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1

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials B. Bilyeu1,2 , W have scratch resistance values in the range appropriate for applications as obturation materials. Keywords: Obturation materials, Polymerzsilica, Hybrids, Polymer tribology, Scratch resistance Introduction

North Texas, University of

2

Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture Previous Next List Johanna Maria Huck, Li-Chiang Lin, Adam Berger, Mahdi Niknam Shahrak, Richard Luis Martin,...

3

A general model for chemical erosion of carbon materials due to low-energy H + impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the chemical erosion of carbon materials due to low-energy H + impact is of paramount importance for the prediction of the behavior of carbon-based plasma-facing components in nuclear fusion devices. In this paper a simple general model describing both energy and temperature dependence of carbon-based chemical erosion is presented. Enlightened by Hopf’s model {Hopf et al. [J. Appl. Phys.94 2373 (Year: 2003)} the chemical erosion is separated into the contributions from three mechanisms: thermal chemical erosion energetic chemical sputtering and ion-enhanced chemical erosion. Using input from the Monte Carlo code TRIDYN this model is able to reproduce experimental data well.

Shengguang Liu; Jizhong Sun; Shuyu Dai; Thomas Stirner; Dezhen Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mixing device for materials with large density differences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An auger-tube pump mixing device for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided.

Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mixing device for materials with large density differences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An auger-tube pump mixing device is disclosed for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided. 2 figs.

Gregg, D.W.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Quantification of the number of injured people due to hazardous material accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents with hazardous materials may threaten the lives of people living in the direct environment of the transportation infrastructure. In many countries, fire brigades play a major role in advising the authorities when they are dealing with issues where hazardous materials are involved. Since emergency responders have to deal with injured persons, information concerning the number of injured people and the types of injuries is relevant to them. In response to this need, we developed a method for calculating the number of injured people. This method was applied to the (re)development plans for the largest railway station in the Netherlands, Utrecht Central station. Through this intermodal transfer terminal, both passengers and substantial amounts of hazardous materials are transported. The fire brigades used the injury information to assess the spatial development plans and transportation plans for hazardous materials. Furthermore, the fire brigades used the injury information to determine their suppression tactics and equipment requirements.

Nils Rosmuller; Inge Trijssenaar; Johan Reinders; Peter Blokker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Absorbed Gamma?Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the application of high?resolution gamma?ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides namely 40 K 232 Th and 238 U present in building materials such as sand cement and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24) both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement sand and bricks.

Vitor A. P. Aguiar; Nilberto H. Medina; Ramon H. Moreira; Marcilei A. G. Silveira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials  

SciTech Connect

This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Temperature Expansion Due to Compression Test for the Determination of a Cladding Material Failure Criterion under RIA Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is mainly dedicated to the development of an out-of-pile test reproducing the thermo-mechanical loading conditions encountered during the first stage of a Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) transient, dominated by Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). In particular, the strain-controlled clad loading under high strain rate associated with temperatures up to 600 deg. C expected during the PCMI phase is simulated by an Expansion Due to Compression (EDC) test achievable at high temperature. The use of appropriate materials for the inner pellet made it possible to achieve the tests from 20 deg. C up to 900 deg. C. The interpretation of the test data is supported by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including parameters tuned using an inverse method coupling FEA and tests results. A deformation model, identified upon the PROMETRA (Transient Mechanical Properties) experimental database and describing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding alloys under typical RIA loading conditions, is exploited. The combined analysis of experimental results and finite element simulations provides a deeper understanding of the deformation mode (near pure hoop tension) that arises during the tests. The failure mode appears to be representative of that obtained on tubes during the PCMI stage of RIA experiments. An appropriate device is currently developed in order to reach a bi-axiality of the loading path closer to that expected during the PCMI stage (between plane-strain and equal-biaxial tension). (authors)

Le Saux, M.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.; Sainte Catherine, C.; Carassou, S. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Besson, J. [Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of linear elasticity and non-linearity due to plasticity and material damage in woven and biaxial braided composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Textile composites have a wide variety of applications in the aerospace, sports, automobile, marine and medical industries. Due to the availability of a variety of textile architectures and numerous parameters associated with each, optimal design...

Goyal, Deepak

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

ELUCIDATING THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ONSITE AND OFFSITE SHIPMENT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Federal regulations stipulate how radioactive materials are transported within the United States. However, the Department of Energy, under Department of Energy Order, has the authority to operate, within the boundaries of their physical site, to other stipulations. In many cases the DOE sites have internal reviews for onsite transfers that rival reviews performed by the regulatory authorities for offsite shipments. Most of the differences are in the level or type of packaging that is required, but in some cases it may be in the amount and type of material that is allowed to be transferred. This paper will describe and discuss those differences and it will discuss ways to effectively align the onsite rules for transferring materials with those for offsite shipment.

Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and thickness d. Find the resistance of a square piece, with edge length covers each of the two faces. Show that it is independent of L. (This is the two-dimensional "resistivity

Ross, Joseph

14

Heat Capacity and Latent Heat The objective of this laboratory is for you to explore the heat capacity of materials due to atomic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Capacity and Latent Heat Objective The objective of this laboratory is for you to explore the heat capacity of materials due to atomic vibrations and the latent heat of phase, dataacquisition software, plotting and analysis software Introduction Knowledge of the heat capacity

Braun, Paul

15

Severe accident modeling of a PWR core with different cladding materials  

SciTech Connect

The MAAP v.4 software has been used to model two severe accident scenarios in nuclear power reactors with three different materials as fuel cladding. The TMI-2 severe accident was modeled with Zircaloy-2 and SiC as clad material and a SBO accident in a Zion-like, 4-loop, Westinghouse PWR was modeled with Zircaloy-2, SiC, and 304 stainless steel as clad material. TMI-2 modeling results indicate that lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would result if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2 as cladding. SBO modeling results indicate that the calculated time to RCS rupture would increase by approximately 20 minutes if SiC was substituted for Zircaloy-2. Additionally, when an extended SBO accident (RCS creep rupture failure disabled) was modeled, significantly lower peak core temperatures, less H 2 (g) produced, and a smaller mass of molten material would be generated by substituting SiC for Zircaloy-2 or stainless steel cladding. Because the rate of SiC oxidation reaction with elevated temperature H{sub 2}O (g) was set to 0 for this work, these results should be considered preliminary. However, the benefits of SiC as a more accident tolerant clad material have been shown and additional investigation of SiC as an LWR core material are warranted, specifically investigations of the oxidation kinetics of SiC in H{sub 2}O (g) over the range of temperatures and pressures relevant to severe accidents in LWR 's. (authors)

Johnson, S. C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 5801 Bluff Road, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States); Henry, R. E.; Paik, C. Y. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., 16W070 83rd Street, Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The influence of different electricity-to-emissions conversion factors on the choice of insulation materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current practice of building energy upgrade typically uses thick layers of insulation in order to comply with the energy codes. Similarly, the Norwegian national energy codes for residential buildings are moving towards very low U-values for the building envelope. New and more advanced materials, such as vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) and aerogel, have been presented as alternative solutions to commonly used insulation materials. Both aerogel and \\{VIPs\\} offer very high thermal resistance, which is a favourable characteristic in energy upgrading as the same insulation level can be achieved with thinner insulation layers. This paper presents the results of energy use and lifecycle emissions calculations for three different insulation materials (mineral wool, aerogel, and vacuum insulation panels) used to achieve three different insulation levels (0.18 W/m2 K, 0.15 W/m2 K, and 0.10 W/m2 K) in the energy retrofitting of an apartment building with heat pump in Oslo, Norway. As advanced insulation materials (such as VIP and aerogel) have reported higher embodied emissions per unit of mass than those of mineral wool, a comparison of performances had to be based on equivalent wall U-values rather than same insulation thicknesses. Three different electricity-to-emissions conversion factors (European average value, a model developed at the Research Centre on Zero Emission Buildings – ZEB, and the Norwegian inland production of electricity) are used to evaluate the influence of the lifecycle embodied emissions of each insulation alternative. If the goal is greenhouse gas abatement, the appraisal of buildings based solely on their energy use does not provide a comprehensive picture of the performance of different retrofitting solutions. Results show that the use of the conversion factor for Norwegian inland production of electricity has a strong influence on the choice of which of the three insulation alternatives gives the lowest lifecycle emissions.

Nicola Lolli; Anne Grete Hestnes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Finite element modeling of the temperature rise due to the propagation of ultrasonic waves in viscoelastic materials and experimental validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ultrasound stimulated thermography method is usually used to detect the temperature rise at a defect position. The temperature rise can be due to the friction between the edges of the defect and/or the plastic deformation around the defect. This paper presents another aspect of the method when the ultrasounds are propagating in a viscoelasticanisotropicmaterial such as polymers or fiber-reinforced polymers. The attenuation of the waves produces a distributed temperature field. Therefore even a defect that does not produce some heat can be detected the ultrasonic field is modified. A finite element model is used for computing the temperature field and for predicting the possibility for an infrared camera of detecting the temperature rise and its modification due to a defect. The model computes the stress and displacement fields associated with the propagation and the loss of energy. Then the heat equation is solved with this loss as a source of heating. An experiment is done with a sonotrode that excites a PVC plate. The ultrasonic displacement at the top of the plate is measured with a laser velocimeter and introduced in the model. Finally the model result is compared to the image produced by the camera.

B. Hosten; C. Bacon; C. Biateau

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Analysis of Entropy Generation Due to Natural Convection for Hot and Cold Materials Confined within Two Entrapped Triangular Cavities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, hot inclined walls with cold horizontal walls (case 1) and cold inclined walls with hot horizontal walls (case 2) are considered as boundary conditions during convection (Ra = 103 to 105) for various fluids (Pr = 0.015, 0.7, and 1000) within/surrounded by the tubes. ... The various fields of application of indirect heat exchanger involve material processing, geophysical processes, pollution control, food processing, solar collectors, and solar stills etc.(12-18) Also, indirect contact heat exchangers play a vital role in energy conversion and energy conservation operations in various chemical processes such as in power transportation, cooling towers, desalination, air-conditioning, and refrigeration, heat recovery, alternate fuels, etc.(19-28) ... A numerical investigation to solve the laminar flow and convective problems was performed by Jan et al.(32) The performance of a prism-shaped solar collector with a right angled triangular enclosure was numerically investigated by Joudi et al.(33) Kamiyo et al.(34) presented a comprehensive review on natural convection inside triangular cavity with various boundary conditions using pitch angle and Ra as major parameters. ...

Tanmay Basak; R. Anandalakshmi; T. P. Akshaya Sruthi

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Corrosion and contact resistance measurements of different bipolar plate material for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different types of commercial stainless steels (SS316, SS310 and incoloy 800), poco graphite, composite graphite, titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and carbide base coating on aluminum substrate using thermal spray technique were evaluated as metallic bipolar plate in terms of Interfacial Contact Resistance (ICR) and corrosion resistance in a solution simulating the environment of a bipolar plate in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), 0.5 M H2SO4 and 200 ppm HF at room temperature. In addition, a comparison between graphite composites and carbide-based amorphous metallic coating alloy bipolar plate cost analysis. Results show that stainless steels have a high ICR and undergo corrosion in both anode and cathode due to the passive film formation. Moreover, although carbide-based alloy showed an ICR much less than composite graphite, their behaviour was not satisfactory in corrosive acidic medium.

Yue Hung; Hazem Tawfik; K.M. El-Khatib; Hammam El-Abd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CO{sub 2}-gasification reactivity of different carbonaceous materials at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

At the atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures between 1,223 and 1,673 K, the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of seven different carbonaceous materials comprising coal tar pitch coke, petroleum coke, natural graphite, carbon black and three coal chars was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis. Their crystalline structures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the reactivity of the chars, pitch coke and petroleum coke produced from liquid phase carbonization, is several times poorer than that of the coal chars produced from solid phase carbonization and even lower than that of natural graphite. At the same time, it is obtained that under the condition of the chemical reaction control, the apparent activation energies of the former are in the range of 135.82-174.92 kJ/mol, while those of the latter are between 89.95 kJ/mol and 110.05 kJ/mol. Besides, the reactivity of the sample has a certain correlation with the crystalline structure of the sample, i.e., the larger the fraction of the relatively better crystalline structure is, the poorer the reactivity of the sample is.

Gu, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, Y.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Decomposition of molybdate-hexamethylenetetramine complex: One single source route for different catalytic materials  

SciTech Connect

Decomposition of ammonium heptamolybdate-hexamethylentetramine (HMTA) complex (HMTA){sub 2}(NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}.2H{sub 2}O was studied as a function of treatment conditions in the range 300-1173 K. The evolution of solid products during decomposition was studied by thermal analysis and in situ EXAFS. Depending on the nature of the gas used for treatment, single phases of highly dispersed nitrides Mo{sub 2}N, carbide Mo{sub 2}C, or oxide MoO{sub 2} can be obtained. The nature of the products obtained was explained by qualitative thermodynamical considerations. Morphology of the solids considerably depends on such preparation parameters as temperature and mass velocity of the gas flow. For the nitride-based materials, catalytic activity was evaluated in the model thiophene HDS reaction. It was demonstrated that NH{sub 3}-treated samples showed better catalytic activity than N{sub 2}-treated ones due to cleaner surface and better morphology. Transmission microscopy, XRD and XPS studies showed that MoS{sub 2} is formed on the surface during HDS reaction or sulfidation with H{sub 2}S. Optimized nitride-derived catalysts showed mass activity several times higher than unsupported MoS{sub 2} or MoS{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference catalyst. - Graphical Abstract: Depending on the conditions, decomposition of molybdate-HTMA complex yields highly dispersed molybdenum nitride, carbide or oxide. Research Highlights: > Decomposition of molybdate-HTMA complex yields highly dispersed Mo{sub 2}N, Mo{sub 2}C or MoO{sub 2}. > In situ EXAFS shows formation of common amorphous product MoC{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} at 673 K. > Crystalline Mo{sub 2}N with surface area near 200 m{sup 2}/g was obtained at 823 K. > High mass activity in thiophene HDS was observed.

Chouzier, Sandra [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon UMR5256, CNRS-Universite de Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Czeri, Tivadar; Roy-Auberger, Magalie; Pichon, Christophe [IFP Energies nouvelles, BP 3, 69390 Vernaison (France); Geantet, Christophe; Vrinat, Michel [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon UMR5256, CNRS-Universite de Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Afanasiev, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.afanasiev@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon UMR5256, CNRS-Universite de Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

23

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

24

Characterization and Comparison of Different Cathode Materials for SC-SOFC: LSM, BSCF, SSC and LSCF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cathode materials for Single Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SC-SOFC) (La0.8Sr0.2MnO3- (LSM), Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0 Chamber, Solid Oxide Fuel cell, SSC. 1 Introduction Single Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SC-SOFC) show and their polarization resistance under air and methane/air atmosphere. Electrolyte-supported fuel cells, with Ce0.9Gd0

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Internal neutronics-temperature coupling in Serpent 2 - Reactivity differences resulting from choice of material property correlations  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the unique way of simultaneously solving the power and temperature distributions of a nuclear system with the Monte Carlo neutron transport code Serpent 2. The coupled solution is achieved through the implementation of an internal temperature solver and material property correlations in the code. The program structure is reviewed concerning the temperature solver and the internal correlations as well as the internal coupling between these two and the neutron transport part. To estimate the reactivity differences resulting from correlation choices a simple pin-cell case has been calculated. It is established, that some correlation choices may result in difference in reactivity of approximately 100 pcm. (authors)

Valtavirta, V. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Governing factors for motor oil removal from water with different sorption materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper has been focused on the sorbent efficiency for motor oil removal from water. Two types of sorbents were investigated: organic and inorganic. Natural wool fibers (NWFs) and recycled-wool-based nonwoven material (RWNM)) were tested as organic type of sorbents. Sepiolite, bentonite and zeolite have been chosen as representative inorganic sorbents. Sorption was carried out in batch sorption system. Efficiency of oil removal was determined by measuring the oil concentration before and after the sorption process. Extractive-gravimetric method and refractive index determination have been applied as analytical methods for determination of oil concentration in water. Governing factors for sorbent efficiency were proposed, analysed and compared. It was concluded that sorption process is mostly affected by mass of sorbent, sorption time, temperature and pH value of water. NWFs, which were the most efficient sorbent showed maximal efficiency and maximal sorption capacity: 0.1 g of \\{NWFs\\} after 10 min at 20 °C and pH 8.00 sorbed 3.3 g of motor oil from 300 mL of water polluted with 4.5 g of motor oil. Maximal efficiency for all sorbents investigated was reached after 30 min of sorption processes, it was 95.0% for NWF, 43.0% for NRWM, 20.7% for sepiolite, 19.6% for bentonite and 21.2% for zeolite. Physical adsorption onto all sorbents is a favorable process (sorption efficiency decrease with increasing temperature) while sorption onto bentonite and zeolite is a result of both physical adsorption and chemisorption (sorption efficiency increase with increasing temperature, up to 80 °C).

V. Rajakovi?-Ognjanovi?; G. Aleksi?; Lj. Rajakovi?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Total and Partial Fragmentation Cross-Section of 500 MeV/nucleon Carbon Ions on Different Target Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using an experimental setup based on thin and thick double-sided microstrip silicon detectors, it has been possible to identify the fragmentation products due to the interaction of very high energy primary ions on different targets. Here we report total and partial cross-sections measured at GSI (Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung), Darmstadt, for 500 MeV/n energy $^{12}C$ beam incident on water (in flasks), polyethylene, lucite, silicon carbide, graphite, aluminium, copper, iron, tin, tantalum and lead targets. The results are compared to the predictions of GEANT4 (v4.9.4) and FLUKA (v11.2) Monte Carlo simulation programs.

Behcet Alpat; Ercan Pilicer; Sandor Blasko; Diego Caraffini; Francesco Di Capua; Vasile Postolache; Giorgio Saltanocchi; Mauro Menichelli; Laurent Desorgher; Marco Durante; Radek Pleskac; Chiara La Tessa

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver with non-uniform heat flux at different rim angles and concentration ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, Monte Carlo ray-tracing and computational fluid dynamics are used to numerically investigate the minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver. The analysis was carried out for rim angles in the range 40°–120°, concentration ratios in the range 57–143, Reynolds numbers in the range 1.02 × 104–1.36 × 106 and fluid temperatures in the range 350–650 K. Results show existence of an optimal Reynolds number at any given combination of fluid temperature, concentration ratio and rim angle for which the total entropy generation is a minimum. The total entropy generation was found to increase as the rim angle reduced, concentration ratio increased and fluid temperature reduced. The high entropy generation rates at low rim angles are mainly due to high peak temperatures in the absorber tube at these low rim angles.

Aggrey Mwesigye; Tunde Bello-Ochende; Josua P. Meyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Structural materials for fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion Reactors will require specially engineered structural materials, which ... on safety considerations. The fundamental differences between fusion and other nuclear reactors arise due to the 14MeV neutronics ...

P. M. Raole; S. P. Deshpande

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effect of feldspar concentrate on the chemical resistance of acid-resistant materials prepared on the basis of argillaceous materials of different chemical and mineral composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research shows that introduction of feldspar concentrate into the composition of ceramic mixes improves mullite crystallization, and this promotes an increase in the acid resistance of refractory materials. An in...

E. S. Abdrakhimova

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effects of different particle sizes on electrochemical performance of spinel LiMn2O4 cathode materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the preparation of cathode sheets, a slurry was formed by mixing the active material (85%), acetylene black (10%)...N...-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, NMP). The mixed slurry was coated onto an aluminum current collec...

Ting-Feng Yi; Xin-Guo Hu; Chang-Song Dai; Kun Gao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Verification and Validation of EnergyPlus Conduction Finite Difference and Phase Change Material Models for Opaque Wall Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Phase change materials (PCMs) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. There are few building energy simulation programs that have the capability to simulate PCM but their accuracy has not been completely tested. This report summarizes NREL efforts to develop diagnostic tests cases to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.; Booten, C.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature of gas cylinders hazards of a ruptured cylinder. There are almost 200 different types of materials in gas cylinders, there are several general procedures to follow for safe storage and handling of a compressed gas cylinder: II

Suzuki, Masatsugu

34

Surface loss probability of atomic hydrogen for different electrode cover materials investigated in H{sub 2}-Ar low-pressure plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In an inductively coupled H{sub 2}-Ar plasma at a total pressure of 1.5?Pa, the influence of the electrode cover material on selected line intensities of H, H{sub 2}, and Ar are determined by optical emission spectroscopy and actinometry for the electrode cover materials stainless steel, copper, tungsten, Macor{sup ®}, and aluminum. Hydrogen dissociation degrees for the considered conditions are determined experimentally from the measured emission intensity ratios. The surface loss probability ?{sub H} of atomic hydrogen is correlated with the measured line intensities, and ?{sub H} values are determined for the considered materials. Without the knowledge of the atomic hydrogen temperature, ?{sub H} cannot be determined exactly. However, ratios of ?{sub H} values for different surface materials are in first order approximation independent of the atomic hydrogen temperature. Our results show that ?{sub H} of copper is equal to the value of stainless steel, ?{sub H} of Macor{sup ®} and tungsten is about 2 times smaller and ?{sub H} of aluminum about 5 times smaller compared with stainless steel. The latter ratio is in reasonable agreement with literature. The influence of the atomic hydrogen temperature T{sub H} on the absolute value is thoroughly discussed. For our assumption of T{sub H}?=?600?K, we determine a ?{sub H} for stainless steel of 0.39?±?0.13.

Sode, M., E-mail: maik.sode@ipp.mpg.de; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Jacob, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kersten, H. [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11-19, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermal aging of electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries – An investigation of the impact of protic impurities and different housing materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal degradation products in lithium-ion batteries result mainly from hydrolysis sensitivity of lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6). As organic carbonate solvents contain traces of protic impurities, the thermal decomposition of electrolytes is enhanced. Therefore, resulting degradation products are studied with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The electrolyte contains 1 M LiPF6 in a binary mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethylene carbonate (DEC) in a ratio of 1:2 (v/v) and is aged at ambient and elevated temperature. The impact of protic impurities, either added as deionized water or incorporated in positive electrode material, upon aging is investigated. Further, the influence of different housing materials on the electrolyte degradation is shown. Difluorophosphoric acid is identified as main decomposition product by NMR-spectroscopy. Traces of other decomposition products are determined by headspace GC–MS. Acid–base and coulometric titration are used to determine the total amount of acid and water content upon aging, respectively. The aim of this investigation is to achieve profound understanding about the thermal decomposition of one most common used electrolyte in a battery-like housing material.

Patricia Handel; Gisela Fauler; Katja Kapper; Martin Schmuck; Christoph Stangl; Roland Fischer; Frank Uhlig; Stefan Koller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

2014 ALCC Proposals Due  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALCC Proposals Due February 3, 2014 2014 DOE ALCC Proposals Due February 3 December 23, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) DOE's 2014 call for its ASCR Leadership Computing...

37

Tensile properties and strain rate sensitivity of Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si sheet material with different microstructures  

SciTech Connect

New materials based on gamma titanium aluminides (gamma alloys) have emerged as potential candidates for high temperature applications such as aerospace structural components (e.g., airframes, turbine components, thermal protection systems) and automotive parts (e.g., exhaust valves, turbocharger rotors). Because of their low density, high Young`s modulus, high-temperature strength retention, good oxidation and burn resistance, the so-called second generation gamma alloys are able to exceed the application temperature of advanced titanium alloys and also to replace nickel- and iron-based superalloys up to 800C. However, poor formability and low room temperature (RT) ductility resulting in low fracture toughness have limited possible applications. The present paper deals with the dependence of tensile properties of Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si (composition in atomic-%) sheet material on microstructure and test conditions. Four different microstructures, i.e., fine-grained primary annealed (PA), near gamma (NG), duplex (DU) as well as coarse-grained fully lamellar (FL) have been investigated with emphasis on the influence of grain size, phase distribution, and strain rate on tensile properties at 700 C. Fractography was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the influence of temperature on the fracture behavior and to determine the onset of dynamic recrystallization effects.

Clemens, H. [Plansee AG, Reutte (Austria)] [Plansee AG, Reutte (Austria); Glatz, W. [Montanuniversitaet, Leoben (Austria). Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Werkstoffpruefung] [Montanuniversitaet, Leoben (Austria). Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Werkstoffpruefung; Appel, F. [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research] [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Functional Materials for Energy SHARE Functional Materials for Energy The concept of functional materials for energy occupies a very prominent position in ORNL's research and more broadly the scientific research sponsored by DOE's Basic Energy Sciences. These materials facilitate the capture and transformation of energy, the storage of energy or the efficient release and utilization of stored energy. A different kind of

39

Chemomechanics of calcium leaching of cement-based materials at different scales : the role of CH-dissolution and C-S-H degradation on strength and durability performance of materials and structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calcium leaching is a durability threat for cement-based materials employed in critical infrastructures, such as Nuclear Waste Storage Systems. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of the material and structural ...

Heukamp, Franz H. (Franz Hoyte), 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Measurement and characterization techniques for thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of thermoelectric materials can pose many problems. A temperature difference can be established across these materials as an electrical current is passed due to the Peltier effect. The thermopower of these materials is quite large and thus large thermal voltages can contribute to many of the measurements necessary to investigate these materials. This paper will discuss the chracterization techniques necessary to investigate these materials and provide an overview of some of the potential systematic errors which can arise. It will also discuss some of the corrections one needs to consider. This should provide an introduction to the characterization and measurement of thermoelectric materials and provide references for a more in depth discussion of the concepts. It should also serve as an indication of the care that must be taken while working with thermoelectric materials.

Tritt, T.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method for forming materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sound radiation due to rapid deformation of an impacted plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sound radiation due to forced deformation of an impacted plate was investigated. An initial sound pressure pulse due to rapid local deformation of a plate was generated before the radiation from natural modes of the plate occurred. On the axis of impact near the plate a distinct pressure pulse is observed to reproduce the velocity waveform of the plate at the opposite side of the impact point. Data from experiments involving impact of spheres on plates differing in size and material properties are presented to show the plate behavior and the radiated soundpressure. Theoretical results were obtained from an analytical model in which impulsive acceleration of a plate with Gaussian spatial distribution is convoluted with the acceleration?time history of the actual impact. Theoretical results for the on?axis pressure are compared with the experimental results.

Adnan Akay; Reginald O. Cook

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - amelogenesis imperfecta due Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science ; Biotechnology 58 Combining High-resolution Micro computed Tomography with Material Summary: in assessing bone volumetric density is severely limited due...

44

Materialism and materiality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accountants and auditors in recent financial scandals have been pictured as materialistic, simply calculating consequences and ignoring duties. This paper potentially explains this apparently materialistic behaviour in what has historically been a truthtelling profession. Materiality, which drives audit priorities, has been institutionalised in accounting and auditing standards. But a materiality focus inherently implies that all amounts that are not 'materially' misstated are equally true. This leads to habitual immaterial misstatements and promotes the view that auditors do not care about truth at all. Auditors' lack of commitment to truth undermines their claim to be professionals in the classic sense.

Michael K. Shaub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) - PSD Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filler A National Resource for Collaborative Materials Research The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program is on hiatus due to federal budget reductions....

46

Joining of dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

48

Reference Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Materials There are a variety of reference materials the NSSAB utilizes and have been made available on its website. Documents Fact Sheets - links to Department of Energy...

49

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

50

Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Materializing energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of ... Keywords: design, design theory, energy, materiality, sustainability

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

High accuracy electronic material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

High accuracy electronic material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mechanics of abrasive wear of elastomeric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elastomeric materials are widely used as tire and sealing materials due to their ability to undergo large deformations and conform to the mating surface. However, their applications often result in repeated contact with ...

Qi, Hang, 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

60

Critical Materials:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

material, determined by ACEM, with structural phenomena revealed using neutron beams, to elucidate storage mechanisms. * Commissioning of Vulcan has been delayed due to...

62

Computation of seismic attenuation and dispersion due to ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2006 ... due to mesoscopic heterogeneity in porous materials ... permeability and L a characteristic patch size of the .... The inverse quality factor ..... in shaly sediments or a fracture embedded in a sandstone are natural ..... Archie, G. E., The electrical resistivity log as an aid in determining some reservoir char-.

masson@localhost.localdomain (masson)

2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American National Standards Edition: January 2010 Copyright by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York 10036. This material may be copied without permission from ANSI only

64

Due date assignment using ADRES and simulated annealing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, flowtime estimation and/or Due Date Assignment (DDA) is studied by making use of a statistical technique, namely Adaptive Response Rate Exponential Smoothing (ADRES) and Simulated Annealing (SA). Primary objective of this study is to compare accuracies of the Due Date Assignment Models (DDAMs). In order to achieve this objective, simulation models are constructed representing different shop load level and using different despatching rules. Case by case findings are summarised in this paper.

Adil Baykasoglu; Mustafa Gocken; Zeynep D. Unutmaz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Laser-Material Interactions: A Study of Laser Energy Coupling with Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 3 Detecting Phase Change materials where the latentnear field, material undergoing phase change could expand orproperties of the material due to phase-change can certainly

Shannon, M.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC allocation requests due September 22 2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22 August 13, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) NERSC's allocation submission system is...

67

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

68

Complex Materials  

SciTech Connect

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Complex Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Materializing Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of materializing energy. Three critical themes are presented: the intangibility of energy, the undifferentiatedness of energy, and the availability of energy. Each theme is developed through combination of critical investigation and design exploration, including the development and deployment of several novel design artifacts: Energy Mementos and The Local Energy Lamp. A framework for interacting with energy-as-materiality is proposed involving collecting, keeping, sharing, and activating energy. A number of additional concepts are also introduced, such as energy attachment, energy engagement, energy attunement, local energy and energy meta-data. Our work contributes both a broader, more integrative design perspective on energy and materiality as well as a diversity of more specific concepts and artifacts that may be of service to designers and researchers of interactive systems concerned with sustainability and energy. Author Keywords Sustainability, energy, materiality, design, design theory

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

71

Production and characterization of a composite insulation material from waste polyethylene teraphtalates  

SciTech Connect

The pollution of polyethylene teraphtalate (PET) is in huge amounts due to the most widely usage as a packaging material in several industries. Regional pumice has several desirable characteristics such as porous structure, low-cost and light-weight. Considering the requirements approved by the Ministry of Public Works on isolation, composite insulation material consisting of PET and pumice was studied. Sheets of composites differing both in particle size of pumice and composition of polymer were produced by hot-molding technique. Characterization of new composite material was achieved by measuring its weight, density, flammability, endurance against both to common acids and bases, and to a force applied, heat insulation and water adsorption capacity. The results of the study showed that produced composite material is an alternative building material due to its desirable characteristics; low weight, capability of low heat conduction.

Kurtulmus, Erhan; Karaboyac?, Mustafa; Yigitarslan, Sibel [Chemical Engineering Department of Suleyman Demirel University, 32200, Isparta (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MEMS THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents the fabrication and characterization of MEMS thermal interface materials. Different materials were used to fabricate and characterize different configurations of sample thermal… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Natural gas dehydration by desiccant materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water vapor in a natural gas stream can result in line plugging due to hydrate formation, reduction of line capacity due to collection of free water in the line, and increased risk of damage to the pipeline due to the corrosive effects of water. Therefore, water vapor must be removed from natural gas to prevent hydrate formation and corrosion from condensed water. Gas dehydration is the process of removing water vapor from a gas stream to lower the temperature at which water will condense from the stream; this temperature is called the “dew point” of the gas. Molecular sieves are considered as one of the most important materials that are used as desiccant materials in industrial natural gas dehydration. This work shows a study of natural gas dehydration using 3A molecular sieve as a type of solid desiccant materials, the scope of this work was to build up a pilot scale unit for a natural gas dehydration as simulation of actual existing plant for Egyptian Western Desert Gas Company (WDGC). The effect of different operating conditions (water vapor concentration and gas flow rate) on dehydration of natural gas was studied. The experimental setup consists of cylinder filled with 3A molecular sieve to form a fixed bed, then pass through this bed natural gas with different water vapor concentration, The experimental setup is fitted with facilities to control bed pressure, flow rate, measure water vapor concentration and bed temperature, a gas heater was used to activate molecular sieve bed. Increasing water vapor concentration in inlet feed gas leads to a marked decrease in dehydration efficiency. As expected, a higher inlet flow rate of natural gas decrease dehydration efficiency. Increasing feed pressure leads to higher dehydration efficiency.

Hassan A.A. Farag; Mustafa Mohamed Ezzat; Hoda Amer; Adel William Nashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Creep Behavior of High Density Polyethylene after Aging in Contact with Different Oil Derivates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creep Behavior of High Density Polyethylene after Aging in Contact with Different Oil Derivates The creep behavior of a high density polyethylene (HDPE), currently used as raw material for pipe manu polyethylene (HDPE) is a natural choice due to its good properties, its large availability, and its reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Materials Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE sub title of this handbook gives the clue to the mode of treatment of the subject matter, and so ... seventeen to 'alkalis'; in fact, a better title for the book would be "Handbook of Engineering Materials". British trade names are conspicuously few, but no doubt a ...

E. H. TRIPP

1942-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Materials Synthesis from...

77

Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges.

Hildebrand, Bernard P. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

Hildebrand, B.P.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

16 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of road pavement materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: At present the choice of materials and techniques in road construction is dictated by structural requirements and economic aspects. However, ecological factors have gained in importance due to environmental considerations in politics and society. To evaluate the environmental impact of motorways, a life cycle assessment (LCA) according to ISO 14040 was carried out for different pavement types. By investigating different case scenarios, the reduction potential of environmental impact was quantified. The biggest reduction in air pollution can be achieved by improving pavement properties (e.g., texture, stiffness and flatness) which would significantly reduce the fuel consumption of vehicles.

C. Thiel; T. Stengel; C. Gehlen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Materials Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ferritic and austenitic steels have been used for many different high temperature applications in oil and chemical plants and in power generation equipment. Such applications have been generally successful, an...

R. D. Townsend; J. J. Jones; S. R. Keown…

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Materials Under Extremes | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Materials Under Extremes SHARE Materials Under Extremes Materials that can withstand extreme conditions such...

82

Functionalized Materials From Elastomers to High Performance Thermoplastics  

SciTech Connect

Synthesis and incorporation of functionalized materials continues to generate significant research interest in academia and in industry. If chosen correctly, a functional group when incorporated into a polymer can deliver enhanced properties, such as adhesion, water solubility, thermal stability, etc. The utility of these new materials has been demonstrated in drug-delivery systems, coatings, membranes and compatibilizers. Two approaches exist to functionalize a material. The desired moiety can be added to the monomer either before or after polymerization. The polymers used range from low glass transition temperature elastomers to high glass transition temperature, high performance materials. One industrial example of the first approach is the synthesis of Teflon(reg. sign). Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE or Teflon(reg. sign)) is synthesized from tetrafluoroethylene, a functionalized monomer. The resulting material has significant property differences from the parent, poly(ethylene). Due to the fluorine in the polymer, PTFE has excellent solvent and heat resistance, a low surface energy and a low coefficient of friction. This allows the material to be used in high temperature applications where the surface needs to be nonabrasive and nonstick. This material has a wide spread use in the cooking industry because it allows for ease of cooking and cleaning as a nonstick coating on cookware. One of the best examples of the second approach, functionalization after polymerization, is the vulcanization process used to make tires. Natural rubber (from the Hevea brasiliensis) has a very low glass transition temperature, is very tacky and would not be useful to make tires without synthetic alteration. Goodyear's invention was the vulcanization of polyisoprene by crosslinking the material with sulfur to create a rubber that was tough enough to withstand the elements of weather and road conditions. Due to the development of polymerization techniques to make cis-polyisoprene, natural rubber is no longer needed for the manufacturing of tires, but vulcanization is still utilized.

Laura Ann Salazar

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Photovoltaic Materials  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of a research methodology to study lumber waste due to design causes in residential construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Construction faces problems regarding inefficiencies of material usage. Builders pay twice for the lumber that is wasted. Once when it is purchased and once when it is disposed. Part of the lumber waste is generated due to the design...

Vyas, Ashok Madhusudan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Energy harvesting using a thermoelectric material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel energy harvesting system and method utilizing a thermoelectric having a material exhibiting a large thermally induced strain (TIS) due to a phase transformation and a material exhibiting a stress induced electric field is introduced. A material that exhibits such a phase transformation exhibits a large increase in the coefficient of thermal expansion over an incremental temperature range (typically several degrees Kelvin). When such a material is arranged in a geometric configuration, such as, for a example, a laminate with a material that exhibits a stress induced electric field (e.g. a piezoelectric material) the thermally induced strain is converted to an electric field.

Nersessian, Nersesse (Van Nuys, CA); Carman, Gregory P. (Los Angeles, CA); Radousky, Harry B. (San Leandro, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Critical Materials Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentations during the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 overviewing critical materials strategies

88

Critical Materials Institute  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

Alex King

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermoelectric standardisation - Reference materials and characterisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials for working temperatures between 300 K and 1000 K become continuously more important for energy recuperation applications. The efficiency is determined by the transport properties (electrical and thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient) which form the known thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. The thorough determination of ZT represents the basis for the assessment of thermoelectric materials research. Due to different continuing difficulties measurement errors distinctly higher than 15% can be observed repeatedly which is still too high for an industrial benchmark and deficient for many scientific investigations and technological developments. Against this background a project was launched in 2011 together with the Fraunhofer Institute of Physical Measurement Techniques (IPM Freiburg) the Department Temperature of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB Berlin) and the company Netzsch Gerätebau GbmH (Selb). The aim of the project "Thermoelectric Standardisation" (TEST) is to minimise the measurement uncertainties and to develop traceable high-accurate thermoelectric characterisation techniques and thermoelectric reference materials for the mentioned temperature range. Here we initially present the project to the thermoelectric society and want to give a survey on the planned activities and the current status of the contributions of the German Aerospace Center (DLR Cologne).

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Materials Science and Engineering A252 (1998) 117132 Optimization of 316 stainless steel/alumina functionally graded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction Due to differences of thermal and mechanical prop- erties in ceramics and metals, residual stresses develop in regions near the ceramic/metal interfaces during fabrication and under thermal/alumina functionally graded material for reduction of damage induced by thermal residual stresses M. Grujicic *, H

Grujicic, Mica

91

Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Local Structure of Materials at Atomic Resolution by Electron Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in materials science and nanoscience through the use ofin materials science and nanoscience has revived due to thescience, biology and nanoscience, they have their own

Zhu, Chun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Argonne TTRDC - Experts - Materials Experts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Technologies Battery Technologies Combustion Analysis Engines & Emissions Fuel Cell Technologies Systems Assessment Technology Analysis Tribology Vehicle Recycling Vehicle Systems Materials Experts Click on a name to see a full résumé. Deformation Joining Cinta Lorenzo-Martin, Postdoctoral Appointee phone: 630/252-8577, fax: 630/525-5568, e-mail: lorenzo-martin@anl.gov PhD, Material Science, University of Seville, Spain Joining of different materials at high temperature Research on reduction of friction and wear to minimize energy losses Scuffing, wear and friction studies of ceramics 21+ publications and presentations Dileep Singh, Materials Scientist phone: 630/252-5009, fax: 630/252-2785, e-mail: dsingh@anl.gov PhD, Material Science, University of Utah Structure-mechanical property relationships in advanced energy materials

94

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

Gray, P. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Rapidly solidified magnesium: nickel alloys as hydrogen storage materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to high hydrogen capacity, good reversibility and low cost, magnesium hydride is one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials. However, the high desorption… (more)

Yi, Xiaodong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multi Material Paradigm  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Multi Material Paradigm Glenn S. Daehn Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University Advanced Composites (FRP) Steel Spaceframe Multi Material Concept...

97

Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Mark J. Cooker School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. m.cooker@uea.ac.uk Theory of Water Waves, Cambridge Motion due to Impact 2. Pressure-Impulse Theory 214 M.J. COOKER AND D.H. PEREGRINE Y; O: .-- I mpact zone

98

A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Degradation of the mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 due to hydrogen embrittlement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During nuclear reactor operation, the embrittlement of components made of zirconium-based alloys is observed. The degradation of their mechanical properties is due to the combined effect of hydrogen absorption and the damage caused by neutron irradiation. In this work we studied the influence of hydrogen content on the fracture toughness of a Zircaloy-4 alloy. Compact tension (CT) specimens were obtained from a hot-rolled, annealed and finally cold-rolled material. The observed microstructure consisted of ?-Zr rounded grains with diameters of about 15 ?m. Selection of the tested material was guided by the need to perform experiments on samples with a texture equivalent to the cladding components of Candu-type nuclear reactors. The specimens were fatigue precracked and hydrogen charged before testing. Two different reactions were performed. Specimens with a final hydrogen content ranging from 10 to 400 ppm were obtained by electrochemical charging and those with a final concentration of up to 2000 ppm were charged by absorption under a gaseous atmosphere. In both cases, an homogeneous distribution of dissolved hydrogen and hydride phases was obtained. The dependence of the toughness on temperature and hydrogen content was measured on CT specimens. The analysis was performed in terms of J-integral and resistance curves.

G Bertolino; G Meyer; J Perez Ipiña

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Occupational exposure due to naturally occurring radionuclide material in granite quarry industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......resolution of about 8 % at the energy of 0.662 MeV of 137Cs. The equipment was calibrated against reference source from Rocketdyne Laboratories (CA). The following gamma transitions were used: 40K, 1.461 MeV; 226Ra, 1.760 MeV (214Bi) and 232Th......

J. A. Ademola

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Supplementary Material for "Emergent multicellular life cycles in filamentous bacteria due to density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not exceed 1000 cells. For a turnover one order of magnitude lower ( = 0.001), the peak of the average length+ . As for the linear case, the birth and rate functions in (1) and (2) satisfy (N c ) = (N c ) = . The pie charts, the trend is not very marked. On the other hand, the charts obtained with hyperbolic20 functions

Barbour, Andrew

104

Multimodal options for materials research to advance the basis for fusion energy in the ITER era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. Due to differences in national timelines and fusion device concepts, a parallel-track (multimodal) approach is currently being used for developing fusion energy. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major candidate materials systems for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high-temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: (1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and (2) application of this knowledge to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high-performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

S.J. Zinkle; A. Möslang; T. Muroga; H. Tanigawa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ultrastructural Nuclear Changes Due to Tannic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Variations in Ultrastructural Nuclear Changes in Hepatocarcinogenesis...Cytochemical Studies on Nuclear Fine Structure. Exptl...Papers, p. 103. Tokyo, Japan, 1966. 58. Widnell...27 Ultrastructural Nuclear Changes Due to Tannic...Six hours. A high power view of a hepatocyte...

Antonio Racela; Harold Grady; and Donald Svoboda

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Is Hubble's Expansion due to Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{\\it The universe is expanding} is known (through Galaxy observations) since 1929 through Hubble's discovery ($V = H D$). Recently in 1999, it is found (through Supernovae observations) that the universe is not simply expanding but is accelerating too. We, however, hardly know only $4\\%$ of the universe. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite observational data suggest $73\\%$ content of the universe in the form of dark-energy, $23\\%$ in the form of non-baryonic dark-matter and the rest $4\\%$ in the form of the usual baryonic matter. The acceleration of the universe is ascribed to this dark-energy with bizarre properties (repulsive-gravity). The question is that whether Hubble's expansion is just due to the shock of big-bang & inflation or it is due to the repulsive-gravity of dark-energy? Now, it is believed to be due to dark-energy, say, by re-introducing the once-discarded cosmological-constant $\\Lambda$. In the present paper, it is shown that `the formula for acceleration due to dark-energy' is (almost) exactly of same-form as `the acceleration formula from the Hubble's law'. Hence, it is concluded that: yes, `indeed it is the dark-energy responsible for the Hubble's expansion too, in-addition to the current on-going acceleration of the universe'.

R. C. Gupta; Anirudh Pradhan

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

NEWTON's Material Science References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science References Material Science References Do you have a great material science reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Materials Research Society Materials Research Society The Materials Research Society has assembled many resources in its Materials Science Enthusiasts site. This site has information for the K-12 audience, general public, and materials science professionals. Material Science nanoHUB nanHUB.org is the place for nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. There are Simulation Programs, Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. (Intened for high school and up) Materials Science Resources on the Web Materials Science Resources on the Web This site gives a good general introduction into material science. Sponsered by Iowa State, it talks about what material science is, ceramics and composites, and other topics.

108

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Coupling undulator radiation from Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamlines 3-ID and 13-ID to nuclear resonant inelastic scattering techniques, researchers have determined the phonon density of states for iron under pressures up to 153 gigapascals, equivalent to those found at the Earth's core. Image of the Earth's core. Although indirect measurements and theory have, since the early 1950s, produced an informed picture of the structure and composition of the materials that make up the core of the Earth, direct proof and the answers to some intriguing questions remain unanswered. Previously, ultrahigh-pressure experiments using nuclear resonant inelastic scattering have been difficult to carry out due the tiny samples required.

109

Flow enhancement in nanotubes of different materials and lengths  

SciTech Connect

The high water flow rates observed in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have previously been attributed to the unfavorable energetic interaction between the liquid and the graphitic walls of the CNTs. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of water flow in carbon, boron nitride, and silicon carbide nanotubes that show the effect of the solid-liquid interactions on the fluid flow. Alongside an analytical model, these results show that the flow enhancement depends on the tube's geometric characteristics and the solid-liquid interactions.

Ritos, Konstantinos, E-mail: konstantinos.ritos@strath.ac.uk [James Weir Fluids Lab, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)] [James Weir Fluids Lab, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Mattia, Davide [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Calabrò, Francesco [DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino (Italy)] [DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Reese, Jason M. [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Computation of multi-material interactions using point method  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of fluid flows are often based on Eulerian description, while calculations of solid deformations are often based on Lagrangian description of the material. When the Eulerian descriptions are used to problems of solid deformations, the state variables, such as stress and damage, need to be advected, causing significant numerical diffusion error. When Lagrangian methods are used to problems involving large solid deformat ions or fluid flows, mesh distortion and entanglement are significant sources of error, and often lead to failure of the calculation. There are significant difficulties for either method when applied to problems involving large deformation of solids. To address these difficulties, particle-in-cell (PIC) method is introduced in the 1960s. In the method Eulerian meshes stay fixed and the Lagrangian particles move through the Eulerian meshes during the material deformation. Since its introduction, many improvements to the method have been made. The work of Sulsky et al. (1995, Comput. Phys. Commun. v. 87, pp. 236) provides a mathematical foundation for an improved version, material point method (MPM) of the PIC method. The unique advantages of the MPM method have led to many attempts of applying the method to problems involving interaction of different materials, such as fluid-structure interactions. These problems are multiphase flow or multimaterial deformation problems. In these problems pressures, material densities and volume fractions are determined by satisfying the continuity constraint. However, due to the difference in the approximations between the material point method and the Eulerian method, erroneous results for pressure will be obtained if the same scheme used in Eulerian methods for multiphase flows is used to calculate the pressure. To resolve this issue, we introduce a numerical scheme that satisfies the continuity requirement to higher order of accuracy in the sense of weak solutions for the continuity equations. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the new scheme.

Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ma, Xia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giguere, Paul T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Educational Material Science Games  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Games Material Science Games Do you have a great material science game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: >KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials Sponsored by the BBC, K2S Bitsize offers tons of free online science games including a section on materials. Learn about the changes in materials, changing states, heat, rocks, soils, solids, liquids, gases, and much more. Science Kids - Properties of Materials Science Kids - Properties of Materials Learn about the properties of materials as you experiment with a variety of objects in this great science activity for kids. Discover the interesting characteristics of materials; are they flexible, waterproof, strong or transparent? Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools

112

Phase transformations and structural modifications induced by heating in microporous materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal behaviour of microporous materials is relevant both for their characterization and for their application, and varies dramatically from one material to another. This paper intends to give a picture of their behaviour and to highlight analogies and differences in these materials as a function of their chemistry and topology. The information on their response to heating and dehydration/calcinations, even if still scanty and sometimes controversial, shows that some materials undergo dehydration-induced decrease in volume which can be dramatic or very scarce as a function of the extraframework content. These changes in volume can be partially or completely irreversible if they involve structural modifications of the tetrahedral framework. It is to highlight that topological changes are always due to the so called “face sharing tetrahedral” process.

Alberto Alberti; Annalisa Martucci

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The electrical resistance due to nonmagnetic impurities in ferromagnetic metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the electrical resistance due to nonmagnetic impurities in ferromagnetic metals. The impurity resistance depends on the magnetization of the host metal since (1) the densities of states of ±spin electrons at the Fermi surface change with the magnetization of a metal and (2) the screened impurity potential is different for the ±spin electrons and depends on the magnetization of the metal. The effect of the spin dependent screening on the electrical resistance in ferromagnetic metals was not fully considered previously. We choose a single band model for the metallic electrons and obtain an expression for the resistance which includes both of the above mechanisms (1) and (2) simultaneously and self?consistently. We calculate the changes in resistivity due to nonmagnetic impurities in a ferromagnetic metal as a function of magnetization.

D. J. Kim; Brian B. Schwartz

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Injuries Due to Firearms in Three Cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...its size. Galveston, an island city on the coast of Texas, has a population that is approximately 48 percent non-Hispanic white, 29 percent black, 21 percent Hispanic, and 2 percent Asian. In 1990, 24 percent of Galveston's citizens lived below the federal poverty line. In 1993, Galveston's rate of homicide... Injuries due to firearms are a major health problem in the United States.1–4 Although several studies have documented the impact of firearm-related deaths,5–15 little is known about the epidemiologic characteristics of nonfatal gunshot wounds.16–18 ...

Kellermann A.L.; Rivara F.P.; Lee R.K.

1996-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Directionally Solidified Materials Using high-temperature optical floating zone furnace to produce monocrystalline molybdenum alloy micro-pillars Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials | Advanced Materials SHARE ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of advanced materials for energy generation, storage, and use. We have core strengths in three main areas: materials synthesis, characterization, and theory. In other words, we discover and make new materials, we study their structure,

119

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

120

Material Point Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Materials Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary...

122

Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in catalysts and energy materials needed to design new materials and systems for sustainable energy applications. By facilitating the development and rapid dissemination...

123

EMSL - Energy Materials & Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in catalysts and energy materials needed to design new materials and systems for sustainable energy applications. By facilitating the development and rapid dissemination...

124

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between charge transport and microstructure, in particular, to identify the inherent bottlenecks to charge transport. In semicrystalline and polycrystalline materials, charge transport is most likely dominated by grain-boundary effects, although the exact mechanism is not well understood. Unfortunately, grain boundaries in semicrystalline thin films are difficult to characterize: the grains are too small to allow for measurements across individual grain boundaries (as is often done for polycrystalline films of small molecules) and bulk measurements are complicated by the unknown orientation of polymer chains within the grain. To better understand the effect of chain orientation on grain boundaries, we use anisotropic thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) - one of the most well-studied polymeric semiconductors, as a tool to study charge transport.

125

Extreme events due to localisation of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a one-dimensional chain of harmonically coupled units in an asymmetric anharmonic soft potential. Due to nonlinear localisation of energy, this system exhibits extreme events in the sense that individual elements of the chain show very large excitations. A detailed statistical analysis of extremes in this system reveals some unexpected properties, e.g., a pronounced pattern in the inter event interval statistics. We relate these statistical properties to underlying system dynamics, and notice that often when extreme events occur the system dynamics adopts (at least locally) an oscillatory behaviour, resulting in, for example, a quick succession of such events. The model therefore might serve as a paradigmatic model for the study of the interplay of nonlinearity, energy transport, and extreme events.

Colm Mulhern; Stephan Bialonski; Holger Kantz

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Chapter 6: Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Materials : Materials Material Selection Sustainable Building Materials System Integration Issues | Chapter 6 Material Selection Materials The use of durable, attractive, and environmentally responsible building materials is a key element of any high-performance building effort. The use of natural and healthy materials contributes to the well-being of the occupants and to a feeling of connection with the bounty of the natural world. Many construction materials have significant environ- mental impacts from pollutant releases, habitat destruc- tion, and depletion of natural resources. This can occur during extraction and acquisition of raw materials, pro- "Then I say the Earth belongs to duction and manufacturing processes, and transporta- tion. In addition, some construction materials can harm

127

NEWTON's Material Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Videos Material Science Videos Do you have a great material science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: University of Maryland - Material Science University of Maryland - Material Science The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a set of videos about various topics in material science to help students understand what material science is. Learn about plasma, polymers, liquid crystals and much more. LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com offers a series of educational material science lectures that are available to the public for free. Learn about topics like polymers, non-crystalline solids, crystal geometry, phase diagrams, phase transformations and more. NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos

128

Fusion Materials Science Overview of Challenges and Recent Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance generally have very good high temperature capability (high thermal creep resistance) due to high, high fusion neutron flux) arguably makes fusion materials development the greatest challenge ever approach used to develop candidate materials for fusion reactors ­ Materials with high neutron radiation

129

Programming Assignment 1: Due Monday, Sept. 19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'm using vim. You may want to edit on a different machine and copy to water, but keep in mind that you'll need a fast edit-compile-execute path. Or you can try vim, too. 09/08/2011" CS4961" #12;

Hall, Mary W.

130

Energetic Materials Center Energetic Materials Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

experimental characterization of energetic material properties and reactions; and high-speed diagnostic instruments for measuring the chemical and physical processes that occur...

131

Photovoltaic Cell Material Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Material Basics Material Basics Photovoltaic Cell Material Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis Although crystalline silicon cells are the most common type, photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells, can be made of many semiconductor materials. Each material has unique strengths and characteristics that influence its suitability for specific applications. For example, PV cell materials may differ based on their crystallinity, bandgap, absorbtion, and manufacturing complexity. Learn more about each of these characteristics below or learn about these solar cell materials: Silicon (Si)-including single-crystalline Si, multicrystalline Si, and amorphous Si Polycrystalline Thin Films-including copper indium diselenide (CIS), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and thin-film silicon Single-Crystalline Thin Films-including high-efficiency material

132

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dental Materials BIOMATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus is on the development of two standard methods: one for a material's resistance to microleakage will quantify a significant portion of a material's ability to resist secondary caries. The methodsDental Materials BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide reference materials and clinically relevant

134

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the Energy Department webinar, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, held August 13, 2013.

135

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

136

Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing  

SciTech Connect

For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waalâ??s forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals â?? materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sound Speed Perturbations Due to Internal Tides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal tides are perhaps the most prevalent and largest amplitude internal gravity waves in the ocean. They are commonly generated by the scattering of surfacetidal energy into internal modes when the surfacetides propagate on to continental shelves. A portion of the internal tidal energy propagates into the deep ocean. One of the effects of internal tides on underwater acoustic propagation is to perturb the temperature and salinity versus depth profiles and thus the sound speed versus depth profile. Starting with temperature and salinity versus depth profiles from near Eleuthera Island the internal tide eigenfunctions as well as the sound speed profile have been computed for a water depth of 4500 m. Assuming a value for the vertical displacement amplitude of a first vertical mode internal tide the perturbed temperature and salinity profiles have been computed. From these perturbed profiles the consequent perturbed sound speed profiles have been computed for cases of maximum up and down internal tide displacement. The first mode internal tide has no vertical displacement at the sea surface and bottom and a maximum near the base of the main thermocline (depth of about 1200 m). Since the SOFAR axis is also near the base of the main thermocline and since the pressureeffects on sound speed are predominant below the SOFAR axis the sound speed perturbation due to the first mode internal tide is greatest at a depth (about 550 m) above the SOFAR axis. An internal tide with a maximum vertical displacement of 10 m produces a maximum sound speed perturbation of ±0.7 m/sec.

Christopher N. K. Mooers

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EAC Meeting Cancelled Due to Weather | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cancelled Due to Weather EAC Meeting Cancelled Due to Weather March 5, 2013 - 3:06pm Addthis This week's Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) meeting has been cancelled due to a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical...

142

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact  

SciTech Connect

This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling that the specimens were subjected to during testing. The Ag-LSCF composite contact materials proved more effective in trapping Cr within the contact material and preventing Cr migration into the cathode than the Ag-LSM composites. Ag-perovskite composite contact materials are promising candidates for use in intermediate-temperature SOFC stacks with ferritic stainless steel interconnects due to their ability to maintain acceptably low ASRs while reducing Cr migration into the cathode material.

J. H. Zhu

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Human Herpesvirus 6 DNA Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid Due to Primary Infection Differ from Those Due to Chromosomal Viral Integration and Have Implications for Diagnosis of Encephalitis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Encephalitis Published ahead of print on 17 January 2007. Katherine N. Ward 1 Corresponding author. Mailing address: Centre...1250-1256. 7 Clark, D. A., M. Ait-Khaled, A. C. Wheeler, I. M. Kidd, J. E. McLaughlin, M. A. Johnson, P...

Katherine N. Ward; Hoe Nam Leong; Anton D. Thiruchelvam; Claire E. Atkinson; Duncan A. Clark

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

ARM - Public Information Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsPublic Information Materials govPublicationsPublic Information Materials Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Public Information Materials The ARM Climate Research Facility develops public information materials to communicate the purpose and objectives of the program to general audiences. These materials are designed to increase awareness of ARM Climate Research Facility goals and to document its scientific results to a lay audience. Public information materials include fact sheets, brochures, CDs, videos, press releases, and information packets. Approved materials are made

146

Materials/Condensed Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied research aimed at manipulating properties (structural, physical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, optical, etc.). Increasingly, the frontiers of materials research include materials that are "strongly correlated," characterized by strong coupling between a material's electrons with other electrons, magnetism, or the material lattice itself. This coupling often results in novel behavior, such as superconductivity, that may lead to technologically important applications.

147

Nanostructured composite reinforced material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Earth-Abundant Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Below are a list...

149

Geopolymer Sealing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

150

Applications of Ceramic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ceramic materials in science and industry is becoming increasingly widespread. As discussed in Chap. 4, ceramic materials have important advantages over metals and polymers in electronic devices at ...

Murat Bengisu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

Hao, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

153

LANL: Materials Science Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research on current materials and those of future interest. It is a 56,000 square-foot modern facility that can be easily reconfigured to accom- modate new processes and operations. It compris- es 27 laboratories, 15 support rooms, and 60 offices. The MSL supports many distinct materi- als research topics, grouped into four focus areas: mechanical behavior, materials processing, syn- thesis, and characterization. Research within the MSL supports programs of national interest in defense, energy, and the basic sciences. The MSL is a non-classified area in the Materials Science Complex in close proximity to classified and other non-classified materials research facilities. The Materials Science

154

Inadvertent Climate Modification Due to Anthropogenic Lead  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between atmospheric particulate matter and the formation of clouds is among the most uncertain aspects of our current understanding of climate change1. One specific question that remains unanswered is how anthropogenic particulate emissions are affecting the nucleation of ice crystals. Satellites show ice clouds cover more than a third of the globe2 and models suggest that ice nucleation initiates the majority of terrestrial precipitation3. It is therefore not possible to adequately understand either climate change or the global water cycle without understanding ice nucleation. Here we show that lead-containing particles are among the most efficient ice nucleating substances commonly found in the atmosphere. Field observations were conducted with mass spectrometry and electron microscopy at two remote stations on different continents, far removed from local emissions. Laboratory studies within two cloud chambers using controlled experimental conditions support the field data. Because the dominate sources of particulate lead are anthropogenic emissions such as aviation fuel, power generation, smelting, and the re-suspension of residue from tetra-ethyl leaded gasoline4, it is likely that cloud formation and precipitation have been affected when compared to pre-industrial times. A global climate model comparing pre-industrial and anthropogenically perturbed conditions shows that lead-containing particles may be increasing the outgoing longwave radiation by 0.2 to 0.8 W m-2, thereby offsetting a portion of the warming attributed to greenhouse gases1.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Stetzer, Olaf; Worringen, Annette; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kamphus, M.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Curtius, J.; Borrmann, S.; Froyd, Karl D.; Mertes, S.; Mohler, Ottmar; Lohmann, U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sludge stabilization boat material test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides instructions for testing different types of potential boat materials in the HC-21C muffle furnace process. The boats must withstand corrosive environments at up to 1000 degrees C.

De Vries, M.L.

1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Instructions and Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

157

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism: 1) What is Magnetism?Magnetism is a force or repulsion due to charge is called the electric force. But what about magnetism, is there a fundamental property of some matter that makes things magnetic? The answer is: "sort of." Electric current

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

158

Why engineer porous materials?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal conductivity materials (Maex et al. 2003...Hrubesh et al. 1993); materials remarkably similar to...reduce the oxygen at the cathode and oxidize the fuel...electrochemically active, have large surface...volume fraction of porous materials about 0.3 (Brandon...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Critical Materials Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE.

160

Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compatibility of Materials Compatibility of Materials August 13, 2013 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Webinar Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 SAND2013-6278P 2 Webinar Objectives * Provide context for hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen compatibility of materials - Distinguish embrittlement, compatibility and suitability - Examples of hydrogen embrittlement * Historical perspective - Previous work on hydrogen compatibility - Motivation of "Materials Guide" * Identify the landscape of materials compatibility documents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NEWTON's Material Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Archive: Materials Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Materials Science Questions: Hydrogen Compounds and Heat Conduction Weaving Carbon Nanotubes Metal as Electrical Conductor, Not Thermal Steel Changes with Age PETE, Ultraviolet Light, Benefits Strength of Yarn by Spinning Each Substance Unique Density Alloy versus Constituent Density Knowing When Material is Melted Crystalline Metal Versus Metallic Glass and Conduction Super Glue, Surgery, and Skin Silica Gel Teflon Non-Stick Property Salt Crystal Formation Lubricating Rubber Bands and Elasticity Materials for Venus Probe Crystalline Solids and Lowest Energy Sodium Polycarbonate and Salt Water Early Adhesives Surface Energy and Temperature Separating Polypropylene, Polyester, and Nylon Factors Effecting Polymer Flexibility

162

Tailored Porous Materials  

SciTech Connect

Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Surface space : digital manufacturing techniques and emergent building material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores tectonic possibilities of new material and forming techniques. The design process is catalyzed by experimenting different configurations of the material.This project attempts to develop inventive ways ...

Ho, Joseph Chi-Chen, 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A constitutive equation for stratospheric balloon materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The selection of a suitable material for use as a reliable stratospheric balloon gas barrier and structural component is based on a variety of properties. Due to a more desirable combination of properties, the low density polyethylene that has been used for the last half century has been replaced during the last decade by linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE). This paper describes the effort to characterize the time dependent properties of a 38 micron coextrusion of LLDPE. The nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation presented may be used to accurately describe the creep and/or relaxation of this film when subjected to a biaxial state of stress, such as might be required for an extended balloon flight. Recent laboratory data have been used to modify an existing model of LLDPE to account for differences caused by the coextrusion process. The new model will facilitate structural design optimization and reliability assessment, and may be further utilized as a predictive tool to benefit in-flight operations. Current structural analysis techniques based on linear elastic properties have predicted stresses in excess of those which would actually exist.

J.L. Rand; W.J. Sterling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

15 - Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter covers hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials, which is one of the options currently being considered for automotive or mobile applications. It first introduces the principles behind hydrogen adsorption by these materials and the methods used to characterise their hydrogen storage properties. It then provides an overview of the different material types that are available – including porous carbons, zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and microporous organic polymers – and their most important hydrogen storage properties. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of nanoporous materials in practical hydrogen storage units, the most important considerations for this purpose, and a discussion of future trends in the area.

D.P. Broom; D. Book

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

On the use of doped polyethylene as an insulating material for HVDC cables  

SciTech Connect

The merits of HVDC cables with polymeric insulation are well recognized. However, the development of such cables is still hampered due to the problems resulting from the complicated dependence of the electrical conductivity of the polymer on the temperature and the dc electric field and the effects of space charge accumulation in this material. Different methods have been suggested to solve these problems yet none of these methods seem to give a conclusive solution. The present report provides, firstly a critical review of the previous works reported in the literature concerning the development of HVDC cables with polymeric insulation. Different aspects of those works are examined and discussed. Secondly, an account is given on an investigation using low density polyethylene (LDPE) doped with an inorganic additive as a candidate insulating material for HVDC cables. Preliminary results from measurements of dc breakdown strength and insulation resistivity of both the undoped and the doped materials are presented. It is shown that the incorporation of an inorganic additive into LDPE has improved the performance of the doped material under polarity reversal dc conditions at room temperature. Moreover, the dependency of the insulation resistivity on temperature for the doped material appears to be beneficially modified.

Khalil, M.S. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Impact resistance and energy absorption of regular and functionally graded hexagonal honeycombs with cell wall material strain hardening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper highlights the effects of cell wall material strain hardening and density functional gradation (FG) on in-plane constant-velocity dynamic crushing response and impact behavior of hexagonal honeycombs. Results show that cell wall material strain hardening influences the distinct deformation modes induced by crushing velocity generally observed in regular hexagonal honeycombs. This is seen by a delay in the onset of localized deformation up until intermediate crushing velocities after which localization becomes dominant smearing out differences brought about by cell wall material strain hardening (plasticity convergence). In addition, during the impact loading on regular honeycombs, it was found that increasing the cell wall material strain hardening decreases the rate of gain of maximum crushing strain with increments in initial kinetic energy of impact. On the other hand, introducing FG brings about new deformation patterns due to changes in material distribution and preferential cell wall collapse of the weaker members. Interestingly, although the dynamic localization effect at higher crushing velocities observed earlier was not found to be particularly affected by FG, gradient convergence (i.e. smearing out the effects of FG due to higher velocities analogous to plasticity convergence) was not observed. On the contrary, gradient convergence emerged at higher impacting velocities primarily brought about by a combination of initial deformation localization and its subsequent advancement into FG region ahead. The kinetic energy threshold for the emergence of this gradient convergence effect was found to be considerably delayed by cell wall material strain hardening.

D. Mousanezhad; R. Ghosh; A. Ajdari; A.M.S. Hamouda; H. Nayeb-Hashemi; A. Vaziri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Materials Science Division - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home About MSD Information Awards Visit MSD Administrative Staff Division Personnel Research Research Groups Condensed Matter Theory Emerging Materials Energy Conversion and Storage Magnetic Films Molecular Materials Neutron and X-ray Scattering Superconductivity and Magnetism Surface Chemistry Synchrotron Radiation Studies Threat Detection and Analysis Group Research Areas Careers in MSD Internal Sites Search Front Slide 1 November 2013 - Patricia Dehmer (second from right), Deputy Director of Science Programs, DOE Office of Science, joined Argonne Director Eric Isaacs(left) and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences and Engineering Peter Littlewood(second from left) to tour the recently-opened Energy Sciences Building. Among Dehmer's stops was the crystal growth

169

Characterization of Nanoscale Reinforced Polymer Composites as Active Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based polymer nanocomposites have generated a lot of interest as potential multifunctional materials due to the exceptional physical properties of SWNTs. To date, investigations into the electromechanical...

Deshmukh, Sujay

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Improved Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a battery material due to its excellent thermal safetybattery system, including the safety attributes (both overcharge and thermalbattery electrodes, for example, have been observed during electrochemical cycling and thermal

Conry, Thomas Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

Zhao, Wei

172

Vibration intensity difference thresholds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The intensity difference threshold is defined as ‘the difference in the intensity of two stimuli which is just sufficient for their difference to be detected’.… (more)

Forta, Nazim Gizem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

174

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

175

Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL Auxiliary Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

run [Ammann et al., 2007; hereinafter CCSM] and the GKSS ECHO-g ERIK2 run [González-Rouco et al., 2006; hereinafter ECHO-g]. The annual means of the modeled temperature fields are interpolated to 5° latitude;SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL 2 ECHO-g simulations, respectively. The above conventions

Smerdon, Jason E.

177

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material Supplemental Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 1 Supplemental Material A. Entropy, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 2 occupied, it is ambiguous whether

Smith, Matthew A.

178

Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supporting Organizations Supporting Organizations Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Chemical Sciences Division Materials Science and Technology BES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Program BES Materials Sciences and Engineering Program Joint Institute For Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Supporting Organizations | Materials Science and Technology SHARE Materials Science and Technology Division The Materials Science and Technology Division is unique within the Department of Energy (DOE) System with mission goals that extend from fundamental materials science to applied materials science and technology. One key component of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of materials theory, synthesis

179

Nonconforming Material Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Nonconforming Material / Product Process Document Number: P-011 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-015 Nonconformance Report, REG-003 Record Register, ISDP-002 Training Production Process P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Added verbiage CAR/PAR/IO to Step 2 P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose To establish the process for nonconforming material to be identified, segregated and dispositioned to prevent its unintended

180

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

182

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Physical Chemistry 4 CP General Chemistry 2 CP Synthesis of Org. & Inorg. Materials 4 CP Introductory Solid

Pfeifer, Holger

184

ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Physical Chemistry 4 CP General Chemistry 2 CP Synthesis of Org. & Inorg. Materials 4 CP Introductory Solid

Pfeifer, Holger

185

Synthesis and Characterization of Nanoporous Materials and Their Films with Controlled Microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanoporous material’s microstructure is of great interest due to the strong influence on efficiency and performance. For particles, microstructure refers to particle size, shape, surface morphology, and composition. When discussing thin films, microstructure...

Lee, In Ho

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

187

Fission, Fusion Materials Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is shown in illustration. Materials are the immediate priority of both the fission and fusion communities. Extending the lifetime of the current fleet of light water reactors...

188

Thermoelectric materials having porosity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

today New high-tech materials are the key to breakthroughs in biology, the environment, nuclear energy, transportation and national security. Argonne continues to make...

190

UESC Workshop Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the UESC Workshop Materials and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

191

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the interface of electrodes and electrolytes and using supercomputers to predict how battery systems will perform. We develop "soft" materials, including polymers and...

192

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

193

Webinar: Materials Genome Initative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

194

EMSL - battery materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

battery-materials en Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

195

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Timelines | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of interest to rare earths and critical materials, organized by those specific to rare earth elements, general chemistry and uses. Timelines of rare earth discovery: Discovery and...

197

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Novel Anode Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with a variety of loadings, morphologies, and thicknesses. - Develop synchrotron tomography tools to better understand how the active materials interact with their surroundings...

199

An Opto-electric Smart Material Detector with Wavelength-Dependent Bob Zheng,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GP-B-19 An Opto-electric Smart Material Detector with Wavelength-Dependent Logic Bob and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. Smart materials are artificial materials, or the coherent, collective oscillations of conduction-band electrons, are ideal sensors for smart materials due

200

Calculation of the reactivity feedback due to core-assembly bowing in LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect

The nonuniformity of the temperature distribution in an LMFBR leads to differential thermal expansion of the walls of an assembly hexcan. These thermal expansion differentials cause the hexcan to distort or bow. Consequentially, the assembly experiences a spatial displacement, which results in a change in reactivity for the core. A computational model to calculate the reactivity feedback due to material displacements induced by assembly bowing effects has been developed.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recent Advances in Computational Materials Science and Multiscale Materials Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Advances in Computational Materials Science and Multiscale Materials Modeling Guest Editors Advances in Computational Materials Science and Multiscale Materials Modeling. These symposia provide. Professor Karel Matous Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department University of Notre Dame Email

Matous, Karel

202

The Use of Energy Information in Plastic Scintillator Material  

SciTech Connect

Plastic scintillator material is often used for gamma-ray detection in many applications due to its relatively good sensitivity and cost-effectiveness compared to other detection materials. However, due to the dominant Compton scattering interaction mechanism, full energy peaks are not observed in plastic scintillator spectra and isotopic identification is impossible. Typically plastic scintillator detectors are solely gross count detectors. In some safeguards and security applications, such as radiation portal monitors for vehicle screening, naturally-occurring radioactive material (NORM) often triggers radiation alarms and results in innocent or nuisance alarms. The limited energy information from plastic scintillator material can be used to discriminate the NORM from targeted materials and reduce the nuisance alarm rate. An overview of the utilization of the energy information from plastic scintillator material will be presented, with emphasis on the detection capabilities and potential limitations for safeguards and security applications. (PIET-43741-TM-490)

Ely, James H.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bates, Derrick J.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Runkle, Robert C.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Weier, Dennis R.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Incoherent neutron scattering from multi-element materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differences and distinguishing characteristics of incoherent scattering vis-à-vis diffuse coherent scattering due to atomic disorder are delineated and demonstrated experimentally.

Glinka, C.J.

2011-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

The synthesis and characterization of porous, conductive, and ordered materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two different classes of polymers were pursued as candidates for materials possessing porosity, conductivity, and crystalline order. Attempts were made with hexaazatrinaphthylene- and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene-based ...

Narayan, Tarun Chandru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

diplomacy. As the nation's leading funder of research on the physical sciences, DOE's capabilities with respect to materials research are substantial. Topics identified for priority research attention include rare earth substitutes in magnets, batteries, photovoltaic films and phosphors; environmentally sound mining and materials processing; and recycling. The eight programs and policies address risks, con- straints and opportunities across the supply chain,

206

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

diplomacy. As the nation's leading funder of research on the physical sciences, DOE's capabilities with respect to materials research are substantial. Topics identified for priority research attention include rare earth substitutes in magnets, batteries, photovoltaic films and phosphors; environmentally sound mining and materials processing; and recycling. The eight programs and policies address risks, con- straints and opportunities across the supply chain,

207

MATERIAL TRACKING USING LANMAS  

SciTech Connect

LANMAS is a transaction-based nuclear material accountability software product developed to replace outdated and legacy accountability systems throughout the DOE. The core underlying purpose of LANMAS is to track nuclear materials inventory and report transactions (movement, mixing, splitting, decay, etc.) to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). While LANMAS performs those functions well, there are many additional functions provided by the software product. As a material is received onto a site or created at a site, its entire lifecycle can be tracked in LANMAS complete to its termination of safeguards. There are separate functions to track material movements between and within material balance areas (MBAs). The level of detail for movements within a MBA is configurable by each site and can be as high as a site designation or as detailed as building/room/rack/row/position. Functionality exists to track the processing of materials, either as individual items or by modeling a bulk process as an individual item to track inputs and outputs from the process. In cases where sites have specialized needs, the system is designed to be flexible so that site specific functionality can be integrated into the product. This paper will demonstrate how the software can be used to input material into an account and track it to its termination of safeguards.

Armstrong, F.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cybersecurity Awareness Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of awareness material to be used during cyber awareness campaigns or as needed to address an emerging cyber threat or hot topic. These materials are available to other DOE organizations or public and private institutions to enhance or supplement site-specific awareness programs.

210

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies used to develop energy sources, protect the environment, preserve the national infrastructure, electronic materials, composites, biomaterials, nuclear materials and nanomaterials. The common thread and Engineering program. Effective 2014-2015 1 Updated May 2014 #12;Additionally, here are some helpful

Simons, Jack

211

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

212

Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Renewing Music Library Materials Online Most checked out Music Library materials can be renewed through PantherCat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewing Music Library Materials Online Most checked out Music Library materials can be renewed://www.uwm.edu/Libraries/Music/about.html#loan. Please Note: Item loan periods are renewed from the date you renew them. If you renew an item one day full loan period you must wait to renew the item until its original due date. What can and cannot

Saldin, Dilano

215

Swellings due to alkali-silica reaction and delayed ettringite formation: Characterisation of expansion isotropy and effect of moisture conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of different conditions on the development of concrete expansions due to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and their combination. The presence of products of the two reactions has been observed during structure diagnosis. The aim of this research is to study the two reactions in concretes with close mix designs but with various types of aggregate and moisture conditions. Measurements performed in the three directions of stress-free specimens showed that DEF expansions could be considered as isotropic for stress-free material. DEF expansions were largely influenced by the storage conditions (immersed in water or in sealed conditions). The volume of storage water modified the kinetics. Under sealed conditions, no expansions were measured for mortar containing non-reactive aggregate, while small positive strains were obtained for mortar containing reactive aggregate. In all cases, new water supply caused fast, large expansions. The different effects of alkali leaching and moisture conditions on DEF and ASR expansions are discussed.

Hassina Bouzabata; Stéphane Multon; Alain Sellier; Hacène Houari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine, transmission, fuel system, and exhaust after-treatment systems. Electric drive vehicles use propulsion materials in their electric motors and power electronics. Developing advanced propulsion materials is essential to commercializing new, highly efficient automotive technologies that have technical requirements that existing powertrain materials cannot meet. The Vehicle Technology Office's (VTO) research in propulsion materials focuses on four areas: Materials for hybrid and electric drive systems Materials for high efficiency combustion engines Materials to enable energy recovery systems and control exhaust gases

217

National and international nuclear material monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The status of nuclear materials in both the U.S. and Former Soviet Union is changing based upon the execution of agreements relative to weapons materials production and weapon dismantlement. The result of these activities is that a considerably different emphasis is being placed on how nuclear materials are viewed and utilized. Even though much effort is being expended on the final disposition of these materials, the interim need for storage and security of the material is increasing. Both safety and security requirements exist to govern activities when these materials are placed in storage. These requirements are intended to provide confidence that the material is not being misused and that the storage operations are conducted safely. Both of these goals can be significantly enhanced if technological monitoring of the material is performed. This paper will briefly discuss the traditional manual methods of U.S. and international material monitoring and then present approaches and technology that are available to achieve the same goals under the evolving environment.

Waddoups, I.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Critical Materials Hub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

219

Fissile material detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electrically conductive composite material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Material control evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) scope of work have stimulated several laboratories and commercial companies to develop and apply technology to enhance nuclear material control. Accountability, inventory, radiation exposure, and insider protection concerns increase as many DOE facilities require increased storage. This paper summarizes a study of the existing material control technologies. The goal of the study is to identify, characterize, and quantify the trade-offs associated with using these technologies to provide real-time information on stored nuclear material that in turn supports decreasing the frequency of inventories conducted by site personnel.

Waddoups, I.G.; Anspach, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Abbott, J.A. [EG& G Kirtland Operations, Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS  

SciTech Connect

Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Materials Performance in USC Steam  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Synthesis and characterization of specific electrode materials for solar cells and supercapacitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a brief overview of research in the field of electrode materials for solar cells and supercapacitors is presented which the authors dealt with for years. In addition to the standard electrode material (graphite and silicon in supercapacitor with solar cells) different materials were examined particularly oxides and sulfides of copper. Copper (I) oxide or cuprous oxide is an oxide semiconductor which is used as the anodic material in the form of thin film in lithium batteries and solar cells. The cathodic process of synthesis of cuprous oxide thin film is carried out in a potentiostatic mode from the organic electrolyte. The electrochemical characterization was carried out by cyclic voltammetry. The electro deposition techniques are particularly well suited for the deposition of single elements but it is also possible to carry out simultaneous depositions of several elements and syntheses of well-defined alternating layers of metals and oxides with thicknesses down to a few nanometers. Electrochemical characteristics of covellite (CuS) are of importance from flotation and metallurgical point of view due to its potential application in solid state solar cells and in photocatalytic reactions. Also the compound CuS appears as an intermediary product or a final product in electrochemical oxidation reactions of chalcocite (Cu 2S) which exhibits supercapacitor characteristics. Natural copper mineral covellite has been investigated in inorganic sulfate acid electrolytes as well as in strong alkaline electrolyte. Different electrochemical methods (galvanostatic potentiostatic cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) have been used in these investigations.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mechanics of Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of extension, he calls Eei the “true stress “due to the “apparent stresses “Slf S2, S3. This is to use the term “stress “in a totally new ...

1905-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Public Scoping Meeting Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Fact sheets, presentations, and other information from the Conversion EIS Public Scoping Meetings. The following materials were made available during the DUF6 Conversion EIS public scoping meetings held near Portsmouth, Ohio, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Paducah, Kentucky, November - December, 2001. Notice of Intent PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details Presentation PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program 5.97 MB details DUF6 Fact Sheets PDF Icon Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program 174 KB details PDF Icon NEPA Activities for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program

228

Work with Biological Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

229

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Toward Lighter, Stiffer Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as additive manufacturing and three-dimensional (3D) printing offer the opportunity to tailor properties to location-specific...fabrication routes for cellular materials are exemplified by 3D printing, but considerable progress must still be made to enhance...

Tobias A. Schaedler; Alan J. Jacobsen; Wiliam B. Carter

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

NEW MAGNETIC MATERIALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New, sophisticated magnetic materials can be found as essential components in computers, sensors, and actuators, and in a variety of telecommunications devices ranging from telephones to satellites. Some of th...

STANOJA STOIMENOV

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Next Generation Materials:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of 2 to 1 for additive manufacturing by 2020; Composite materials Fiber processing costs reduce by one-half by 2026; 6x improvement in tooling cycles for composite matrix...

233

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Aucierllo has edited 19 books, published about 450 articles, holds 14 patents, and has organized, chaired and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry

234

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

Materials of Construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of coal into clean energy in any process either through direct combustion or conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels involves application of materials at high or reasonably high temperature in aggres...

W. A. Ellingson; K. Natesan; T. Vojnovich

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reversible hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear Material Packaging Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Materials of Construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ferrous materials are affected by residual chlorine in saline water feed of desalination plants. In stagnant C1 test solution a semilogarithmically increased corrosion rate was observed with increasing dissolv...

Prof. Dr. Anthony Delyannis; Dr. Euridike-Emmy Delyannis

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Materials Project:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing | June 2014 Energy & Environmental Technologies Berkeley Lab Materials d ata f rom: E agar T., King M. Technology R eview 1 995 What are the properties of known...

242

Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary of the Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop held November, 3, 2010, at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. Summary includes the workshop agenda, an overview of the morning presentations, a discussion of the afternoon meeting, and a list of participants.

243

Hybrid sol-gel optical materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

Zeigler, J.M.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hybrid sol-gel optical materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hybrid sol-gel optical materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tune modulation due to synchrotron oscillations and chromaticity, and the dynamic aperture  

SciTech Connect

A tracking study was done of the effects of a tune modulations, due to synchrotron oscillations and the tune dependence on momentum (chromaticity), on the dynamic aperture. The studies were done using several RHIC lattices and tracking runs of about 1 {times} 10{sup 6} turns. The dynamic aperture was found to decrease roughly linearly with the amplitude of the tune modulation. Lower order non-linear resonances, like the 1/3 and 1/4 resonance are not crossed because of the tune modulation. Three different cases were studied, corresponding to RHIC lattices with different {beta}*, and with different synchrotron oscillation amplitudes. In each case, the tune modulation amplitude was varied by changing the chromaticity. In each case, roughly the same result, was found. The result found here for the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity may be compared with the result found for the effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple in the quadrupoles. The effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple appears to be about 4 times stronger than the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity and synchrotron oscillations.

Parzen, G.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Bespoke Materials Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bespoke Materials Surfaces Bespoke Materials Surfaces Background The Department of Energy (DOE) has established performance and efficiency goals for power generation systems which will improve the ability of the U.S. energy sector to produce electricity efficiently with less impact to the environment. Power systems showing the most promise for reaching these goals require corrosion resistance alloys able to perform at very high pressures and temperatures. Increasing both the

248

Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due to Scope and Method of Assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIERARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAWPUS. E39-932-10M-L180 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 458 SEI -- . -. Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due... are the assessed values of properties comparable, both of the same and different kinds in the same and in different governmental 6 BULLETIN NO. 458, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION units? What is the effect of partial property assessments and inequalities...

Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sandia National Laboratories: Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery Recycling March 23, 2011 Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet In 2004, the US...

250

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

253

Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department, Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Facilities Publications Presentations Organizational Chart Other Information Basic Energy Sciences Directorate BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? :: Next CMPMS Seminar There are no seminars scheduled at this time. Advanced Energy Materials Group We study both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of complex and nano-structured materials with a view to understanding and developing their application in different energy related technologies Group Leader: Qiang Li Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 11973-5000 (631) 344-4490 qiangli@bnl.gov AEM group news: Current research topics include: Superconducting Materials Nano-scale Materials (S. Wong) Applied Superconductivity Thermoelectric Materials

254

A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

ATS materials support  

SciTech Connect

The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine System Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-base gas turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. The materials manufacturing subelement was developed with input from gas turbine manufacturers, material suppliers, government laboratories and universities. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single-crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization and technology information exchange. Westinghouse Power Generation and Pratt and Whitney each have material programs to develop dependable TBCs that enable increased turbine inlet temperatures while maintaining airfoil substrate temperatures at levels to meet the ATS life goals. Howmet and PCC Airfoils each have projects to extend the capability of single-crystal complex-cored airfoil technology to larger sizes so that higher turbine inlet temperatures can be attained in land-based turbines in a cost-effective manner. Materials characterization tasks are ongoing on TBCs in support of the industrial projects. In addition, a project on long-term testing of ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites for gas turbines is being conducted in support of programs at Solar Turbines, Allison Engines, and Westinghouse Power Generation.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Holcomb, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rawlins, M.H. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen Crack Growth Resistance of Thermal Power Plant Material Collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of electrolytical hydrogenation on fracture toughness, corrosion crack-growth resistance and fracture micromechanisms of operated 12Cr1MoV steel of thermal power plant superheater collector has been studied. Compact tension specimens were cut from perforated surface of thermal power plant superheater collector dismounted after 178,500 hours of operation. Corrosion crack-growth resistance under tension of previously hydrogenated compact specimens with fatigue cracks was studied. Due to the increased concentration of hydrogen in solution an additional buffer was being created that prevents hydrogen leakage from the specimen through the fracture surface during the experiment. The hydrogenation causes the significant decrease of critical stress intensity factor Kc, during the experiment in 0.1 N NaOH solution as compared with critical stress intensity factor K of non-hydrogenation 12Cr1MoV steel obtained by the 5% secant line method and in comparison with critical stress intensity factor Kc, determined through the J-integral. The areas of ductile crack growth in hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated specimens were found to have similar material fracture micromechanisms with dimples creation of different shape and size. But on the ductile crack growth area in hydrogenated specimens material intergranular fracture mechanisms were found caused by the hydrogen embrittlement which are similar to areas without ridges with the products corrosion traces.

V. Iasnii; P. Maruschak; O. Yasniy; Y. Lapusta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! October 5, 2010 - 12:15pm Addthis Ebony Meeks Former Assistant Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs If you haven't submitted your Part I application for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program's Renewables Solicitation yet, today is your last day! Round 8, Part I applications for DOE's Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Advanced Transmission and Distribution Technologies Solicitation (2009) are due today by midnight EDT. Applicants can submit information through either the online application portal or by using FedConnect and Express Mail. Round 7 and Round 8 Part II applications are due December 31, 2010. The "Renewables Solicitation" invites the submission of applications

259

Geothermal materials development  

SciTech Connect

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

262

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Materials for geothermal production  

SciTech Connect

Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

Kukacka, L.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optical limiting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

8 - Ceramic materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ceramic materials, manufactured from fired clay, have been used in construction since at least 4000 BC in Egypt, and represent the earliest manufactured building materials. Whilst the strict definition of ceramics includes glass, stone and cement, this chapter deals only with the traditional ceramics based on clays. The variety of traditional ceramic products used within the building industry arises from the wide range of natural and blended clays used for their production. The roof of the spectacular Sydney Opera House (Fig. 8.1) is surfaced with white ceramic tiles which reflect the changing light associated with the time of day.

Arthur Lyons

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment  

SciTech Connect

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g?=?2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael, E-mail: michael.krueger@fmf.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de; Eck, Michael [Freiburg Materials Research Center (FMF), University of Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Str. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre, E-mail: michael.krueger@fmf.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Various effects on transposition activity and survival of Escherichia coli cells due to different ELF-MF signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both the active and the sham coils were maintained in an incubator (lab co...-CT15) at a constant temperature of 37°C. The background field within the incubator was also measured: the static component (local geom...

B. Del Re; F. Bersani; C. Agostini; P. Mesirca…

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Calculation of gamma radiation dose rate and radon concentration due to granites used as building materials in Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Magusa, North Cyprus, via Mersin 10, Turkey Natural radioactivity concentrations...equivalent from all natural sources of radiation...health(4). Radon gas is a radionuclide present...to determining the natural radioactivity concentration......

A. Abbasi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Short courses in Composite Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short courses in Composite Materials Overview The ability to tailor the material properties used. Combining the adaptability of composites with clear weight savings, whilst tailoring materials properties Airbus and Glyndr University, the Advanced Composites Training and Development Centre educates current

Davies, John N.

271

Thermal expansion of SOFC materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A short overview is given for the thermal expansion of solid oxide fuel cell materials. The thermomechanical compatibility of state-of-the-art materials is compared with alternative, new materials. With these ...

F. Tietz

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report  

SciTech Connect

Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

\\\\due.uci.edu\\due\\Files\\SAC\\CIE\\STAFF\\Duties\\REGIONS.DOC ` 09/06/13 Staff Advisor Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\\\due.uci.edu\\due\\Files\\SAC\\CIE\\STAFF\\Duties\\REGIONS.DOC ` 09/06/13 Staff Advisor Regions UCI Study.studyabroad.uci.edu Advisor Countries/Regions (EAP & IOP) EAP Countries Chrystal Fairbanks cfairban@uci.edu (949) 824

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

274

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

276

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Supplemental Material Supplemental methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Material (ESI) for Integrative Biology This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2009 #12;Computing counter and % ID/g calculated as (counts/weight tissue)/ total counts injected. Mass Spectrometry. To extract ACPPs to obtain electrospray (ESI) mass spectra, a solution of 9M guanidinium chloride (Gu

Tsien, Roger Y.

278

Materials Safety Data Sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

Schweik, Charles M.

279

Sustainable Materials Course Outline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, embodied energy; environmental footprint, waste recycling and pollution minimization, life cycle assessment Science and Engineering (Building E8) Phone: 9385 5025 j.q.zhang@unsw.edu.au Consultation hours: by appointment To be advised School of Materials Science and Engineering (Building E8) Consultation hours

New South Wales, University of

280

Why engineer porous materials?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Porous carbon of high thermal conductivity is used...absorption, fuel cells and battery materials is a number...photoluminescence, thermal conductivity, low k...self-lubricating bearings and battery electrodes. The range...vibration suppression and thermal management. The porous...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Old Electrochromic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochromic Materials Electrochromic Materials DOE also supports the development of electrochromic coatings through several mechanisms. Three companies are engaged in development of commercial prototypes through the Electrochromics Initiative and an SBIR small business grant. LBNL and another DOE laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) perform a variety of measurements to evaluate the energy performance and durability of these prototypes . Other research activities are intended to assist the efforts of the industry in general. At LBNL, research focuses on rapid development and analysis of electrode materials. Among recent accomplishments was the production of a stoichiometric form of Li0.5Ni0.5O by laser deposition and sputtering with excellent electrochromic properties. Dr. Stuart Cogan of EIC Laboratories tested the films and declared them to have "the highest coloration efficiency of any known anodic electrochromic material." EIC will test the films in their own devices in the near future. We also work on several binary electrodes produced by cosputtering from two targets simultaneously. For example, enhanced forms of tungsten oxide produced in this way have wide application because of the prevalence of tungsten oxide in today's devices. In addition to testing durability, NREL also investigates the degradation mechanisms which lead to failure in the hope of being able to correlate accelerated testing to real time failure as well as to diagnose and correct device problems.

282

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials with Solar Cells for Increased Photovoltaic Efficiency On December 4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy,...

283

Electric Motors and Critical Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EV, materials, and motor designers is missing * Achieving high volume July 24, 2012 Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Session 2 - Discussion of Breakthroughs and...

284

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science and Engineering Support for Microsystems-Enabled Photovoltaic Grand Challenge Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Project On May 22,...

285

NREL: Energy Sciences - Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Materials Science Learn about our...

286

News Releases | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy, September 10, 2014 Five Critical Materials Institute researchers named Most Influential Scientific Minds...

287

Transient temperature rise due to ultrasound absorption at a bone/soft-tissue interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal effects due to high ultrasound absorption in bone pose an ongoing safety issue. Of considerable concern is the heating of the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. Mathematical models can be useful in predicting the transient temperature near the interface during insonation. This paper develops a model that provides the temperature field in terms of simple expressions that convey the functional dependence of the material properties and are easily incorporated into standards and ultrasound machine software yet are able to incorporate the material properties of both bone and soft tissue. The model contains an asymptotic theory based upon a “high-attenuation” assumption: the distance diffused by heat over the time of interest is large compared to the ultrasound attenuation length. Model predictions of temperature rise and location of maximum temperature were in close agreement with finite-element calculations using parameters appropriate for radiation-force imaging and focused-ultrasound surgery.

Matthew R. Myers

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Spedding entry closed due to falling debris | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spedding entry closed due to falling debris Facilities and Engineering Services, with concurrence from ESH&A, has closed the front (north) entrance of Spedding Hall to all but...

289

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1 Arshad Kudrolli,1 Alexander E. Lobkovsky,2, and D. H. Rothman, J. Fluid Mech. 503, 357 2004 . 2 A. E. Lobkovsky, B. Smith, A. Kudrolli, D. C. Mohrig

Kudrolli, Arshad

290

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495...

291

Spectral Energy Dissipation due to Surface Wave Breaking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A semiempirical determination of the spectral dependence of the energy dissipation due to surface wave breaking is presented and then used to propose a model for the spectral dependence of the breaking strength parameter b, defined in the O. M. ...

Leonel Romero; W. Kendall Melville; Jessica M. Kleiss

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamical fracture instabilities due to local hyperelasticity at crack tips  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a crack propagating through a brittle material increases, a dynamical instability leads to an increased roughening of the fracture surface. Cracks moving at low speeds create atomically flat mirror-like ...

Markus J. Buehler; Huajian Gao

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

Glowka, D.A.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials Requirements and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials ­ Requirements and Challenges Lutz Frommberger (lutz construction, production engineer- ing, or wearable computing. Smart and sensorial materials provide a variety this application than the material itself that can be considered being "smart". In this contribution, we proceed

Bremen, Universität

297

Laser Detection Of Material Thickness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection Of Material Thickness Detection Of Material Thickness Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of

298

Scour around a circular pile due to oscillatory wave motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCOUR AROUND A CIRCULAR PILE DUE TO OSCILLATORY WAVE MOTION A Thesis by DONALD RAYMOND WELLS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January... 1970 Major Subject: Civil Engineering SCOUR AROUND A CIRCULAR PILE DUE TO OSCILLATORY WAVE MOTION A Thesis by DONALD RAYMOND WELLS Approved as to style and content by: hairman of Committee) (Head of Department) ember) . (Member) (Member...

Wells, Donald Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Carrier pocket engineering applied to ``strained'' Si/Ge superlattices to design useful thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermoelectric materials T. Koga,a) X. Sun, S. B. Cronin, and M. S. Dresselhausb) Department of Physics to provide a promising strategy for designing materials with a large thermoelectric figure of merit ZT is already a good thermoelectric material, 3 the reduction of the lattice ther- mal conductivity ph due

Cronin, Steve

300

Short communication Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short communication Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in microbial activity for ORR [7]. The procedures to make these materials have required several synthesis steps, long catalytic activity is thought to be due to production of nitrogen-containing carbon materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

302

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

303

NEWTON: Determining Material Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Material Degradation Determining Material Degradation Name: Hamish Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: I am working on a science project about photo-degradation of plastic film. My question is how much degraded a plastic film should be to say that it was 100% photo-degraded? The plastic film I am photo-degrading is turning into dust when I touch it, what level of degradation is that? Replies: Hi Hamish, Thanks for the question. You will need to define what you mean by photo-degraded. 100% photo-degraded could be that the film becomes translucent and lets through only blurry images. Or it could mean that the film turns to dust when you touch it. As long as you clearly state in your science project what you mean by 100% photo-degraded, you will be doing a good job.

304

Standard test method for determining the superplastic properties of metallic sheet materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes the procedure for determining the superplastic forming properties (SPF) of a metallic sheet material. It includes tests both for the basic SPF properties and also for derived SPF properties. The test for basic properties encompasses effects due to strain hardening or softening. 1.2 This test method covers sheet materials with thicknesses of at least 0.5 mm but not greater than 6 mm. It characterizes the material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Note 1—Most industrial applications of superplastic forming involve a multi-axial stress condition in a sheet; however it is more convenient to characterize a material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Tests should be performed in different orientations to the rolling direction of the sheet to ascertain initial anisotropy. 1.3 This method has been used successfully between strain rates of 10-5 to 10-1 per second. 1.4 This method has been used successfully on Aluminum and Titanium alloys. The use of the method wi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

VERY LOW FREQUENCY BREAKDOWN PROPERTIES OF ELECTRICAL INSULATION MATERIALS AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

For long cables or equipment with large capacitance it is not always possible to conduct high voltage withstand at tests at 60 Hz due to limitations in charging currents of the power supply. Very low frequency (typically at a frequency of 0.1 Hz) has been used for conventional cables as a way of getting around the charging current limitation. For superconducting grid applications the same issues apply. However there is very little data at cryogenic temperatures on how materials perform at low frequency compared to 60 Hz and whether higher voltages should be applied when performing a high voltage acceptability test. Various materials including G10 (fiberglass reinforced plastic or FRP), Cryoflex (a tape insulation used in some high temperature superconducting cables), kapton (commonly used polyimide), polycarbonate, and polyetherimide, and in liquid nitrogen alone have been tested using a step method for frequencies of 60 Hz, 0.1 Hz, and dc. The dwell time at each step was chosen so that the aging factor would be the same in both the 60 Hz and 0.1 Hz tests. The data indicated that, while there is a small frequency dependence for liquid nitrogen, there are significant differences for the solid materials studied. Breakdown data for these materials and for model cables will be shown and discussed.

Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Pace, Marshall O [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Phase transformations in engineering materials  

SciTech Connect

Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement.

Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dunand, D.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Priesmeyer, H.G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Webinar: Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, originally presented on August 13, 2013.

309

George Smith, Department of Materials,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

George Smith, Department of Materials, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH UK Email: george.smith@materials.ox.ac.uk URL: www.materials.ox.ac.uk The aims of the Department of Materials experienced one of the most successful years in its 46-year history, says head of department George Smith. Top

Paxton, Anthony T.

310

Materials Science and Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering 1 Fe---Cr A lloys f or A dvanced N uclear E nergy A pplica9ons Ron S caMaterials Science and Engineering 2 Thermodynamic S tabiliza9on o f G rain S ize The concept is that non---equilibrium solutes introduced by mechanical alloying can segregate to grain b oundaries, p roducing

311

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

312

An effective method for multi-material part design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Injection moulding is the most commercially important of all plastic processing methods. In recent years, multi-material over-moulding has become one of the fastest growing sectors of the injection moulding industry mainly due to its in-mould ... Keywords: CAD, computer-aided design, conceptual design, freeform surfaces, haptic interface, in-mould assembly, in-mould decoration, injection moulding, multi-material parts, over-moulding, part decomposition, product design, stiffness evaluation, surface painting, virtual prototyping

Zhan Gao; Yonghua Chen

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Tune modulation due to synchrotron oscillations and chromaticity, and the dynamic aperture  

SciTech Connect

A tracking study was done of the effects of a tune modulation, due to synchrotron oscillations and the tune dependence on momentum (chromaticity), on the dynamic aperture. The studies were done using several RHIC lattices and tracking runs of about 1 {times} 10{sup 6} turns. The dynamic aperture was found to decrease roughly linearly with the amplitude of the tune modulation and may be represented by A = A{sub o}(l--10 {Delta}{nu}) where A{sub o} is the dynamic aperture for {Delta}{nu} = 0, and {Delta}{nu} is the tune modulation amplitude. In Eq. (1), the range of {Delta}{nu} is such that lower order non-linear resonances, like the 1/3 and 1/4 resonance axe not crossed because of the tune modulation. Three different cases were studied, corresponding to RHIC lattices with different {beta}*, and with different synchrotron oscillation amplitudes. In each case, the tune modulation amplitude was varied by changing the chromaticity. In each case, roughly the same result, Eq. (1), was found. The result found here for the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity may be compared with the result found for the effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple in the quadrupoles, which was A = A{sub o}(l--42 {Delta}{nu}). The effect of a {Delta}{nu} due to a gradient ripple appears to be about 4 times stronger than the effect of a {Delta}{nu} due to chromaticity and synchrotron oscillations.

Parzen, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermal decomposition of charring materials  

SciTech Connect

Experimental techniques and methods were developed to investigate the transient process of wood pyrolysis under different levels of external radiation, moisture content of the wood sample, and oxygen concentration of the ambient atmosphere. A unique small-scale combustion-wind tunnel was constructed to conduct the pyrolysis experiments and to obtain the time dependent gasification mass flux, surface and in-depth temperatures, and evolved products of pyrolysis (CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and total hydrocarbons (THC)) for thermally thick samples of Douglas-fir. Experiments were performed both in inert atmosphere (nitrogen), and in air at several different heat fluxes and three different moisture contents of wood. Time dependent empirical chemical composition, char yield, and the heat of combustion of the pyrolysis products were determined. The experimental results indicate that the presence of moisture reduces the pyrolysis mass flux and delays the occurrence of its maxima. Presence of oxygen drastically increases the pyrolysis mass flux but its effect specially at lower temperatures depends on the experimental conditions such as the boundary layer thickness over the wood surface. Char yield, chemical composition of the volatiles, and the heat of combustion were found to vary during the pyrolysis process and with changes in the environmental conditions and wood moisture content. The pyrolysis temperature assumption often used for the simplified modeling of wood pyrolysis was examined in detail by considering two otherwise identical models; one with infinitely fast decomposition kinetics and the other with finite rate chemistry. It was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature is not a material property and different pyrolysis temperatures are needed for every problem.

Nurbakhsh, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an organic background Title Laser Ablation of Organic Materials for discrimination of bacteria in an organic background Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Baudelet, Matthieu, Myriam Boueri, Jin Yu, Xianglei Mao, Samuel S. Mao, and Richard E. Russo Conference Name Ultrafast Phenomena in Semiconductors and Nanostructure Materials XIII Series Title Proceedings SPIE Volume 7214 Pagination 72140J Date Published 02/2009 Abstract We demonstrate in this paper that laser ablation allows efficient analysis of organic and biological materials. Such analysis is based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which consists in the detection of the optical emission from the plasma induced by a high intensity laser pulse focused on the sample surface. The optimization of the ablation regime in terms of laser parameters (pulse duration, wavelength, fluence) is important to generate a plasma suitable for the analysis. We first present the results of a study of laser ablation of organic samples with different laser parameters using time-resolved shadowgraph. We correlate the early stage expansion of the plasma to its optical emission properties, which allows us to choose suitable laser parameters for an efficient analysis of organic or biological samples by LIBS. As an illustration of the analytical ability of LIBS for biological materials, we show that the emission from CN molecules can be used to distinguish between biological and inorganic samples. Native CN molecular fragment directly ablated from a biological sample are identified using time-resolved LIBS. Those due to recombination with nitrogen contained in atmospheric air can be distinguished with their specific time evolution behavior.

316

Material accountancy for metallic fuel pin casting  

SciTech Connect

The operation of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. The pin casting operation, although only one of several operations in FCF, was the first to be on-line. As such, it has served to demonstrate the material accountancy system in many of its facets. This paper details, for the operation of the pin casting process with depleted uranium, the interaction between the mass tracking system (MTG) and some of the ancillary computer codes which generate pertinent information for operations and material accountancy. It is necessary to distinguish between two types of material balance calculations -- closeout for operations and material accountancy for safeguards. The two have much in common, for example, the mass tracking system database and the calculation of an inventory difference, but, in general, are not congruent with regard to balance period and balance spatial domain. Moreover, the objective, assessment, and reporting requirements of the calculated inventory difference are very different in the two cases.

Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.; Beitel, J.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

318

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

319

Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Davis, Mary S. (Wading River, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

322

High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) - PSD Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filler A National Resource for Collaborative Materials Research The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program is on hiatus due to federal budget reductions. However, research projects at the HTML still may be conducted on a cost-recovery basis through the Work for Others (WFO) Program or under a Cooperative R&D Agreement (CRADA). Dr. Edgar Lara-Curzio, HTML Director Tel: 865.574.1749 Fax: 865.574.4913 laracurzioe@ornl.gov Christine Goudy, Administrative Specialist Tel: 865.574.8295 Fax: 865.574.4913 goudyc@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory [MST Home] [ORNL Home] [Site Index] [Search][Disclaimer] [Webmaster] Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a national multi-program research and development facility managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy

323

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogren. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN.sub.3. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Materials Preparation Center | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Preparation Center Materials Preparation Center Materials Preparation Center The Materials Preparation Center (MPC) is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering specialized research center located at the Ames Laboratory. MPC operations are primarily funded by the Materials Discovery, Design, & Synthesis team's Synthesis & Processing Science core research activity. MPC is recognized throughout the worldwide research community for its unique capabilities in purification, preparation, and characterization of: Rare earth metals [learn about rare earths] Single crystal growth Metal Powders/Atomization Alkaline-earth metals [learn more, wikipedia] External Link Icon Refractory metal [learn more, wikipedia] External Link Icon

330

Material Effects and Detector Response Corrections for Bunch Length Measurements  

SciTech Connect

A typical diagnostic used to determine the bunch length of ultra-short electron bunches is the auto-correlation of coherent transition radiation. This technique can produce artificially short bunch length results due to the attenuation of low frequency radiation if corrections for the material properties of the Michelson interferometer and detector response are not made. Measurements were taken using FTIR spectroscopy to determine the absorption spectrum of various materials and the response of a Molectron P1-45 pyroelectric detector. The material absorption data will be presented and limitations on the detector calibration discussed.

Zacherl, W.; Blumenfeld, I.; Berry, M.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES DENYS DUTYKH AND HENRIK KALISCH, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced which is able to handle time-dependent bottom

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES DENYS DUTYKH # AND HENRIK KALISCH, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time­dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced which is able to handle time­dependent bottom

333

Resonant Heating Due to Cyclotron Subharmonic Frequency Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct ion heating process which is resonant with the wave at the cyclotron subharmonic frequency, ?=32?i, is discovered through the particle-simulation investigation of the ion Bernstein-wave heating. The particle trapping in phase space due to the wave of an arbitrary cyclotron subharmonic frequency is studied theoretically and numerically confirmed.

H. Abe; H. Okada; R. Itatani; M. Ono; H. Okuda

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels B. Qin and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* Twinning induced plasticity steels are austenitic alloys in which mechanical twinning is a prominent deformation, Twinning, Twinning induced plasticity, Automobiles Introduction Mechanical twinning is a plastic

Cambridge, University of

335

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc. Reflections led on this accident have pushed to consider the phenomenon of tank pressurization as a potential initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Parton energy loss due to synchrotron-like gluon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a quasiclassical theory of the synchrotron-like gluon radiation. Our calculations show that the parton energy loss due to the synchrotron gluon emission may be important in the jet quenching phenomenon if the plasma instabilities generate a sufficiently strong chromomagnetic field. Our gluon spectrum disagrees with that obtained by Shuryak and Zahed within the Schwinger's proper time method.

B. G. Zakharov

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield  

SciTech Connect

For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

339

Atomic displacements due to spinspin repulsion in conjugated alternant hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary batteries [7]. Graphene nanoflakes, also known as nanoislands or nanodisks, are finite­H bond as well as to the spin density at carbon atoms in both open and closed shell at graphene of graphene has increased the interest in CAHs in physics, chemistry and material sciences from both a the

Benzi, Michele

340

Material efficiency in a multi-material world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complex policies and political forces. The overall goal here is...share many of the same driving forces-the materials we use and...materials. Recalling that the fundamental goal of material efficiency...cycle data system (ILCD) handbook-general guide for life cycle...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2*** 2*** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

342

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 A 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

343

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 Company 1 RIS A 2 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 3 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

344

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Example 4 *** Example 4 *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

345

Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials  

SciTech Connect

The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Generic planning and control of automated material handling systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the problem to design a generic planning and control architecture for automated material handling systems (AMHSs). We illustrate the relevance of this research direction, and then address three different market sectors where AMHSs ... Keywords: Automated material handling systems, Generic control architecture, Real-time scheduling

S. W. A. Haneyah; J. M. J. Schutten; P. C. Schuur; W. H. M. Zijm

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DPC materials and corrosion environments  

SciTech Connect

This review focuses on the performance of basket materials that could be exposed to ground water over thousands of years, and prospective disposal overpack materials that could possibly be used to protect dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) in disposal environments.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Stephanie Teich-McGoldrick; Ernest Hardin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Scientists seek nonlinear optical materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonlinear optical materials seem about to do for light what semiconductors already have done for electricity. ... Successful development of these materials could mean big payoffs in telecommunications, data processing, nuclear fusion, and applications of lasers in commerce and industry generally. ...

1982-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Carbon nanotubes in new materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies of materials consisting of carbon nanotubes or containing them have been analyzed and generalized. Classification of these materials is proposed, their general features and main types are considered, and individual examples are presented. The bibliography includes 372 references.

Eduard G Rakov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 (08-98) Previous editions are obsolete. MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 75, 150. Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1001; ACT OF JUNE 25, 1948; 62 STAT. 749; MAKES IT A CRIMINAL OFFENSE TO MAKE A WILLFULLY FALSE STATEMENT OR REPRESENTATION TO ANY DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES AS TO ANY MATTER WITHIN ITS JURISDICTION. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper OMB Control No. 1910-1800 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Reverse SECTION A 7. DOE/NRC 740M ATTACHED 8. BEGINNING INVENTORY - DOE OWNED 9. BEGINNING INVENTORY - NOT DOE OWNED RECEIPTS 11. PROCUREMENT FROM DOE FROM: 13. PROCUREMENT - FOR THE ACCOUNT OF DOE 14. DOD RETURNS - USE A 15. DOD RETURNS - USE B

351

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

352

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaug (C2) provided a perspective for seven accompanying papers describing results from the Hayabusa (Falcon) spacecraft that flew by, and may have briefly landed on the 500-m S-type asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, to sample and, hopefully return surface materials to Earth. ... As part of a six-paper series describing the Spirit and Opportunity exploration rovers' results from the Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum landing places, respectively, Yen et al. (C6) described and compared the soil chemistry at mineralogy on opposite sites of Mars. ... As one of a six-paper report on the Deep Impact collision with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Mumma et al. (C7) used high-dispersion IR (2.8?5.0 ?m) spectroscopy to quantify H2O, C2H6, HCN, CO, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H2, and CH4 in the comet before and after impact. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; Adam J. R. Kent

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

ANALYTICAL NEUTRONIC STUDIES CORRELATING FAST NEUTRON FLUENCE TO MATERIAL DAMAGE IN CARBON, SILICON, AND SILICON CARBIDE  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates how fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV correlates to material damage (i.e., the total fluence spectrum folded with the respective material’s displacements-per- atom [dpa] damage response function) for the specific material fluence spectra encountered in Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) service and the irradiation tests conducted in material test reactors (MTRs) for the fuel materials addressed in the white paper. It also reports how the evaluated correlations of >0.1 MeV fluence to material damage vary between the different spectral conditions encountered in material service versus testing.

Jim Sterbentz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Organic solar cells: Structure, materials, critical characteristics, and outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review surveys recent advances in the field of photovoltaic devices based on organic photoactive materials and used for converting solar energy into electricity. Different architectures of organic photovolta...

P. A. Troshin; R. N. Lyubovskaya; V. F. Razumov

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20, 2013, in CINT, Facilities, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Transmission Grid Integration The nation's...

358

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, in Capabilities, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Office of Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities,...

359

materials | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Manuscript Presentation Desulfurization of Coal Timothy R. Armstrong, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presentation Materials for Advanced Heat Exchange...

360

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reactor Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits Crosscutting Technology Development Reactor Materials Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Advanced Methods for Manufacturing...

362

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

363

Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are presently three generic mechanisms known for storing hydrogen in materials: absorption, adsorption, and chemical reaction.

365

Materials for Production and Storage of Renewable Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for Production and Storage of Renewable Energy ... The ?INJ value was low and strongly wavelength-dependent, which was attributed to a poor energetic matching between dye excited states and TiO2 acceptor states due to unfavorable electrolyte compn. ...

Juan Bisquert

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Separation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, delivery, and micro-devices. In the first part of this dissertation, we will study the synthesis of membranes using an emerging class of nanoporous materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for carbon dioxide (CO2) separations. Due to the unique chemistry...

Varela Guerrero, Victor

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

368

MEASUREMENT, MATERIALS & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M2SEC MEASUREMENT, MATERIALS & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CENTER #12;#12;M2SEC | The University 66045 MEASUREMENT, MATERIALS & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CENTER The Measurement, Materials Sustainable initiative themes of KU's strategic plan, Bold Aspirations: · Sustaining The Planet, Powering The World

369

Department of Advanced Materials Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@k.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3781T E L Environmental-friendly materials process, Metal smelting and re ning process of Advanced Materials Science masashi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3225T E L Nuclear magnetic resonance New Materials Synthesis, Superconductivity, Quantum Spin Liquid,Topological Hall Effect takatama

Katsumoto, Shingo

370

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pawel, "Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for MercuryMercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 ­ updated Feb 3, 2010 #12;ORNL Material Reports Reviewed · IDS-NF requested ORNL research any past SNS

McDonald, Kirk

371

Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments Extended abstracts of the 24th Risø International Symposium LABORATORY ROSKILDE, DENMARK #12;Risø International Symposium on Superconductivity and Magnetism: Material

372

Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising Sea Levels Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W. Washington) Select to enlarge. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could greatly lessen the impacts of climate change. However, the gases already added to the atmosphere ensure a certain amount of sea level rise to come, even if future emissions are reduced. A study by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

374

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy?s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles? Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

McDonald, D.K.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

378

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures Christian Licht , Thibaut Weller mathematical models of smart materials and smart structures. Smart materials are materials which present perturbations methods, asymptotic analysis, plates and rods models. 1 Introduction Smart materials present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Play and tolerance : notions of looseness in social and material assemblages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The material scenario provides the most illustrative of entry points into this collection of evidence embodying the difference between play and tolerance. In a material assemblage, the looseness in a joint (expansion, pin, ...

Voorhees, Jeremy, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne TDC: Material Transfer Agreements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Transfer Agreements Material Transfer Agreements Materials produced by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are often of interest to the private sector. Depending on the circumstances under which the material was developed, such material may be transferred to industry for a number of reasons (e.g., testing, feasibility studies, etc.). This transfer is usually temporary and can initiate a more formal working arrangement. At this time, TDC, in conjunction with Argonne's Legal Department, provides such agreements on an as-needed basis. If you would like to acquire material produced by Argonne researchers during the course of a federally funded research project, please contact TDC or fill out a Material Transfer Agreement request form. Printed or electronically downloaded copies may become obsolete. Before using such a copy for work direction, employees must verify that it is current by comparing its revision number with that of the online version. Obsolete forms will be rejected.

382

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD Workshop Co-Chairs and Principle Report Editors Dianne L. Poster, John A. Small, Michael T. Postek National Institute of Standards and Technology Sponsored by U

Magee, Joseph W.

385

Inversion of Scattered Waves for Material Properties in Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect

The authors apply a recently developed low-frequency, non-linear inversion method which includes near and far field terms to a crosshole data set to determine the bulk and shear modulus, as well as the density for a fractured zone in a granitic rock mass. The method uses the scattered elastic wavefield which is extracted from the recorded data before the inversion is performed. The inversion result is appraised by investigating the resolution and standard deviation of the model estimates. The sensitivity of the three parameters to different features of the medium is revealed. While the bulk modulus appears to be sensitive to voids and welded contacts, the density is mostly affected by fractured zones. The shear modulus is least constrained due to the absence of S wave anisotropy information. It is shown that the three medium parameters are generally sensitive to other medium features than those determined by velocity inversions. Thus this method is viewed as a complimentary approach to travel time tomography which provides more insight into the material properties of inhomogeneous media.

Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri A.; Johnson, Lane R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Analytical modeling of elastic-plastic wave behavior near grain boundaries in crystalline materials  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that changes in material properties across an interface will produce differences in the behavior of reflected and transmitted waves. This is seen frequently in planar impact experiments, and to a lesser extent, oblique impacts. In anisotropic elastic materials, wave behavior as a function of direction is usually accomplished with the aid of velocity surfaces, a graphical method for predicting wave scattering configurations. They have expanded this method to account for inelastic deformation due to crystal plasticity. The set of derived equations could not be put into a characteristic form, but instead led to an implicit problem. to overcome this difficulty an algorithm was developed to search the parameters space defined by a wave normal vector, particle velocity vector, and a wave speed. A solution was said to exist when a set from this parameter space satisfied the governing vector equation. Using this technique they can predict the anisotropic elastic-plastic velocity surfaces and grain boundary scattering configuration for crystalline materials undergoing deformation by slip. Specifically, they have calculated the configuration of scattered elastic-plastic waves in anisotropic NiAl for an incident compressional wave propagating along a <111> direction and contacting a 45 degree inclined grain boundary and found that large amplitude transmitted waves exist owing to the fact that the wave surface geometry forces it to propagate near the zero Schmid factor direction <100>.

Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian [LLNL; Peralta, Pedro [ASU

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

Kumar Sridharan; Todd Allen; Mark Anderson; Guoping Cao; Gerald Kulcinski

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermal Performance of Microencapsulated Phase Material (MPCM) Slurry in a Coaxial Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries and coil heat exchangers had been recently studied separately as enhancers of convective heat transfer processes. Due to the larger apparent heat related to the phase change process...

Yu, Kun

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Numerical Simulation of Matrix Reinforced Composite Materials Subjected to Compression Loads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the most common formulations to obtain the compression strength of long fiber composites due to fiber buckling. This failure mode was first studied by Rosen (Fibre Composite Materials, pp. 3...

Xavier Martinez; Sergio Oller

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Failure in shear bands for granular materials: thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Failure in shear bands for granular materials: thermo-hydro-chemo- mechanical effects M. VEVEAKIS depends on the chemical reaction characteristics and that micro-inertia due to grain translations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Complementary Chemistry and Matched Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complementary Chemistry and Matched Materials Complementary Chemistry and Matched Materials Complementary Chemistry and Matched Materials November 15, 2013 - 1:45pm Addthis DNA linkers allow different kinds of nanoparticles to self-assemble and form relatively large-scale nanocomposite arrays. This approach allows for mixing and matching components for the design of multifunctional materials. | Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. DNA linkers allow different kinds of nanoparticles to self-assemble and form relatively large-scale nanocomposite arrays. This approach allows for mixing and matching components for the design of multifunctional materials. | Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts?

392

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 10-volume Treatise on Geochemistry (A3) devotes its first volume to meteorites, comets, and planets, with information on specific analytical techniques scattered throughout the work. ... The Stardust mission launched in February 1999 is to bring dust from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 collected on 2 January 2004 to Earth on 15 January 2006 for detailed laboratory analysis. ... Soil at this site compositionally resembles those at prior Martian landing sites while fresh rock surfaces suggest low-K primitive basalts, differing from those at the Pathfinder sites. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; John M. Hanchar

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comment on “Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comment on “Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power” ... Energy Analysis Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 ... This work was funded by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program and Solar Energy Technologies Program) and by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ...

Andrew Mills; Ryan Wiser; Michael Milligan; Mark O’Malley

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

A study of temperature distributions due to conduction reservoir heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity with temperature. He showed this effect could be very important in considering a material such as oil shale, where the conductivity of the raw shale may be five times as great as that of the spent shale. Neglecting this variation... conduction model to investigate the in place heating of oil shale by hot gases forced through a fracture. The heat injection rate he considered is much less than would normally be employed for steam injection into permeable reservoirs and is only about...

Connaughton, Charles Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear materials management storage study  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs` Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites.

Becker, G.W. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C. The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs.

Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, E.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles  

SciTech Connect

Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450?ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation) [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Baksht, R. B. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation) [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Eliciting a human understandable model of ice adhesion strength for rotor blade leading edge materials from uncertain experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the thermal conductivity of isotropic materials that protect the leading edge of the blade from erosion. For this reason, electro-thermal de-icing is not ideal for new high erosion resistant polymer based leading edge protec- tion materials because they have lower thermal conductivity than isotropic materials. Due

Granada, Universidad de

403

www.manufacturing.gatech.edu The fire, smoke and toxicity (FST) factors of composite materials are becoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Conventional methods to improve fire resistance of polymeric composite materials are expensive due to the high fireshield skins Industry Benefits New class of lightweight, low-cost, fire-resistant materials meetingwww.manufacturing.gatech.edu The fire, smoke and toxicity (FST) factors of composite materials

Das, Suman

404

Sandia National Laboratories: materials science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of microsystems-enabled PV (MEPV) technology and ... Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating...

405

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Damping of Composite Laminates”, SPIE Proceedings onpublication to Journal of Composite Materials Biggerstaff,submitted for publication to Composites, Part A Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

materials | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director, U.S. DOE-NETL Session I - Functional Materials Moderators: Timothy R. Armstrong, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bulk Carbon Dioxide Removal By Adsorption: Current...

407

Advanced Materials Research Highlights | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials | Research Highlights Research Highlights 1-10 of 93 Results Prev 12345 Next Single Supported Atoms Participate in Catalytic Processes December 04, 2014 -...

408

Hydraulic Fracturing in Particulate Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For more than five decades, hydraulic fracturing has been widely used to enhance oil and gas production. Hydraulic fracturing in solid materials (e.g., rock) has… (more)

Chang, Hong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the ASME 12th Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology Conference in Boston, Massachusetts. One pathway for delivering H2 ... Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with...

410

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the functionality of nanoscale materials and interacting assemblies * Research on optoelectronic, ferroelectric, ionic and electronic transport, and catalytic phenomena at the...

411

Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and batteries/fuel cells. Nanostructured electrode materials have demonstrated superior electrochemical of polymethine dyes electronic spectra is crucial for successful design of the new molecules with optimized

Wu, Shin-Tson

412

Materials Compatibility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Publications Mechanical Properties of Structural Steels in Hydrogen Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Report on Assessment of...

413

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4252011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech...

414

Center for Energy Efficient Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plastic Solar Solid State Lighting High-Efficiency Solar Cells Thermoelectrics Undergraduate Internship Program Overview The Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM) is an...

415

Glass as a structural material.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Glass can be beautiful and strong, so why is it not used more often as a structural material? Most often the reasoning is because people… (more)

White, Rachel Lynn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

in-situ chemistry mapping of hydrogen storage materials by neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Neutron diffraction was used to nondestructively study the microstructures for two hydrogen storage media systems. In the first case, sodium alanate based hydrogen storage is a vehicle-scale candidate system developed by Sandia/GM. Neutron scattering was used to determine the distribution of phases in the storage media at different hydrogen loading levels, to help understand the absorption/desorption of hydrogen in large-scale systems. This study also included a 3D neutron tomographic study of the microstructure. In the second case, tin-doped lanthanum nickel alloys have been studied at JPL for space-based applications, for which the gradual degradation of the material due to segregation and disproportionation of phases is a known problem. A regenerative process developed to restore the storage properties of these alloys was studied, using in-situ neutron diffraction to relate the microstructure to the thermodynamic simulations.

Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman Jr, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Johnson, Terry A [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jorgensen, Scott W [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan] [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 6/17/2005 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of value may be deducted for purposes of calculating Compensating Tax due Provider New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in determining the amount of

418

NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS PRESENT FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS PRESENT Graphene Colloquium

Farritor, Shane

419

Modeling of magnetostrictive materials and structures  

SciTech Connect

The constitutive model for a magnetostrictive material and its effect on the structural response is presented in this article. The example of magnetostrictive material considered is the TERFENOL-D. As like the piezoelectric material, this material has two constitutive laws, one of which is the sensing law and the other is the actuation law, both of which are highly coupled and non-linear. For the purpose of analysis, the constitutive laws can be characterized as coupled or uncoupled and linear or non linear. Coupled model is studied without assuming any explicit direct relationship with magnetic field. In the linear coupled model, which is assumed to preserve the magnetic flux line continuity, the elastic modulus, the permeability and magnetoelastic constant are assumed as constant. In the nonlinear-coupled model, the nonlinearity is decoupled and solved separately for the magnetic domain and the mechanical domain using two nonlinear curves, namely the stress vs. strain curve and the magnetic flux density vs. magnetic field curve. This is performed by two different methods. In the first, the magnetic flux density is computed iteratively, while in the second, the artificial neural network is used, where in the trained network will give the necessary strain and magnetic flux density for a given magnetic field and stress level. The effect of nonlinearity is demonstrated on a simple magnetostrictive rod.

Gopalakrishnan, S. [Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

420

Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of the light yield of some modern scintillators, namely CaWO4, CdWO4 and Bi4Ge3O12, is close to the theoretical limit. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of different materials with emphasis on their application as cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) in rare event search experiments.

V. B. Mikhailik; H. Kraus

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SC e-journals, Materials Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Materials Science Materials Science Acta Materialia Advanced Composite Materials Advanced Energy Materials Advanced Engineering Materials Advanced Functional Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Powder Technology Advances in Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Annual Review of Materials Research Applied Composite Materials Applied Mathematical Modelling Applied Mathematics & Computation Applied Physics A Applied Physics B Applied Surface Science Archives of Computational Materials Science and Surface Engineering - OAJ Archives of Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Carbohydrate Polymers Carbon Catalysis Science & Technology Cellulose Cement and Concrete Research Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings Ceramics International Chalcogenide Letters - OAJ Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

422

Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics Transient materials is an emerging area of materials design with the key attribute being the ability to physically...

423

Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disordered materials hold promise for better batteries Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries February 21, 2014 | Tags: Chemistry, Hopper, Materials Science,...

424

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material. Available for thumbnail of...

425

Cybersecurity Awareness Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Cybersecurity Awareness Materials Cybersecurity Awareness Materials The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of awareness material to be used during cyber awareness campaigns or...

426

The Materials Science of Titanium Dioxide Memristors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unipolar resistance switching,” Advanced Materials, vol. 20,A variety of resistance switching materials could be used3 for resistance-change memory,” Advanced Materials, vol.

Pickett, Matthew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

On the fracture toughness of advanced materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurs when the materials resistance to fracture ceases toall classes of materials, the fracture resistance does notthese biological materials derive their fracture resistance

Launey, Maximilien E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Material Safety Data Sheets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Material Safety Data Sheets Material Safety Data Sheets Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) provide workers and emergency personnel with ways for handling and working with a...

429

Cybersecurity Awareness Marketing/Promotional Material | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MarketingPromotional Material Cybersecurity Awareness MarketingPromotional Material The OCIO has developed a variety of marketing and promotional material to be used during cyber...

430

Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compatible Materials Workshop Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories hosted the Hydrogen Compatible Materials...

431

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3,...

432

Computational materials: Embedding Computation into the Everyday  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building forces, smart materials are dynamic in that theymaterial With a smart material, we should be clearly1] Addington, M. 2001 Smart Materials and Technologies. In A

Thomsen, Mette Ramsgard; Karmon, Ayelet

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Materials Sciences and Engineering Program | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Sciences and Engineering Program SHARE BES Materials Sciences and Engineering Program The ORNL materials sciences and engineering program supported by the Department of...

434

REDUCTION OF DRIFT EFFECTS DUE TO SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

Gradient and curvature drift play a key role in the modulation of cosmic rays. Reduction in the drift coefficient due to turbulence has been demonstrated unambiguously through direct numerical simulations, but a theory that can explain these results is still lacking. We introduce a parameterized form of the drift coefficient based on direct numerical simulations and show that good agreement with observed proton energy spectra at Earth can be found when it is used in a numerical modulation model. We show that the turbulence ultrascale, for which no observations currently exist, plays an important role in drift reduction. The magnitude at Earth and spatial dependence of this quantity required to fit cosmic-ray observations at Earth are argued to be plausible based on the required properties of the two-dimensional turbulence spectrum at large scales.

Burger, R. A.; Visser, D. J. [Unit for Space Physics, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Optical analog of Rabi oscillation suppression due to atomic motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Rabi oscillations of a two-level atom illuminated by a laser on resonance with the atomic transition may be suppressed by the atomic motion through averaging or filtering mechanisms. The optical analogs of these velocity effects are described. The two atomic levels correspond in the optical analogy to orthogonal polarizations of light and the Rabi oscillations to polarization oscillations in a medium which is optically active, naturally or due to a magnetic field. In the later case, the two orthogonal polarizations could be selected by choosing the orientation of the magnetic field, and one of them be filtered out. It is argued that the time-dependent optical polarization oscillations or their suppression are observable with current technology.

J. G. Muga; B. Navarro

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Investigation of induced thermal behavior due to simple tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermodynamics. Tni. s was sub', ect 2 to the restriction that the materi" 1 conform sufficiently to the ideally elastic hypothesis and that the deformrationr b(. adiabatic. 2N. A . Blot, J. Applied Phys. , 2 I, 2(1{1-2S. (1956) Col&i c '. . '. : ll y 1 & li...&'i ~ li&} ': &1 ciⅈ al)y to ' iisrli iibe }&c . . :i] cixtrrm!i &l i;hie! I oer?rs. Th ?: ppl'& a&'h of Rpc"I ion 2 f, . to cxpl r&it f l)e ?r?, )ail )z?'] e&]ur&t i& ns oi conLiliuur&i mec]ial)ics, 'L'hc re] at. ionohili c&f el i! ssic I]. th!. rn...

Tenison, Larry Turner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pseudoplastic deformation pits on polished ceramics due to cavitation erosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a previous study, pseudoplastic deformation pits created by cavitation exposure were reported in silicon nitride and zirconia. In this research, further comparison of the size and number of pits between several silicon nitride and zirconia materials is carried out. The pits are larger and much more numerous in silicon nitride than in zirconia although silicon nitride is harder than zirconia. An explanation of this phenomenon is given. Also, in the previous study it was reported that apparently a partially stabilized zirconia with yttria oxide developed a delay in the phase transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic after being exposed to cavitation. In this research, further experiments related with this phase transformation delay are carried out. Also, the phase transformation is verified with X-ray diffraction analysis. It is concluded that the “activation” of the partial stabilized zirconia happens regardless of the oxide used to stabilize it.

G. García-Atance Fatjó; M. Hadfield; K. Tabeshfar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

QAM multi-path characterization due to ocean scattering  

SciTech Connect

A series of RF channel flight characterization tests are to be run, in early March, to benchmark high speed, 16QAM multi-path performance over the ocean surface. The modulation format being tested is a 16 differential phase, absolute amplitude, two level polar quadrature amplitude modulation. The bit rate is 100 Megabits per second. This transmitted signal will be generated in a burst mode, being on for 40 microseconds once every 40 milliseconds. An aircraft will radiate the RF test signal at 5 different altitudes. The aircraft will make two inward flights at each altitude with vertical and horizontal polarization respectively. Receivers are to be placed in two different locations using circular antenna polarization. One receiver will be placed at an altitude of 230 feet above the ocean surface, and the other on a boat with the antenna placed just up off of the ocean surface. Data is to be collected over multiple wavelength changes in the difference between the line of sight and the reflected multi-path ray. The real time signal strength variation is to be recorded as well. Analysis of the resulting data will show flat fading and frequency selective fading effects. The test is run over two different days to provide for some variation in sea state conditions. This resulting information will help quantify the effectiveness of this novel modulation scheme for missile telemetry end event data applications.

Petersen, T. L. (Thomas L.); Bracht, R. R.; Pasquale, R. V. (Regina V.); Dimsdle, J. (Jeffery); Swanson, R. (Richard)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum ...

Cruz J. R.; Shah C. H.; Postyn A. S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b , Hjalte S than that of other chemical fuels1 . However, hydrogen storage is still a key problem remaining on reversible hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides, these materials have dominated the research field due

442

Identification of anomalous radon concentrations due to geodynamic processes by elimination of Rn variations caused by other factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......concentrations due to geodynamic processes by elimination of Rn variations...number of different physical processes including seismic activity...Ulomov V.I., 1972The processes preceding strong earthquakes...Arad region,Trans. Ann. Mtg Israel geol. Soc., Ashqelon......

M. Finkelstein; S. Brenner; L. Eppelbaum; E. Ne'Eman

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

0-7803-7724-9/03/$17.00 2003 IEEE 500 Abstract Due to their unpredictable nature, collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0-7803-7724-9/03/$17.00 © 2003 IEEE 500 Abstract Due to their unpredictable nature, collaboration activities are rarely supported by a single CSCW technology. Then different types of collaborative applications are usually applied in order to support group work such as collaborative e- learning. But in spite

Hoyos Rivera, Guillermo de Jesús

444

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

445

Materials science aspects of coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural organic materials are arrangements of linear aliphatic units and ring-like aromatic units arranged in a polymeric pattern. We show that fossilized organic materials such as coals and oil shale retain this polymeric character. We also show the polymeric nature of jet and amber fossilized organic matter used for centuries for ornamentation.

Charles Wert; Manfred Weller

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The material footprint of nations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other solid energy materials/carriers A.4.1.1: Brown coal (lignite) A.4.1.2: Hard coal A.4.1.3: Oil shale and tar sands* A.4.1.4: Peat A.4.2: Liquid and gaseous energy materials/carriers A.4.2.1: Crude...

Thomas O. Wiedmann; Heinz Schandl; Manfred Lenzen; Daniel Moran; Sangwon Suh; James West; Keiichiro Kanemoto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Materials science Nanotubes get hard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials science Nanotubes get hard under pressure Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA doi:10.1073/pnas.0405877101 (2004) When Zhongwu Wang et al. squeezed carbon nanotubes in a diamond anvil cell, they made nanotubes into diamond itself: the carbon material formed under compression at room temperature seems

Downs, Robert T.

448

Material selection for electrooptic deflectors  

SciTech Connect

The selection of a material for a practical device is generally guided by a number of criteria, including cost, size, difficulty of fabrication, durability, driver requirements, and system constraints. A quantitative analysis can usually be made for comparison, or a figure of merit can be computed. In the case of materials for electrooptical (EO) devices the choice is often made based on the availability of materials meeting some minimum system requirement. For fast EO deflectors, where a large number of resolvable spots is required, the choice of materials is quite limited. A model of just such a device is proposed; it is based on the resolution of 400 spots and reasonable boundary conditions. The model predicts that to be successful, an EO material must be chosen that has a linear EO coefficient (r/sub 33/) of at least 336 pm/V. A survey was conducted of the EO materials which are generally available. Based on the model and the survey, Czochralski crystal growth of strontium barium niobate (SBN:60) is recommended. Although SBN:60 does not have the largest EO coefficient, it may be the easiest to grow in the required size and optical quality, thus satisfying the availability criterion. It should be borne in mind that many materials may be grown by this technique and there are many new and potential applications for EO materials. 92 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Field of Expertise Materials Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure-property relationships through the characterisation of diverse materials to process optimisation and international research partners in order to keep Austrian high-technology industry, scientific production semiconductors Paper and physical chemistry principles of paper strength Metallic materials for energy applica

450

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Materials Science Graduate Student Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Science Program Graduate Student Handbook Fall 2010 #12;1 http://www.engr.wisc.ede/interd/msp/handbook year are eligible to run for office. This handbook was written by materials science graduate students Assistance (page 5): How does research funding work? Course Registration (page 7): What classes should I

Evans, Paul G.

453

PLANETARY-SCALE STRONTIUM ISOTOPIC HETEROGENEITY AND THE AGE OF VOLATILE DEPLETION OF EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic anomalies in planetary materials reflect both early solar nebular heterogeneity inherited from presolar stellar sources and processes that generated non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionations. The characterization of isotopic variations in heavy elements among early solar system materials yields important insight into the stellar environment and formation of the solar system, and about initial isotopic ratios relevant to long-term chronological applications. One such heavy element, strontium, is a central element in the geosciences due to wide application of the long-lived {sup 87}Rb-{sup 87}Sr radioactive as a chronometer. We show that the stable isotopes of Sr were heterogeneously distributed at both the mineral scale and the planetary scale in the early solar system, and also that the Sr isotopic heterogeneities correlate with mass-independent oxygen isotope variations, with only CI chondrites plotting outside of this correlation. The correlation implies that most solar system material formed by mixing of at least two isotopically distinct components: a CV-chondrite-like component and an O-chondrite-like component, and possibly a distinct CI-chondrite-like component. The heterogeneous distribution of Sr isotopes may indicate that variations in initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr of early solar system materials reflect isotopic heterogeneity instead of having chronological significance, as interpreted previously. For example, given the differences in {sup 84}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between calcium aluminum inclusions and eucrites ({epsilon}{sup 84}Sr > 2), the difference in age between these materials would be {approx}6 Ma shorter than previously interpreted, placing the Sr chronology in agreement with other long- and short-lived isotope systems, such as U-Pb and Mn-Cr.

Moynier, Frederic; Podosek, Frank A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science and McDonnell Center for Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Day, James M. D. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093-0244 (United States); Okui, Wataru; Yokoyama, Tetsuya [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Bouvier, Audrey [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0231 (United States); Walker, Richard J., E-mail: moynier@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: fap@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: jmdday@ucsd.edu, E-mail: rjwalker@umd.edu, E-mail: okui.w.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: tetsuya.yoko@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: abouvier@umn.edu [Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Materials Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials SHARE Materials Highlights 1-7 of 7 Results Neutron scattering characterizes dynamics in polymer family December 01, 2012 - Understanding the interplay between structure and dynamics is the key to obtaining tailor-made materials. In the last few years, a large effort has been devoted to characterizing and relating the structure and dynamic properties in families of polymers with alkyl side groups. Theory meets experiment: structure-property relationships in an electrode material for solid-oxide fuel cells December 01, 2012 - Fuel cell technology is one potentially very efficient and environmentally friendly way to convert the chemical energy of fuels into electricity. Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) can convert a wide variety of fuels with simpler, cheaper designs than those used in

455

Success Stories: Materials Discovery - Symyx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Discovery Materials Discovery Until Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Peter Schultz thought of a better way, materials discovery was a costly, slow, and laborious process. In the early 1990s Dr. Schultz and colleagues invented a super efficient materials research process that combined minaturizing with parallel processing. In 1994 the start-up company Symyx Technologies, Inc. licensed the invention and began developing research tools that can create and screen new materials hundreds to thousands of times faster than traditional methods at a fraction of the cost. Combinatorial techniques had been successfully applied in the pharmaceutical industry to discover new drugs when Schultz and co-workers in the Molecular Design Institute of Berkeley Lab proposed that the same

456

Insulation Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Materials Insulation Materials May 30, 2012 - 10:08am Addthis Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo

457

Insulation Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Materials Insulation Materials Insulation Materials May 30, 2012 - 10:08am Addthis Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Rigid foam board adds R-value to this wall in a Florida home. | Photo

458

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

Rynders, Steven Walton (Fogelsville, PA); Minford, Eric (Laurys Station, PA); Tressler, Richard Ernest (Boalsburg, PA); Taylor, Dale M. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

High Temperature Integrated Thermoelectric Ststem and Materials  

SciTech Connect

The final goal of this project is to produce, by the end of Phase II, an all ceramic high temperature thermoelectric module. Such a module design integrates oxide ceramic n-type, oxide ceramic p-type materials as thermoelectric legs and oxide ceramic conductive material as metalizing connection between n-type and p-type legs. The benefits of this all ceramic module are that it can function at higher temperatures (> 700 C), it is mechanically and functionally more reliable and it can be scaled up to production at lower cost. With this all ceramic module, millions of dollars in savings or in new opportunities recovering waste heat from high temperature processes could be made available. A very attractive application will be to convert exhaust heat from a vehicle to reusable electric energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Phase I activities were focused on evaluating potential n-type and p-type oxide compositions as the thermoelectric legs. More than 40 oxide ceramic powder compositions were made and studied in the laboratory. The compositions were divided into 6 groups representing different material systems. Basic ceramic properties and thermoelectric properties of discs sintered from these powders were measured. Powders with different particles sizes were made to evaluate the effects of particle size reduction on thermoelectric properties. Several powders were submitted to a leading thermoelectric company for complete thermoelectric evaluation. Initial evaluation showed that when samples were sintered by conventional method, they had reasonable values of Seebeck coefficient but very low values of electrical conductivity. Therefore, their power factors (PF) and figure of merits (ZT) were too low to be useful for high temperature thermoelectric applications. An unconventional sintering method, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was determined to produce better thermoelectric properties. Particle size reduction of powders also was found to have some positive benefits. Two composition systems, specifically 1.0 SrO - 0.8 x 1.03 TiO2 - 0.2 x 1.03 NbO2.5 and 0.97 TiO2 - 0.03 NbO2.5, have been identified as good base line compositions for n-type thermoelectric compositions in future module design. Tests of these materials at an outside company were promising using that company's processing and material expertise. There was no unique p-type thermoelectric compositions identified in phase I work other than several current cobaltite materials. Ca3Co4O9 will be the primary p-type material for the future module design until alternative materials are developed. BaTiO3 and rare earth titanate based dielectric compositions show both p-type and n-type behavior even though their electrical conductivities were very low. Further research and development of these materials for thermoelectric applications is planned in the future. A preliminary modeling and optimization of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) that uses the n-type 1.0 SrO - 1.03 x 0.8 TiO2 - 1.03 x 0.2 NbO2.5 was performed. Future work will combine development of ceramic powders and manufacturing expertise at TAM, development of SPS at TAM or a partner organization, and thermoelectric material/module testing, modeling, optimization, production at several partner organizations.

Mike S. H. Chu

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of GeSbSe phase-change materials," Nature Materials, vol. 6,processing of the phase-change material KSb5S8," Chemistryhas demonstrated the phase change material KSbS by a similar

Feser, Joseph Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Aerogel and ferroelectric dielectric materials for plasma actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents performance evaluation of two thick materials with extreme permittivity as dielectric barrier discharge actuators. Specifically, the use of silica aerogels and ferroelectrics is investigated. Due to high polarizability of the ferroelectric material the supplied power manifests itself primarily as heat generation with no measurable thrust. The silica aerogel, however, has a significant impact on thrust saturation as compared with other dielectrics reported to date. Specifically, the silica aerogel is found to have an order of magnitude better thrust to actuator weight ratio than acrylic and twice than that of Kapton with no power penalty, making it potentially useful for small vehicle applications.

Ryan Durscher; Subrata Roy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Prediction of underwater noise and far field propagation due to pile driving for offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy plays a key role towards a greener and more sustainable energy generation. Due to limited onshore areas and possible negative effects on human living space offshore wind parks become increasingly popular. However during construction by pile driving high levels of underwater sound emission are observed. To avoid negative effects on marine mammals and other sea life different approaches are currently investigated to cut down the sound pressure levels like e.g. bubble curtains or cofferdams. In order to predict the expected underwater noise both with and without sound damping measures numerical simulation models are needed to avoid complex and costly offshore tests. Within this contribution possible modelling strategies for the prediction of underwater noise due to pile driving are discussed. Different approaches are shown for the direct adjacencies of the pile and for the far field sound propagation. The effectivity of potential noise mitigation measures is investigated using a detailed finite element model of the surroundings of the pile. Far field propagation in the kHz range at distances of several kilometres from the pile on the other hand is computed by a model based on wavenumber integration. Finally the model validation with corresponding offshore tests is addressed.

Stephan Lippert; Tristan Lippert; Kristof Heitmann; Otto Von Estorff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Prediction of underwater noise and far field propagation due to pile driving for offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy plays a key role toward a greener and more sustainable energy generation. Due to limited onshore areas and possible negative effects on human living space offshore wind parks become increasingly popular. During construction by pile driving however high levels of underwater sound emission are observed. To avoid negative effects on marine mammals and other sea life different approaches like e.g. bubble curtains or cofferdams are currently investigated to cut down the sound pressure levels. In order to predict the expected underwater noise both with and without sound damping measures numerical simulation models are needed to avoid complex and costly offshore tests. Within this contribution possible modeling strategies for the prediction of underwater noise due to pile driving are discussed. Different approaches are shown for the direct adjacencies of the pile and for the far field sound propagation. The effectivity of potential noise mitigation measures is investigated using a detailed finite element model of the surroundings of the pile. The far field propagation in the kilohertz range at distances of several kilometer from the pile on the other hand is computed by a model based on wavenumber integration. Finally the model validation with corresponding offshore tests is addressed.

Stephan Lippert; Tristan Lippert; Kristof Heitmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Downloads & Patient Materials - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Ergonomics Fitness & Exercise Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Health & Productivity Health Calculators &...

466

CHARACTERIZATION OF SIALON-TYPE MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testing of ceramic materials. crucihle Thermal Shock Tests.and thermal shock. Among the various ceramic materials being

Spencer, P.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Porous Materials Thin Film Deposition Single Crystal Growth Texture Control Additive Manufacturing Nanomaterials Synthesis Designer Organic Molecules Related Research Materials...

468

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

469

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High...

470

ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and...

471

Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial...

472

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen...

473

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Storage...

474

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Program's subprograms in Lightweight Materials, Propulsion Materials, Energy Storage, and Thermoelectric Conversion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. * This...

475

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Mg...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Materials Engineering (ICME) for Mg: International Pilot Project Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Mg: International Pilot Project Magnesium Projects...

476

Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode...

477

Chemistry and Materials Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home Science at NERSC Chemistry & Materials Science Chemistry & Materials Science Simulation plays an indispensable...

478

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Materials Applications and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaics Research Printable Version Materials Applications & Performance Staff The materials applications & performance staff members at the National Renewable Energy...

479

Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation...

480

The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5.  

SciTech Connect

In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}.

Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "differ materially due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessment of annoyance due to wind turbine noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception and annoyance of noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions including prevalence of annoyance due to noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and wellbeing. In addition current mental health status of respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where respondents lived A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weighted SPL of 30?48 dB was perceived as annoying outdoors by about one third of respondents while indoors by one fifth of them. The proportions of the respondents annoyed by the wind turbine noise increased with increasing A-weighted sound pressure level. Subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. Further studies are needed including a larger number of respondents before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Malgorzata Pawlaczyk-Luszczynska; Kamil Zaborowski; Malgorzata Zamojska; Malgorzata Waszkowska

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Assessment of annoyance due to wind turbine noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception and annoyance of noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. The study group comprised 378 subjects. All subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions including prevalence of annoyance due to noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition current mental health status of respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where respondents lived A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weighted SPL of 30?50 dB was perceived as annoying outdoors by about one third of respondents while indoors by one fifth of them. The proportions of the respondents annoyed by the wind turbine noise increased with increasing A-weighted sound pressure level. Subjects’ attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. Further studies are needed including a larger number of respondents before firm conclusions can be drawn.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Simulating environmental changes due to marine hydrokinetic energy installations.  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) projects will extract energy from ocean currents and tides, thereby altering water velocities and currents in the site's waterway. These hydrodynamics changes can potentially affect the ecosystem, both near the MHK installation and in surrounding (i.e., far field) regions. In both marine and freshwater environments, devices will remove energy (momentum) from the system, potentially altering water quality and sediment dynamics. In estuaries, tidal ranges and residence times could change (either increasing or decreasing depending on system flow properties and where the effects are being measured). Effects will be proportional to the number and size of structures installed, with large MHK projects having the greatest potential effects and requiring the most in-depth analyses. This work implements modification to an existing flow, sediment dynamics, and water-quality code (SNL-EFDC) to qualify, quantify, and visualize the influence of MHK-device momentum/energy extraction at a representative site. New algorithms simulate changes to system fluid dynamics due to removal of momentum and reflect commensurate changes in turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. A generic model is developed to demonstrate corresponding changes to erosion, sediment dynamics, and water quality. Also, bed-slope effects on sediment erosion and bedload velocity are incorporated to better understand scour potential.

Jones, Craig A. (Sea Engineering Inc., Santa Cruz, CA); James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse Daniel (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Seetho, Eddy

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Transformed materials : a material research center in Milan, Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[Transformed Materials] is an exploration into today's design methodologies of architecture production. The emergence of architectural form is questioned in relation to the temporal state of design intent and the physical ...

Skerry, Nathaniel S. (Nathaniel Standish), 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Critical Materials Institute List of Projects | Critical Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Lithium Extraction 1.1.3 Herbst, Scott INL Enhanced Separation of Adjacent Rare Earth Elements 1.2.1 Mishra, Brajendra CSM Conversion to Metal, Alloys, and Materials 1.2.2...

486

Storage depot for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Materials Challenges in Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of the worldwide electrical power, and has emerged as a reliable baseload source of electricity. A number of materials challenges must be successfully resolved for nuclear energy to continue to make further improvements in reliability, safety and economics. The operating environment for materials in current and proposed future nuclear energy systems is summarized, along with a description of materials used for the main operating components. Materials challenges associated with power uprates and extensions of the operating lifetimes of reactors are described. The three major materials challenges for the current and next generation of water-cooled fission reactors are centered on two structural materials aging degradation issues (corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials and neutron-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels), along with improved fuel system reliability and accident tolerance issues. The major corrosion and stress corrosion cracking degradation mechanisms for light water reactors are reviewed. The materials degradation issues for the Zr alloy clad UO2 fuel system currently utilized in the majority of commercial nuclear power plants is discussed for normal and off-normal operating conditions. Looking to proposed future (Generation IV) fission and fusion energy systems, there are 5 key bulk radiation degradation effects (low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement, radiation-induced and modified solute segregation and phase stability, irradiation creep, void swelling, and high temperature helium embrittlement) and a multitude of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking effects (including irradiation-assisted phenomena) that can have a major impact on the performance of structural materials.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.  

SciTech Connect

Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

SIMOS,N.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Bioinspired Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical and Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

The demand of green, affordable and environmentally sustainable materials has encouraged scientists in different fields to draw inspiration from nature in developing materials with unique properties such as miniaturization, hierarchical organization, and adaptability. Together with the exceptional properties of nanomaterials, over the past century, the field of bioinspired nanomaterials has taken huge leaps. While on one hand, the sophistication of hierarchical structures endow biological systems with multifunctionality, the synthetic control on the creation of nanomaterials enables the design of materials with specific functionalities. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the field of bioinspired nanomaterials, which we have broadly categorized into biotemplates and biomimics. We will discuss the application of bioinspired nanomaterials as biotemplates in catalysis, nanomedicine, immunoassays and in energy, drawing attention to novel materials such as protein cages. Further, the applications of bioinspired materials in tissue engineering and biomineralization will also be discussed.

Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects  

SciTech Connect

Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

Alexander, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials  

SciTech Connect

The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

Pandey, Amit [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Stafford, Randall [Cummins, Inc; Hemker, Kevin J [Johns Hopkins University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Fuel mass penalty due to generators and fuel cells as energy source of the all-electric aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of an assessment of the fuel mass penalty due to generators and fuel cell systems. Based on the simulation tool SysFuel, fuel mass penalties for different mission ranges and fuel cell architectures are calculated and compared to a conventional reference architecture. Different fuel cell architectures using ram air or cabin exhaust air and different options of energy recovery are considered. As a result of the studies, target values are presented for the mass to power ratio of fuel cell systems to achieve fuel mass reductions compared to conventional generator and auxiliary power unit systems.

Jürgen Dollmayer; Nicola Bundschuh; Udo B. Carl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Carbon 40 (2002) 781786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon 40 (2002) 781­786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material manufactured a significantly higher capacity for copper and strontium sorption than that of 21 21 a commercial material used and strontium. CAC can be produced from different types of raw materi- als, including wood, coal, fruit stones

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

494

Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material  

SciTech Connect

This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C).

Porter, W.D.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Neutron reflectometry for interfacial materials characterization  

SciTech Connect

Neutron reflectometry provides a powerful non-destructive analytic technique to measure physical properties of interfacial materials. The sample reflectivity provides information about composition, thickness, and roughness of films with 0.1 nm resolution. The use of neutrons has the additional advantage of being able to label selected atomic species by using different isotopes. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the use of neutron reflectometry in measuring the thermal expansion of a buried thin polymer film and measuring the change in polymer mobility near a solid substrate.

Lin, Eric K.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Kolb, Rainer; Wu Wenli [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Satija, Sushil K. [Polymers Division and NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

496

Hoffmann-011912 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoffmann-011912 Hoffmann-011912 MATERIALS SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER: Dr. Axel Hoffmann Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory TITLE: "Spin Hall Effects: A Pathway towards Charge-Free Spintronics" DATE: Thursday, January 19, 2012 TIME: 11:00 a.m. PLACE: Building 212 / A-157 HOST: Sam Bader Refreshments will be served at 10:45 a.m. ABSTRACT: As semiconducting electronic devices are miniaturized to ever-smaller dimensions, power dissipation becomes an ever-increasing problem due to leakage charge currents. Spintronics may help addressing some of these issues by utilizing besides the charge degree of freedom also the electron spin. Towards this end, pure spin currents [1] may eliminate some of the limitations due to charge currents and their concomitant power

497

7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISIPM7 Home ISIPM7 Home About ISIPM7 Conference Brochure Organizers Scientific Committee Proceedings Sponsors Speakers Exhibitors Program Call for Abstracts & Posters Registration Hotels Maps Bus Schedule Contact Us isipm7 header About the Conference It is a great pleasure for the organizing committee of the 7th International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials (ISIPM7) to invite all who are interested in the design and development of inorganic phosphate materials with applications in various domains of modern technology including energy storage, biomaterials, storage of waste, catalysis, and optics. Read more » Dates to Remember July 18 - Abstracts due (new) July 18 - Registration opens July 25 - Paper and poster acceptance (new) October 17 - Final registration and payment due

498

LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to materi- als research through the use of ion beams. Current major research areas include surface characterization through ion beam analysis techniques, surface modification and materials synthesis through ion implantation technology, and radiation damage stud- ies in gases, liquids, and solids. The laboratory's core is a 3.2 MV tandem ion accelerator and a 200 kV ion implanter together with several beam lines. Attached to each beam line is a series of experimental stations that support various research programs. The operation of IBML and its interactions with users are organized around core facilities and experimental stations. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities as well as supports

499

Digital materials for digital fabrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces digital materials by analogy with digital computation and digital communications. Traditional fabrication techniques include pick-and-place, roll-to-roll, molding, patterning and more. Current research ...

Popescu, George A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Cancels: DOE M 474.1-1B DOE M 474.1-2A

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z