a blend of observational data and a simple forward model of Alfvenic wave propagation to resolve this discrepancy and determine the Alfvenic wave energy content of the corona. Our results indicate that enormous line-of-sight superposition within the coarse spatio-temporal sampling of CoMP hides the strong wave flux observed by Hinode and SDO and leads to the large non-thermal line broadening observed. While this scenario has been assumed in the past, our observations with CoMP of a strong correlation between the non-thermal line broadening with the low-amplitude, low-frequency Alfvenic waves observed in the corona provide the first direct evidence of a wave-related non-thermal line broadening. By reconciling the diverse measurements of Alfvenic waves, we establish large coronal non-thermal line widths as direct signatures of the hidden, or ''dark'', energy content in the corona and provide preliminary constraints on the energy content of the wave motions observed.

McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover St., Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy content of rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis) in relation to temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the chemical composition (carbon, nitrogenand ash content) and the energy content of the rotifers Brachionusplicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis ... populations. Dry weightand carb...

M. Yúfera; G. Parra; E. Pascual

38

High-rate penetration of a striker into SiC ceramic with different void content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of penetration of deformable striking rods into SiC ceramics with different void content is studied. The penetration may be viewed as a two-stage process. At the first stage, the penetration rate is ...

A. S. Vlasov; E. L. Zil’berbrand; A. A. Kozhushko; A. I. Kozachuk…

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy consumption during impact cutting of canola stalk as a function of moisture content and cutting height  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study surveys the needed energy for cutting canola stems in different levels of cutting height and moisture content. The canola was harvested from the experimental farm in Gorgan, Iran. Test device fabricated and then calibrated. The device works on the principle of conservation of energy. The tests were repeated 15 times for any level of moisture content and cutting height and they were analyzed using split plot design. The results showed the effect of height and moisture content on cutting energy is significant (P energy was 1.1 kJ in 25.5 (w.b.%) moisture content and 10 cm cutting height. Also the minimum cutting energy was 0.76 kJ in 11.6 (w.b.%) moisture content and 30 cm cutting height. Blade velocity was 2.64 m/s in cutting moment.

Mohsen Azadbakht; Ebrahim Esmaeilzadeh; Mostafa Esmaeili-Shayan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS March 21, 2013 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assurancecontrol) 3. Responsible operations manager 4. Equipment custodian 5. Cognizant engineer. *Reviewapproval is mandatory. 18.3.3 Hostile Environment Plan Contents The plan...

42

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Introduction ........................................................................................................3 ON THE HORIZON: Promising Research Efforts Currently Underway A Smarter Charge .........................................................................................4 Unlocking Fire Ice .........................................................................................5 CRISP Crunches Cyber Threats ....................................................................6 Gel Zeroes in on Cancer ...............................................................................7 Liquid Solvent: A Solid Solution for CO 2 .....................................................8 Real-time Grid Stability ................................................................................9

43

Comparative energy content of steel during modernization of OAO Northern Pipe Plant steel smelting production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comparative energy content of open-hearth steel with a scrap- ... production is considered. The structure of steel energy content is revealed in the form of technological ... (TFN) and the main limiting facto...

M. V. Zuev; V. G. Lisienko; A. L. Zasukhin…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Thermodynamic calculations. I: Using free-energy functions and heat-content functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I: Using free-energy functions and heat-content functions ... Extensive tabulations of free-energy and heat content functions are readily available, and these functions are easy to use. ...

John L. Margrave

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Macronutrient and energy content of breast milk of mothers delivering prematurely  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The protein, lactose, fat and energy contents of the fore-milk of mother with ... weeks of lactation, the mean (±SD) energy (Kcal/dl), protein (g/dl) ... days, there was a decline in protein content while fat, la...

Vinod K. Paul; Meharban Singh; L. M. Srivastava…

46

Energy-efficient content delivery networks using cluster shutdown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Content delivery networks (CDNs) are an important class of Internet-scale distributed systems that deliver web, streaming, and application content to end users. A commercial CDN could comprise hundreds of thousands of servers deployed in over thousand clusters across the globe and incurs significant energy costs for powering and cooling their servers. Since energy costs are a significant component of the total operating expense of a CDN, we propose and explore a novel technique called cluster shutdown that turns off an entire cluster of servers of a CDN that is deployed within a data center. By doing so, cluster shutdown saves not just the power consumed by the servers but also the power needed for cooling those servers. We present an algorithm for cluster shutdown that is based on realistic power models for servers and cooling equipment and can be implemented as a part of the global load balancer of a CDN. We evaluate our technique using extensive real-world traces from a large commercial CDN to show that cluster shutdown can reduce the system-wide energy usage by 67%. Further, much of the energy savings are obtainable without sacrificing either bandwidth costs or end-user performance. In addition, 79% of the optimal savings are attainable even if each cluster is limited to at most one shutdown per day, reducing the required operational overhead. Finally, we argue that cluster shutdown has intrinsic architectural advantages over the well-studied server shutdown techniques in the CDN context, and show that it saves more energy than server shutdown in a wide range of operating regimes.

Vimal Mathew; Ramesh K. Sitaraman; Prashant Shenoy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 16-18, 1987 SLIDLIN CH81ICAL CX1'1PANY RARE GAS RECXNERY SYSID1 K.O, ~LM 19) PSIG STEAM F,D, FAN0'1 '" N Z N NAT~L GAS SEAL SEAL FU\\RE OIL PoT STACK TANK FLARE GAS I?T ~y ~LM ~LM ESL...RECOVERING FLARE GAS ENERGY - A DIFFERENT APPROACH \\ WALTER BRENNER Process Engineer SunOlin Chemical Co. Claymont, Delaware AUSTRACT Most petrochemical complexes and oil re fineries have systems to collect and dispose of waste gases...

Brenner, W.

48

Widget:DivContentWrapper | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DivContentWrapper Jump to: navigation, search This widget wraps content in a div of specified style and class. Parameters include: style - inline style class - css class content -...

49

Training Program Content, 4/10/95 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Program Content, 41095 Training Program Content, 41095 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing...

50

The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

M. Horttanainen; N. Teirasvuo; V. Kapustina; M. Hupponen; M. Luoranen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy content of rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis) in relation to temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the chemical composition (carbon, nitrogen and ash content) and the energy content of the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis (formerly B. plicatilis...L- and ...

M. Yúfera; G. Parra; E. Pascual

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy content, storage substances, and construction and maintenance costs of Mediterranean deciduous leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At monthly intervals water content, crude fibre, total and protein nitrogen, sugars, starch, total lipids, ash content and calorific total energy were measured throughout the lifespan of the...Pistacia terebinthu...

S. Diamantoglou; S. Rhizopoulou; U. Kull

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

OpenEI:Core content policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content policies content policies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI models its core content policies after those established by the Wikipedia.[1] Specifically, the OpenEI core content policies are: Neutral point of view - Content must have a neutral point of view, giving unbiased, equal, and proportional representation to all significant views. Verifiability - Any content coming from elsewhere must give attribution to it's source. Any content that is likely to be challenged must be attributed to a reliable and verifiable source. No original research - OpenEI is not a platform for original research. All content should come from and be attributed a verifiable source. These policies are not meant to be considered independently, but as a group. Anyone contributing to the platform should be familiar with each of

54

Quantification of liver iron content with CT—added value of dual-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the value of dual-energy CT (DECT) with use of an ... decomposition algorithm for the quantification of liver iron content (LIC).

Michael A. Fischer; Caecilia S. Reiner; Dimitri Raptis; Olivio Donati…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proximate composition, energy content and physiochemical properties ofAfzelia africana andBrachystegia eurycoma seeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The proximate composition, energy content and physiochemical properties ofAfzelia africana andBrachystegia eurycoma seeds were determined. The bulk density, reconstituability, foam properties and emulsification p...

F. N. Madubuike; P. C. Ojimelukwe; P. O. Ajah

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Triple-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry for Determination of the Bone Mineral Content in Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a ... method for the determination of the bone mineral content in vivo. It has a high precision ... bone. The present work describes a triple-energy X-ray absorptiometry ...

Janos Szücs; Ragnar Jonson; Tommy Hansson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Training Program Content, 4/10/95 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Program Content, 4/10/95 Training Program Content, 4/10/95 Training Program Content, 4/10/95 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs. The process to be evaluated includes (1) determining the tasks individuals must perform; (2) specifying the required knowledge, skills, and abilities for performing tasks; (3) selecting knowledge skills and abilities for training; and (4) selecting appropriate training settings. The Facility Representative reviews records and interviews personnel to evaluate the effectiveness of the process. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. isms_training.doc More Documents & Publications

58

Recent content in Renewable Energy RFPs | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 12:42 Blog entry Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) RFP - Deadline - July 31, 2014 RFP154855 - A...

59

A comparison of thermal decomposition energy and nitrogen content of nitrocellulose in non-fat process of linters by DSC and EA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations of nitrogen content and thermal decomposition activation energy (E a) of two different kinds of nitrocellulose (NC) products, NMNC and MNC from the non-fat and original processes of...

C. -P. Lin; C. -M. Shu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy and Buildings 42 (2010) 16371646 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Buildings 42 (2010) 1637­1646 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild A decision tree method for building energy o Article history: Received 18 March 2010 Accepted 19 April 2010 Keywords: Building energy

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy and Buildings 47 (2012) 430440 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the global energy consumption and to the production of greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, building that useful information hidden in building oper- ation be discovered to help reduce its energy consumptionEnergy and Buildings 47 (2012) 430­440 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Energy

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

62

Measuring Energy Efficiency Report in Html: Table of Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report: Measuring Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy Report: Measuring Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy Measuring Energy Efficiency In The United States' Economy: A Beginning Measuring Energy Efficiency in the United States' Economy (file size .94 MB) pages: 105. To View and/or Print Report (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader. Executive Summary Introduction Defining Energy Efficiency and Its Measurement Residential Sector Introduction Major Data Sources Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector Demand Indicators Energy-Intensity Indicators in the Residential Sector Strength and Limitations of the Energy-Intensity Indicators Commercial Buildings Sector Introduction Major Data Sources Energy Consumption in the Commercial Buildings Sector Demand Indicators Energy-Intensity Indicators in the Commercial Buildings Sector

63

Effect of fiber content of roughage on energy cost of eating and rumination in Holstein cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of the fiber content of roughage on energy cost of chewing was determined by indirect calorimetry. Four Holstein non lactating cows [779 ± 71 kg body weight (BW)] were used in a cross over design with 14-day periods. Two cows were fed sugarcane silage as high fiber roughage (HF) and the other two cows were fed oaten hay as low fiber roughage (LF), along with soybean meal [0.5 g/kg BW on a dry matter (DM) basis]. The aNDFom and peNDF contents were different (718 vs. 542 g/kg DM and 554 vs. 402 g/kg DM, respectively), whereas the physical effectiveness factors (pef) was similar between sugarcane silage and oaten hay (771 vs. 741 g/kg DM). The study was performed in open circuit respiration chambers over a 14-day period, consisting of a 9-day adaptation and a 5-day energy balance measurements. Energy cost of chewing per minute was determined using a multiple linear regression model, with heat production per 10 min as the dependent variable and duration of activities per 10 min as independent variables. DM intake (DMI) of roughage in HF was lower than that in LF (5.46 vs. 9.79 kg/day; P=0.006), whereas duration in total chewing (Eating + rumination) was higher for HF than for LF (120 vs. 77 min/kg DMI; P=0.006). Energy cost of rumination per unit DMI tended to be higher for HF than for LF (0.71 vs. 0.48 MJ/kg DMI, P=0.062), whereas energy cost of each eating and rumination per unit time was similar between treatments (17.7 vs. 18.4 J/min/kg BW for eating, P=0.272; 12.0 vs. 12.7 J/min/kg BW for rumination, P=0.285). Energy cost of total chewing per unit metabolizable energy (ME) was higher for HF than that for LF (14.3 vs. 9.0 MJ/100 MJ ME, P=0.009). These results indicate that fiber content in roughage possibly affects energy cost of chewing per DMI and consequently results in loss of ME available for production.

Tomoyuki Suzuki; Yuko Kamiya; Masahito Tanaka; Ikuo Hattori; Takeo Sakaigaichi; Takayoshi Terauchi; Itoko Nonaka; Fuminori Terada

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Department Makes a Difference Helping Students' Careers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Makes a Difference Helping Students' Careers Energy Department Makes a Difference Helping Students' Careers Energy Department Makes a Difference Helping Students' Careers February 22, 2012 - 5:26am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy To stay a top competitor in today's global economy, we need to make sure that students who aspire to be the next generation of America's scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs can get the hands-on experience and training they need to lead our industries and businesses. The Energy Department takes an active role in cultivating the leaders of tomorrow in the field of clean energy. This role has probably never been more important as more and more people understand the need to expand our use of renewable energy and energy efficiency to tackle the challenges we

65

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Progress in Nuclear Energy journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/pnucene Comparison of thorium-based fuels Fhager a , Christophe Demazière b a Thor Energy, Sommerrogaten 13 15, NO-0255 Oslo, Norway b Chalmers

Demazière, Christophe

66

Predicting corn digestible and metabolizable energy content from its chemical composition in growing pigs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nutrient composition of corn is variable. To prevent unforeseen reductions in ... to define the sources of variation in the energy content of corn and to develop a practical method to accurately estimate the ...

Quanfeng Li; Jianjun Zang; Dewen Liu…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Content of Antarctic Mesopelagic Fishes: Implications for the Marine Food Web  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For a better understanding of the role of mesopelagic fish in the Southern Ocean food web, the energy and water content of Bathylagus antarcticus, Electrona antarctica and Gymnoscopelus braueri...from the Lazarev...

Anton Van de Putte; Hauke Flores; Filip Volckaert…

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Dependence of the activation energy of vacancy formation on the zinc content in alpha brasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations on quenched-in resistivity in alpha brasses showed an apparent decrease in the activation energy of vacancy formation with increasing zinc content from a value of 0·85 eV ... up to a concentration of...

R. Kamel; T. H. Youssef

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MobiSLIC: Content-Aware Energy Saving for Educational Videos on Mobile Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a context-aware system that simultaneously increases energy-efficiency and readability for educational videos on ... with OLED displays. Our system analyzes the content of each frame of the video and ....

Qiyam Tung; Maximiliano Korp; Chris Gniady…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy content at metamorphosis and growth rate of the early juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energetic cost of metamorphosis in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite...Darwin was estimated by quantification of lipid, carbohydrate and protein contents. About 38–58% (4–5 mJ...?1) of cypris energy ...

V. Thiyagarajan; T. Harder; Jian-Wen Qiu; Pei-Yuan Qian

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Faecal weight as an index of development rate and energy content of imago of lepidopterous insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Statistically significant correlation coefficients were obtained for the relation between defecation rate and development rate as well as energy contents of pupa and imago of the noctuid...Achaea janata. Using si...

J Muthukrishnan; T J Pandian

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Differential rotation and the structure and energy content of coronal magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is argued that differential rotation of the photospheric magnetic fields will induce currents in the corona. The work done against surface magnetic stresses will increase the energy content of the coronal magn...

M. A. Raadu

1972-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

In-network caching for energy efficiency in content-centric networking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, Internet energy efficiency is paid more and more attention. New Internet architectures with more energy efficiency were proposed to promote the scalability in energy consumption. The content-centric networking (CCN) proposed a content-centric paradigm which was proven to have higher energy efficiency. Based on the energy optimization model of CCN with in-network caching, the authors derive expressions to tradeoff the caching energy and the transport energy, and then design a new energy efficiency cache scheme based on virtual round trip time (EV) in CCN. Simulation results show that the EV scheme is better than the least recently used (LRU) and popularity based cache policies on the network average energy consumption, and its average hop is also much better than LRU policy.

Guo-qing WANG; Tao HUANG; Jiang LIU; Ren-chao XIE; Yun-jie LIU

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Probing the Heavy Quark Content of the Photon Using b Tagging at High Energy $e?$ and $e^+e^-$ Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a method for probing the quark content of the photon using $b$ tagging at high energy $e^+e^-$ and $e\\gamma$ colliders. We find that heavy quark tagging provides a sensitive and effective probe of the quark content of the photon especially in the low $x$-region where the various models differ the most. This process is complementary to others that have been studied in the literature and can contribute to more precise determinations of quark and gluon distributions inside the photon.

Michael A. Doncheski; Stephen Godfrey; K. Andrew Peterson

1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular momentum for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves also turn out to be constant. Further, we evaluate their gravitational energy-momentum fluxes and gravitational pressure.

M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

76

Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we shall mainly focus on the behaviour of symmetry energy slope parameter L at densities close to ? 0. The value of L(? 0) has been shown [5] to be strongly correlat...

B K AGRAWAL; J N DE; S K SAMADDAR

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Skylarks trade size and energy content in weed seeds to maximize total ingested lipid biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The trade-off between forage quality and quantity has been particularly studied in herbivore organisms, but much less for seed eating animals, in particular seed-eating birds which constitute the bulk of wintering passerines in European farmlands. The skylark is one of the commonest farmland birds in winter, mainly feeding on seeds. We focus on weed seeds for conservation and management purposes. Weed seeds form the bulk of the diet of skylarks during winter period, and although this is still a matter for discussion, weed seed predation by granivorous has been suggested as an alternative to herbicides used to regulate weed populations in arable crops. Our objectives were to identify whether weed seed traits govern foraging decisions of skylarks, and to characterize key seed traits with respect to size, which is related to searching and handling time, and lipid content, which is essential for migratory birds. We combined a single-offer experiment and a multiple-offer one to test for feeding preferences of the birds by estimating seed intake on weed seed species differing in their seed size and seed lipid content. Our results showed (1) a selective preference for smaller seeds above a threshold of seed size or seed size difference in the pair and, (2) a significant effect of seed lipid biomass suggesting a trade-off between foraging for smaller seeds and selecting seeds rich in lipids. Skylarks foraging decision thus seems to be mainly based on seed size, that is presumably a ‘proxy’ for weed seed energy content. However, there are clearly many possible combinations of morphological and physiological traits that must play crucial role in the plant–bird interaction such as toxic compound or seed coat.

Sabrina Gaba; Claire Collas; Thibaut Powolny; François Bretagnolle; Vincent Bretagnolle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Content of Quantum Systems and the Alleged Collapse of the Wavefunction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that within a quantum system, the wave field has a (potential) energy content that can be exchanged with quantum particles. Energy conservation in quantum systems holds if potential energy is correctly taken to be a field attribute. From this perspective, a transfer of energy occurs on measurement from the wave field to a quantum particle and this provides a physical explanation of what is commonly referred to as the collapse of the wavefunction.

Peter J. Riggs

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

DNA Damage by Low-Energy Electron Impact: Dependence on Guanine Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DNA Damage by Low-Energy Electron Impact: Dependence on Guanine Content ... The interaction of low-energy electrons (LEE) with living matter at energies below the ionization threshold (about 7.5 eV for DNA) is of increasing importance from the fundamental scientific as well as from technological points of view. ... This low-energy feature was shown to be a "fingerprint" in all the spectra of dinucleotides and trinucleotides that contain the guanine base. ...

T. Solomun; H. Seitz; H. Sturm

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

Batteries for Efficient Energy Extraction from a Water Salinity Difference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity-gradient power; mixing entropy; sodium intercalation; energy harvesting ... The entropic energy created by the difference in water salinities is normally dissipated when river water flows into the sea. ... Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. ...

Fabio La Mantia; Mauro Pasta; Heather D. Deshazer; Bruce E. Logan; Yi Cui

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Biomass yield and nitrogen content of annual energy/forage crops preceded by cover crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to reduce input costs and improve sustainability of energy/forage crops in the northern Great Plains (NGP), preceding cover crops can be included into existing annual crop systems. The objective of the study was to determine biomass yield and quality of five annual energy/forage crops, grown after six different, leguminous and non-leguminous cover crop species. The experiment was conducted at two locations, Fargo and Prosper, ND, from 2010 to 2012. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replicates, in a split-plot arrangement where the preceding season's cover crop was the main plot and the forage crop was the sub-plot. Six cover crops, forage pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Arvika, Austrian winter pea (Pisum sativum ssp. arvense (L.) Poir), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) forage radish (Raphanus sativus var. niger) cv. Daikon, turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) cv. Purple Top, and forage turnip (Brassica campestris x napus) cv. Pasja, were planted no-till on 8 to 9 August in 2010 and 2011 into oat (Avena sativa L.) residue. In the following spring, five energy/forage crops, maize (Zea mays L.), forage sorghum and sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), oat, and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were planted no-till onto the winter-killed cover crops residue. Results across locations and years indicated forage pea and forage radish, produced the highest dry matter yield (3.3 Mg ha?1) in the fall. Total plant N content was 116 kg N ha?1 in forage peas and 76 kg N ha?1 in forage radish, respectively. Results across locations and years indicated all energy/forage crops had greater biomass yield, and total N content when preceded by a legume cover crop compared with a non-legume or the check, in the previous year. Forage sorghum had the highest average biomass yield among the five energy/forage crops, with 17.8 Mg ha?1, followed by sweet sorghum with 15.3 Mg ha?1. In conclusion, forage pea was the most suitable cover crop to provide additional N for the subsequent crops in the NGP. Forage sorghum and sweet sorghum can be considered as the most productive energy/forage crops, especially when preceded by a legume cover crop.

D.P. Samarappuli; B.L. Johnson; H. Kandel; M.T. Berti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Recent content in Clean and Renewable Energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Clean and Renewable Energy Recent content in Clean and Renewable Energy Home Name Post date sort icon Type ICCE 2013: International Conference & Exhibition on Clean Energy Alex123 10 Nov 2012 - 11:46 Event GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway Jessi3bl 16 Dec 2012 - 19:18 Blog entry IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18 Blog entry Energy Secretary Steven Chu to host DOE's first google hangout at 2 EST Graham7781 21 Feb 2013 - 15:32 Blog entry Viridis Africa 2013 - investment in cleantech SuzaAdam 3 Mar 2013 - 10:32 Event Transportation Energy Futures Study: The Key Results and Conclusions Webinar Graham7781 1 May 2013 - 11:38 Event Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

83

Polarization and energy content of parsec scale AGN jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of energy carried by relativistic AGN jets remains undetected until hundreds of kiloparsecs where interaction with intergalactic medium produces hot spots. The jet's hidden energy is only partially dissipated at smaller scales, from parsecs to kiloparsecs. Several media may play the role of the ``prime mover'': ions, pairs or large scale magnetic fields. Analyzing VLBI polarization structures of relativistic parsec scale jets we conclude that large-scale magnetic fields can explain the salient polarization properties of parsec-scale AGN jets. This implies that large-scale magnetic fields carry a non-negligible fraction of jet luminosity. We also discuss the possibility that relativistic AGN jets may be electromagnetically (Poynting flux) dominated. In this case, dissipation of the toroidal magnetic field (and not fluid shocks) may be responsible for particle acceleration.

Maxim Lyutikov; Vladimir I. Pariev; Denise C. Gabuzda

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Seasonal variation in the energy content of benthic macroinvertebrates of Lake Nainital, U.P., India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses seasonal variation in the energy contents of four macrobenthic invertebrates of Lake Nainital during 1977–78. The energy values varied from 16971–19437 J/g...Tubifex tubifex, 16 511–20 231 J/g...

P. K. Gupta; M. C. Pant

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Influence of Ambient Temperature and the Energy and Protein Content of Food on Nitrogenous Excretion in the Egyptian Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Perrin 1991), and birds are gen- erally uricotelic. There are energy and water cost trade000 The Influence of Ambient Temperature and the Energy and Protein Content of Food on Nitrogenous energy but low protein contents. Therefore, we tested the prediction that to save energy under conditions

Vatnick, Itzick

86

General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle February 3, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week, we told you about a new company that's developing battery technology that will allow energy storage for multiple hours on the power grid. General Compression is another innovative company that's developing a different way to store electricity by using compressed air energy storage, or CAES. The technology uses cheap power to pump air into

87

General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle February 3, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week, we told you about a new company that's developing battery technology that will allow energy storage for multiple hours on the power grid. General Compression is another innovative company that's developing a different way to store electricity by using compressed air energy storage, or CAES. The technology uses cheap power to pump air into

88

The informational content of oil and natural gas prices in energy fund performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores whether the informational content of oil and gas prices has an impact on energy mutual fund returns. We first re-visit the relationship between oil and gas prices and energy index returns; our findings confirm that better energy index performance is associated with oil and gas price increases. Using the Fama and MacBeth (1973) two-stage regressions, we find that the information contained in oil and gas prices also plays a significant role in explaining energy mutual fund returns, making these an alternative investment to direct energy stock investments.

Viet Do; Tram Vu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Multiple regression analysis for the estimation of energy content of municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regression equation is proposed to predict the Higher Heating Value (HHV) of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) from the waste data of 86 cities of 35 countries. A mathematical model is developed, by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS-10.0), to correlate the energy content of waste with the variables derived from its physical composition. Performance of the proposed multiple regression model is superior to available models. For validation, the proposed model is applied to the waste data of Jaipur City (India), nine cities of EEC countries and also to the MSW of USA. Energy content values obtained by proposed regression model and Modified Dulong's Equation (MDE) are closer to the measured mean energy content values for EEC countries compared to the values obtained by Khan's method. Objective of the paper is to propose a simple model, which can replace the lengthy MDE and which has universal applicability for the predication of HHVs.

G.D. Agrawal; A.P.S. Rathore; A.B. Gupta

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low energy charge and high adenosine content in smooth muscle of human bladder in comparison with striated muscle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study determined the energy charge, adenosine and inosine content of human bladder smooth muscle in comparison ... stress incontinence. We found that the ATP content of bladder smooth muscle was only about ....

K. Wedenberg; G. Ronquist; A. Waldenström…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Free energy differences : Representations, estimators, and sampling strategies   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we examine methodologies for determining free energy differences (FEDs) of phases via Monte Carlo simulation. We identify and address three generic issues that arise in FED calculations; the choice of representation, the choice...

Acharya, Arjun R

92

Energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ventilated windows have shown great potential in conserving energy in buildings and provide fresh air to improve indoor air quality. This paper reports our effort to use EnergyPlus to simulate the energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates. Our investigation first developed a network model to account for the two-dimensional heat transfer in the window system and implemented it in EnergyPlus. The two-dimensional assumption and the modified EnergyPlus program were validated by the measured temperatures of the window and the energy demand of a test cell with the window under actual weather conditions. Then EnergyPlus was applied to analyze energy performance of a small apartment installed with the dual airflow windows in five different climate zones in China. The energy used by the apartment with blinds windows and low-e windows was also calculated for comparison. The dual airflow window can reduce heating energy of the apartment, especially in cold climate. The cooling energy reduction by the window was less important than that by shading solar radiation. The dual airflow window is recommended for colder climate. If improving air quality is a major consideration for a building, the window can be used in any climate.

Jingshu Wei; Jianing Zhao; Qingyan Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Neurotransmitter Tissue Content of Drosophila melanogaster in Different Life Stages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. ... (16) In adult brains, tissue content (85 pg/brain) agreed with some previously published values (80.7 pg/brain)(20) but not others (10 ± 2 pg/brain). ... detection has been used to quantify biogenic amines in microdissected Drosophila melanogaster brains and brain regions. ...

Madelaine E. Denno; Eve Privman; B. Jill Venton

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Recent content in Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Energy Data Initiative (EDI) Recent content in Energy Data Initiative (EDI) Home Name Post date sort icon Type Current and historical incentive data available as XML! Rmckeel 11 Sep 2012 - 13:41 Blog entry Datapalooza Announcements Ianjkalin 23 Sep 2012 - 15:52 Blog entry IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18 Blog entry How do I add open data requirements into my government contract? Ianjkalin 13 Feb 2013 - 18:33 Question There are many ways to accompl... Ianjkalin 13 Feb 2013 - 18:41 Answer Another great reference for ge... Ianjkalin 13 Feb 2013 - 18:46 Answer Energy Highlights from the 2013 State of the Union Ianjkalin 13 Feb 2013 - 19:05 Blog entry Top Open Data per Category Ianjkalin 17 Feb 2013 - 20:16 Blog entry

95

What the World's Greatest Energy Managers Do Differently  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the World's GREATEST the World's GREATEST Energy Managers Do Differently? Nasr Alkadi, PhD, CEM U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) Tuesday Webcast for Industry Role of an Energy Manager July 10, 2012 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is DOE's Largest Science and Energy Laboratory ï‚· World's most powerful open scientific computer ï‚· Operating the world's most intense pulsed neutron source and a world-class research reactor ï‚· $1.4B budget ï‚· 4,550 employees ï‚· 4,000 research guests annually ï‚· $500M invested in modernization ï‚· Nation's most diverse energy portfolio ï‚· Nation's largest

96

Constraints on the Energy Content of the Universe from a Combination of Galaxy Cluster Observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that constraints on cosmological parameters from the distribution of clusters as a function of redshift (dN/dz) are complementary to accurate angular diameter distance (D_A) measurements to clusters, and their combination significantly tightens constraints on the energy density content of the Universe. The number counts can be obtained from X-ray and/or SZ (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) surveys, and the angular diameter distances can be determined from deep observations of the intra-cluster gas using their thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission and the SZ effect. We combine constraints from simulated cluster number counts expected from a 12 deg^2 SZ cluster survey and constraints from simulated angular diameter distance measurements based on the X-ray/SZ method assuming a statistical accuracy of 10% in the angular diameter distance determination of 100 clusters with redshifts less than 1.5. We find that Omega_m can be determined within about 25%, Omega_Lambda within 20%, and w within 16%. We show that combined dN/dz + D_A constraints can be used to constrain the different energy densities in the Universe even in the presence of a few percent redshift dependent systematic error in D_A. We also address the question of how best to select clusters of galaxies for accurate diameter distance determinations. We show that the joint dN/dz + D_A constraints on cosmological parameters for a fixed target accuracy in the energy density parameters are optimized by selecting clusters with redshift upper cut--offs in the range 0.5 < z < 1.

S. M. Molnar; Z. Haiman; M. Birkinshaw; R. F. Mushotzky

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evaluating the mass content and the energy spectrum of a plasma jet in a conical pulse accelerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are shown of an experimental study concerning the mass content and the energy spectrum of a plasma jet generated in...

V. L. Vereshchagin

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paul Holtberg, Moderator Paul Holtberg, Moderator April 26, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives Speakers 2 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * John Conti, Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis, Energy Information Administration * Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP * Douglas Meade, Director of Research, INFORUM Forecasts/projections and uncertainty 3 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * Forecast or projections? * Know your analyst * Tools * Uncertainty - Basic underlying trends (e.g., population growth, economic growth, social norms) - Technology (e.g., new technologies, improved technology, breakthroughs vs. evolutionary, new applications)

99

A comparison of differing techniques for the determination of mineral content in bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN) AT CONCHO BLUFF QUEEN FIELD, CRANE COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DOUGLAS FLOYD NEWSOM Approved as to style and content by: Jam . Mazzullo (Chair of Committee) Robert R. Berg (Member) ilfred D. Gardner (Member) John H. S ang (Head... in the Concho Bluff Queen Field, which is located in the western part of the Midland Basin of the Permian Basin. Four discrete sandstone packages occur in this field and have been designated in order of deposition as the Queen A, B, C, and D. The purpose...

Narrow, Samuel Everett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lutein Content and in Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Different Cultivars of Indian Marigold Flower (Tagetes patula L.) Extracts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lutein Content and in Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Different Cultivars of Indian Marigold Flower (Tagetes patula L.) Extracts ... † Dey’s Medical Stores (Manufacturing) Limited, Bondel Road, Kolkata 700?019, India ... From that point of view Figure 6c clearly shows the protective effect of MGO extract against liver cell damage induced by H2O2, compared with positive control, that is, untreated liver cell (Figure 6a) and negative control (Figure 6b). ...

Sugata Bhattacharyya; Sanjukta Datta; Bidisha Mallick; Pubali Dhar; Santinath Ghosh

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Content of Young Alewives in Eastern Lake Michigan and Muskegon Lake, a Connected Drowned River Mouth Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured values are similar to the few previously published energy density values for age-0 alewives appropriate energy measures for bioenergetics applications to inform fisheries management. Energy content in vital rates (growth and mortality). Similarly, energy density (energy per unit wet weight

102

Developing an energy-finance course with critical content: an integrated and SLO process-driven approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, collaborative initiatives between engineering and business disciplines are few because the targeted clients are quite different. However, the engineering world is increasingly facing new business challenges that are associated with the need for business skills to manage unlimited resources and to increase corporate revenue. First, this paper presents the results of a survey showing the current state of the energy finance course offerings in all 12 universities in the USA. Second, this study describes the author's arduous journey and experience of creating an integrated energy finance course from scratch at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in 2009-2010 and the continuous improvement over the past four years. Finally, the author proposes common content areas to be included in energy finance courses that are compatible with the student learning outcomes standards advocated by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International.

Shuming Bai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effect of different secondary quinoline insoluble content on the cellular structure of carbon foam derived from coal tar pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon foam was produced using mesophase pitches obtained under different temperatures as precursors, via foaming and carbonization process. The physicochemical properties of mesophase pitch, as well as the microstructure and physical properties of carbon foam were investigated by optical microscope, infrared spectrometer, thermograviment analyzer (TGA), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and universal testing machine, respectively. The results show that the amount of secondary quinoline insoluble in mesophase pitches increase with heat-treatment temperature increase, meanwhile, the cell size of carbon foams increased firstly and then reduced. Moreover, the compressive strength of carbon foams also exhibited the same variation trend. The cellular structure of carbon foam can be severely affected by the secondary quinoline insoluble content of mesophase pitch; thus it is critical to tailor the secondary quinoline insoluble content of mesophase pitch for obtaining carbon foam with high performance.

Heguang Liu; Tiehu Li; Yachun Shi; Xilin Wang; Jing Lv; Wenjuan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

National Lab Technology Transfer Making a Difference | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Lab Technology Transfer Making a Difference National Lab Technology Transfer Making a Difference National Lab Technology Transfer Making a Difference August 28, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis Incorporation of a new CO2 sorbent into commercial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems will save energy and reduce operating costs. HVAC is one of the largest consumers of electric power in the United States, responsible for more than half of the load on the electric grid in many major cities. NETL work has led to a patented CO2 sorbent that has now been licensed commercially. Incorporation of a new CO2 sorbent into commercial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems will save energy and reduce operating costs. HVAC is one of the largest consumers of electric power in the United

105

Impact of different macronutrient definitions and energy conversion factors on energy supply estimations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnitude of differences in energy supply using different definitions for carbohydrates and protein as well as different energy conversion factors was investigated. Food supply data for 1999–2001 from FAOSTAT were used for nine countries with different types of diets. Nutrient values were derived from USDA and the British food composition tables for three definitions of carbohydrate (total, available by difference, available as monosaccharide equivalents), three protein definitions (nitrogen (N)×Jones factors, N×6.25, sum of amino acids), fat, and two dietary fibre definitions (AOAC, non-starch polysaccharide). Then three sets of energy conversion factors were applied (Merrill & Watt, general Atwater with/without energy value for fibre, and gross energy—GE). Using the same nutrient definitions, differences between general and specific Atwater factors accounted for 50–320 kJ/capita/day (10–75 kcal/capita/day) and for 290–1500 kJ/capita/day (70–360 kcal/capita/day) between GE and metabolizable energy supply calculations. Protein definitions have a minor impact on per capita energy supply values. They generate differences of less than 1%, or 4–105 kJ (1–25 kcal), with N×6.25 values providing the highest values, followed by Jones factors and the sum of amino acids. The largest differences observed in per capita energy supply calculations are due to carbohydrate definitions. Differences of 3.5–8% or 330–780 kJ/capita/day (80–190 kcal/capita/day) are observed between total and available carbohydrates as monosaccharide equivalents within the general Atwater system. Differences in energy supply between total and available carbohydrates could be minimized by applying an energy factor of 8 kJ/g (2 kcal/g) for dietary fibre, resulting in a higher energy supply of 100–250 kJ/capita/day (25–60 kcal/capita/day) or 1–2%. Differences in energy supply are less influenced by the energy factors as such than by the nutrient definition used, especially for carbohydrates. Differences in energy supply of up to 780 kJ/capita/day (160 kcal/capita/day) or 8% may be statistically relevant and might change research results, estimates of the dietary energy supply and consequently the estimation of the prevalence of undernourishment which may affect nutrition program and policies. Global harmonization of macronutrient definitions and energy factors is important to achieve unambiguous and comparable macronutrient and energy values among countries.

U.R Charrondiere; S Chevassus-Agnes; S Marroni; B Burlingame

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy Contents of Some Well-Known Solutions in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of teleparallel equivalent to General Relativity, we study energy and its relevant quantities for some well-known black hole solutions. For this purpose, we use the Hamiltonian approach which gives reasonable and interesting results. We find that our results of energy exactly coincide with several prescriptions in General Relativity. This supports the claim that different energy-momentum prescriptions can give identical results for a given spacetime. We also evaluate energy-momentum flux of these solutions.

M. Sharif; Abdul Jawad

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Studies on the effect of different solar dryers on the vitamin content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples of tomato fruit were dried under four different conditions: open-air sun drying method and by using three different models of integral passive solar dryers which include green house solar dryer sun-tracking solar dryer and latitudinal box solar dryer. The fresh tomato samples and the dried samples were analysed for vitamins A C and E. The results showed a significant difference in the concentrations of vitamins A C and E between the fresh samples and the dried samples for all drying systems. While vitamin C is reduced in concentration for all dried samples vitamins A and E are increased significantly with open-air system having the highest value in vitamin C concentration while latitudinal box dryer gives the best result in terms of vitamins A and E retention. All year round availability of tomato could be enhanced by chipping and drying. Packaging and marketing of dried chips in small quantities could be a lucrative entrepreneurial endeavour for the business minded.

J. I. Eze; O. Ojike

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Heat energy Q: -energy exchanged between systems if they have a different temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About heat Heat energy Q: - energy exchanged between systems if they have a different temperature - heat flows from higher to lower temperature - without temperature difference, no heat is exchanged If a system is receiving or releasing heat, then this heat is called a) Sensible heat, if the system changes

Boyd, Sylke

109

Imprint of the symmetry energy on the inner crust and strangeness content of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we study the effect of the symmetry energy on several properties of neutron stars. First, we discuss its effect on the density, proton fraction and pressure of the neutron star crust-core transition. We show that whereas the first two quantities present a clear correlation with the slope parameter $L$ of the symmetry energy, no satisfactory correlation is seen between the transition pressure and $L$. However, a linear combination of the slope and curvature parameters at $\\rho=0.1$ fm$^{-3}$ is well correlated with the transition pressure. In the second part we analyze the effect of the symmetry energy on the pasta phase. It is shown that the size of the pasta clusters, number of nucleons and the cluster proton fraction depend on the density dependence of the symmetry energy: a small $L$ gives rise to larger clusters. The influence of the equation of state at subsaturation densities on the extension of the inner crust of the neutron star is also discussed. Finally, the effect of the effect of the density dependence of the symmetry energy on the strangeness content of neutron stars is studied in the last part of the work. It is found that charged (neutral) hyperons appear at smaller (larger) densities for smaller values of the slope parameter $L$. A linear correlation between the radius and the strangeness content of a star with a fixed mass is also found.

Constança Providência; Sidney S. Avancini; Rafael Cavagnoli; Silvia Chiacchiera; Camille Ducoin; Fabrizio Grill; Jérôme Margueron; Débora P. Menezes; Aziz Rabhi; Isaac Vidaña

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ash, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the metacarpus of hereford cows under different nutritional and physiological conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hone is (plant Ltntivc Jy expl essed as lr~ &3 p0/ )2]3 ~ CnOOq. Other su ncrals besides calcium mhich are present in bone are phosphorus, magnesium' odium, chlorine and fluorine. The skeletal system is the main. depot for calcium, phosphorus...ASH, CALCIUM, PHOSPHORUS AND MAGNESIUM CONTENT OF THE METACARPUS OF HEREFORD COWS UNDER DIFFERENT NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS A Thesis By MOZAMMEL HAQUE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial...

Haque, Mozammel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Methodological differences behind energy statistics for steel production – Implications when monitoring energy efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy efficiency indicators used for evaluating industrial activities at the national level are often based on statistics reported in international databases. In the case of the Swedish iron and steel sector, energy consumption statistics published by Odyssee, Eurostat, the IEA (International Energy Agency), and the United Nations differ, resulting in diverging energy efficiency indicators. For certain years, the specific energy consumption for steel is twice as high if based on Odyssee statistics instead of statistics from the IEA. The analysis revealed that the assumptions behind the allocation of coal and coke used in blast furnaces as energy consumption or energy transformation are the major cause for these differences. Furthermore, the differences are also related to errors in the statistical data resulting from two different surveys that support the data. The allocation of coal and coke has implications when promoting resource as well as energy efficiency at the systems level. Eurostat's definition of energy consumption is more robust compared to the definitions proposed by other organisations. Nevertheless, additional data and improved energy efficiency indicators are needed to fully monitor the iron and steel sector's energy system and promote improvements towards a greener economy at large.

Johannes Morfeldt; Semida Silveira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear symmetry energy from the Fermi-energy difference in nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron-proton Fermi-energy difference and the correlation to nucleon separation energies for some magic nuclei are investigated with the Skyrme energy density functionals and nuclear masses, with which the nuclear symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities is constrained from 54 Skyrme parameter sets. The extracted nuclear symmetry energy at sub-saturation density of 0.11 fm$^{-3}$ is 26.2 $\\pm$ 1.0 MeV with 1.5 $\\sigma$ uncertainty. By further combining the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb, ten Skyrme forces with slope parameter of 28energy around saturation densities.

Ning Wang; Li Ou; Min Liu

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Are You Ready to Make a Difference? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Are You Ready to Make a Difference? Are You Ready to Make a Difference? Are You Ready to Make a Difference? September 27, 2010 - 2:23pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Steven Chu talks about the influence of his physics teacher. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Providing America's students with a quality education is essential to ensuring that we can continue to be leaders of innovation and industry, and we can't fulfill that responsibility without quality teachers. There is already a great need for skilled math and science teachers and with many of the most accomplished educators approaching retirement age, the demand for specialists in those fields will only grow in the coming years. That's why public figures like Secretary Chu are sharing the personal impact that

114

Information content of the low-energy electric dipole strength: correlation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the information content carried by the electric dipole strength with respect to isovector and isoscalar indicators characterizing bulk nuclear matter and finite nuclei. To separate isoscalar and isovector modes, and low-energy strength and giant resonances, we analyze the E1 strength as a function of excitation energy $E$ and momentum transfer $q$. We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, augmented by the random phase, to compute the E1 strength, and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables. Calculations are performed for spherical, doubly-magic nuclei $^{208}$Pb and $^{132}$Sn. We demonstrate that E1 transition densities in the low-energy region below the giant dipole resonance exhibit appreciable state dependence and multi-nodal structures, which are fingerprints of weak collectivity. The correlation between the accumulated low-energy strength and symmetry energy is weak, and dramatically depends on the energy cutoff assumed. On the other hand, a strong correlation is predicted between isovector indicators and the accumulated isovector strength at $E$ around 20 MeV and momentum transfer $q\\sim 0.65$ fm$^{-1}$. Momentum- and coordinate-space pattern of the low-energy dipole modes indicate a strong fragmentation into individual particle-hole excitations. The global measure of low-energy dipole strength poorly correlates with the nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector characteristics. Consequently, our results do not support the suggestion that there exists a collective "pygmy dipole resonance," which is a strong indicator of nuclear isovector properties.

P. -G. Reinhard; W. Nazarewicz

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, through Fish Energy Content and Habitat Abiotic Conditions. (Under the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat quality were compared: fish energy content and habitat abiotic conditions. The hypothesis habitat quality. When measured on appropriate temporal and spatial scales, total fish energy contentABSTRACT ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

116

The influence of aluminium content to the stacking fault energy in Fe-Mn-Al-C alloy system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four Fe-30Mn-0.9C-XAl alloys are employed to investigate the influence of aluminium content to the stacking fault energy in Fe-Mn-Al-C alloy system. The range of aluminium content is zero to 8.47 wt%. ... on the ...

W. S. Yang; C. M. Wan

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Content-aware Encoding for Improving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Level Cell Resistive Random Access Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Content-aware Encoding for Improving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Level Cell Resistive Random Access general-purpose and embedded systems. It is widely acknowl- edged that energy of the memory structure is a major contributor in overall system energy. Recent advances with emerging non-volatile memory (NVM

Mishra, Prabhat

118

The difference between source and site energy | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The difference between source and site energy The difference between source and site energy Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

119

Comparison of dual-energy CT-derived iodine content and iodine overlay of normal, inflammatory and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma cervical lymph nodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate whether dual-energy computed tomography (DECT)-derived iodine content and iodine overlay could differentiate between normal,...

Ahmed M. Tawfik; A. A. Razek; J. Matthias Kerl; N. E. Nour-Eldin…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A new method for nondestructive evaluation of solid wood moisture content based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new method to determine the moisture content of solid wood based on the principle of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The study investigates the ... obtained equation is proposed to calcula...

Takashi Tanaka; Yasuo Kawai

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Accuracy and precision of lumbar bone mineral content by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in live female monkeys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used...in vivo bone mineral content (BMC) of lumbar vertebrae in 20...Macaca fascicularis). The ash weight of the third lumbar vertebra (L3) was compared to the measured...

M. J. Jayo; S. E. Rankin; D. S. Weaver; C. S. Carlson…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Determining the density content of symmetry energy and neutron skin: an empirical approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter $L$ alongwith that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of $L$ is found to be $L$= 64$\\pm $5 MeV. For $^{208}$Pb, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188 $\\pm $0.014 fm. Knowing $L$, the method can be applied to predict neutron skins of other nuclei.

Agrawal, B K; Samaddar, S K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Determining the Density Content of Symmetry Energy and Neutron Skin: An Empirical Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter L along with that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of L is found to be L=64±5??MeV. For Pb208, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188±0.014??fm. Knowing L, the method can be applied to predict neutron skin thicknesses of other nuclei.

B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Contents of a Class of Regular Black Hole Solutions in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we discuss the energy-momentum problem in the realm of teleparallel gravity. The energy-momentum distribution for a class of regular black holes coupled with a non-linear electrodynamics source is investigated by using Hamiltonian approach of teleparallel theory. The generalized regular black hole contains two specific parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ (a sort of dipole and quadrupole of non-linear source) on which the energy distribution depends. It is interesting to mention here that our results exactly coincide with different energy-momentum prescriptions in General Relativity.

M. Sharif; Abdul Jawad

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Determining the density content of symmetry energy and neutron skin: an empirical approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Starting from precise empirical values of the nuclear volume and surface symmetry energy coefficients and the nuclear saturation density, we show how in the ambit of microscopic calculations with different energy density functionals, the value of the symmetry energy slope parameter $L$ alongwith that for neutron skin can be put in tighter bounds. The value of $L$ is found to be $L$= 64$\\pm $5 MeV. For $^{208}$Pb, the neutron skin thickness comes out to be 0.188 $\\pm $0.014 fm. Knowing $L$, the method can be applied to predict neutron skins of other nuclei.

B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

Interplay between the symmetry energy and the strangeness content of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of the density dependence of the nucleonic equation of state and the hyperon meson couplings on the star properties, including strangeness content, mass and radius, are studied within a relativistic mean field formalism. It is shown that there is still lacking information on the nucleonic equation of state at supra-saturation densities and on the hyperon interactions in nuclear matter that will allow a clear answer to the question whether the mass of the pulsar J1614-2230 could rule out exotic degrees of freedom from the interior of compact stars. We show that some star properties are affected in a similar way by the density dependence of the symmetry energy and the hyperon content of the star. To disentangle these two effects it is essential to have a good knowledge of the equation of state at supra-saturation densities. A linear correlation between the radius and the strangeness content of a star with a fixed mass is obtained.

Constança Providência; Aziz Rabhi

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Towards Decentralized, Energy- and Privacy-Aware Device-to-Device Content Delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Device-to-Device (D2D) content delivery is a new approach to directly exchange content between mobile devices, which allows to offload ... operator to discover nearby devices and initiate a content transfer, in d...

Leonhard Nobach…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (2012) 10991109 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article historyRenewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (2012) 1099­1109 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews journal homepage: www

129

Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22 weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization.

Barbara Scaglia; Silvia Salati; Alessandra Di Gregorio; Alberto Carrera; Fulvia Tambone; Fabrizio Adani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

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141

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161

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168

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170

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171

Energy Savings in Aluminium Electrolysis by Continual Monitoring and Control of the AlF3 Content of the Cryolitic Melt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AlF3 content in the cryolite bath is an important ... heat balance, therefore affecting current efficiency and energy consumption. Traditional control of AIF3 content in the bath consists in periodic bath...3 det...

V. Vassiliadou; I. Paspaliaris; D. Stefanidis…

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Change in stacking-fault energy with Mn content and its influence on the damping capacity of the austenitic phase in Fe-high Mn alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of Mn content on the damping capacity of ? austenitic ... been studied in relation to the stacking-fault energy ( SFE), on the basis of ... austenite decreases with the increase in the Mn content. The ...

Joong-Hwan Jun; Chong-Sool Choi

173

What the World's GREATEST Energy Managers Do Differently  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation describes some tips and practices to help energy managers understand the goal, build a coalition, and sustain momentum.

174

Sex differences in energy expenditure in non–human primates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1986 Time and energy budgets. In...141^166. New York: Alan R. Liss...175^200. New York and London...colobus as a low-energy strategist...pp. 11^33. New York: Cambridge University...and C. Ross Energy expenditure in...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy loss of light ions in different carbon compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data on the energy loss of light H, Li, B, and N ions ... have been presented for the range of ion energies from 0.01 to 0.6 MeV/nucleon. It has been shown that the energy loss in the compounds does ...

Yu. A. Belkova; Ya. A. Teplova

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Caloric content of phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 10, 1972 ... from carbon content, enabling much smaller ... surement of the energy efficiency of primary ... caloric content of the tissues of organisms.

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use 8/24/98 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

6 Procedure Content and Use 82498 OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use 82498 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for...

178

BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring BioDiesel Content On-board monitoring onboard fuel monitoring of fuel and biofuel qualities using an optical sensor for engine...

179

Changes in Free Water Content and Energy Metabolism of the Brain in Experimental Hydrocephalus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In acute and subacute hydrocephalus periventricular oedema is most prominent. At these stages of hydrocephalus, the free water content is increased and the bound water content, to the contrary, significantly d...

N. Tamaki M.D.; T. Nagashima; K. Ehara; M. Kimura; S. Matsumoto…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The effect of post-exercise drink macronutrient content on appetite and energy intake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbohydrate and protein ingestion post-exercise are known to facilitate muscle glycogen resynthesis and protein synthesis, respectively, but the effects of post-exercise nutrient intake on subsequent appetite are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether protein induced satiety that has been reported at rest was still evident when pre-loads were consumed in a post-exercise context. Using a randomised, double blind, crossover design, 12 unrestrained healthy males completed 30?min of continuous cycling exercise at ~60% VO2peak, followed by five, 3?min intervals at ~85% VO2peak. Ten min post-exercise, subjects consumed 500?ml of either a low energy placebo (15?kJ) (PLA); a 6% whey protein isolate drink (528?kJ) (PRO); or a 6% sucrose drink (528?kJ) (CHO). Sixty min after drink ingestion, a homogenous ad-libitum pasta lunch was provided and energy intake at this lunch was quantified. Subjective appetite ratings were measured at various stages of the protocol. Energy consumed at the ad-libitum lunch was lower after PRO (5831?±?960?kJ) than PLA (6406?±?492?kJ) (P??0.315). Considering the post-exercise drink, total energy intake was not different between trials (P?=?0.383). There were no differences between trials for any of the subjective appetite ratings. The results demonstrate that where post-exercise liquid protein ingestion may enhance the adaptive response of skeletal muscle, this may be possible without affecting gross energy intake relative to consuming a low energy drink.

David J. Clayton; David J. Stensel; Phillip Watson; Lewis J. James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Curvature dark energy reconstruction through different cosmographic distance definitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of $f(\\mathcal{R})$ gravity, dark energy is a geometrical fluid with negative equation of state. Since the function $f(\\mathcal{R})$ is not known \\emph{a priori}, the need of a model independent reconstruction of its shape represents a relevant technique to determine which $f(\\mathcal{R})$ model is really favored with respect to others. To this aim, we relate cosmography to a generic $f(\\mathcal R)$ and its derivatives in order to provide a model independent investigation at redshift $z \\sim 0$. Our analysis is based on the use of three different cosmological distance definitions, in order to alleviate the duality problem, i.e. the problem of which cosmological distance to use with specific cosmic data sets. We therefore consider the luminosity, $d_L$, flux, $d_F$, and angular, $d_A$, distances and we find numerical constraints by the Union 2.1 supernovae compilation and measurement of baryonic acoustic oscillations, at $z_{BAO}=0.35$. We notice that all distances reduce to the same expression, i.e. $d_{L;F;A}\\sim\\frac{1}{\\mathcal H_0}z$, at first order. Thus, to fix the cosmographic series of observables, we impose the initial value of $H_0$ by fitting $\\mathcal H_0$ through supernovae only, in the redshift regime $ztheoretical bounds, while its variation, namely the jerk parameter, is compatible with $j_0>1$. Finally, we infer the functional form of $f(\\mathcal{R})$ by means of a truncated polynomial approximation, in terms of fourth order scale factor $a(t)$.

Salvatore Capozziello; Mariafelicia De Laurentis; Orlando Luongo

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improving clay content measurement in oxidic and volcanic ash soils of Hawaii by increasing dispersant concentration and ultrasonic energy levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Quantifying clay content is a fundamental step in predicting and managing soil behaviors such as nutrient and water retention. However, clay measurements are underestimated when using standard methods of dispersion in soils rich in oxides and volcanic ash-derived non-crystalline minerals. Increasing levels of the chemical dispersant and ultrasonic energy are two simple techniques found to increase dispersion and clay measurements in temperate soils, but their effects are less known for oxidic and volcanic ash soils. In this study we investigated the effects of increasing dispersion concentration and ultrasonic energy on clay measurements for a range of oxidic and volcanic ash soils from Hawaii. While doubling and tripling the standard sodium hexametaphosphate concentration of 0.441 g L? 1 did not increase estimates of clay content, increasing levels of ultrasonic energy up to 1600 J mL? 1 significantly increased measured clay content for all oxide and volcanic ash soils. The response to ultrasonication was dependent on soil carbon, oxide content, and surface charge, with more energy needed to disperse soils higher in carbon, oxides, and positive charge. Scanning electron microscopy revealed damage to the sand fraction in some soils when ultrasonicated, but the extent of this damage was viewed as negligible. Porous sand-sized particles resembling pumice grains were also observed in some soils, suggesting that conventional particle size analysis and clay interpretations may not adequately describe surface related behaviors.

Joshua H.S. Silva; Jonathan L. Deenik; Russell S. Yost; Gregory L. Bruland; Susan E. Crow

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Terrestrial Search for Dark Contents of the Vacuum, Such as Dark Energy, Using Atom Interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the theory and first experimental work on our concept for searching on earth for the presence of dark contents of the vacuum (DCV) using atom interferometry. Specifically, we have in mind any DCV that has not yet been detected on a laboratory scale, but which might manifest itself as dark energy on the cosmological scale. The experimental method uses two atom interferometers to cancel the effect of earth's gravity and diverse noise sources. It depends upon two assumptions: first, that the DCV possesses some space inhomogeneity in density, and second that it exerts a sufficiently strong nongravitational force on matter. The motion of the apparatus through the DCV should then lead to an irregular variation in the detected matter-wave phase shift. We discuss the nature of this signal and note the problem of distinguishing it from instrumental noise. We also discuss the relation of our experiment to what might be learned by studying the noise in gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO. The paper concludes with a projection that a future search of this nature might be carried out using an atom interferometer in an orbiting satellite. The laboratory apparatus is now being constructed.

Adler, Ronald J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /San Francisco State U.; Muller, Holger; /UC, Berkeley; Perl, Martin L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wind, Hydrogen and other Energy Technologies Similarities and Differences in Expectation Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind, Hydrogen and other Energy Technologies ­ Similarities and Differences in Expectation Dynamics But mostly a "storytelling" on expectations and wind energy Per Dannemand Andersen Head of Technology Use of Wind Energy #12;Wind Energy in Early Industrialisation Charles Bush 1890 #12;Wind Energy

185

Determining the Flavour Content of the Low-Energy Solar Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the sensitivity of the HELLAZ and Borexino solar neutrino experiments on discriminating the neutrino species nu_e, anti-nu_e, nu_{mu,tau}, anti-nu_{mu,tau}, and nu_{sterile} using the difference in the recoil electron kinetic energy spectra in elastic neutrino-electron scattering. We find that one can observe a non-vanishing nu_{mu,tau} component in the solar neutrino flux, especially when the nu_e survival probability is low. Also, if the data turn out to be consistent with nu_e nu_{mu,tau} oscillations, an anti-nu_e component can be excluded effectively.

Andre de Gouvea; Hitoshi Murayama

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Proposal for Determining the Energy Content of Gravitational Waves by Using Approximate Symmetries of Differential Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since gravitational wave spacetimes are time-varying vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations, there is no unambiguous means to define their energy content. However, Weber and Wheeler had demonstrated that they do impart energy to test particles. There have been various proposals to define the energy content but they have not met with great success. Here we propose a definition using "slightly broken" Noether symmetries. We check whether this definition is physically acceptable. The procedure adopted is to appeal to "approximate symmetries" as defined in Lie analysis and use them in the limit of the exact symmetry holding. A problem is noted with the use of the proposal for plane-fronted gravitational waves. To attain a better understanding of the implications of this proposal we also use an artificially constructed time-varying non-vacuum metric and evaluate its Weyl and stress-energy tensors so as to obtain the gravitational and matter components separately and compare them with the energy content obtained by our proposal. The procedure is also used for cylindrical gravitational wave solutions. The usefulness of the definition is demonstrated by the fact that it leads to a result on whether gravitational waves suffer self-damping.

Ibrar Hussain; F. M. Mahomed; Asghar Qadir

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

Comparison and analysis of energy consumption of energy-efficient office buildings in different climate regions in China: case studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the energy consumption (EC) and find out the determining factors of energy-efficient office building cases according to specific case studies in typical cities of differ...

Ke Zhang; Neng Zhu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reduced postprandial energy expenditure and increased exogenous fat oxidation in young woman after ingestion of test meals with a low protein content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macronutrient composition of diets can influence energy balance in humans. We tested the hypothesis whether low protein content in single meals may induce lower values of energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation...

Klaus J Petzke; Susanne Klaus

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Save Energy, Cut Costs, and Bring a Different Kind of Value to Work |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Save Energy, Cut Costs, and Bring a Different Kind of Value to Work Save Energy, Cut Costs, and Bring a Different Kind of Value to Work Save Energy, Cut Costs, and Bring a Different Kind of Value to Work June 1, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Amy Foster Parish For many of us, thinking about energy efficiency means thinking about changes we can make at home. But residential energy efficiency is just one slice of the energy use pie. According to data from the Energy Information Administration, energy use in the residential and commercial sectors is neck and neck, at 22% and 19% respectively. Which means that commercial spaces-the offices, stores, schools, warehouses, restaurants, and other buildings that serve as workplaces-should also be on our minds when we think about ways to use less energy in our daily lives. Underscoring this point is ENERGY STAR's National Building Competition, a

190

Lipid content in herring (Clupea harengus L.)—influence of biological factors and comparison of different methods of analyses: solvent extraction, Fatmeter, NIR and NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lipid content in herring from research vessel surveys and commercial landing was measured by chloroform/methanol/water extraction and correlated to Fatmeter-, NIR and NMR-measurements. A broad variation in lipid content was found within catches, and herring size and maturity status could not be used to sort herring according to lipid content. The results showed the Fatmeter, NIR and NMR to have different suitability and applicability. Fatmeter readings were influenced by gonad maturity in whole herring and could therefore only be used in a primary sorting of fillets. High correlation was found between NIR and solvent extraction, but the prediction results were influence by measuring point. Measurements performed by NIR and Fatmeter on meat side of fillets could not predict the lipid content in herring fillets. The average lipid content in a fillet or whole herring could be predicted from single NIR spectra if measurements were performed in the middle section of the sample. A high correlation was also found with the NMR measurements on mince. The NIR technique showed highest potentiality as a production line measurement for sorting whole herring or fillets into more homogenous batches, and thus allowing more optimal utilization of the resources.

Durita Nielsen; Grethe Hyldig; Jette Nielsen; Henrik Hauch Nielsen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Help:Copying Page Content to New Page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copying Page Content to New Page Copying Page Content to New Page Jump to: navigation, search To copy a page to a new page Go to the page you want to copy Click "Edit" under "Page Actions". Do a "Select all" (Ctrl+A) of the page content in the box and copy (Ctrl-C) the content. In another window or tab, create a new page name using the url. You can use the wiki's URL for creating a new page. The URL to an article of the wiki is usually something like this: http://www.example.net/wiki/ARTICLE If you replace ARTICLE with the name of the page you wish to create, you will be taken to a blank page which indicates that no article of that name exists yet. Clicking the "Create" button at the top of the page will take you to the edit page for that article, where you can create the new page by

192

Energy Content and Use of Solar Radiation of Fennoscandian Tundra Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The calorific content of plant material from Finnish and Norwegian IBP tundra sites described elsewhere (Sonesson et al., 1975), and photosynthetie efficiency of plants at five of the Norwegian sites are presente...

F. E. Wielgolaski; S. Kjelvik

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The nonthermal energy content and gamma ray emission of starburst galaxies and clusters of galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nonthermal particle production in contemporary starburst galaxies and in galaxy clusters is estimated from the Supernova rate, the iron content, and an evaluation of the dynamical processes which characterize...

H. J. Völk; F. A. Aharonian; D. Breitschwerdt

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

EMS-MAC: Energy Efficient Contention-Based Medium Access Control Protocol for Mobile Sensor Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Towards a classification of energy aware MAC protocols for...Estrin, D. (2002) An Energy- Efficient MAC Protocol...Proc. INFOCOM'02, New York, USA, June 2327, pp...2003) An Adaptive Energy- Efficient MAC Protocol......

Mahdi Zareei; Alireza Taghizadeh; Rahmat Budiarto; Tat-Chee Wan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Difference of Thermal Energy Transmitted to the Earth by Radiation from different Parts of the Solar Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... that the rays projected from the north pole of the sun transmit a perceptibly greater energy to the actinometers than the rays from the opposite pole. Subsequent observation; having positively ... difference of zenith distance of the opposite poles of the sun, my table of maximum solar intensity for given zenith distances (prepared from data collected during a series of years) ...

J. ERICSSON

1875-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

196

Picosecond Energy Transfer Kinetics between Different Pigment Pools in Chlorosomes from the Green Bacterium Chloroflexus Aurantiacus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chloroflexus aurantiacus a thermophilic green bacterium, contains at least four different bacteriochlorophyll ... coupled in a specific way to optimize the energy transfer from the main antenna, ...

Kai Griebenow; Marc G. Müller…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modelling of CO2 content in the atmosphere until 2300: influence of energy intensity of gross domestic product and carbon intensity of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study provides a model of CO2 content in the atmosphere based on the global carbon cycle and the Kaya identity. The influences of: 1) energy intensity of GDP; 2) carbon intensity of energy on CO2 trajectories are given under four scenarios. The results from the most optimistic and technologically challenging scenario show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration can stabilise at 610 ppmv. It is also shown that the annual growth rates of atmospheric CO2 peak for all the scenarios before 2100 due to the expected world population peak in 2075 and the large share of fossil fuel energy.

Wojciech M. Budzianowski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy and Buildings 81 (2014) 371380 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s t r a c t A model for minimization of HVAC energy consumption and room temperature ramp rate Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Minimizing the energy consumption of heating energy consumed in the US [1]. Stud- ies of saving energy in HVAC systems have been addressed using two

Kusiak, Andrew

199

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organizati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organization Energy Efficiency Upgrades Make a Big Difference to a Small Organization Photo of a man and woman standing outside...

200

Prediction of the digestible and metabolizable energy content of wheat milling by-products for growing pigs from chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thirty samples of wheat milling by-products (wheat bran, wheat middlings, wheat shorts, wheat red dog, wheat feed flour), collected from 11 flour mills, were fed to growing pigs to determine their digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) content and to establish equations for predicting their DE and ME content based on chemical analysis. The basal diet was based on corn and soybean meal while the other 30 experimental diets contained 290.4 g/kg wheat milling by-products added at the expense of corn and soybean meal. The 31 diets were fed to 96 growing pigs (BW = 61.9 ± 3.2 kg) according to a completely randomized design during two successive periods. During each period, the 30 experimental diets were fed to three pigs and the basal diet was fed to six pigs, resulting in 6 replications per experimental diet and 12 replications for the basal diet over the two periods. The chemical composition of the 30 samples was variable, and starch and fiber content had a strong negative correlation (r = ?0.96 to ?0.99 for CF and ADF, respectively). The DE content of wheat feed flour, wheat red dog, wheat shorts, wheat middlings and wheat bran averaged 17.4, 16.9, 15.2, 12.5 and 12.0 MJ/kg DM, respectively. From the stepwise regression analysis, a series of DE and ME prediction equations were generated. The best fit equations for wheat milling by-products were: DE (MJ/kg DM) = 19.2 ? (0.016×aNDF) with R2 = 0.94, RSD = 0.58 and Pcontent varied substantially and various correlated single predictors (aNDF, ash, CF, starch, etc.) can be used to accurately predict the DE and ME content when fed to growing pigs.

Q. Huang; C.X. Shi; Y.B. Su; Z.Y. Liu; D.F. Li; L. Liu; C.F. Huang; X.S. Piao; C.H. Lai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CEDR Content  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CEDR Content" CEDR Content" "The Consolidated Energy Data Report (CEDR) consists of 27 worksheets that should be completed by each site, as applicable, and included as part each site's SSP in a MS Excel electronic format. The CEDR is due to the SPO no later than December 9th." "Worksheet",,"Overview","Action" 1.1,"Content","Stand-alone overview of the CEDR tabs.","None" 2.1,"Funds, Meters, Training","Collects information on energy and water spending, and metering status.","If applicable, complete cells highlighted in orange. Edited and new data cells should be highlighted in light blue." 3.1,"BTU & Gal Key","Reference tab containing all factors and dropdown menu information for all tabs starting with ""3"". If you need to divide up the CEDR, please keep all tabs starting with ""3"" together to ensure calculation links are not broken. ","None"

202

Green Energy and Content Aware Scheduling in Maritime Wideband Communication Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are interested in video transmission scheduling targeting to maximize network throughput in green energy powered maritime wideband networks. Network throughput and the energy depletion probability should be co...

Tingting Yang; Xuemin (Sherman) Shen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Approximating the solar/stellar energy generation rate, luminosity gradient, and the hydrogen content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we wish to develop an analytical technique for modelling the energy generation rate and the luminosity gradient for ... 1989) we derive dimensionless variables for the energy generation rate and lum...

John F. Doorish

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quantum free-energy differences from nonequilibrium path integrals. II. Convergence properties for the harmonic oscillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum free-energy differences from nonequilibrium path integrals. II. Convergence properties July 2008; published 2 October 2008 Nonequilibrium path-integral methods for computing quantum free-energy with the purpose of establishing the convergence properties of the work distribution and free energy as the number

Schofield, Jeremy

205

Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies F. S. Mozer reconnection is often invoked to explain electromagnetic energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres, stellar in these bodies, it is important to understand energy conversion as a function of magnetic field strength

California at Berkeley, University of

206

Energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates Jingshu Wei1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

great po tential in conserving energy in buildings and provide fresh air to improve indoor air qua lity that by shading solar radiation. The dual airflow window is recomm ended for colder climate. If improving air airflow window; Energy demand; Indoor air quality; Different climates 1. Introduction Energy dem

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

207

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 15 (2011) 33323340 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/rser GIS-based wind farm: Received 2 March 2011 Accepted 7 April 2011 Keywords: Site selection Wind energy Wind farm GIS Planning energy on the verge of massive growth, much research emphasis is put on enabling the implementation

208

Energy and Buildings 82 (2014) 310321 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clustering algorithm a b s t r a c t Energy consumption and air quality index (AQI) prediction is important clustering method. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The huge energy consumption 50% of the energy consumed of office buildings in the US [1,2]. The modeling and short

Kusiak, Andrew

209

Energy and Buildings 43 (2011) 14091417 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the method facili- tates the evaluation of building energy-saving potential by improving the behavior in order to reduce building energy consumption, and help improve modeling of occupant behavior in numerical of the identified determinants on energy consumption patterns, could assist in achieving the goal of improving

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

210

Analysis of diffractive features in elastic scattering of {sup 7}Li by different target nuclei at different energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffractive features of angular distribution have been investigated by analyzing the experimental data for a set of elastic scattering processes of {sup 7}Li by different target nuclei at different laboratory energies. Both Frahn-Venter and McIntyre models are used to analyze experimental data of angular distribution for elastic scattering processes. The theoretical models can reasonably reproduce the general pattern of the data. Some geometrical parameters for colliding nuclei have been obtained from the elastic scattering processes. It is found that interpretation of the diffractive features of the data is model-independent. The values of extracted parameters, from adopted models, are found comparable to each other and to those of others. The total reaction cross section is correlated to the incident laboratory energy for each scattering and values of total reaction cross section are found comparable with those of others.

Badran, R. I.; Masri, Dana Al [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, The Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Influence of Moisture Content on the Evaluation of Latent Heat of Molten Salts used for Thermal Energy Storage Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Precise measurements of the thermo-physical properties are essential for the process design of thermal energy storage systems. This paper is concerned with the measurement of heat of fusion of molten salts, which plays a key role in determining the storage capacity of latent heat based thermal energy storage units. The focus of the work is on the effect of moisture content of molten salts on latent heat measurements using a differential scanning calorimetry. The results reveal that, the change in the mass of the samples investigated is due to moisture content, and hence, this leads to a reduction in the value of the heat of fusion of the phase change material. For instance, the heat of fusion for one of the wet samples (containing moisture) was determined to be 314.29J/g. However, the calculated heat of fusion for the same sample without moisture is found to be 350.029J/g. This is associated with the methodology of the DSC analysis, which does not consider the mass of the moisture in the sample. It is found that, the deviation in the heat of fusion due to the effect of the moisture content in the investigated samples is proportional to the amount of moisture in the original sample. Therefore, it is imperative to consider the effect of the moisture content on the evaluation of the latent heat of molten salts. In order to obtain reliable findings, either the samples should be dried and then weighed promptly, or weighed after the test and then re-evaluate the latent heat using the new weight.

Salama Omran; Peter Heggs; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy Contents of Some Non-Vacuum Spacetimes in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper elaborates the problem of energy-momentum in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity. For this purpose, we consider energy-momentum prescription derived from the integral form of the constraint equations developed in the Hamiltonian formulation of the teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity. We use this technique to investigate energy-momentum of stationary axisymmetric Einstein-Maxwell solutions and cosmic string spacetimes. The angular momentum, gravitational and matter energy-momentum fluxes of these spacetimes are also evaluated. It is concluded that the results of teleparallel theory are relatively analogous to the results of General Relativity.

M. Sharif; Sumaira Taj

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Energy Metabolites, Water Content, and Catecholamine Changes in a Model of Cerebral Embolic Infarction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the practical and theoretical interest in mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of cerebral infarction, little is known about the effects of infarction on parenchymal energy metabolism. The present...

K. Kogure; R. Busto; P. Scheinberg; O. M. Reinmuth

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

CONTENT FOR TEACHING SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS IN PHYSICS AT UPPER SECONDARY SCHOOL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding energy with a focus on sustainable development requires further knowledge beyond traditional conceptual understanding. This paper presents the result from one main investigation and two smaller f...

Susanne Engström; Peter Gustafsson…

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis of the mineral content of corn bran treated in vitro and by passage through the pig Gastrointestinal tract  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was ... a method for examining the mineral contents of corn bran loaded in vitro or passed through ... tract of pigs. Particles of dry-milled corn pericarp treated in vitro ...

Frederick R. Dintzis; Frederick L. Baker…

216

The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 November 1929 research-article The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions J. A. V. Butler C. M. Robertson The Royal Society...

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Muon content of ultrahigh-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sample of 33 extensive air showers (EASs) with estimated primary energies above 2 × 1019 eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array is analyzed. The observed muon density is compared event-...

A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov…

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Production of high-energy fuel with low volatile content from 3B and D coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments on the carbonization of coal show that high-energy fuel with satisfactory piece strength (?8 MPa in compression) may be produced in the nonoxidative heating of 3B and D coal, with gradual increase ...

M. V. Kulesh; S. R. Islamov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy-Saving Design for Pressure Difference Control in Variable Flow Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhang Senior Engineer Postgraduate Wuhan Architectural Design Institute, Wuhan, China, 430014 Chenyh918@263.net Abstract: This paper analyzes energy-saving design for pressure-difference control in a variable flow air...

Chen, Y.; Zhang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Comment on “American Exceptionalism? Similarities and Differences in National Attitudes Toward Energy Policy and Global Warming”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Similarities and Differences in National Attitudes Toward Energy Policy and Global Warming” ... In the United States, the only uranium enrichment plant is the one at Paducah, Kentucky, which runs on coal. ...

Deborah Wallace

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Public Perception of 13 Different Energy Topics analyzed in new Study |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Perception of 13 Different Energy Topics analyzed in new Study Public Perception of 13 Different Energy Topics analyzed in new Study Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 27 December, 2012 - 14:27 consumer behavior Navigant OpenEI Pike Research Renewable Energy Report Pike Research, part of Navigant, recently released a White Paper that takes an in-depth view at public perception of 13 energy topics. The study uses a 1,000 person sample to show favorability and unfavorability energy topics such as transportation, renewable technology, nuclear, clean coal, and smart grid topics. Some of the highlights of the study are as follows: * Solar Energy had the highest number of respondents holding both "favorable" and "strongly favorable" opinions of any technology.

222

Teleparallel Version of the Levi-Civita Vacuum Solutions and their Energy Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we find the teleparallel version of the Levi-Civita metric and obtain tetrad and the torsion fields. The tensor, vector and the axial-vector parts of the torsion tensor are evaluated. It is found that the vector part lies along the radial direction only while the axial-vector vanishes everywhere because the metric is diagonal. Further, we use the teleparallel version of M$\\ddot{o}$ller, Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz and Bergmann-Thomson prescriptions to find the energy-momentum distribution of this metric and compare the results with those already found in General Relativity. It is worth mentioning here that momentum is constant in both the theories for all the prescriptions. The energy in teleparallel theory is equal to the corresponding energy in GR only in M$\\ddot{o}$ller prescription for the remaining prescriptions, the energy do not agree in both theories. We also conclude that M$\\ddot{o}$ller's energy-momentum distribution is independent of the coupling constant $\\lambda$ in the teleparallel theory.

M. Sharif; M. Jamil Amir

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

Peinke, Joachim

224

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decades, intense human activities, such as over-grazing, mowing and crop cultivation have led to severeEnergy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index

Chen, Jiquan

225

Relevant distance between two different instances of the same potential energy in protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of complex systems and, particularly, of protein folding, a physically meaningful distance is defined which allows to make useful statistical statements about the way in which energy differences are modified when two different instances of the same potential-energy function are used. When the two instances arise from the fact that different algorithms or different approximations are used, the distance herein defined may be used to evaluate the relative accuracy of the two methods. When the difference is due to a change in the free parameters of which the potential depends on, the distance can be used to quantify, in each region of parameter space, the robustness of the modeling to such a change and this, in turn, may be used to assess the significance of a parameters' fit. Both cases are illustrated with a practical example: the study of the Poisson-based solvation energy in the Trp-Cage protein (PDB code 1L2Y).

Jose Luis Alonso; Pablo Echenique

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Low-Energy Dynamics of N=1 SUSY Gauge Theories with Small Matter Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the low-energy dynamics of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories with the Dynkin index of matter fields less than or equal to the Dynkin index of the adjoint plus two. We explain what kinds of nonperturbative phenomena take place in this class of supersymmetric gauge theories.

Witold Skiba

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

ELECTRIFICATION OF ISOLATED AREAS BY INTERCONNECTING DIFFERENT RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY: A SUSTANAIBLE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a methodology for rural electrification by micro-grids based upon different renewable resources. > ApplicationELECTRIFICATION OF ISOLATED AREAS BY INTERCONNECTING DIFFERENT RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY to absorb innovations such as rural electrification by isolated micro grid Sustainable approach The success

228

Teleparallel Version of the Stationary Axisymmetric Solutions and their Energy Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work contains the teleparallel version of the stationary axisymmetric solutions. We obtain the tetrad and the torsion fields representing these solutions. The tensor, vector and axial-vector parts of the torsion tensor are evaluated. It is found that the axial-vector has component only along $\\rho$ and $z$ directions. The three possibilities of the axial vector depending on the metric function $B$ are discussed. The vector related with spin has also been evaluated and the corresponding extra Hamiltonian is furnished. Further, we use the teleparallel version of M$\\ddot{o}$ller prescription to find the energy-momentum distribution of the solutions. It is interesting to note that (for $\\lambda=1$) energy and momentum densities in teleparallel theory are equal to the corresponding quantities in GR plus an additional quantity in each, which may become equal under certain conditions. Finally, we discuss the two special cases of the stationary axisymmetric solutions.

M. Sharif; M. Jamil Amir

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Spatially Homogeneous Rotating Solution in f(R) Gravity and Its Energy Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the metric approach of $f(R)$ theory of gravity is used to investigate the exact vacuum solutions of spatially homogeneous rotating spacetimes. For this purpose, R is replaced by f(R) in the standard Einstein-Hilbert action and the set of modified Einstein field equations reduce to a single equation. We adopt the assumption of constant Ricci scalar which maybe zero or non-zero. Moreover, the energy density of the non-trivial solution has been evaluated by using the generalized Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum complex in the perspective of f(R) gravity for some appropriate f(R) model, which turns out to be a constant quantity.

M. Jamil Amir; Saima Naheed

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Different Energy Metabolism in Two Human Small Cell Lung Cancer Subpopulations Examined by 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Biochemical Analysis in Vivo and in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Verlag Chemie, 1974. energy phosphate content and...spectroscopy studies of tumor energy metabolism...z , z ,, and Us relationship to intracapillarv...oxvhemoelobm saturation status and Ed. 2. New York...1989. Levels of high energy phosphates in human lung...

Paul E. G. Kristjansen; Mogens Spang-Thomsen; and Bjørn Quistorff

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Quantum geometrodynamical description of the dark sector of the matter-energy content of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of the universe is studied in exactly solvable dynamical quantum model with the Robertson-Walker metric. It is shown that the equation of motion which describes the expansion or contraction of the universe can be represented in the form of the law of conservation of zero total energy for a particle with arbitrary mass being an analogue of the universe. The analogue particle moves in the potential well under the action of the internal force produced by the curvature of space, matter, and pressures of classical and quantum gravitational sources. This force has two components: one performs the positive work on the universe which is equivalent to the work of the repulsive forces of dark energy, and the other component does the negative work analogous to the work of the attractive forces of dark matter. Their competition determines the regime of the expansion of the universe: whether the universe would be accelerating or decelerating. It is demonstrated that predictions of the quantum model do not co...

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy exploitation of acid gas with high H2S content by means of a chemical looping combustion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In gas and petroleum industry, the waste gas stream from the sweetening process of a sour natural gas stream is commonly referred as acid gas. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) technology has the potential to exploit the combustible fraction of acid gas, H2S, to produce energy obtaining a flue gas highly concentrated on CO2 and SO2, which can be cost-effectively separated for subsequent applications, such as sulfuric acid production. At the same time, a concentrated CO2 stream ready for storage is obtained. The resistance of oxygen carriers to sulfur becomes crucial when an acid gas is subjected to a CLC process since the H2S content can be very high. In this work, a total of 41 h of continuous operation with acid gas and H2S concentrations up to 20 vol.% has been carried out in a 500 Wth CLC unit with two oxygen carriers based on Cu (Cu14?Al) and Fe (Fe20?Al). The formation of copper sulfides and the SO2 emissions in the air reactor made the Cu14?Al material not adequate for the process. In contrast, excellent results were obtained during acid gas combustion with the Fe20?Al oxygen carrier. H2S was fully burnt to SO2 in the fuel reactor at all operating conditions, SO2 was never detected in the gas outlet stream of the air reactor, and iron sulfides were never formed even at H2S concentrations as high as 20 vol.%. Furthermore, it was found that a H2S content of 20 vol.% in the acid gas was high enough to turn the CLC process into an auto-thermal process. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the Fe-based materials prepared by impregnation are very adequate to exploit the energy potential of acid gas mixtures with CO2 capture.

F. García-Labiano; L.F. de Diego; P. Gayán; A. Abad; A. Cabello; J. Adánez; G. Sprachmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Non-profit Making a Difference in Louisiana | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-profit Making a Difference in Louisiana Non-profit Making a Difference in Louisiana Non-profit Making a Difference in Louisiana March 12, 2010 - 4:58pm Addthis SMILE Weatherization Coordinator Venice Roberts shows client Shelia Sturgis an attic tent, which conserves energy and decreases costs. | Photo by Susannah Malbreau SMILE Weatherization Coordinator Venice Roberts shows client Shelia Sturgis an attic tent, which conserves energy and decreases costs. | Photo by Susannah Malbreau Change is in the air at SMILE Community Action Agency. The non-profit received a $3 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant for its weatherization program. With the needed boost in funding Louisiana-based SMILE can increase its reach. SMILE targets five unique parishes, helping locals conserve energy and save

235

Regional Differences in the Price-Elasticity of Demand for Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the RAND Corporation examined the relationship between energy demand and energy prices with the focus on whether the relationships between demand and price differ if these are examined at different levels of data resolution. In this case, RAND compares national, regional, state, and electric utility levels of data resolution. This study is intended as a first step in helping NREL understand the impact that spatial disaggregation of data can have on estimating the impacts of their programs. This report should be useful to analysts in NREL and other national laboratories, as well as to policy nationals at the national level. It may help them understand the complex relationships between demand and price and how these might vary across different locations in the United States.

Bernstein, M. A.; Griffin, J.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Rebates: The Energy Efficiency Measure that Can Make a Major Difference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their efforts are, and, consequently, no reinforcement to continue them. Building owners and energy companies grappling with this problem have devised numerous techniques intended to instill in tenants of centrally-metered apartment buildings behavior... that will conserve energy. These techniques may be divided into three fundamentally different approaches: (a) conversion from master-metered to individually-metered utilities; (b) management or remote control of apartment temperature settings ; and (c) check...

Haun, C. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation on energy and thermal performance for office building envelope in different climate zones of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective evaluation on the thermal performance of envelope plays an important role towards the reduction of energy consumption for space cooling and heating. In order to calculate the energy consumption for cooling and heating and assess the whole energy efficiency of envelop designs, a new evaluation index on energy and thermal performance for office building envelop (EETPO) is put forward. Three cities of Shenyang, Wuhan and Guangzhou in China are selected for EETPO analysis, which represent the cold zone, hot summer cold winter zone and hot summer warm winter zone, respectively. The regression equations between EETPO and energy use for cooling/heating are studied in three cities, illustrations indicate that the regression lines fit extremely well and the algorithm is accurate and simple. According to the compulsory indices stipulated by standard (GB50189-2005), the maximum allowable values of EETPO are determined in three cities, the maximum \\{EETPOc\\} in cooling period is 1.750 W/m3 K in Wuhan and 1.733 W/m3 K in Guangzhou, the maximum \\{EETPOh\\} in heating period is 0.200 W/m3 K in Shenyang and 0.414 W/m3 K in Wuhan. This index and energy use calculation method can help designers to evaluate the whole energy and thermal performance of the proposed envelopes and analyze energy saving effects for different energy conservation measures.

Jinghua Yu; Liwei Tian; Xinhua Xu; Jinbo Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

239

Effect of dietary digestible energy content on expression of genes of lipid metabolism and LC-PUFA biosynthesis in liver of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The relationship between lipid and digestible energy content of the feed and growth performance has been exploited with great effect in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The precise metabolic consequences of so-called “high-energy” feeds have not been fully defined, but increased and altered tissue lipid deposition patterns impacting on carcass and product quality have been reported. Recent studies on global gene expression have shown that dietary lipid and digestible energy content can have significant effects on gene expression in salmonids. In addition, we recently showed that functional feeds with reduced digestible energy significantly improved outcomes in response to inflammatory disease in salmon. The present study aimed to elucidate and clarify the effects of dietary digestible energy content (22, 20 and 18 MJ/kg; HE, ME and LE diets, respectively) on lipid and fatty acid metabolism in salmon fed diets containing graded amounts of lipid. Specifically the effects on liver lipid and fatty acid compositions, and on the hepatic expression of genes of lipid and fatty acid metabolism were determined. Final weight and weight gain were significantly higher, and FCR lower, in fish fed the HE diet. Crude lipid content was significantly lower in fish fed the LE diet compared to fish fed the two higher energy contents. Significantly lower total lipid and triacylglycerol levels were recorded in liver of fish fed the LE diet compared to fish fed the higher energy diets. Liver lipids in salmon fed the LE diet had generally significantly higher proportions of saturated fatty acids and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), and lower monounsaturated fatty acids, C18 and n ? 6 PUFA. Consistent with this, salmon fed the LE diet showed increased liver expression of both ?6 and ?5 fatty acyl desaturases in comparison to fish fed the diets with higher energy levels. Fatty acid synthase expression showed a clear upward trend as dietary energy decreased, and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 and liver X receptor showed reciprocal trends that were consistent with the level of dietary cholesterol that reflects digestible energy content. Although not statistically significant, these trends were biologically logical, significant and relevant. Expression of genes of fatty acid oxidation was less consistent. Overall, reduced dietary digestible energy/lipid content alone, without major changes in dietary fatty acid composition, altered the expression of key genes of lipid and fatty acid metabolism resulting in general up-regulation of biosynthetic pathways.

Laura Martinez-Rubio; Simon Wadsworth; Jose L. González Vecino; J. Gordon Bell; Douglas R. Tocher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP): An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy system modeling can be intentionally or unintentionally misused by decision-makers. This report describes how both can be minimized through careful use of models and thorough understanding of their underlying approaches and assumptions. The analysis summarized here assesses the impact that model and data choices have on forecasting energy systems by comparing seven different electric-sector models. This analysis was coordinated by the Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP), a collaboration among governmental, academic, and nongovernmental participants.

Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K. R.; Venkatesh, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Short communication: Effect of dietary manipulation of crude protein content and nonfibrous-to-fibrous-carbohydrate ratio on energy balance in early-lactation dairy cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Disparities between nutrient intake and demand often result in a state of negative energy balance (EB) in the early-lactation dairy cow. Reducing dietary crude protein (CP) content and providing glucogenic nutrients may overcome this issue. This study evaluates whether or not offering a diet lower in CP and higher in nonfiber carbohydrates (LP-NFC) can improve EB and the metabolic status of the early-lactation dairy cow compared with a diet higher in CP and fibrous carbohydrates (HP-FC). Twenty Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were assigned to 1 of 2 dietary treatments in a randomized block design. Diets were isoenergetic (6.57 MJ of net energy for lactation) and formulated to contain 15% CP and 6% starch (HP-FC), or 12% CP and 28% starch (LP-NFC) and were offered for the first 63 d of lactation. Intake and milk yield were determined daily, whereas milk and blood samples, weights, and body condition scores were collected weekly. Intakes (mean ± standard errors of the mean, SEM) of dry matter (17.4 ± 0.6 kg/d) and energy (113.0 ± 4.6 MJ of net energy for lactation) were not different between treatments. However, the HP-FC group had a higher milk yield (31.8 vs. 28.9 ± 1.4 kg/d) and a lower EB compared with the LP-NFC group. Blood urea N concentration (3.5 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L) was higher, whereas bilirubin (6.0 vs. 6.7 ± 0.2 mmol/L) and ?-hydroxybutyrate concentrations (0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.05 mmol/L) were lower in the HP-FC group compared with the LP-NFC group. These data suggest that EB can be improved during early lactation through the manipulation of milk output by offering a lower CP, higher NFC diet.

S.J. Whelan; F.J. Mulligan; V. Gath; B. Flynn; K.M. Pierce

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Proximate Analysis, in Vitro Organic Matter Digestibility, and Energy Content of Common Guava (Psidium guajava L.) and Yellow, Strawberry Guava (Psidium cattleianum Var. lucidum) Tree Parts and Fruits as Potential Forage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proximate Analysis, in Vitro Organic Matter Digestibility, and Energy Content of Common Guava (Psidium guajava L.) and Yellow, Strawberry Guava (Psidium cattleianum Var. ... Nutritional contents of guava were assessed accordingly: guava content × site, guava content × season, and guava content × site × season. ... Previous work found that the seeds of the fruit when evaluated by dry weight contain 14% oil, with 15% proteins and 13% starch;(14) and phenolic and flavonoid compounds,(15) with some isolated compounds being cytotoxic. ...

Julie Ann Luiz Adrian; Norman Q. Arancon; Bruce W. Mathews; James R. Carpenter

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients from the masses differences of isobaric nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei are extracted by using the differences between the masses of isobaric nuclei. Based on the masses of more than 2400 nuclei with $A=9-270$, we investigate the model dependence in the extraction of symmetry energy coefficient. We find that the extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients is strongly correlated with the forms of the Coulomb energy and the mass dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient adopted. The values of the extracted symmetry energy coefficients increase by about 2 MeV for heavy nuclei when the Coulomb correction term is involved. We obtain the bulk symmetry energy coefficient $S_0=28.26\\pm1.3$ MeV and the surface-to-volume ratio $\\kappa=1.26\\pm 0.25 $ MeV if assuming the mass dependence of symmetry energy coefficient $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0(1-\\kappa/A^{1/3})$, and $S_0=32.80\\pm1.7$ MeV, $\\kappa=2.82\\pm0.57$ MeV when $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0 (1+\\kappa/A^{1/3})^{-1}$ is adopted.

Junlong Tian; Haitao Cui; Kuankuan Zheng; Ning Wang

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Biomechanical pulping of aspen chips; Energy savings resulting from different fungal treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Besides increasing paper strength, fungal treatments can also reduce the electrical energy needed for fiberizing chips during mechanical pulping. Fungal species, chip movement, and treatment duration affected the extent of energy savings. This paper reports that four-week-long treatment with white-rot fungi, including Phlebia species or Pholiota mutabilis, in a stationary wire tray bioreactor resulted in at least 35% energy savings for pulping chips to 100 mL CSF in a 300-mm-diameter disc refiner. With Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating-drum bioreactor, the optimal treatment duration was four weeks. Treatment with a brown-rot fungus also resulted in energy savings. Over the range of fungi and conditions tested, neither chip weight loss nor lignin loss correlated with energy savings. Some treatments giving the least chip weight loss ({lt}5%) saved the most energy. Wood modifications responsible for energy savings differed from those that increased strength. Treatments that saved the most energy did not necessarily give the highest strength properties.

Leatham, G.F.; Myers, G.C.; Wegner, T.H. (USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (US))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different Reactants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different in experimental development of large- scale and highly-productive reactors. This paper proposes to address this issue by developing microwave chemistry reactors as microwave systems, rather than as black

Yakovlev, Vadim

246

Impact of Wire Geometry in Energy Extraction from Salinity Differences Using Capacitive Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

§ Department of Chemistry, NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway ... The oceans have long been considered a great source of energy available in many different forms,(1) but the vast research effort has focused on waves, tidal, and offshore wind power. ... to power output only, would generally give a low energetic efficiency. ...

Bruno B. Sales; Odne S. Burheim; Fei Liu; Olivier Schaetzle; Cees J. N. Buisman; Hubertus V. M. Hamelers

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

Estimation of annual energy output from a tidal barrage using two different methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, there have been growing international challenges relating to climate change and global warming, with a conflict developing between the need to create a low-carbon economy and rapid depleting reserves of fossil fuels. In addition to these challenges there continues to be the added complexity of a significant global increase in energy demand. Marine renewable energy from tidal barrages is carbon-free and has the potential to make a significant contribution to energy supplies now and in the future. Therefore, it is appropriate to evaluate the total energy that can be extracted from such barrages. In this study two different methods are proposed to estimate the total annual energy output from a barrage, including a theoretical estimation based on the principle associated with tidal hydrodynamics, and a numerical estimation based on the solutions obtained from a 2D hydrodynamic model. The proposed Severn Barrage in the UK was taken as a case study, and these two methods were applied to estimate the potential annual energy output from the barrage. The predicted results obtained using the two methods indicate that the magnitude of the annual energy output would range from 13 to 16 TWh, which is similar to the value of 15.6 TWh reported by the Department of Energy and Climate Change, in the UK. Further investigations show that the total annual energy output would increase by about 15% if a higher discharge coefficient were to be adopted for the sluice gates, or if the turbine performance were to be improved. However, the estimated annual energy output could exceed the value of 16 TWh if future technological advances in both sluice gate construction and turbine performance are included.

Junqiang Xia; Roger A. Falconer; Binliang Lin; Guangming Tan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Microstructural characterization of high-manganese austenitic steels with different stacking fault energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructures of tensile-deformed high-manganese austenitic steels exhibiting twinning-induced plasticity were analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction pattern observation and X-ray diffraction measurement to examine the influence of differences in their stacking fault energies on twinning activity during deformation. The steel specimen with the low stacking fault energy of 15 mJ/m{sup 2} had a microstructure with a high population of mechanical twins than the steel specimen with the high stacking fault energy (25 mJ/m{sup 2}). The <111> and <100> fibers developed along the tensile axis, and mechanical twinning occurred preferentially in the <111> fiber. The Schmid factors for slip and twinning deformations can explain the origin of higher twinning activity in the <111> fiber. However, the high stacking fault energy suppresses the twinning activity even in the <111> fiber. A line profile analysis based on the X-ray diffraction data revealed the relationship between the characteristics of the deformed microstructures and the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens. Although the variation in dislocation density with the tensile deformation is not affected by the stacking fault energies, the effect of the stacking fault energies on the crystallite size refinement becomes significant with a decrease in the stacking fault energies. Moreover, the stacking fault probability, which was estimated from a peak-shift analysis of the 111 and 200 diffractions, was high for the specimen with low stacking fault energy. Regardless of the difference in the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens, the refined crystallite size has a certain correlation with the stacking fault probability, indicating that whether the deformation-induced crystallite-size refinement occurs depends directly on the stacking fault probability rather than on the stacking fault energies in the present steel specimens. - Highlights: {yields} We studied effects of stacking fault energies on deformed microstructures of steels. {yields} Correlations between texture and occurrence of mechanical twinning are discussed. {yields} Evolutions of dislocations and crystallite are analyzed by line profile analysis.

Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kwon, Eui-Pyo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Imafuku, Muneyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Research of Economic Sustainability of Different Energy Refurbishment Strategies for an Apartment Block Building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract May energy saving derived from the retrofit of a building be able to pay its costs? The paper wants to answer to this simple question, reporting a research started with a simple case study (an Italian social housing quarter, served by a district heating system, which needs – as many others in many other countries – a reasonable refurbishment). The economic sustainability of different retrofitting strategies has been studied: a method to evaluate the costs of refurbishment interventions has been developed through a detailed design of interventions, identifying construction costs thanks to the contribution of a group of selected contractors which gave us reasonable prices representative of a real services offers and assessing the cost-optimal energy levels leading the building towards the energy labels B and A. Both envelope and systems refurbishment works have been investigated. The adopted method allows to chose among different refurbishment options, evaluating them as elementary cases and whole interventions, considering their efficiency by means of the Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE) method and the pay-back of the investments (ROI) by the cash-flow method, analysing different funding systems and incentives.

Enrico De Angelis; Giorgio Pansa; Ermanno Serra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy and economic savings using geothermal heat pumps in different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A technical and economic feasibility study is performed on residential buildings, heated and cooled by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) equipped with energy piles. The analysis is carried out for two different climate locations and building energy needs, which have been evaluated following the current European standard ISO 13790. The energy pile system performance coupled with the GHP has been numerically calculated by using the PILESIM2 software over 20 years of operation. The Primary Energy Saving (PES) indices were calculated comparing the actual \\{GHPs\\} systems with traditional cooling and heating systems, together with their sensitivity to thermal and cooling loads for two different climate locations. Also, economic savings and greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction have been calculated resulting from the \\{GHPs\\} use. The results show that in mild climates, where the \\{GHPs\\} are mainly used as HP, the annual average temperature of the ground around the energy piles can increase up to about 10 °C after many years of operation, whereas in cold climates the increase is nearly negligible. Thus, the economical profit of \\{GHPs\\} is more difficult to achieve in mild climates than in cold ones. Conversely, GHG emission reduction is found to be larger in mild climates than in cold ones.

Biagio Morrone; Gaetano Coppola; Vincenzo Raucci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of local energy supply to a hypersonic flow on the drag of bodies with different nose bluntness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters of the axisymmetric flow around bodies with different bluntness are compared in the case of constant energy supply to the main hypersonic flow. Flow structures, drag coefficients, and expenditure of energy on overcoming drag are analyzed with the effect of thermal energy on the flow taken into account for different bodies with equal volume.

Borzov, V.Yu.; Rybka, I.V.; Yur`ev, A.S. [A.F. Mozhaisky Military Space Engineering Academy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Non-empirical nuclear energy functionals, pairing gaps and odd-even mass differences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First, we briefly outline some aspects of the starting project to design non-empirical energy functionals based on low-momentum vacuum interactions and many-body perturbation theory. Second, we present results obtained within an approximation of such a scheme where the pairing part of the energy density functional is constructed at first order in the nuclear plus Coulomb two-body interaction. We discuss in detail the physics of the odd-even mass staggering and the necessity to compute actual odd-even mass differences to analyze it meaningfully.

T. Duguet; T. Lesinski

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Total Energy Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The important message of RG theory [1] is that we have to attribute a specific symmetry to the continuous or infinite solid. Also, magnets with long range magnetic order show properties of an infinite system. Usi...

Dr. Ulrich Köbler; Dr. Andreas Hoser

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of moisture susceptibility of asphalt mixes containing RAP and different types of aggregates and asphalt binders using the surface free energy method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The surface free energy (SFE) measurement of asphalt binder and aggregate is considered a reliable mechanistic framework for evaluating the moisture-induced damage potential of asphalt mixes. In the present study, the SFE method was used to evaluate the effects of asphalt binder type, Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and its amount, and aggregate type on the moisture-induced damage potential of asphalt mixes. The SFE components (non-polar, acid and base) of a PG 64-22 and a PG 76-28 (polymer-modified) asphalt binders, blended with different amounts of RAP binder (0%, 10%, 25% and 40%) were measured in the laboratory using a Dynamic Contact Angle (DCA) analyzer. Also, the SFE components of six types of aggregates, namely limestone, rhyolite, sandstone, granite, gravel, and basalt were used in this study. The SFE components of limestone and rhyolite aggregates were measured using a Universal Sorption Device (USD), while those of the sandstone, granite, gravel, and basalt aggregates were obtained from the literature. The energy ratio parameters estimated based on the spreading coefficient, the work of adhesion, and the work of debonding were used to assess the moisture-induced damage potential of different combinations of asphalt binders and different RAP binder contents and aggregates. The SFE test results indicated that the acid SFE component of PG 64-22 and PG 76-28 asphalt binders increase with the addition of RAP binder, while the base SFE component remains almost unchanged. Also, the wettability and the work of adhesion of both PG 64-22 and PG 76-28 asphalt binders over different types of aggregates increased with an increase in RAP content (by 25% and more). Based on the energy ratio parameters, it was found that the resistance to moisture-induced damage increased with an increase in RAP content for both PG 64-22 and PG 76-28 asphalt binders and all types of aggregates, specifically when higher RAP contents were used. Moreover, it was found that the higher the total SFE of the aggregates, the lower the energy ratio parameter values. Therefore, a high total SFE component of aggregate may result in a high moisture-induced damage potential of the mix. The results presented herein are expected to be helpful in mechanistically assessing the moisture-induced damage potential of asphalt mixes, produced with polymer-modified and non-polymer-modified asphalt binders, containing RAP.

Rouzbeh Ghabchi; Dharamveer Singh; Musharraf Zaman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The influence of sympathetic denervation on the content of glycogen and high-energy phosphorus compounds in the myocardium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complete desympathization of the heart provokes changes in the macroergasic metabolism of myocardium. In operated animals a rise is noted in the content of glycogen, adenosinepolyphosphates, and creatinephosph...

V. A. Govyrin

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in Northeast Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of cleaner and renewable energy sources are needed in order to reduce dependency and global warming. Wood pellets are a clean renewable fuel and has been considered as one of the substitutes for fossil fuels. In Argentina, large quantities of sawmill residues are still unused and wood pellets production could be seen as both, as an environmental solution and an extra economical benefit. The general aim of this study was to determine the wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in northeast Argentina. The specific costs of wood pellets for the different scenarios showed relative lower costs comparing to the ones reported in other studies, ranging from 35 to 47 €/Mgpellets. Raw material costs represented the main cost factor in the calculation of the total pellets production costs. A lower specific production cost was observed when 50% of the raw material input was wood shavings. The specific electricity consumption per metric ton of pellet was lower in scenarios with higher production rate. Lower heat energy consumption was observed in scenarios that have a mixed raw material input. The most promising framework condition for Northeast Argentina, in terms of costs effectiveness and energy consumption could be acquired with production rates of 6 Mg/h with sawdust and wood shavings as raw material. However, simultaneous increment of the electricity by 50% and raw material price by 100% may increase the specific costs up to 50%.

Augusto Uasuf; Gero Becker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,279817 25019,285978 25384,295027 25749,297022 26114,304327

258

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Bcf)" Bcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)"

259

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 37271,98.3 37302,98.5 37330,98.4 37361,98.1

260

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5050US2" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1416 29767,1289 30132,1197 30497,1121 30863,1048 31228,625 31593,579 31958,591

262

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:59 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,201407 25019,211763 25384,220728 25749,232189 26114,237387 26480,240662

263

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,232 35110,193 35139,232 35170,176 35200,230 35231,258 35261,269

264

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE3" "Date","Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

265

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)"

266

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)"

267

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AZ2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)"

268

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)"

269

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DC2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)"

270

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CO2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)"

271

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,77130 25019,79015 25384,84406 25749,86811 26114,87617 26480,89042

272

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

273

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WV3" "Date","West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

274

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,74386 25019,77762 25384,82965 25749,86148 26114,79893 26480,82847

275

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

276

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nm3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nm3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM3" "Date","New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

277

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6179 25019,6545 25384,6980 25749,7711 26114,8455 26480,10887 26845,9947 27210,9652

278

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,23160 25019,26342 25384,30479 25749,31929 26114,33934 26480,38631

279

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

280

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,4.08

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5992 25019,5987 25384,4058 25749,2909 26114,2823 26480,5696 26845,3791 27210,1227

282

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,4 27941,5

283

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2656 25019,1514 25384,1326 25749,7126 26114,2843 26480,4758 26845,3008 27210,2957

284

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

285

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,1 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

286

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ma2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ma2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MA2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,73471 25019,74919 25384,78451 25749,82646 26114,83434 26480,86171

287

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,32 35110,38 35139,34 35170,40 35200,43 35231,27 35261,63 35292,59 35323,60

288

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 13331,392528 13696,526159 14061,649106 14426,677311 14792,655967 15157,630212 15522,626782 15887,684115

289

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,277 35110,277 35139,277 35170,277 35200,277 35231,277 35261,277

290

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

291

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9012us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9012us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" 33253,475614 33526,500196 33984,513068 34015,462218

292

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

293

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

294

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9050US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" 26679,1948000 26710,1962000 26738,1907000 26769,1814000 26799,1898000 26830,1839000

295

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_a.xls" mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPVA1","MCRFPWV1","MCRFPP21","MCRFPIL1","MCRFPIN1","MCRFPKS1","MCRFPKY1","MCRFP_SMI_1","MCRFPMO1","MCRFPNE1","MCRFPND1","MCRFPOH1","MCRFPOK1","MCRFPSD1","MCRFPTN1","MCRFPP31","MCRFPAL1","MCRFPAR1","MCRFPLA1","MCRFPMS1","MCRFPNM1","MCRFPTX1","MCRFP3FM1","MCRFPP41","MCRFPCO1","MCRFPMT1","MCRFPUT1","MCRFPWY1","MCRFPP51","MCRFPAK1","MCRFPAKS1","MANFPAK1","MCRFPAZ1","MCRFPCA1","MCRFPNV1","MCRFP5F1"

296

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)"

297

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9100US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.21 31593,2.43 31958,1.95 32324,1.84

298

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34515,1.934 34880,1.692 35246,2.502 35611,2.475 35976,2.156 36341,2.319

299

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9130US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 26679,5808 26710,6079 26738,4021 26769,8017 26799,8741 26830,4131 26860,5744 26891,8726 26922,6403 26952,5473

300

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS3" "Date","Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,97 35110,103 35139,109 35170,107 35200,107 35231,104 35261,108

302

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103US2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 35445,9977 35476,7667 35504,2530 35535,2557 35565,5007 35596,5059 35626,5026 35657,7535

303

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5022 25019,12551 25384,26458 25749,5203 26114,4917 26480,4222 26845,3691 27210,3901

304

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,2478 33284,2147 33312,2113 33343,2353 33373,3203 33404,2833 33434,3175

305

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.77 31593,2.81 31958,3.07 32324,2.74

306

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,0 27941,0 28306,0 28671,0

307

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2630 25019,2529 25384,2666 25749,2713 26114,2669 26480,2681 26845,2377 27210,889 27575,846

308

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,23 33284,13 33312,12 33343,7 33373,13 33404,28 33434,28 33465,30

309

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6844 25019,7068 25384,7475 25749,7843 26114,8172 26480,8358 26845,7514

310

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_a.xls" mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS2","MCRFPP12","MCRFPFL2","MCRFPNY2","MCRFPPA2","MCRFPVA2","MCRFPWV2","MCRFPP22","MCRFPIL2","MCRFPIN2","MCRFPKS2","MCRFPKY2","MCRFP_SMI_2","MCRFPMO2","MCRFPNE2","MCRFPND2","MCRFPOH2","MCRFPOK2","MCRFPSD2","MCRFPTN2","MCRFPP32","MCRFPAL2","MCRFPAR2","MCRFPLA2","MCRFPMS2","MCRFPNM2","MCRFPTX2","MCRFP3FM2","MCRFPP42","MCRFPCO2","MCRFPMT2","MCRFPUT2","MCRFPWY2","MCRFPP52","MCRFPAK2","MCRFPAKS2","MANFPAK2","MCRFPAZ2","MCRFPCA2","MCRFPNV2","MCRFP5F2"

311

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

312

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

313

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:44 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Exports " "Sourcekey","N9132US2","N9132US3","N9133US2","N9133US3" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

314

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,7098 25019,5910 25384,8097 25749,7233 26114,5090 26480,3672 26845,10767 27210,10787

315

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

316

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ND3" "Date","North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

317

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35246 35611,0 35976,0 36341,0 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0 38533,0 38898,0 39263,0

318

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ky2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ky2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,69542 25019,75824 25384,83815 25749,86473 26114,84197 26480,85881

319

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9160us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9160us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9160US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 29235,93000 29266,87000 29295,93000 29326,85000

320

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9030US2" "Date","U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI3" "Date","Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

322

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9070US2" "Date","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" 35445,1617923 35476,1465907 35504,1627602 35535,1551268 35565,1610527 35596,1525325

323

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9102us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9102us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9102US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" 35445,268310 35476,232878 35504,254455 35535,235621 35565,236725 35596,227059 35626,230567

324

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,11939 25019,12592 25384,16592 25749,17984 26114,19463 26480,22242 26845,13868

325

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AK2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)"

326

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 26679,843900 26710,747331 26738,648504 26769,465867 26799,326313

327

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,19756 25019,19711 25384,21463 25749,24794 26114,25379 26480,23787 26845,24923

328

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,3 35476,3

329

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9132US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" 35445,6424 35476,6846 35504,10601 35535,8211 35565,6284 35596,5741 35626,6380 35657,10101

330

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

331

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI3" "Date","Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

332

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,194 35110,200 35139,140 35170,132 35200,106 35231,82 35261,205 35292,152

333

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

334

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:23:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Yield" "Sourcekey","MLRRYUS3","MGFRYUS3","MGARYUS3","MKJRYUS3","MKERYUS3","MDIRYUS3","MRERYUS3","MNFRYUS3","MOTRYUS3","MNSRYUS3","MLURYUS3","MWXRYUS3","MCKRYUS3","MAPRYUS3","MSGRYUS3","MMSRYUS3","MPGRYUS3"

335

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020US2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)"

336

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

337

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Monthly","11/2013","12/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU"

338

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA3" "Date","Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

339

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ut3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ut3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010UT3" "Date","Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

340

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC2" "Date","District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,13730 29767,13686 30132,13041 30497,13007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX3" "Date","Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

342

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Processing Plant " "Sourcekey","MAOSNUS1","MPPSNUS1","MLPSNUS1","METSNUS1","MPRSNUS1","MBNSNUS1","MBISNUS1"

343

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,347 26480,367 26845,277 27210,26 27575,47 27941,32 29036,101 29402,143 29767,106 30132,162

344

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

345

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010oh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010oh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:49 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OH3" "Date","Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

346

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

347

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,63 35110,63 35139,63 35170,61 35200,62 35231,57 35261,57 35292,55 35323,56

348

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NV2" "Date","Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0 33526,0

349

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,217 35110,199 35139,223 35170,219 35200,237 35231,234 35261,239

350

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.6 31593,4.62 32324,2.71

351

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 32523,2.69 32554,2.4

352

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,129403 25019,124584 25384,111499 25749,100305 26114,70222 26480,59821 26845,36133 27210,34431

353

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,45543 25019,51708 25384,54804 25749,55779 26114,54867 26480,53397 26845,55685

354

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,302472 25019,315694 25384,333264 25749,340033 26114,343773 26480,355266

355

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO3" "Date","Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

356

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA3" "Date","Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

357

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,1958 25019,2293 25384,4573 25749,6211 26114,6893 26480,8394 26845,5024

358

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,52777 25019,56346 25384,58322 25749,59792 26114,48737 26480,47387

359

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,126629 25019,129408 25384,130766 25749,129629 26114,39799 26480,38797 26845,36411

360

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

362

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

363

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,1788 33284,1684 33312,1571 33343,1593 33373,1807 33404,1690 33434,2042

364

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

365

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI2" "Date","Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,90994 25019,93425 25384,101124 25749,105208 26114,109758 26480,104648

366

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

367

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:43 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NH3" "Date","New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

368

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,139519 25019,145955 25384,156699 25749,158699 26114,162747 26480,169267

369

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

370

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mo3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mo3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MO3" "Date","Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

371

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,161849 25019,166439 25384,158852 25749,154089 26114,103564 26480,63667 26845,102091

372

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 34592,646 34834,696 34865,4590 34895,4767 34926,4382 34957,4389 34987,4603 35018,4932

373

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,25376 25019,26681 25384,28426 25749,29679 26114,32619 26480,34259 26845,36280

374

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

375

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.92 31593,2.35

376

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID3" "Date","Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

377

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME2" "Date","Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,3967 25019,3571 25384,4910 25749,5247 26114,5591 26480,6036 26845,6027 27210,6174

378

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ne3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ne3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NE3" "Date","Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

379

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,1498 25019,13038 25384,17632 25749,18419 26114,3860 26480,8376 26845,6618 27210,6102

380

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MN3" "Date","Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,522122 25019,517636 25384,562127 25749,552544 26114,630998 26480,637289

382

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,384 33284,350 33312,382 33343,380 33373,382 33404,376 33434,405

383

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,236 35110,220 35139,240 35170,230 35200,241 35231,229 35261,217

384

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,75351 25019,78371 25384,81068 25749,82595 26114,84864 26480,89187

385

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc2d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc2d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC2" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34346,2.13 34347,2.072 34348,2.139 34351,2.196 34352,2.131

386

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

387

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mo2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MO2" "Date","Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

388

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc4d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc4d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC4" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34323,1.894 34324,1.83 34325,1.859 34326,1.895 34330,1.965

389

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:17 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

390

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,3000 25019,2906 25384,2802 25749,2852 26114,2926 26480,5506 26845,7664 27210,5259 27575,1806

391

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,1793 32554,2148 32582,1566 32613,1223 32643,858 32674,638

392

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,25795 25019,22050 25384,22955 25749,19862 26114,2686 26480,20786 26845,22533

393

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

394

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

395

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010va2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010va2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,41495 25019,43582 25384,46663 25749,49554 26114,49488 26480,55427

396

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,112 35110,77 35139,78 35170,91 35200,100 35231,89 35261,100 35292,106

397

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,80322 25019,84072 25384,87878 25749,87359 26114,88319 26480,85256 26845,86191

398

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)"

399

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)"

400

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AR2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,26177 25019,26437 25384,29048 25749,31187 26114,31878 26480,32879

402

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC3" "Date","District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

403

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ri3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ri3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010RI3" "Date","Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

404

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SD3" "Date","South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

405

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DE2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)"

406

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TN3" "Date","Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

407

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ny3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ny3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY3" "Date","New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

408

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,13427 25019,15126 25384,20507 25749,19742 26114,21217 26480,23331 26845,22271

409

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9140us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9140us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9140US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,2676998 36937,2309464 36965,2246633 36996,1807170 37026,1522382 37057,1444378

410

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34347,2.194 34348,2.268 34351,2.36 34352,2.318 34353,2.252

411

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

412

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,686540 36937,640026 36965,664918 36996,622054 37026,576532 37057,536820

413

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040FL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,355 26480,284 27941,837 28306,607 29402,677 29767,428 30132,435 30497,198 30863,34

414

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,67395 25019,74782 25384,75310 25749,77460 26114,75238 26480,77608

415

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,997 25019,895 25384,1326 25749,226 26114,1734 26480,2649 26845,1947 27210,1716 27575,1318

416

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME3" "Date","Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

417

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3060us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3060us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:27:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3060US2" "Date","Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" 36906,2505011 36937,2156873 36965,2086568 36996,1663832

418

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 11139,295700 11504,294406 11870,298520 12235,283197 12600,288236 12965,313498 13331,343346

419

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN3" "Date","Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

420

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9011us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9011us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9011US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" 33253,1482053 33526,1363737 33984,1452098 34015,1305490

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

422

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NV3" "Date","Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

423

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9133US3" "Date","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

424

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SC3" "Date","South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

425

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010vt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010vt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VT2" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1301 29767,1290 30132,1278 30497,1252 30863,1352 31228,1456 31593,1595

426

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Weekly","12/13/2013","12/24/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

427

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9040IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0

428

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

429

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

430

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,84912 25019,89372 25384,94320 25749,97317 26114,98644 26480,100720 26845,96468

431

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9100US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 26679,92694 26710,83870 26738,91581 26769,88407 26799,85844 26830,79121 26860,79428 26891,84400 26922,81157

432

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

433

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9133US2" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 35445,5604 35476,5596 35504,5675 35535,5660 35565,3812 35596,3786 35626,3756 35657,7532

434

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9170us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9170us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9170US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" 36906,76386 36937,65770 36965,63626 36996,50736

435

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 32689,99.9 33054,99.2 33419,99.2 33785,99.1 34150,99.1 34515,99.1

436

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

437

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

438

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040fl2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040fl2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040FL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

439

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,1861 25019,1120 25384,808 25749,809 26480,1032 26845,1117 27210,1268 27575,1612

440

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,6774 32554,7118 32582,6736 32613,3835 32643,1927 32674,1402

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010la3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010la3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010LA3" "Date","Louisiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

442

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9100US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 32523,1.72 32554,1.88

443

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ne2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ne2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,1558 26480,1263 26845,834 27210,2137 27575,1398 27941,797

444

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9020us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9020us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9020US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103 27134 27164

445

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,98 27575,96 27941,99

446

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010oh2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010oh2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,442360 25019,444964 25384,456414 25749,459972 26114,460820 26480,478331 26845,439212

447

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,3565 25019,2780 25384,3074 25749,2499 26114,575 26845,1999 27210,1560 27575,1537

448

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

449

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","11/2013" Monthly","11/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34349,2.347 34380,2.355 34408,2.109 34439,2.111 34469,1.941

450

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010az3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010az3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AZ3" "Date","Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

451

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3045us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3045us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:26:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" 36906,340292 36937,312843 36965,362843

452

Warming impact on energy use of HVAC system in buildings of different thermal qualities and in different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to combat climate change, energy use in the building must be further reduced. Heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in residential buildings account for considerable fraction of global energy consumption. The potential contribution the domestic sector can make in reducing energy consumption is recognized worldwide. The driving energy of \\{HVACs\\} depends on the thermal quality of the building envelope (TQBE) and outside temperature. Definitely, building regulations are changing with the time toward reduce the thermal loads of buildings. However, most of the existing residential buildings were built to lower TQBE. For instant, 72% of residential dwellings in the 15-EU were built before 1972. To investigate the impact of warming on driving energy of \\{HVACs\\} of a residential building a computer model was developed. Three climate categories/cities were considered, i.e. Stockholm (cold), Istanbul (mild), and Doha (hot). In each city, two buildings were modeled: one was assumed to be built according to the current local buildings regulations (standard TQBE), while the anther was built to lower TQBE. The simulations were run for present and future (in 2050) outdoor designing conditions. The calculations show that the impact of the warming on annual driving energy of \\{HVACs\\} (reduction or increase) depends very much on the climate category and on the TQBE. Based on the climate and TQBE, the change in annual \\{HVACs\\} energy varies from ?7.4% (in cold climate) to 12.7% (in hot climate). In mild climate, it was shown that the warming does not have significant impact on annual \\{HVACs\\} energy. Improving the TQBE can mitigate the impact of the warming.

Mohamad Kharseh; Lobna Altorkmany; Mohammed Al-Khawaj; Ferri Hassani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effects of outside storage on the energy potential of hardwood particulate fuels: part 1. Moisture content and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Widespread use of woody materials for industrial fuels has generated interest and concern about the energy value of fuels stored outdoors. This paper reports on the effect of storage for periods up to 1 year on the temperature and moisture content (MC) of wood particulate fuels in cone-shaped piles according to the type of fuel and height of pile. Three fuels - hardwood whole-tree chips, bark, and sawdust - were stored in piles 10, 15, and 20 feet high. The experimental piles were built during the late summer of 1978 at the Union Camp woodyard in Ford, Virginia. Internal pile temperatures rose rapidly during the first weeks to highs of 45 degrees C for whole-tree chips and 73 degrees C for bark and sawdust. In the bark and chip piles these temperatures fluctuated seasonally. The interior temperature of the sawdust pile was insensitive to ambient temperature changes and declined slowly throughout the remainder of the study. Within the first 60 to 120 days of storage, the surfaces of all piles became saturated with moisture. The interior zones of the bark and sawdust piles remained at or slightly above the original MC while the corresponding regions of the chip pile exhibited some drying. After 1 year's time, the weighted average MCs of chips, bark, and sawdust increased by 84, 108, and 191 percent, respectively, over the original MCs. To minimize increases of MC in stored woody fuels, storage time should be kept to less than 60 days, chips should be preferred to bark and sawdust, and piles should be built as high as possible consistent with available space and storage procedures which limit the potential for spontaneous combustion.

White, M.S.; Curtis, M.L.; Sarles, R.L.; Green, D.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Environmental impacts of different food waste resource technologies and the effects of energy mix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The environmental impacts of food waste management strategies and the effects of energy mix were evaluated using a life cycle assessment model, EASEWASTE. Three different strategies involving landfill, composting and combined digestion and composting as core technologies were investigated. The results indicate that the landfilling of food waste has an obvious impact on global warming, although the power recovery from landfill gas counteracts some of this. Food waste composting causes serious acidification (68.0 PE) and nutrient enrichment (76.9 PE) because of NH3 and SO2 emissions during decomposition. Using compost on farmland, which can marginally reduce global warming (?1.7 PE), acidification (?0.8 PE), and ecotoxicity and human toxicity through fertilizer substitution, also leads to nutrient enrichment as neutralization of emissions from N loss (27.6 PE) and substitution (?12.8 PE). A combined digestion and composting technology lessens the effects of acidification (?12.2 PE), nutrient enrichment (?5.7 PE), and global warming (?7.9 PE) mainly because energy is recovered efficiently, which decreases emissions including SO2, Hg, NOx, and fossil CO2 during normal energy production. The change of energy mix by introducing more clean energy, which has marginal effects on the performance of composting strategy, results in apparently more loading to acidification and nutrient enrichment in the other two strategies. These are mainly because the recovered energy can avoid fewer emissions than before due to the lower background values in power generation. These results provide quantitative evidence for technical selection and pollution control in food waste management.

Yan Zhao; Wenjing Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Difference of Thermal Energy transmitted to the Earth by Radiation from different parts of the Solar Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 1. Previous to undertaking a systematic investigation of the mechanical properties of solar heat, I examined thoroughly the merits of Laplace's famous demonstration relating to the ... the absorptive power of the sun's atmosphere, proving that only one-twelfth of the energy developed by the sun is transmitted to the earth. The demonstration being based on ...

J. ERICSSON

1876-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effect of barium content on dielectric and energy storage properties of (Pb,La,Ba)(Zr,Sn,Ti)O3 ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of barium content on phase development, dielectric property and energy storage performance of (Pb0.925?xLa0.05Bax) (Zr0.52Sn0.39Ti0.09)O3 (PLBZST) ceramics synthesized by a solid state reaction method was investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electron microscopy micrographs illustrated that the pyrochlore phase was effectively suppressed by the introduction of barium in the (Pb0.925La0.05) (Zr0.52Sn0.39Ti0.09)O3 (PLZST) ceramics. The increase in maximum dielectric constant and the decrease in both transition temperature and switching field with increasing barium content were due to the decrease in the stability of antiferroelectric phase. The energy storage performance of the barium doped PLZST ceramics was studied by measurements of polarization hysteresis loops and discharge curves. The increase of barium content led to the increase of the energy storage density at first and then slight decrease. The study of cyclic charge–discharge showed that barium doped PLZST ceramic capacitor can withstand up to 10,000 cycles with about 8% energy density loss.

Qian Zhang; Xiaolin Liu; Yong Zhang; Xiaozhen Song; Jia Zhu; Ivan Baturin; Jianfeng Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the United States began a programme to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types—categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly—from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Michael Wang; May Wu; Hong Huo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy flow between two hydrodynamically coupled particles kept at different effective temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the energy exchanged between two hydrodynamically coupled micron-sized Brownian particles trapped in water by two optical tweezers. The system is driven out of equilibrium by random forcing the position of one of the two particles. The forced particle behaves as it has an "effective temperature" higher than that of the other bead. This driving modifies the equilibrium variances and cross-correlation functions of the bead positions: we measure an energy flow between the particles and an instantaneous cross-correlation, proportional to the effective temperature difference between the two particles. A model of the interaction which is based on classical hydrodynamic coupling tensors is proposed. The theoretical and experimental results are in excellent agreement.

Antoine Bérut; Artyom Petrosyan; Sergio Ciliberto

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U. [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)] [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Speck, T. [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Hamilton's principle: why is the integrated difference of kinetic and potential energy minimized?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present an intuitive answer to an often asked question: why is the integrated difference K-U between the kinetic and potential energy the quantity to be minimized in Hamilton's principle? Using elementary arguments, I map the problem of finding the path of a moving particle connecting two points to that of finding the minimum potential energy of a static string. The mapping implies that the configuration of a non--stretchable string of variable tension corresponds to the spatial path dictated by the Principle of Least Action; that of a stretchable string in space-time is the one dictated by Hamilton's principle. This correspondence provides the answer to the question above: while a downward force curves the trajectory of a particle in the (x,t) plane downward, an upward force of the same magnitude stretches the string to the same configuration x(t).

Alberto G. Rojo

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy flow between two hydrodynamically coupled particles kept at different effective temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the energy exchanged between two hydrodynamically coupled micron-sized Brownian particles trapped in water by two optical tweezers. The system is driven out of equilibrium by random forcing the position of one of the two particles. The forced particle behaves as it has an "effective temperature" higher than that of the other bead. This driving modifies the equilibrium variances and cross-correlation functions of the bead positions: we measure an energy flow between the particles and an instantaneous cross-correlation, proportional to the effective temperature difference between the two particles. A model of the interaction which is based on classical hydrodynamic coupling tensors is proposed. The theoretical and experimental results are in excellent agreement.

Antoine Bérut; Artyom Petrosyan; Sergio Ciliberto

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

The energy consumption and economic costs of different vehicles used in transporting woodchips  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the weak points in the energy-wood chain is the transport of woodchips from the forestry yard to the power station. This operation is critical because the vehicles used must be very versatile to operate under different conditions while maintaining low operating costs. The goal of this study is to implement the information on this topic by examining the different categories of vehicles that are considered to be appropriate for this purpose. For each category of vehicle, the working time, working rate, fuel consumption, energy costs and economic costs were processed. Tests were conducted using both “agricultural convoys” (tractor + trailer) and “industrial vehicles” (lorries). All vehicles were tested on short itineraries of approximately 5, 15 and 25 km and on long itineraries of 50, 100 and 200 km. The study showed that on routes longer than 25 km, lorries had the highest average transfer speed (42 km h?1) whereas agricultural vehicles had the lowest (24 km h?1). The transport costs depending on the distance, the type of vehicle used and the unit cost (€ km?1) were high, especially for distances less than 20 km (up to 5 € km?1). The application of these values to a biomass-fed thermal power unit of 1 MW with an annual use of 2000 h and a supply of biofuels in the radius of 75 km shows that 1500 h year?1 are needed for the bestowal of chips to power the unit (3700 tss). The total cost for a lorry is approximately € 148,000 year?1 and approximately four times higher for agricultural convoys. The energy required to transport the woodchips is approximately 90 MJ m?3 loose chips for agricultural vehicles and 35 MJ m?3 loose chips for lorries. In both cases, these values represent a small claim (2%) of the energy value of the biomass transported.

Marco Manzone; Paolo Balsari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

An outgoing energy flux boundary condition for finite difference ICRP antenna models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For antennas at the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) modeling in vacuum can now be carried out to a high level of detail such that shaping of the current straps, isolating septa, and discrete Faraday shield structures can be included. An efficient approach would be to solve for the fields in the vacuum region near the antenna in three dimensions by finite methods and to match this solution at the plasma-vacuum interface to a solution obtained in the plasma region in one dimension by Fourier methods. This approach has been difficult to carry out because boundary conditions must be imposed at the edge of the finite difference grid on a point-by-point basis, whereas the condition for outgoing energy flux into the plasma is known only in terms of the Fourier transform of the plasma fields. A technique is presented by which a boundary condition can be imposed on the computational grid of a three-dimensional finite difference, or finite element, code by constraining the discrete Fourier transform of the fields at the boundary points to satisfy an outgoing energy flux condition appropriate for the plasma. The boundary condition at a specific grid point appears as a coupling to other grid points on the boundary, with weighting determined by a kemel calctdated from the plasma surface impedance matrix for the various plasma Fourier modes. This boundary condition has been implemented in a finite difference solution of a simple problem in two dimensions, which can also be solved directly by Fourier transformation. Results are presented, and it is shown that the proposed boundary condition does enforce outgoing energy flux and yields the same solution as is obtained by Fourier methods.

Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Site-specific measurement of adatom binding energy differences by atom extraction with the STM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a scanning tunneling microscope, single adatoms can be extracted from a Si(111)7×7 surface by field evaporation, when the sample voltage is pulsed at 4 V or more in either polarity. Statistically, adatoms at the center of the 7×7 unit cell are more frequently removed than those near the corner holes, by a ratio of 1.6:1. This difference can be explained by assuming that the binding energy of center adatoms is approximately 0.01 eV less than for corner adatoms. The relationship of this result to previous observations of greater chemical reactivity at center adatom sites is discussed.

Hironaga Uchida; Dehuan Huang; François Grey; Masakazu Aono

1993-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

466

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:41:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

467

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:08:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

468

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS2","MCREXUS2","MNGEXUS2","MPPEXUS2","MLPEXUS2","METEXUS2","MPREXUS2","MBNEXUS2","MBIEXUS2","MOLEXUS2","MOHEXUS2","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_2","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_2","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MBCEXUS2","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_2","MBAEXUS2","MTPEXUS2","MGFEXUS2","MGREXUS2","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_2","MGAEXUS2","MKJEXUS2","MKEEXUS2","MDIEXUS2","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MDGEXUS2","MREEXUS2","MNFEXUS2","MOTEXUS2","MNSEXUS2","MLUEXUS2","MWXEXUS2","MCKEXUS2","MAPEXUS2","MMSEXUS2"

469

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS1","MCRUPUS1","MNGUPUS1","MPPUPUS1","MLPUPUS1","METUPUS1","MPRUPUS1","MBNUPUS1","MBIUPUS1","MOLUPUS1","MOHUPUS1","MUOUPUS1","MBCUPUS1","MO1UP_NUS_1","MO5UP_NUS_1","MBAUPUS1","MTPUPUS1","MGFUPUS1","MGRUPUS1","MG4UP_NUS_1","MGAUPUS1","MKJUPUS1","MKEUPUS1","MDIUPUS1","MD0UP_NUS_1","MD1UP_NUS_1","MDGUPUS1","MREUPUS1","MPCUP_NUS_1","MNFUPUS1","MOTUPUS1","MNSUPUS1","MLUUPUS1","MWXUPUS1","MCKUPUS1","MCMUP_NUS_1","MCOUP_NUS_1","MAPUPUS1","MSGUPUS1","MMSUPUS1"

470

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:30:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity" "Sourcekey","MGIRIUS2","MOCLEUS2","MOCGGUS2","MOCIDUS2","MOPUEUS2" "Date","U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels Per Day)","U. S. Operable Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Calendar Day)","U. S. Operating Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U. S. Idle Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity"

471

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:20:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SW0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

472

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS2","MCRUPUS2","MNGUPUS2","MPPUPUS2","MLPUPUS2","METUPUS2","MPRUPUS2","MBNUPUS2","MBIUPUS2","MOLUPUS2","MOHUPUS2","MUOUPUS2","MBCUPUS2","MO1UP_NUS_2","MO5UP_NUS_2","MBAUPUS2","MTPUPUS2","MGFUPUS2","MGRUPUS2","MG4UP_NUS_2","MGAUPUS2","MKJUPUS2","MKEUPUS2","MDIUPUS2","MD0UP_NUS_2","MD1UP_NUS_2","MDGUPUS2","MREUPUS2","MPCUP_NUS_2","MNFUPUS2","MOTUPUS2","MNSUPUS2","MLUUPUS2","MWXUPUS2","MCKUPUS2","MCMUP_NUS_2","MCOUP_NUS_2","MAPUPUS2","MSGUPUS2","MMSUPUS2"

473

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:17:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SS0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

474

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

475

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:19:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRIUS1","MCRRIUS1","MNGRIUS1","MPPRIUS1","MLPRIUS1","METRIUS1","MBNRIUS1","MBIRIUS1","MOLRIUS1","MOHRIUS1","M_EPOOOH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRIUS1","MOORIUS1","M_EPOOR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MFERIUS1","M_EPOORD_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MUORIUS1","MNLRI_NUS_1","MKORI_NUS_1","MH1RI_NUS_1","MRURI_NUS_1","MBCRIUS1","MO1RI_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RI_NUS_1","MO4RI_NUS_1","MO2RI_NUS_1","MO5RI_NUS_1","MO6RI_NUS_1","MO7RI_NUS_1","MO9RI_NUS_1","MBARIUS1"

476

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

477

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MCREXUS1","MNGEXUS1","MPPEXUS1","MLPEXUS1","METEXUS1","MPREXUS1","MBNEXUS1","MBIEXUS1","MOLEXUS1","MOHEXUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_1","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MBCEXUS1","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_1","MBAEXUS1","MTPEXUS1","MGFEXUS1","MGREXUS1","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_1","MGAEXUS1","MKJEXUS1","MKEEXUS1","MDIEXUS1","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MDGEXUS1","MREEXUS1","MNFEXUS1","MOTEXUS1","MNSEXUS1","MLUEXUS1","MWXEXUS1","MCKEXUS1","MAPEXUS1","MMSEXUS1"

478

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/2011 /2011 Decades of Discovery Decades of Discovery Page 2 6/1/2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 6 2 BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES .................................................................................................. 7 2.1 Adenosine Triphosphate: The Energy Currency of Life .............................................. 7 2.2 Making Better Catalysts .............................................................................................. 8 2.3 Understanding Chemical Reactions............................................................................ 9 2.4 New Types of Superconductors ................................................................................ 10

479

Effect of Sm content on energy product of rapidly quenched and oriented SmCo5 ribbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sm-content dependence of phase composition, anisotropy, and...1+? Co5 (? ? 0.12) ribbons melt spun at 10 m/s has been studied. The samples consist of hexagonal SmCo5 grains whose c axes are pref...

Wenyong Zhang; Xingzhong Li; Shah Valloppilly

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Assessment of the possibilities of the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of multicomponent samples with variable content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibility of the employment of a linear coupling equation of mass attenuation coefficients for two energies for the density determination by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of multicomponent samples with varia...

N. A. Antropov; D. A. Karpov; Yu. Yu. Kryuchkov

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differing energy contents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Net energy content of dry extruded-expelled soybean meal fed to growing pigs using indirect calorimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feed is the single most expensive input in commercial pork production and at least 50% of this cost can be attributed in supplying energy to the animal thus making energy financially the most vital component. Swi...

D. E. Velayudhan; J. M. Heo; C. M. Nyachoti

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic...

483

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

484

Upper bounds on the relative energy difference of pure and mixed Gaussian states with a fixed fidelity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact and approximate formulas for the upper bound of the relative energy difference of two Gaussian states with the fixed fidelity between them are derived. The reciprocal formulas for the upper bound of the fidelity for the fixed value of the relative energy difference are obtained as well. The bounds appear higher for pure states than for mixed ones, and their maximal values correspond to squeezed vacuum states. In particular, to guarantee the relative energy difference less than 10%, for quite arbitrary Gaussian states, the fidelity between them must exceed the level 0.998866.

V. V. Dodonov

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

485

Diffusion of environmentally-friendly energy technologies: buy versus lease differences in residential PV markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion of microgeneration technologies, particularly rooftop photovoltaic (PV), represents a key option in reducing emissions in the residential sector. We use a uniquely rich dataset from the burgeoning residential PV market in Texas to study the nature of the consumer's decision-making process in the adoption of these technologies. In particular, focusing on the financial metrics and the information decision-makers use to base their decisions upon, we study how the leasing and buying models affect individual choices and, thereby, the adoption of capital-intensive energy technologies. Overall, our findings suggest that the leasing model more effectively addresses consumers' informational requirements and that, contrary to some other studies, buyers and lessees of PV do not necessarily differ significantly along socio-demographic variables. Instead, we find that the leasing model has opened up the residential PV market to a new, and potentially very large, consumer segment—those with a tight cash-flow situation.

Varun Rai; Benjamin Sigrin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Measurement of D* photoproduction at three different centre-of-mass energies at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photoproduction of $D^{*\\pm}$ mesons has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different ep centre-of-mass energies, $\\sqrt{s}$, of 318, 251 and 225 GeV. For each data set, $D^*$ mesons were required to have transverse momentum, $p_T^{D^*}$, and pseudorapidity, $\\eta^{D^*}$, in the ranges $1.9 < p_T^{D^*} < 20$ GeV and $|\\eta^{D^*}|<1.6$. The events were required to have a virtuality of the incoming photon, $Q^2$, of less than 1 GeV$^2$. The dependence on $\\sqrt{s}$ was studied by normalising to the high-statistics measurement at $\\sqrt{s} =318$ GeV. This led to the cancellation of a number of systematic effects both in data and theory. Predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD describe the $\\sqrt{s}$ dependence of the data well.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. N. Barakbaev; N. Bartosik; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; I. Bloch; V. Bokhonov; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; I. Brock; R. Brugnera; A. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; C. D. Catterall; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; G. D'Agostini; R. K. Dementiev; R. C. E. Devenish; G. Dolinska; V. Drugakov; S. Dusini; J. Ferrando; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; W. Hain; G. Hartner; D. Hochman; R. Hori; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; M. Ishitsuka; A. Iudin; F. Januschek; I. Kadenko; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; L. A. Khein; D. Kisielewska; R. Klanner; U. Klein; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; N. Kovalchuk; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; J. F. Martin; S. Mergelmeyer; F. Mohamad Idris; K. Mujkic; V. Myronenko; K. Nagano; A. Nigro; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; E. Paul; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; V. Samojlov; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shevchenko; O. Shkola; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; V. Sola; A. Solano; A. Spiridonov; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; P. Stopa; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; E. Tassi; T. Temiraliev; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; A. Trofymov; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; K. Wichmann; M. Wing; G. Wolf; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; N. Zakharchuk; A. F. Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; D. S. Zotkin

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

487

Measurement of D* photoproduction at three different centre-of-mass energies at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross sections for the photoproduction of $D^*$ mesons have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different ep centre-of-mass energies, $\\sqrt{s}$, of 318, 251 and 225 GeV. For each data set, $D^*$ mesons were required to have transverse momentum, $p_T^{D^*}$, and pseudorapidity, $\\eta^{D^*}$, in the ranges $1.9 < p_T^{D^*} < 20$ GeV and $|\\eta^{D^*}|<1.6$. The events were required to have a virtuality of the incoming photon, $Q^2$, of less than 1 GeV$^2$. The dependence on $\\sqrt{s}$ was studied by normalising to the high-statistics measurement at $\\sqrt{s} =318$ GeV. This led to the cancellation of a number of systematic effects both in data and theory. Predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD describe the $\\sqrt{s}$ dependence of the data well.

Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Barakbaev, A N; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bokhonov, V; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Brock, I; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; D'Agostini, G; Dementiev, R K; Devenish, R C E; Dolinska, G; Drugakov, V; Dusini, S; Ferrando, J; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hartner, G; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Iudin, A; Januschek, F; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Khein, L A; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kotz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Lohr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Martin, J F; Mergelmeyer, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Mujkic, K; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nigro, A; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlanski, W; Perrey, H; Pokrovskiy, N S; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Samojlov, V; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Shcheglova, L M; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Sola, V; Solano, A; Spiridonov, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tassi, E; Temiraliev, T; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trofymov, A; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zotkin, D S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Cost-effective and comfort-aware residential energy management under different pricing schemes and weather conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays with the emerging of smart micro-grids(SM-Gs) in residential sectors, a large portion of energy consumption can be saved through optimal scheduling of household devices and management of domestic hybrid energy sources. By the aid of such technologies, residential consumers have the capability to mitigate their energy costs and satisfy their own requirements paying less attention to the configuration of the energy supply system. This paper presents a novel residential energy management system (REMS) to improve the efficiency of energy consumption in a typical SM-G taking into account minimum cost of energy as well as maximum user's comfort level as competitive objectives. The optimization model is also formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear problem (MINLP) and its performance is tested under different operating scenarios with real data. The simulation results show that the proposed model not only reduces energy consumption costs, but also ensures a comfortable lifestyle for occupants.

Amjad Anvari-Moghaddam; Hassan Monsef; Ashkan Rahimi-Kian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Influence of net energy content of the diets on productive performance and carcass merit of gilts, boars and immunocastrated males slaughtered at 120 kg BW  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In total, 540 crossbred pigs with an initial body weight of 28.5 kg were used to investigate the effects of the net energy (NE) content (2.29, 2.33, 2.37, 2.41 and 2.45 Mcal/kg) of the diet on growth performance and carcass and meat quality traits of gilts, boars and immunocastrated males (IMC). An increase in dietary NE increased NE intake and decreased feed conversion ratio linearly. The IMC pigs showed greater feed intake and average daily gain than gilts and boars. Backfat depth increased and chilled and trimmed ham yield decreased, as the dietary NE increased. Backfat depth was greater for gilts and IMC than for boars. Also, gilts had greater carcass and loin yields than boars and IMC. Diets with the greater NE content were more appropriate for the production of heavy pigs. However, the economic interest of this practice needs further assessment.

L. Cámara; J.D. Berrocoso; J.L. Sánchez; C.J. López-Bote; G.G. Mateos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Marketed Production ",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Natural Gas Marketed Production ",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_prod_whv_a_epg0_vgm_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_prod_whv_a_epg0_vgm_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:54:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Marketed Production " "Sourcekey","N9050US2","N9050FX2","N9050AL2","N9050AK2","N9050AZ2","N9050AR2","N9050CA2","N9050CO2","N9050FL2","N9050IL2","N9050IN2","N9050KS2","N9050KY2","N9050LA2","N9050MD2","N9050MI2","N9050MS2","N9050MO2","N9050MT2","N9050NE2","N9050NV2","N9050NM2","N9050NY2","N9050ND2","N9050OH2","N9050OK2","N9050OR2","N9050PA2","N9050SD2","N9050TN2","N9050TX2","N9050UT2","N9050VA2","N9050WV2","N9050WY2"

491

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MCREXUS1","MNGEXUS1","MPPEXUS1","MLPEXUS1","METEXUS1","MPREXUS1","MBNEXUS1","MBIEXUS1","MOLEXUS1","MOHEXUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_1","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MBCEXUS1","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_1","MBAEXUS1","MTPEXUS1","MGFEXUS1","MGREXUS1","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_1","MGAEXUS1","MKJEXUS1","MKEEXUS1","MDIEXUS1","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MDGEXUS1","MREEXUS1","MNFEXUS1","MOTEXUS1","MNSEXUS1","MLUEXUS1","MWXEXUS1","MCKEXUS1","MAPEXUS1","MMSEXUS1"

492

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

493

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO4RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO7RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

494

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

495

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_enp_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_enp_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9132US2","N9132CN2","NA1287_YEPRT-NCA_2","NGA_EPG0_ENP_YCAL-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YDTW-NCA_2","NA1287_YMARY-NCA_2","NA1287_YSSM-NCA_2","NA1287_YCHRE-NCA_2","NA1287_YNOYS-NCA_2","NA1287_YBAB-NCA_2","NA1287_YHVR-NCA_2","NGA_EPG0_ENP_YPITT-NCA_MMCF","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YGRIS-NCA_MMCF","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YMSS-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YUSNI-NCA_2","NGM_EPG0_ENP_YWADD-NCA_MMCF","NA1287_YSUMS-NCA_2","N9132MX2","NA1287_YDUG-NMX_2","NA_EPG0_ENP_YNOGS-NMX_MMCF","NA1287_YCAX-NMX_2","NA1287_YOESA-NMX_2","NA1287_YALA-NMX_2","NA1287_YCLI-NMX_2","NA_EPG0_ENP_YDRT-NMX_MMCF","NA1287_YEGP-NMX_2","NA1287_YELP-NMX_2","NA1287_YHDGO-NMX_2","NA1287_YMFE-NMX_2","NA1287_YPENI-NMX_2","NA1287_Y44RB-NMX_2","NA1287_Y44RM-NMX_2"

496

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" 65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS1","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBL","MTTRPUS1","MTTIMUS1","MTTUA_NUS_1","MTTSCUS1","MTTRIUS1","MTTEXUS1","MTTUPUS1","MTTSTUS1","MTTFPP11","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBL","MTTRPP11","MTTIMP11","MTTNRP11","MTTUA_R10_1","MTTSCP11","MTTRIP11","MTTEXP11","MTTUPP11","MTTSTP11","MTTFPP21","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBL","MTTRPP21","MTTIMP21","MTTNRP21","MTTUA_R20_1","MTTSCP21","MTTRIP21","MTTEXP21","MTTUPP21","MTTSTP21","MTTFPP31","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBL","MTTRPP31","MTTIMP31","MTTNRP31","MTTUA_R30_1","MTTSCP31","MTTRIP31","MTTEXP31","MTTUPP31","MTTSTP31","MTTFPP41","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBL","MTTRPP41","MTTIMP41","MTTNRP41","MTTUA_R40_1","MTTSCP41","MTTRIP41","MTTEXP41","MTTUPP41","MTTSTP41","MTTFPP51","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBL","MTTRPP51","MTTIMP51","MTTNRP51","MTTUA_R50_1","MTTSCP51","MTTRIP51","MTTEXP51","MTTUPP51","MTTSTP51"

497

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" 59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS2","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBLD","MTTRPUS2","MTTIMUS2","MTTUA_NUS_2","MTTSCUS2","MTTRIUS2","MTTEXUS2","MTTUPUS2","MTTFPP12","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBLD","MTTRPP12","MTTIMP12","MTTNRP12","MTTUA_R10_2","MTTSCP12","MTTRIP12","MTTEXP12","MTTUPP12","MTTFPP22","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBLD","MTTRPP22","MTTIMP22","MTTNRP22","MTTUA_R20_2","MTTSCP22","MTTRIP22","MTTEXP22","MTTUPP22","MTTFPP32","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBLD","MTTRPP32","MTTIMP32","MTTNRP32","MTTUA_R30_2","MTTSCP32","MTTRIP32","MTTEXP32","MTTUPP32","MTTFPP42","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBLD","MTTRPP42","MTTIMP42","MTTNRP42","MTTUA_R40_2","MTTSCP42","MTTRIP42","MTTEXP42","MTTUPP42","MTTFPP52","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBLD","MTTRPP52","MTTIMP52","MTTNRP52","MTTUA_R50_2","MTTSCP52","MTTRIP52","MTTEXP52","MTTUPP52"

498

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_a_epg0_pnp_dpmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " "Sourcekey","N9132US3","N9132CN3","NA1287_YEPRT-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YCAL-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YDTW-NCA_3","NA1287_YMARY-NCA_3","NA1287_YSSM-NCA_3","NA1287_YCHRE-NCA_3","NA1287_YNOYS-NCA_3","NA1287_YBAB-NCA_3","NA1287_YHVR-NCA_3","NGA_EPG0_PNP_YPITT-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YGRIS-NCA_DMCF","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YMSS-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YUSNI-NCA_3","NGM_EPG0_PNP_YWADD-NCA_DMCF","NA1287_YSUMS-NCA_3","N9132MX3","NA1287_YDUG-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YNOGS-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YCAX-NMX_3","NA1287_YOESA-NMX_3","NA1287_YALA-NMX_3","NA1287_YCLI-NMX_3","NA_EPG0_PNP_YDRT-NMX_DMCF","NA1287_YEGP-NMX_3","NA1287_YELP-NMX_3","NA1287_YHDGO-NMX_3","NA1287_YMFE-NMX_3","NA1287_YPENI-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RB-NMX_3","NA1287_Y44RM-NMX_3"

499

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

500

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:11:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Pipeline" "Sourcekey","MTTMPP2P11","MCRMPP2P11","MPEMPP2P11","MPPMP_R20-R10_1","MLPMPP2P11","MBCMPP2P11","MO5MP_R20-R10_1","MO6MP_R20-R10_1","MO7MP_R20-R10_1","MO9MP_R20-R10_1","M_EPOOR_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","M_EPOORD_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","MGFMPP2P11","MGRMPP2P11","MG4MP_R20-R10_1","MG6MP_R20-R10_1","MKJMPP2P11","MKEMPP2P11","MDIMPP2P11","MD0MP_R20-R10_1","MD1MP_R20-R10_1","MDGMPP2P11"