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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... Optimization of hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation over a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) requires consideration of (i) HC gas diffusion into the catalyst layer, (ii) HC gas adsorption and desorption from catalyst sites, and (iii) kinetics of the oxidation reaction. ... Mutagenicity of Diesel Engine Exhaust Is Eliminated in the Gas Phase by an Oxidation Catalyst but Only Slightly Reduced in the Particle Phase ...

Yasushi Tanaka; Takashi Hihara; Makoto Nagata; Naoto Azuma; Akifumi Ueno

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effect of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts on the Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts on the Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration Process ... A Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration process was investigated during aftertreatment exhaust of a simulated diesel engine under the influence of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC). ... Diesel particulate matter (PM) significantly contributes to urban air pollution and has often been associated with adverse health effects. ...

Leonardo Lizarraga; Stamatios Souentie; Antoinette Boreave; Christian George; Barbara D’Anna; Philippe Vernoux

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

4

Predicting the Effect of Catalyst Axial Active Site Distributions on a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Zone-coated diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) can be used to obtain overall improved performance in oxidation reaction extents. However, why this occurs and under what conditions… (more)

Al-Adwani, Suad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed the advantageous plasma catalyst coupling effect on the lowering of the catalyst activation temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions† ... Hydrogen production via hydrocarbon steam reforming and water gas shift reactions was investigated over a monolith-supported Pt-based diesel oxidation catalyst. ...

Meshari AL-Harbi; Jin-Yong Luo; Robert Hayes; Martin Votsmeier; William S. Epling

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... † Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ... In contrast to the conventional approach of using ethanol in spark-ignition engines, this study demonstrates the potential of ethanol utilization in diesel engines using dual-fuel combustion, where ethanol is injected into the intake manifold and diesel ... ...

K. S. Tsang; Z. H. Zhang; C. S. Cheung; T. L. Chan

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Effect of an Axial Catalyst Distribution on the Performance of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst and Inverse Hysteresis Phenomena during CO and C3H6 Oxidation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is a key component in the exhaust after-treatment system of diesel engines. In this study two aspects of a DOC… (more)

Abedi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel...

10

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Don Newburry Research & Development Manager...

11

Adsorption and Desorption of SOx on Diesel Oxidation Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general the method proved to be very accurate and reproducible: the changes of SOx values caused by aging of the catalyst, change of the catalytic coating, or absorption and desorption processes were much higher than the errors of the analysis method. ... Besides its better material properties, the function of alumina as a sulfur trap might be appreciated as a measure to meet particulate matter (PM) emission limits in regulated engine test cycles. ... However, the temperature of diesel exhaust gas stays below 350 °C for almost the entire test cycle, that is, sulfur will be adsorbed under the testing conditions. ...

Oliver Kröcher; Markus Widmer; Martin Elsener; Dieter Rothe

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Materials - Catalysts for Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing denox monolith Argonne's deNOx catalyst can be prepared as a powder or a monolith. chris marshall Principal investigator Chris Marshall shows the monolith form of the Argonne deNOx catalyst with a sensor inserted for testing. doug longman Mechanical engineer Doug Longman inserts the instrumented deNOx catalyst monolith into the aftertreatment chamber of Argonne's heavy-duty Caterpillar diesel test engine. Background Diesel engines, while efficient, produce many undesirable combustion byproducts in their exhaust. While we tend to think of the sooty exhaust products we see as the bad stuff, it is the less-visible exhaust products such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) that create bigger problems.

15

Impact of Lube-oil Phosphorus on Diesel Oxidation Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

16

The Role of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/-Al2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation. To isolate and examine the contribution of each deactivation mechanism, performance evaluations are carried out for each DOC ''as received'' and after removal of surface carbon in a high-temperature oxidizing environment. In such a manner the deactivation contribution of soot contamination is de-convoluted from that of phosphorus poisoning. It will be shown that this is accomplished while preserving phosphorus (and to a lesser degree sulfur, calcium and zinc) chemistries and concentrations within the washcoat. Washcoat contaminant information and materials changes are characterized using electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), BET surface area, oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, from which the relative severity of each mechanism can be quantified. Results show that soot contamination from diesel exhaust severely degrades THC and CO oxidation performance by acting as a catalyst surface diffusion barrier. This results in a considerable increase of light-off temperatures. In contrast, phosphorus poisoning, which is considered a significant deactivation mechanism in three-way catalysts, is shown to have minimal effect on DOC oxidation performance for the conditions studied here. Material changes include the formation of both Ce(III-IV) and aluminum phosphates which do not significantly hinder the THC and CO oxidation in lean exhaust. In addition, thermal aging and sulfur poisoning are shown to produce minimal contributions to the overall deactivation. Consequently, performance of aged DOCs after soot removal is observed to be comparable to that of a fresh catalyst under our testing conditions.

Eaton, Scott J [ORNL; Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effects of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on Nanostructure and Reactivity of Diesel Soot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustible mixture in the cylinder of a diesel is always oxygen-rich in general, resulting in the existence of oxygen in the exhaust flow. ... range of the typical duty cycle for a diesel vehicle or to require a min. of active regeneration. ...

Zhihao Ma; Lei Li; Ying Chao; Ning Kang; Bin Xu; Jian Wu

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

SciTech Connect

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

22

Spatial Temperature and Concentration Changes Following Heterogeneous Damage To a Model Diesel Oxidation Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Infra-Red thermography and spatially-resolved capillary inlet mass spectrometry (SpaciMS) have been used to characterize propylene oxidation along a Pt/Al2O3 monolith-supported catalyst, before and after heterogeneous… (more)

Russell, April Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

New Catalysts for Green Diesel | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Catalysts for Green Diesel A new economical and efficient catalyst for upgrading renewable feedstocks to green diesel has been created. Green diesel, produced by converting...

24

Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effects of Fuel Sulfur Content and Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on PM Emitted from Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work aims at the particle number concentrations and size distributions, sulfate and trace metals emitted from a diesel engine fueled with three different sulfur content fuels, operating with and without DOC. ... Figure 2. Sulfate emission rate and fuel consumption as a function of sulfur content at engine speed of 2690 rpm. ... Thus, the use of low metal fuels and lubricating oil is as important to the environment and human health as low sulfur fuels, especially for engines with after-treatment devices. ...

Hong Zhao; Yunshan Ge; Xiaochen Wang; Jianwei Tan; Aijuan Wang; Kewei You

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ultrafine PM Emissions from Natural Gas, Oxidation-Catalyst Diesel, and Particle-Trap Diesel Heavy-Duty Transit Buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In urban areas, transit buses are a significant source of heavy-duty vehicle traffic, and many municipalities, including Los Angeles, Sacramento, Cleveland, and Atlanta, have recently modified their fleets to compressed natural gas (CNG) as the “clean” alternative to conventional uncontrolled diesel vehicles to meet increasingly strict particulate matter (PM) air quality regulations. ... ARB's mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. ...

Britt A. Holmén; Alberto Ayala

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

28

Influence of supporting materials on the deactivation of diesel exhaust catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two kinds of vehicle-aged diesel oxidation catalysts were analyzed. The phase transition of alumina as a support and Pt sintering after a long-time operation caused serious deactivation of the catalysts.

Song-Taek Oh; Sang-Min Kim; Man-Suk Yoon…

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Kinetics of Diesel Nanoparticle Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation rates in air of diesel nanoparticles sampled directly from the exhaust stream of a medium-duty diesel engine were measured over the temperature range of 800?1140 °C using online aerosol techniques. ... Particulate emission from diesel engines is currently a topic of great concern from both pollution and public health standpoints. ... In addition, the fundamental carbon-to-hydrogen ratio may be different in diesel particles as compared to the commonly used surrogates (15). ...

Kelly J. Higgins; Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Jeffrey T. Roberts; Michael R. Zachariah

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Impact of Fuel-Borne Catalysts on Diesel Aftertreatment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Borne Catalyst Assisted DPF regeneration on a Renault truck MD9 Engine Outfitted with SCR Fuel Additivies for Improved Performance of Diesel Aftertreatment Systems...

31

Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts Aaron Williams, Jonathan Burton, Robert McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Todd Toops, Michael Lance, Andrew...

32

Low-Load Dual-Fuel Compression Ignition (CI) Engine Operation with an On-Board Reformer and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst: Effects on Engine Performance and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ideally, homogeneous air fuel mixtures ignited spontaneously exhibit less pollutants and can improve engine efficiency compared to standard diesel combustion, which is based on diffusion combustion. ... Although optimization of the injection timing of the in-cylinder DI fuel (e.g., diesel) aims to ignite the mixture and control the start of combustion (SOC) for the different premixed fuel ratios, the fuel ignition timing is complicated and problematic for a dual-fueled engine under a number of engine-operating conditions (e.g., low loads and use of residual gas trapping). ... Deactivation due to coking of a single Ni/Pt-based catalyst is significant, but operation using a platinum-ceria catalyst in line with a Ni-based steam-reforming catalyst allows acceptable efficiencies. ...

A. Tsolakis; R. Torbati; A. Megaritis; A. Abu-Jrai

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Diesel Reforming for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Application  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the development of a diesel reforming catalyst and catalytic system development.

Liu, D-J.; Sheen, S-H.; Krumpelt, M.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mixed-Phase Oxide Catalyst Based on Mn-Mullite (Sm, Gd)Mn2O5 for NO Oxidation in Diesel Exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...efficiency than gasoline engines (1). However...devices to reduce the engine-generated nitrogen...NOx to N 2 under fuel-rich regeneration...NOx-based pollutants, diesel engines also generate black...indicating the consumption of surface...

Weichao Wang; Geoffrey McCool; Neeti Kapur; Guang Yuan; Bin Shan; Matt Nguyen; Uschi M. Graham; Burtron H. Davis; Gary Jacobs; Kyeongjae Cho; Xianghong (Kelly) Hao

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mixed-Phase Oxide Catalyst Based on Mn-Mullite (Sm, Gd)Mn2O5 for NO Oxidation in Diesel Exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...step of the reaction cycle, O 2 gas molecules decompose...available for the next cycle of NO conversion...ramp-up and ramp-down cycles. Four key factors contribute...performs in simulated diesel exhaust, we added MnCe-7...R. J. Farrauto, Fundamentals of Industrial Catalytic...

Weichao Wang; Geoffrey McCool; Neeti Kapur; Guang Yuan; Bin Shan; Matt Nguyen; Uschi M. Graham; Burtron H. Davis; Gary Jacobs; Kyeongjae Cho; Xianghong (Kelly) Hao

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Non-Conventional Plasma Assisted Catalysts for Diesel Exhaust Treatment: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the application of pulse discharges along with catalysts in treating the exhaust gas at higher temperatures. In the present work a plasma reactor, filled with catalysts, called as plasma catalytic reactor, is studied for removal of oxides of nitrogen, total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experiments are conducted on an actual diesel engine exhaust at no-load and at different temperatures starting from room temperature to 300°C. The removal efficiencies of these pollutants are studied. The experiments are carried out with both conventional and non-conventional catalysts. The idea is to explore the pollutant removal efficiency characteristics by non-conventional catalysts. The efficiency results are compared with that of conventional catalysts. The experiments are carried out at a constant pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. Both pellet and honeycomb type catalysts are used in the study.

B S Rajanikanth; P K Srinivas Kumar; V Ravi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control The more...

40

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

44

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, Kenneth D. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results on hydroxycarbonate precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are reinterpreted, taking into account earlier work on these systems.

M.S. Spencer

49

Gold catalyst Styrene Benzaldehyde Styrene oxide Acetophenone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O O O + + O2 Gold catalyst Styrene Benzaldehyde Styrene oxide Acetophenone studies. However, the study by Turner et al.1 seems to be the first to use Au55 in the synthesis of supported gold catalysts a very narrow and reproducible size distribution for the result- ing particles. Traditional catalyst

Rouyer, Francois

50

Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance. Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance. Abstract: In H2 fuel cells,...

51

Non-Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via Reforming of Diesel, Hexadecane and Bio-Diesel for Nitrogen Oxides Remediation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? After-treatment technologies are required for diesel engines to meet the current and future stringent emissions regulations. Lean NOx traps and SCR catalysts represent the… (more)

Hernandez-Gonzalez, Sergio Manuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

SBA-15-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch production of diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect

Iron supported on SBA-15, a mesoporous structured silica, has been developed as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. The catalysts retain the high surface area of the support, {approximately}500 m{sup 2}/g, average pore size, and pore volume. Inclusion of aluminum into the SBA-15 did not significantly alter these parameters. XRD, XAFS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies were used to characterize the catalyst before and after being subjected to the reaction conditions. Prior to reaction, the iron was distributed among {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ferrihydrite, and minor {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. After reaction, the iron phases detected were nonmagnetic iron oxides, iron carbide, and metallic iron. The length of the induction period typically seen with iron-based F-T catalysts was strongly dependent on the amount of aluminum present in the catalyst. With no aluminum, the induction period lasted about 25 h, whereas the induction period decreased to less than 5 h with an Al:Si mass ratio of 0.010. A further increase in aluminum content lengthened the induction period, but always remained less than that without aluminum. Catalyst activity and product selectivity were also strongly dependent on aluminum content with the maximum diesel fuel fraction, C{sub 11+}, occurring with the Al:Si ratio of 0.010 and a CO conversion of 37%. The small concentration of aluminum may serve to increase the rate of iron carbide formation, whereas higher concentrations may begin to inhibit the rate. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Dae Jung Kim; Brian C. Dunn; Frank Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman; Min Kang; Jae Eui Yie; Edward M. Eyring [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Department of Chemistry

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Volatile Carbon Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research...

54

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst Authors: Sherman, B. D., Pillai, S., Kodis, G., Bergkamp, J., Mallouk, T. E., Gust, D., Moore, T. A., and Moore, A. L....

56

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

A novel soluble nano-catalysts in diesel–biodiesel fuel blends to improve diesel engines performance and reduce exhaust emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study was aimed at synthesizing a novel soluble hybrid nanocatalyst to decrease emissions i.e., nitrogen oxide compounds (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and soot, of a DI engine fueled with diesel–biodiesel blends. Moreover, enhancement of performance parameters i.e. power, torque and fuel consumption was also simultaneously targeted. The hybrid nanocatalyst containing cerium oxide on amide-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated using two types of diesel–biodiesel blends (B5 and B20) at three concentrations (30, 60 and 90 ppm). The results obtained revealed that high surface area of the soluble nano-sized catalyst particles and their proper distribution along with catalytic oxidation reaction resulted in significant overall improvements in the combustion reaction specially in B20 containing 90 ppm of the catalyst B20(90 ppm). More specifically, all pollutants i.e., NOx, CO, HC and soot were reduced by up to 18.9%, 38.8%, 71.4% and 26.3%, respectively, in B20(90 ppm) compared to neat B20. The innovated fuel blend also increased engine performance parameters i.e., power and torque by up to 7.81%, 4.91%, respectively, and decreased fuel consumption by 4.50%.

Mehrdad Mirzajanzadeh; Meisam Tabatabaei; Mehdi Ardjmand; Alimorad Rashidi; Barat Ghobadian; Mohammad Barkhi; Mohammad Pazouki

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and Demonstration Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement...

59

Low Temperature Catalyst for Fuel Injection System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A low temperature oxidation catalyst applied to a DOC and DPF combined with a unique fuel injection system remove soot from a diesel exhaust system.

60

Diesel Soot Oxidation with NO2:? Engine Experiments and Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel Soot Oxidation with NO2:? Engine Experiments and Simulations ... Particulate filtration in the exhaust system of diesel engines is increasingly gaining in importance for both light- and heavy-duty applications. ... The reaction rates are, in general, in the same order of magnitude with the engine-out soot emission rates. ...

Ioannis P. Kandylas; Onoufrios A. Haralampous; Grigorios C. Koltsakis

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thief Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov January 2012 Significance * Oxidizes heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury, in gas streams * Uses partially combusted coal ("Thief" carbon) * Yields an inexpensive catalyst * Cheap enough to be a disposable catalyst * Cuts long-term costs * Simultaneously addresses oxidation and adsorption issues Applications * Any process requiring removal of heavy

62

Diesel Soot Filter Characterization and Modeling for Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor regeneration of soot loaded catalyzed SCF * Micro-model of soot oxidation versus spatial catalyst loading. 7 2008 DOE OVT Merit Review Diesel Soot Filter Characterization...

63

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research Progress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Describes how Tier 2 Bin 5 and US06 engine-out NOx levels were achieved and progress to meet Bin 2 through latest advances in lean NOx trap, diesel oxidation catalyst, and diesel particulate filter.

67

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Influence of different configurations of a catalyst and a trap on particulate emission of a diesel passenger car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New particulate emission measurements performed on a diesel passenger car to see the influence of different configurations of after-treatment systems are reported. Five combinations of a particle trap and an oxidation catalyst are investigated. These configurations are discussed in view of particulate emission, measured by number and mass. All measurements were carried out at a chassis dynamometer of the EMPA. A diesel passenger car with an IDI engine was operated at four steady state conditions. Exhaust gas was diluted in a standard constant volume sampler (CVS) device (full flow dilution tunnel). Particulate size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and gravimetric measurements were performed according to regulations. Furthermore, measurements without CVS tunnel were done by using external dilution units to see the influence of the sampling method. We used a thermo desorber to distinguish volatile and non-volatile aerosol fractions and we analysed filter samples for determination of organic soluble fraction, water-soluble fraction and sulphur content. Huge differences depending on the configuration of the after-treatment system and load were observed. In general it was found that a large reduction of particulate emission could be obtained by using a particle trap. A catalyst converter has minor effect on particulate emission. Nucleation of new particles was observed under certain conditions depending on configuration and sampling method.

Urs Lehmann; Martin Mohr

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 entitled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl 2 , and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species,

71

Transition metal-promoted oxygen ion conductors as oxidation catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons was prepared by combining oxygen ion conducting materials with active transition metals. The oxygen ion conductors used were typical fluorite-type oxides, such as ceria, zirconia, and others. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of oxygen ion conductors. The intimate contact of the two kinds of materials gave rise to a highly active oxidation catalyst. On Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts, 95% of carbon monoxide was oxidized by air at {approximately} 100 C. Complete methane oxidation on the same catalyst took place at {approximately} 550 C. When the stoichiometric amount of sulfur dioxide was sued to oxidize carbon monoxide, 96% of sulfur dioxide was reduced to elemental sulfur at temperatures above 460 C with 99% of sulfur dioxide conversion. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water poisoning.

Liu, W.; Sarofim, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts From fuels to renewable energy sources. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have enormous potential in this area A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts Rob Usiskin In partnership

73

Searching for novel catalysts for water oxidation | Center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center News Research Highlights Center Research News Media about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Searching for novel catalysts for water oxidation 30 Oct 2012...

74

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal are being performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation correlations will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature are also being investigated. SO2 oxidation is also being investigated for each test condition.

Thomas K. Gale

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface Christian P. Canlas1 , Junling Lu2 of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present

Mohseni, Hooman

76

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Oxidation of Proximal Protein Sulfhydryls by Phenanthraquinone, a Component of Diesel Exhaust Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxidation of Proximal Protein Sulfhydryls by Phenanthraquinone, a Component of Diesel Exhaust Particles ... Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) contain quinones that are capable of catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems, resulting in induction of oxidative stress. ... 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ) is a PAHQ found in diesel exhaust particulates ... ...

Yoshito Kumagai; Sachie Koide; Keiko Taguchi; Akiko Endo; Yumi Nakai; Toshikazu Yoshikawa; Nobuhiro Shimojo

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

The role of doped Fe on the activity of alumina-supported Pt and Pd diesel exhaust catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supported Pt and Pd are most commonly used for oxidation catalysts. They have similar and different characteristics for deactivation factors. The catalytic activity of Pt and Pd catalysts supported on ?-Al2O3 was...

Yeon-Su Kim; Sun Ju Lim; Young Hun Kim; Jin Ha Lee…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Polyoxometalate water oxidation catalysts and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) for the oxidation of water to produce hydrogen ions and oxygen, and methods of making and using thereof are described herein. In a preferred embodiment, the WOC is a polyoxometalate WOC which is hydrolytically stable, oxidatively stable, and thermally stable. The WOC oxidized waters in the presence of an oxidant. The oxidant can be generated photochemically, using light, such as sunlight, or electrochemically using a positively biased electrode. The hydrogen ions are subsequently reduced to form hydrogen gas, for example, using a hydrogen evolution catalyst (HEC). The hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in combustion reactions and/or in hydrogen fuel cells. The catalysts described herein exhibit higher turn over numbers, faster turn over frequencies, and/or higher oxygen yields than prior art catalysts.

Hill, Craig L.; Gueletii, Yurii V.; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Yin, Qiushi; Botar, Bogdan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method of forming supported doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a supported oxidation catalyst includes providing a support comprising a metal oxide or a metal salt, and depositing first palladium compound particles and second precious metal group (PMG) metal particles on the support while in a liquid phase including at least one solvent to form mixed metal comprising particles on the support. The PMG metal is not palladium. The mixed metal particles on the support are separated from the liquid phase to provide the supported oxidation catalyst.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project - honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. Most experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal will be performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation graph will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature and later sulfur will be investigated after this is complete. Also, last quarter's tests showed a potential linear relationship between SO3 conversion and mercury oxidation. As a result, SO3 samples will be taken more frequently to investigate each catalyst's ability to selectively oxidize mercury.

Alex J. Berry; Thomas K. Gale

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effect of a homogeneous combustion catalyst on the combustion characteristics and fuel efficiency in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of a ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst on the combustion characteristics and fuel efficiency was studied using a fully instrumented diesel engine. A naturally aspirated four stroke, single cylinder, air cooled, direct injection diesel engine was tested at engine speeds of 2800 rpm, 3200 rpm and 3600 rpm under variable load conditions, with different dosing ratio of the catalyst in a commercial diesel fuel. The results indicated that the brake specific fuel consumption decreased and the brake thermal efficiency increased with the addition of the catalyst. At the catalyst dosing ratio of 1:10,000, the brake specific fuel consumption was reduced by 3.3–4.2% at light engine load of 0.12 MPa and 2.0–2.4% at heavy engine load of 0.4 MPa due to the application of the catalyst. From the in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate analysis, it was found that the catalyst reduced ignition delay and combustion duration of fuel in the engine, resulting in slightly higher peak cylinder pressure and faster heat release rate.

Mingming Zhu; Yu Ma; Dongke Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

84

Reduction of nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust: Prospects for use of synthesis gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Already commercialized and some of the most promising technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction in automotive diesel exhaust are compared. The Boreskov Institute of Catalysis... x ...

V. A. Kirillov; E. I. Smirnov; Yu. I. Amosov; A. S. Bobrin…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Photochemical synthesis of a water oxidation catalyst based on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photochemical synthesis of a water oxidation catalyst based on cobalt nanostructures Authors: Wee, T-L., Sherman, B.D., Gust, D., Moore, A.L., Moore, T.A., Liu, Y., and Scaiano,...

86

Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, particulate filter, and DeNOx catalyst are implemented to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 limits for U.S. market diesel engines.

87

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning Midwestern and Eastern coals, which are higher in sulfur and chlorine. Also, the isolation of such gases as hydrogen chloride (HCl), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) will be investigated. All of these efforts will be used to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to flue gas composition, temperature, and flow rate.

Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Monolithic Metal Oxide based Composite Nanowire Lean NOx Emission Control Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents latest progress in the development of a new type of lean NOx trapping catalyst based on heterogenous composite nanowires, which could potentially be used in gasoline and diesel engines.

89

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Impact of Biofuel Blending on Diesel Soot Oxidation: Implications for Aftertreatment  

SciTech Connect

Control strategies for diesel particulate filters (DPFs) remain one of the most important aspects of aftertreatment research and understanding the soot oxidation mechanism is key to controlling regeneration. Currently, most DPF models contain simple, first order heterogeneous reactions oxidation models with empirically fit parameters. This work improves the understanding of fundamental oxidation kinetics necessary to advance the capabilities of predictive modeling, by leading to better control over regeneration of the device. This study investigated the effects of blending soybean-derived biodiesel fuel on diesel particulate emissions under conventional combustion from a 1.7L direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five biofuel blend levels were investigated and compared to conventional certification diesel for the nanostructure, surface chemistry and major constituents of the soluble organic fraction (SOF) of diesel particulate matter (PM), and the relationship between these properties and the particulate oxidation kinetics.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, David [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Vander Wal, Dr. Randy [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lactose oxidation kinetics with oxygen in catalyst-solution-gas three-phase system with simultaneous electrical potential measurement of supported gold catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lactose oxidation kinetics was studied on an supported gold catalyst with simultaneous control of catalyst potential. The experimental data were described well...

D. Yu. Murzin; E. V. Murzina; A. V. Tokarev…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are International. b DOC = Diesel Oxidation Catalyst; DPF = Diesel Particulate Filter; EGR = Exhaust GasREAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS Gurdas Sandhu H 26-28, 2012 #12;2 Objectives 1. Quantify inter-run variability in exhaust emission rates 2. Assess

Frey, H. Christopher

93

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nonprecious Metal Catalysts for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonprecious Metal Catalysts for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ... Initial and final state geometries are found with standard geometry optimization, then a number of intermediate states are generated by interpolation of atomic positions. ... A special "metric" and a special "preconditioning" optimized for a plane-wave basis set will be introduced. ...

Timothy P. Holme; Fritz B. Prinz

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Wagner, Richard W. (Murrysville, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins are disclosed having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Wagner, R.W.

1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Metal oxide catalysts for the low temperature selective oxidation of propane to iso-propanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A range of Ga203/Mo03 and C03O4 catalysts have been prepared and tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene. The Ga2(VMo03 physical mixture demonstrated… (more)

Davies, Thomas Edward.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Combined Catalyzed Soot Filter and SCR Catalyst System for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Substantially reduces particulate emission for diesel vehicles Up to 90% effective against carbonaceous particulate matter Significantly reduces CO and HC Filter regenerates at normal diesel operation temperatures Removable design for easy cleaning and maintenance.

Kakwani, R.M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Organic Aerosol Formation from Photochemical Oxidation of Diesel Exhaust in a Smog Chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diluted exhaust from a diesel engine was photo-oxidized in a smog chamber to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. Photochemical aging rapidly produces significant SOA, almost doubling the organic aerosol contribution of primary ...

Emily A. Weitkamp; Amy M. Sage; Jeffrey R. Pierce; Neil M. Donahue; Allen L. Robinson

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Two-photon nitric oxide laser-induced fluorescence measurements in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-photon nitric oxide (NO) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was developed and applied to study in-cylinder diesel combustion. The technique prevents many problems...

Martin, Glen C; Mueller, Charles J; Lee, Chia-Fon F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Using IR Thermography to Evaluate Temperature Distributions on a Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst during Simulated Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In emissions catalyst applications, an axial distribution of reaction, surface chemistry, and temperature all exist on or along the surface of the catalyst. Understanding these… (more)

Aftab, Khurram

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

An experimental study of the effect of a homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the influence of a ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission of a laboratory diesel engine. The catalyst used in this study was supplied by Fuel Technology Pty. Ltd. The fuel consumption and smoke emission were measured as a function of engine load, speed and catalyst dosing ratio. The brake specific fuel consumption and smoke emission decreased as the dosing ratio of the catalyst doped in the diesel fuel increased. At the catalyst dosing ratio of 1:3200, the brake specific fuel consumption was reduced by from 2.1% to 2.7% and the smoke emission was reduced by from 6.7% to 26.2% at the full engine load at speeds from 2600 rpm to 3400 rpm. The results also indicated that the potential of the fuel saving seems to be greater when the engine was run under light load.

Mingming Zhu; Yu Ma; Dongke Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srˇpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

Adzic, Radoslav

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the Acid-Base Mechanism for Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed theoretical study of the pathway for water oxidation in synthetic ruthenium-based catalysts. As a first step, we consider a recently discovered single center catalyst, where experimental observations ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

110

Structure and Oxidation Activity Correlations for Carbon Blacks and Diesel Soot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work focuses on a comprehensive investigation of structure–activity relationships for a diesel engine soot sample (Corning) and 10 commercially available carbon black samples. ... Su and colleagues used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the relation between the microstructure and oxidation behavior of soot from exhausts of different heavy-duty diesel engines and discovered the microstructure-controlled oxidation behavior of diesel soot. ... FE-SEM images (see Figure S1 of the Supporting Information) of some carbon blacks (Monarch 1400, Monarch 280, and Printex-U) and diesel soot-1 show the agglomerates, which are composed of their fundamental units called primary particles. ...

Lakshitha Pahalagedara; Hom Sharma; Chung-Hao Kuo; Saminda Dharmarathna; Ameya Joshi; Steven L. Suib; Ashish B. Mhadeshwar

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Catalytic reactions on well-characterized vanadium oxide catalysts. 1. Oxidation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect

The oxidation of carbon monoxide over unsupported and supported vanadium oxide catalysts was investigated from the standpoint of structure sensitivity. The activity of unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ markedly decreased the turnover frequency, while the reduction-oxidation treatment of the fused catalyst increased it. The turnover frequency of V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with low V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content was much smaller than that of the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with high V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content or the unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Such a retarding effect of the TiO/sub 2/ support on the activity of the oxidation of carbon monoxide is in contrast to the known promoting effect of TiO/sub 2/ for the oxidations of various hydrocarbons. From these results coupled with the characterization of the catalysts, it was concluded that the oxidation of carbon monoxide on vanadium oxide catalysts is a structure-sensitive reaction and that the activity of surface defects such as steps, kinks, and vacancies is much higher than that of the surface V=O species in the smooth (010) face of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. 39 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Mori, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Murakami, Y.

1984-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mechanisms of Oxidation-Enhanced Wear in Diesel Exhaust Valves...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. pmp01blau.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

113

Isobutane oxidation in the presence of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for oxidizing isobutane with an oxygen-containing material in the presence of an effective amount of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst.

Sanderson, J.R.; Marquis, E.T.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

An Intriguing Twist in the Structure of a Cobalt Oxide Catalyst...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights rss feed An Intriguing Twist in the Structure of a Cobalt Oxide Catalyst AUGUST 14, 2012 Bookmark and Share Scanning electron micrograph of the...

115

Partial oxidation of propane on ceria-and alumina-supported platinum catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three Pt/CeO2 catalysts and Pt/Al2O3 catalyst were studied for partial oxidation of propane. The 1 % Pt/CeO2 (C) catalyst which was prepared using CeO2 prepared… (more)

Bansode, Vijaya Anil.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydrocarbon Inhibition and HC Storage Modeling in Fe-Zeolite Catalysts for HD Diesel Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Investigating the dynamics between various aftertreatment devices for overall optimal performance to simultaneously reduce NOx and PM. Ex: HC poisoning/inhibition on zeolites1, catalyst aging, etc.

117

Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

Wright, Randy B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Preparation and evaluation of novel hydrous metal oxide (HMO)-supported noble metal catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials that, because of their high cation exchange capacity, possess a unique ability to allow the preparation of highly dispersed supported-metal catalyst precursors with high metal loadings. This study evaluates high weight loading Rh/HMO catalysts with a wide range of HMO support compositions, including hydrous titanium oxide (HTO), silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si), hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO), and silica-doped hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO:Si), against conventional oxide-supported Rh catalysts with similar weight loadings and support chemistries. Catalyst activity measurements for a structure-sensitive model reaction (n-butane hydrogenolysis) as a function of catalyst activation conditions show superior activity and stability for the ZrO{sub 2}, HZO, and HZO:Si supports, although all of the Rh/HMO catalysts have high ethane selectivity indicative of high Rh dispersion. For the TiO{sub 2}-, HTO-, and HTO:Si supported Rh catalysts, a significant loss of both catalyst activity and Rh dispersion is observed at more aggressive activation conditions, consistent with TiO{sub x} migration associated with SMSI phenomena. Of all the Rh/HMO catalysts, the Rh/HZO:Si catalysts appear to offer the best tradeoff in terms of high Rh dispersion, high activity, and high selectivity.

Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Evans, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Catalysis and Chemical Technologies Dept.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, together with a reversible inhibition due to competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} with NO on the catalyst. In an effort to minimize the deactivating effect of SO{sub 2} on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, two synthetic approaches were briefly examined. These consisted of (1) the incorporation of highly dispersed Co(II) ions in silica, as a non-sulfating matrix, via the sol-gel preparation of CoO-SiO{sub 2}; and (2) the sol-gel preparation of a mixed metal oxide, CoO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, with the aim of exploiting the acidity of the niobium oxide to minimize SO2 adsorption. While both catalysts showed almost no activity for NO oxidation in the absence of SO{sub 2}, when SO{sub 2} was present low activity was observed, indicating that SO{sub 2} acts as a promoter for NO oxidation over these materials. The kinetics of NO oxidation over Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} were also examined. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was found to exhibit a higher apparent activation energy for NO oxidation than the Pt catalysts, while the combined reaction order in NO and O{sub 2} for the three catalysts was very close to one. CO{sub 2} was found to have no effect on the kinetics of NO oxidation over these catalysts. The presence of H{sub 2}O caused a decrease in NO conversion for both Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, while no effect was observed for Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The inhibiting effect of water was reversible and is attributed to competitive adsorption with the reactants. In sum, this study has shown that a variety of base metal catalysts are very active for NO oxidation. However, all of the catalysts studied are strongly deactivated in the presence of 2800 ppm SO{sub 2} at typical flue gas temperatures; consequently improving catalyst resistance to SO{sub x} will be a pre-requisite if the fast SCR concept is to be applied to coal-fired flue gas conditions.

Mark Crocker

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst AnalyzedThe performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquidUV radiation is required to photo-activate the catalytic

Mul, Guido

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electrocatalytic Measurement Methodology of Oxide Catalysts Using a Thin-Film Rotating Disk Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition-metal oxides can exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for reactions such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. It is often difficult to measure and compare the activities of oxide catalysts ...

Suntivich, Jin

122

Diesel particulate filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is the broad market introduction of diesel particulate filters throughout Europe wishful thinking or reality? The challenges facing the introduction of diesel particulate filters with a fuel-borne catalyst...

Pierre Macaudičre; Laurent Rocher; Wolfgang Naschke

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cu- and Ag-modified cerium oxide catalysts for methane oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic activity of nanocrystalline doped ceria and Cu- and Ag-modified ceria for the complete oxidation of methane was studied in this work. The catalyst structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and related to the availability of low-temperature oxygen species. Selected samples were also analyzed by STEM/EDX, HRTEM, and XPS. Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) by H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, as well as oxygen chemisorption, measurements were used to characterize the different oxygen species present on the catalyst. La and Zr were used as dopants to modify the crystal size and reduction properties of ceria. Enhanced activity for the complete oxidation of methane is discussed in terms of ceria reducibility, crystal size, and formation of oxygen defects at the surface (extrinsic oxygen vacancies). Addition of transition metal oxides (CuO) or transition metals (Ag) improves the low-temperature oxidation activity of cerium oxide. The interaction of ceria with Ag and CuO is a strong function of the crystal size of ceria. In the presence of the transition metal or metal oxide, a small crystal size of ceria favors the formation of highly reducible oxygen species and enhances the methane oxidation activity.

Kundakovic, L.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulis, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based fuel processor, method for improving catalyst function in autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a fuel processor comprising a linear flow structure having an upstream portion and a downstream portion; a first catalyst supported at the upstream portion; and a second catalyst supported at the downstream portion, wherein the first catalyst is in fluid communication with the second catalyst. Also provided is a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Selective Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water Over Solid Ruthenium Hydroxide Catalysts with Magnesium-Based Supports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid catalyst systems comprised of ruthenium hydroxide supported on magnesium-based carrier materials (spinel, magnesium oxide and hydrotalcite) were investigated for the selective, aqueous aerobic oxidation of ...

Yury Y. Gorbanev; Sřren Kegnćs; Anders Riisager

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of...

128

Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand...

129

Reformulated diesel fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mechanisms of Oxidation-Enhanced Wear in Diesel Exhaust Valves...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of wear oxidation microstructures of alloys Fe-, Ni-, Co-alloys h T h i h v Combined plastic deformation, wear, and oxidation on both valve and seat surfaces 6 Managed by...

131

Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel...

133

Characterization of Particulate Matter Emissions from a Common-Rail Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy ... The preferred approach to control the emissions of diesel engines is the adoption of an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system followed by a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) in front of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). ... Some fundamental information on the particulate matter (PM) characteristics emitted by an automotive diesel engine was gathered in order to provide a precious tool for the knowledge-based design of a new generation of diesel particulate traps in the EURO VI regulation perspective. ...

D. Fino; N. Russo

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

A pilot reactor study to determine operational factors of the commercial hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst to produce ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A pilot plant test was carried out using a catalyst from the refinery hydrotreater unit to process blend feed of 70 vol% Light Gas Oil – LGO & 30 vol% hydrotreated Gas Oil – HDT GO to produce 8 ppm ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD) product. The impact of changes in process conditions have been studied for catalyst deactivation rate and hydrogen consumption. Test results shown that refinery unit can process such blend feed to reach 8 ppm sulphur product by an increase of the reactor bed temperature. However due to higher aromatic content in the blend feed as compare to reference feed LGO, moderate increase in hydrogen consumption was also observed. Catalyst performance was evaluated at 55/42/32 bar hydrogen partial pressure (PPH2) to determine catalyst deactivation rate and hydrogen consumption, targeting ULSD product. A decrease of PPH2 from 52 bar (which is current operating condition) to 32 bar resulted in reduction of H2 consumption but also shows decrease of catalyst cycle length due to higher deactivation rate. Pilot plant test shows that by contriving computational methods and analysis techniques for hydrogen balance & catalyst deactivation rate from the pilot plant test data, it becomes possible to predict catalyst performance in commercial unit.

Nilesh Chandak; Adel Al Hamadi; Mohamed Yousef; Abdulhamid Mohamed; Kazuhiro Inamura; Mikael Berthod

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The more heavily catalyzed and the hotter the exhaust temperature, the more strongly the aftertreatment will oxidize the exhaust.

136

Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot  

SciTech Connect

This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter, progress was made on the following tasks: TPD techniques were employed to study the reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia over iron oxide pillared clay catalyst; and a sulfur dioxide resistant iron oxide/titanium oxide catalyst was developed.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Oxidation and Surface Segregation Behavior of a Pt–Pd–Rh Alloy Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Platinum gauze catalysts are used extensively in the production of nitric acid from ammonia, where they are subject to harsh operating conditions combining elevated temperatures and oxidizing environments. These cause significant loss of metal species as ...

Paul A. J. Bagot; Karen Kruska; Daniel Haley; Xavier Carrier; Eric Marceau; Michael. P. Moody; George D. W. Smith

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pd oxidation under UHV in a model Pd/ceria–zirconia catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model planar catalyst was prepared by depositing Pd onto a thick (few ?m) film of ceria–zirconia in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), and the oxidation state of Pd ... -ray photoelectron spectroscopy, following thermal t...

M.Yu. Smirnov; G.W. Graham

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

Concepcion Corbea, Javier Jesus; Chen, Zuofeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

Wright, R.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mercury oxidation over a vanadia-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The process of the reaction among elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and reactive flue gas components across the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was studied in a laboratory-scale reactor. Prepared vanadia-based SCR catalysts were characterized and analyzed to understand the potential reaction pathways. Mercury oxidation was observed when pro-exposure of the SCR catalyst to HCl, followed by passing through Hg{sup 0}/N{sub 2} in the absence of gas-phase HCl. At testing conditions, Hg{sup 0} was found to desorb from the catalyst surface by adding HCl to the gas stream, which implies that HCl adsorption onto the SCR catalyst is strong relative to the mercury. Surface analysis verified the absorption of HCl onto the SCR catalysts, and the potential reaction pathways were proposed. Indeed, the monomeric vanadyl sites on the catalyst surface were found to be responsible for the adsorption of both Hg{sup 0} and HCl, which means they are active for mercury oxidation. Furthermore, the detailed Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed to explain the mercury oxidation on the SCR catalyst, where reactive Cl generated from adsorbed HCl reacts with adjacent Hg{sup 0}. 44 refs., 10 figs.

Sheng He; Jinsong Zhou; Yanqun Zhu; Zhongyang Luo; Mingjiang Ni; Kefa Cen [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420{sup o}C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr{sup -1}. Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Constance L. Senior [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Precursors of the copper-zinc oxide methanol synthesis catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coprecipitated hydroxycarbonate precursor of the methanol synthesis and shift reaction catalyst based on 30 at.% copper and 70 at.% zinc oxide, which was previously reported to be a mixture of hydrozincite Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 and rosasite (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2 (R. G. Herman, K. Klier, G. W. Simmons, B. P. Finn, J. B. Bulko, and T. P. Kobylinski, J. Catal. 56, 407, 1979) or a single-phase hydrozincite (G. Petrini, F. Montino, A. Bossi, and G. Gaybassi, in “Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis. Preparation of Catalysis III” (G. Poncelet, P. Grange, and P. A. Jacobs, Eds.), Vol. 16, p. 735. Elsevier, The Netherlands, 1983), is herein shown to be a single-phase aurichalcite (Cu0.3Zn0.7)5(CO3)2(OH)6. The orthorhombic B2212 aurichalcite is crystallograpically distinct from the monoclinic \\{C2m\\} hydrozincite, although these two compounds have the same ratio of metal ions to carbonate and hydroxyl anions. Both aurichalcite and hydrozincite are chemically and structurally distinct from the monoclinic \\{P21a\\} rosasite. The earlier erroneous assignments are attributed to the structural similarity of the three hydroxycarbonates in question. An energy-dispersive characteristic X-ray emission analysis of individual particles in the scanning transmission electron microscope reveals a uniform distribution of copper and zinc at the analytical concentration CuZn = 3070. Precursors with less than 30% copper consist of mixtures of aurichalcite and hydrozincite.

P.B. Himelfarb; G.W. Simmons; K. Klier; R.G. Herman

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts in coal-liquids upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests were performed in a continuous-flow hydrotreating unit at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to evaluate the performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported (HTO) catalysts as hydrotreating catalysts for use in two-stage coal liquefaction. Catalysts containing either a combination of Co, Ni, and Mo as the active metal components or Pd as the active metal component were tested with representative hydrotreater feed stocks from the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. Catalyst performance evaluation was based on desulfurization and denitrogenation activity, the conversion of cyclohexane-insoluble material, and hydrogenation activity, during 100-hour reactor runs. Results indicated that the HTO catalysts were comparable to a commercial Ni/Mo-alumina supported catalyst in the areas evaluated.

Cillo, D.L.; Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G. (Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts in coal-liquids upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests were performed in a continuous-flow hydrotreating unit at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to evaluate the performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported (HTO) catalysts as hydrotreating catalysts for use in two-stage coal liquefaction. Catalysts containing either a combination of Co, Ni, and MO as the active metal components or Pd as the active metal component were tested with representative hydrotreater feed stocks from the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Resarch and Development Facility. Catalyst performance evaluation was based on desulfurization and denitrogenation activity, the conversion of cyclohexane-insoluble material, and hydrogenation activity during 100-hour reactor runs. Results indicated that the HTO catalysts were comparable to a commercial Ni/Mo-alumina supported catalyst in the areas evaluated.

Cillo, D.L.; Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A. (U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts in coal-liquids upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests were performed in a continuous-flow hydrotreating unit at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to evaluate the performance of hydrous titanium-oxide supported (HTO) catalysts as hydrotreating catalysts for use in two-stage coal liquiefaction. Catalysts containing either a combination of CO, Ni, and Mo as the active metal components or Pd as the active metal componet were tested with representative hydrotreater feed stocks from the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. Catalyst performance evaluation was based on desulfurization and denitrogenation activity, the conversion of cyclohexane-insolbule material, and hydrogenation activity during 100-hour reactor runs. Results indicated that the HTO catalysts were comparable to a commercial Ni/Mo-alumina supported catalyst in the areas evaluated. 11 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Cillo, D.L.; Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ethanol electro-oxidation on partially alloyed Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ternary Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts of Pt:Sn:Rh = 1:0.8:0.2 and 1:1:0.33 atomic ratios were synthesized using the formic acid method and their electrochemical activities were compared for ethanol oxidation with that of binary Pt-Sn/C (1:1) and Pt-Rh/C (1:0.11) catalysts. XRD analysis indicated the presence of Sn in both alloyed and oxide form and suggested the formation of a ternary Pt-Sn-Rh alloy in both catalysts. The particle size by TEM was around 3.5 nm for all catalysts. The efficiency for Pt utilization increased with Rh content. Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation than Pt-Rh/C, but lower than Pt-Sn/C. Among ternary catalysts, Pt-Sn-Rh/C (1:0.8:0.2) was the most active. In situ IRRAS showed Rh plays a dual counteracting role during ethanol electro-oxidation on Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts, once it promotes C-C bond breaking, thus favouring CO2 formation, but hinders adsorption of ethanol, decreasing the production of acetic acid.

Elson A. de Souza; M.Janete Giz; Giuseppe A. Camara; Ermete Antolini; Raimundo R. Passos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Decomposition of nitrous oxide on AlFe-PILC catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two AlFe-PILC catalysts were prepared with different OH/metal...2O) decomposition reactions. The 100% conversion of N2O with NH3into N2and H2O was achieved below 500oC with both applied catalysts. However, the ac...

Ern? E. Kiss; Tatjana J Vuli?…

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors ... For safety and environmental protection reasons (to avoid syngas release into the atmosphere), after the analysis section, the reacted gas stream was completely oxidized by forced air in a catalytic honeycomb burner (Figure 2). ...

S. Specchia; L. D. Vella; B. Lorenzut; T. Montini; V. Specchia; P. Fornasiero

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dissociation and oxidation of carbon monoxide over Rh/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for CO oxidation was investigated by transient isotopic pulse experiments using packed-bed reactor. This transient experimental scheme revealed significant CO dissociation activity during CO oxidation over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Results indicate that the oxidation of CO proceeds via dissociative oxidation by its own oxygen as well as via direct oxidation by gas-phase oxygen on well-dispersed Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The rate of CO dissociation is on the same order of magnitude as the rate of CO oxidation; under steady-state conditions at 300{degree}C, the rate of CO dissociation is approximately half that of direct oxidation. Differences in CO dissociation activity between single-crystal Rh surfaces and well-dispersed supported Rh particles are explained in terms of the molecular bonding and adsorption characteristics on these two different surfaces. The importance of CO dissociation kinetics in the overall CO oxidation activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts is further discussed in view of the reaction lightoff behavior.

Cho, Byong K.; Stock, C.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Efforts continued towards the synthesis of new pillared clay catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia. The possibility of utilizing hydrocarbons was also investigated.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Iron supported clay as catalysts for oxidation of cyclooctane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron supported bentonite clay catalysts have been prepared by the ion exchange of bentonite with iron2+ and iron3+ solution and immobilization with iron compounds using ligands: acetylacetonate, picolinate, pyraz...

W. Trakarnpruk; P. Dumrongpong

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Oxidation catalysts comprising metal exchanged hexaaluminate wherein the metal is Sr, Pd, La, and/or Mn  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides metal-exchanged hexaaluminate catalysts that exhibit good catalytic activity and/or stability at high temperatures for extended periods with retention of activity as combustion catalysts, and more generally as oxidation catalysts, that make them eminently suitable for use in methane combustion, particularly for use in natural gas fired gas turbines. The hexaaluminate catalysts of this invention are of particular interest for methane combustion processes for minimization of the generation of undesired levels (less than about 10 ppm) of NOx species. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are also useful for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly hydrocarbons. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are further useful for partial oxidation, particularly at high temperatures, of reduced species, particularly hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes).

Wickham, David (Boulder, CO); Cook, Ronald (Lakewood, CO)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ... A powerful low-cost electrocatalyst, nanorod Nb2O5, is synthesized using the hydrothermal method with monoclinic phases and simultaneously deposited on the surface of a graphite felt (GF) electrode in an all vanadium flow battery (VRB). ... Flow battery cyclic performance also demonstrates the excellent stability of the as prepared Nb2O5 catalyst enhanced electrode. ...

Bin Li; Meng Gu; Zimin Nie; Xiaoliang Wei; Chongmin Wang; Vincent Sprenkle; Wei Wang

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Improvement and Simplification of Diesel Particulate Filter System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Simplification of Diesel Particulate Filter System using a Ceria-Based Fuel-Borne Catalyst in Serial Applications Improvement and Simplification of Diesel Particulate Filter...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up ... (ii) Geometric and electronic effects of TiO2-rutile are predicted not to lead to improved HCl oxidation activity for 1 and 2 epilayers of IrO2 over the carrier. ... From a fundamental viewpoint, it would be interesting to assess whether rutile-type oxides exhibit similar Deacon chemistry. ...

Maximilian Moser; Cecilia Mondelli; Amol P. Amrute; Atsushi Tazawa; Detre Teschner; Manfred E. Schuster; Achim Klein-Hoffman; Núria López; Timm Schmidt; Javier Pérez-Ramírez

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of Vanadium Phosphaate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane.  

SciTech Connect

This DOE sponsored study of methane partial oxidation was initiated at Amax Research and Development in Golden, CO in October of 1993. Shortly thereafter the management of Amax closed this R&D facility and the PI moved to the Colorado School of Mines. The project was begun again after contract transfer via a novation agreement. Experimental work began with testing of vandyl pyrophosphate (VPO), a well known alkane selective oxidation catalyst. It was found that VPO was not a selective catalyst for methane conversion yielding primarily CO. However, promotion of VPO with Fe, Cr, and other first row transition metals led to measurable yields for formaldehyde, as noted in the summary table. Catalyst characterization studies indicated that the role of promoters was to stabilize some of the vanadium in the V{sup 5+} oxidation state rather than the V{sup 4+} state formally expected for (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

McCormick, R.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National...

164

Tar Reforming in Model Gasifier Effluents: Transition Metal/Rare Earth Oxide Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tar Reforming in Model Gasifier Effluents: Transition Metal/Rare Earth Oxide Catalysts ... So in this work we investigated the action of transition metal oxides (TMOs) other than Ni (e.g., Fe, Mn) mixed with REOs for tar reforming, at a medium temperature range (923–1073 K) and under conditions where direct reforming would dominate. ... The heated gas mixture passed through a 1/2” stainless steel tube containing 0.2–1 g of catalyst (40–60 mesh size) diluted with mullite and positioned between beds of ?-Al2O3. ...

Rui Li; Amitava Roy; Joseph Bridges; Kerry M. Dooley

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evaluation of platinum-based catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation in phosphoric acid electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-supported catalysts of Pt, Pt/Ru, Pt/Ru/W, and Pt/Ru/Pd were evaluated for the electro-oxidation of methanol in phosphoric acid at 180 C. These catalysts were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and x-ray diffraction. Addition of Ru to a 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2} Pt catalyst (1:1 atomic ratio) caused a large reduction in polarization. The open-circuit voltage was reduced by 100 mV and polarization at 400 mA/cm{sup 2} was reduced by 180 mV. A Pt/Ru (5:2) catalyst with the same Pt content lowered the open-circuit voltage 70 mV. Additions of W to form Pt/Ru/W (1:1:1, atomic ratio) and Pd to form Pt/Ru/Pd (2:2:1), all with the same platinum loading, gave the same performance as Pt/Ru (1:1) without the additions. All of the catalysts showed two Tafel slopes, 140 mV/dec at lower polarizations and 100 to 120 mV/dec at higher polarizations, indicating that the reaction mechanisms are the same for all of the catalysts. Methanol oxidation is greatly enhanced at 180 C in phosphoric acid compared to the lower operating temperatures of a perfluorosulfonic acid electrolyte. The exchange current density for methanol oxidation is higher than that for O{sub 2} reduction. Ru metal dissolves from catalysts at high potentials. Hydrogen oxidation in the presence of 1 mole percent carbon monoxide showed carbon monoxide tolerance in the order: Pt/Ru/Pd > Pt/Ru > Pt.

He, C.; Kunz, H.R.; Fenton, J.M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Structure-Activity Relationship in Nanostructured Copper-Ceria-Based Preferential CO Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Two series of nanostructured oxidized copper-cerium catalysts with varying copper loadings, and prepared, respectively, by impregnation of ceria and by coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions, have been characterized in detail at structural and electronic levels by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (including Ar{sup +}-sputtering), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). These results have been correlated with analysis of their catalytic properties for preferential oxidation of CO in a H{sub 2}-rich stream (CO-PROX), complemented by Operando-DRIFTS. A relevant difference between the two series of catalysts concerns the nature of the support for the surface-dispersed copper oxide entities, which is essentially ceria for the samples prepared by impregnation and a Ce-Cu mixed oxide for those prepared by microemulsion-coprecipitation. The existence of copper segregation in the form of copper oxide or copper-enriched Cu-Ce mixed oxides for the latter type of samples is uniquely revealed by nanoprobe XEDS and XPS Ar{sup +}-sputtering experiments. The CO oxidation activity under CO-PROX conditions is correlated to the degree of support-promoted reduction achieved by the dispersed copper oxide particles under reaction conditions. Nevertheless, catalysts which display higher CO oxidation activity are generally more efficient also for the undesired H{sub 2} oxidation reaction. The balance between both reactions results in differences in the CO-PROX activity between the two series of catalysts which are examined on the basis of the structural differences found.

Gamarra,D.; Munuera, G.; Hungria, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Conesa, J.; Midgley, P.; Wang, X.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Martinez-Arias, A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures. Copper oxide in excess of monolayer coverage reduces at temperatures close to the reduction temperature of the unsupported copper oxide. Increased dispersion increases the support effect. Low activity of ceria in NO reduction may be due to its resistance to reduction at low temperatures.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Surface spectroscopic characterization of oxide thin films and bimetallic model catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the surface morphology and electronic/geometric structure of the following catalysts: SiO2/Mo(112), Ag/SiO2/Mo(112), Au–Pd/Mo(110), Au–Pd/SiO2/Mo(110), and Pd– Sn/Rh(100). Specifically, different types of oxide surface defects were directly identified by MIES...

Wei, Tao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Many variations on the process cycle were developed to improve efficiency...NOx ) emitted from lean-burn diesel engines. Many catalyst developers...hydrocarbon oxidation in conventional diesel engines and NOx reduction...reduction and system durability. General Motors achieved 50,000-mile-aged...

John D. Sherman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts...

177

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim data report summarizes results as of August, 1999, on the status of the test programs being conducted on three technologies: lean-NO{sub x} catalysts, diesel particulate filters and diesel oxidation catalysts.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

The catalytic oxidation of propylene: investigation of catalyst activity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- thur oxidation resulted in the formation oi' dioxymsthylperoxides acetalde- hydes formic aoids carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide~ hydrogen and water, &t temperatures above 500 degrees Centigrade the polymer1sation of eth- ylene became significant... that water vapor exerted a catalytio effeot on the oxidation of ethylene, while carbon dioxide showed no aooelerating effeot. Davis (ll) observed that water vapor possessed a oatalytio ei'- feet on ths oxidation of olefins. Thompson and Hinshslwood (SS...

Woodham, John Frank

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Multimetal Oxide Catalysts DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902574  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of propane to acrolein and acrylic acid as well as the oxidation of various alcohols.[1a,4] Mo3VOx, which

Goddard III, William A.

180

Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using… (more)

Hereijgers, B.P.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SULFUR-TOLERANT CATALYST FOR THE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??JP-8 fuel is easily accessible, transportable, and has hydrogen content essential to solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operation. However, this syngas has sulfur content which… (more)

Bozeman, Joe Frank, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Determination of chemical properties of a supported copper oxide catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$) to the theoretioal oonsiderations upon whish the derivation of the B. E. T. equation is based, have bean made, tbe &. E. T, method (8) is still aooepted as giving reliable values for the surface area of an adsorbent. Esger~agg1EL3 Ngh~g pease (41) and Homfray... area of a catalyst ar adsorbent, Emmstt (15) des- cribed an apparatus of the constantmotums type, Modifications to this apparatus were suggested by ahura and Harld. ns (26~28) ~ One method used for the investigation of catalytic surfaoes consists...

Bandyopadhyay, Asok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

Carl R.F. Lund

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Photoinduced Water Oxidation by a Tetraruthenium Polyoxometalate Catalyst: Ion-pairing and Primary Processes with Ru(bpy)32+ Photosensitizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoinduced Water Oxidation by a Tetraruthenium Polyoxometalate Catalyst: Ion-pairing and Primary Processes with Ru(bpy)32+ Photosensitizer ... Two interrelated issues relevant to this behavior have been examined in detail: (i) the effects of ion pairing between the polyanionic catalyst and the cationic Ru(bpy)32+ sensitizer, and (ii) the kinetics of hole transfer from the oxidized sensitizer to the catalyst. ... This process competes appreciably with the primary photoreaction of the excited sensitizer with the sacrificial oxidant, even in high ionic strength media. ...

Mirco Natali; Michele Orlandi; Serena Berardi; Sebastiano Campagna; Marcella Bonchio; Andrea Sartorel; Franco Scandola

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Experimental investigations on diesel engine fuelled with methyl esters of cotton seed oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this investigation, cotton seed methyl ester (CSME) was prepared by transesterification using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as catalyst. The engine performance was analysed with different blends of biodiesel and was compared with neat diesel. It was concluded that the lower blends of biodiesel are closer to diesel as far as thermal efficiency is concerned. In the lower blends, the brakes specific fuel consumption is also comparatively reduced. The smoke density also increases for the blends of methyl ester of cotton seed oil diesel compared to neat diesel operation. The oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission level are decreased with the blends of methyl ester of cotton seed oil compared to neat diesel. The results proved that the use of biodiesel (produced from cotton seed oil) in compression ignition engine is a viable alternative to diesel.

M. Saravanan; A. Anbarasu; M. Loganathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

187

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nanostructured Cobalt Oxide Clusters in Mesoporous Silica as Efficient Oxygen-Evolving Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The development of integrated artificial photosynthetic systems for the direct conversion of carbon dioxide and water to fuel depends on the availability of efficient and robust catalysts for the chemical transformations. Catalysts need to exhibit turnover frequency (TOF) and density (hence size) commensurate with the solar flux at ground level (1000Wm2, airmass (AM) 1.5)[1]to avoid wasting of incidentsolar photons. For example, a catalyst with a TOF of 100 s1 requires a density of one catalytic site per square nanometer. Catalysts with lower rates or taking up a larger space will require a high-surface-area, nanostructured support that affords tens to hundreds of catalytic sites per square nanometer. Furthermore, catalysts need to operate close to the thermodynamic potential of the redox reaction so that amaximum fraction of the solar photon energy is converted to chemical energy. Stability considerations favor all-inorganic oxide materials, as does avoidance of harsh reaction conditions of pH value or temperature.

Jiao, Feng; Frei, Heinz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nox reduction with CO over supported Pd catalysts under simulated post Euro-IV diesel exhaust conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic reduction of NOx with CO over Pd/Al2O3 and Pd/TiO2/Al2O3 under simulated post Euro-IV diesel exhaust conditions was studied. The catalytic activities obtained...2 loadings and total amounts of reduc...

Yinghua Li; Dae-Won Lee; Young-Chul Ko…

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Palladium and Tin Alloyed Catalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction in an Alkaline Medium  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a study of a series of carbon-supported Pd-Sn binary alloyed catalysts prepared through a modified Polyol method as anode electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell reactions in an alkaline medium. Transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize the Pd-Sn/C catalysts, where homogeneous Pd-Sn alloys were determined to be present with the surface Sn being partially oxidized. Among various Pd-Sn catalysts, Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C catalysts showed much enhanced current densities in cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, compared to commercial Pd/C (Johnson Matthey). The overall rate law of ethanol oxidation reaction for both Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C and commercial Pd/C were also determined, which clearly showed that Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C was more favorable in high ethanol concentration and/or high pH environment. Density functional theory calculations also confirmed Pd-Sn alloy structures would result in lower reaction energies for the dehydrogenation of ethanol, compared to the pure Pd crystal.

Su D.; Du W.; Mackenzie K.E.; Milano D.F.; Deskins N.A.; Teng X.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst ... The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. ...

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

Water-gas Shift Reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational Catalyst Screening from Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect

Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO{sub 2}/Cu(111), ZrO{sub 2}/Cu(111) < MoO{sub 3}/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

Liu, P.

2010-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Environmentally Friendly Oxidation of Biomass Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-Diformylfuran Catalyzed by Magnetic Separation of Ruthenium Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmentally Friendly Oxidation of Biomass Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-Diformylfuran Catalyzed by Magnetic Separation of Ruthenium Catalyst ... In this study, aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF) was studied over a magnetic catalyst [Fe3O4@SiO2-NH2-Ru(III)]. ... 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), which is generated by the dehydration of C6-based carbohydrates, is considered to be a key platform molecule. ...

Shuguo Wang; Zehui Zhang; Bing Liu; Jinlin Li

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

Exhaust-catalyst development for methanol-fueled vehicles. II. Synergism between palladium and silver in methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation over an alumina-supported palladium-silver catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation were examined over 0.01 Pd, 5% Ag, and 0.01% Pd/5% Ag catalysts - all supported on ..gamma..-alumina. The bimetallic catalyst showed greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation activity than either of the single-component catalysts; moreover, the Pd and Ag interacted synergistically in the bimetallic catalyst to produce greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation rates and lower yields of methanol partial oxidation products than expected from a mixture of the single-component catalysts. Temperature-programmed oxidation experiments and reactivity experiments involving changes in O/sub 2/ partial pressure both provided evidence that the Pd-Ag synergism results from Pd promoting the rate of O/sub 2/ adsorption and reaction with CO and CH/sub 3/OH on Ag. The data also indicate that virtually all of the Pd in the bimetallic catalyst is present in Pd-Ag crystallites.

McCabe, R.W.; Mitchell, P.J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electrochemical catalyst recovery method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Visualizing a Catalyst at Work during the Ignition of the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ignitions or light-offs of heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation reactions are a special challenge for operando studies on catalytic reactors, which have gained increasing attention for the identification of active sites of catalysts and optimal reactor design. ... One of these reactions is the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of hydrocarbons to carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which is considered an important alternative to presently utilized processes in natural gas and biomass conversion such as steam and autothermal reforming. ... In conclusion, we demonstrate that the ignition of heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions can be visualized in a spatiotemporal manner by means of synchrotron radiation based high resolution transmission X-ray absorption imaging combined with IR thermography. ...

Bertram Kimmerle; Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt; Alfons Baiker; Pieter Glatzel; Pit Boye; Sandra Stephan; Christian G. Schroer

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characteristics of SME Biodiesel-Fueled Diesel Particle Emissions and the Kinetics of Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general it is reported that biodiesel has a less adverse effect on human health than petroleum-based diesel fuel. ... The engine used in this study was a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250, which is a medium-duty, off-highway, direct-injection, 4 cylinder, 4 cycle, turbocharged diesel engine. ... These fuels were compared with a low-sulfur, petroleum #2 diesel fuel in a Caterpillar 3304, prechamber, 75 kW diesel engine, operated over heavy- and light-duty transient test cycles developed by the United States Bureau of Mines. ...

Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Michael R. Zachariah

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

SciTech Connect

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Zn(II)–Cr(III) mixed oxide as efficient bifunctional catalyst for dehydroisomerisation of ?-pinene to p-cymene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zn(II)–Cr(III) mixed oxide possessing acid and dehydrogenation functions is an efficient, noble-metal-free catalyst for the one-step dehydroisomerisation of ?-pinene to p-cymene. This reaction is a good example of the use of heterogeneous multifunctional catalysis for the conversion of renewable feedstock into value-added chemicals. It involves acid-catalysed ?-pinene isomerisation followed by dehydrogenation of p-cymene precursor(s). The reaction is carried out over a fixed catalyst bed in the gas phase at 350 °C. Amongst Zn–Cr oxides studied (Zn/Cr = 20:1–1:30), the preferred catalyst is Zn–Cr (1:1) oxide which produces p-cymene with a 78% yield at 100% ?-pinene conversion. This catalyst shows stable performance for over 30 h without co-feeding hydrogen to the reactor.

Fahd Al-Wadaani; Elena F. Kozhevnikova; Ivan V. Kozhevnikov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Exhaust emissions characteristics of a multi-cylinder 18.1-L diesel engine converted to fueled with natural gas and diesel pilot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A six-cylinder, turbocharged and aftercooled diesel engine was converted to operate with natural gas and diesel pilot for generator application. The flow of natural gas was electronically controlled using a throttle valve, and it was pre-mixed with air before being introduced into the combustion chambers. The aim of this work was to study the exhaust emissions characteristics under diesel and dual fuel operations at different operating conditions. Exhaust emissions of total hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), soot, particulate matter and carbon dioxide were measured at different loads. This work also presents the effects of diesel oxidation catalyst on HC and CO conversions under dual fuel operation. Results showed that \\{NOx\\} emission was reduced at all operating loads under dual fuel operation compared to diesel operation. HC and CO emissions were increased under dual fuel operation, but their concentrations were considerably reduced with oxidation catalyst. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it was found that soot and particulate matter were increased under dual fuel operation compared to diesel operation.

Mayank Mittal; Ron Donahue; Peter Winnie; Allen Gillette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Vanadium oxide based nanostructured materials for catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of propane : effect of heterometallic centers on the catalyst performance.  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic properties of a series of new class of catalysts materials-[Co{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42} (XO{sub 4})].24H{sub 2}O (VNM-Co), [Fe{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(XO{sub 4})].24H{sub 2}O (VNM-Fe) (X = V, S) and [H{sub 6}Mn{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 12}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(VO{sub 4})].30H{sub 2}O for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane is studied. The open-framework nanostructures in these novel materials consist of three-dimensional arrays of {l_brace}V{sub 18}O{sub 42}(XO{sub 4}){r_brace} (X = V, S) clusters interconnected by {l_brace}-O-M-O-{r_brace} (M = Mn, Fe, Co) linkers. The effect of change in the heterometallic center M (M = Mn, Co, Fe) of the linkers on the catalyst performance was studied. The catalyst material with Co in the linker showed the best performance in terms of propane conversion and selectivity at 350 C. The material containing Fe was most active but least selective and Mn containing catalyst was least active. The catalysts were characterized by Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), BET surface area measurement, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. TPR results show that all three catalysts are easily reducible and therefore are active at relatively low temperature. In situ X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) studies revealed that the oxidation state of Co(II) remained unchanged up to 425 C (even after pretreatment). The reduction of Co(II) into metallic form starts at 425 C and this process is completed at 600 C.

Khan, M. I.; Deb, S.; Aydemir, K.; Alwarthan, A. A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Miller, J. T.; Marshall, C. L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Illinois Inst. of Tech.); (King Saud Univ.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Acid strength of silica-supported oxide catalysts studied by microcalorimetric measurements of pyridine adsorption  

SciTech Connect

Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heat of pyridine adsorption were used to probe the distribution of acid strength on a series of silica-supported oxide catalysts. Depositing oxides of the following cations onto silica increased the acid strength of the catalyst: Ga{sup 3{plus}}, Zn{sup 2{plus}}, Al{sup 3{plus}}, Fe{sup 3{plus}}, Fe{sup 2{plus}}, Mg{sup 2{plus}}, and Sc{sup 3{plus}}. The acid strength distribution curves for the supported oxide samples showed either two or three regions of constant heat of adsorption while silica had an energetically homogeneous surface. The Ga, Al, and Sc samples were found to have both Bronsted and Lewis acidity while the remaining samples showed only Lewis acidity. Incremental adsorption of pyridine indicated that the initial region of highest heat corresponds to strong Lewis acidity while intermediate heats seemed to be due to weaker Lewis acid sites or a combination of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. The final region of lowest heat was due to H-bonded pyridine on silica. Estimates of the entropies of adsorption were determined, providing information about the mobility of the adsorbed pyridine molecules. The initial differential heat of adsorption increases proportionally to the Sanderson electronegativity of the added oxide.

Cardona-Martinez, N.; Dumesic, J.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Catalyst support of mixed cerium zirconium titanium oxide, including use and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A durable catalyst support/catalyst is capable of extended water gas shift operation under conditions of high temperature, pressure, and sulfur levels. The support is a homogeneous, nanocrystalline, mixed metal oxide of at least three metals, the first being cerium, the second being Zr, and/or Hf, and the third importantly being Ti, the three metals comprising at least 80% of the metal constituents of the mixed metal oxide and the Ti being present in a range of 5% to 45% by metals-only atomic percent of the mixed metal oxide. The mixed metal oxide has an average crystallite size less than 6 nm and forms a skeletal structure with pores whose diameters are in the range of 4-9 nm and normally greater than the average crystallite size. The surface area of the skeletal structure per volume of the material of the structure is greater than about 240 m.sup.2/cm.sup.3. The method of making and use are also described.

Willigan, Rhonda R. (Manchester, CT); Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry (Glastonbury, CT); Tulyani, Sonia (Manchester, CT); Radhakrishnan, Rakesh (Vernon, CT); Opalka, Susanne Marie (Glastonbury, CT); Emerson, Sean C. (Broad Brook, CT)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effective MgO surface doping of Cu/Zn/Al oxides as water–gas shift catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace amounts of MgO were doped on Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts with the Cu/Zn/Al molar ratio of 45/45/10 and tested for the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction. A mixture of Zn(Cu)–Al hydrotalcite (HT) and Cu/Zn aurichalcite was prepared by co-precipitation (cp) of the metal nitrates and calcined at 300 °C to form the catalyst precursor. When the precursor was dispersed in an aqueous solution of Mg(II) nitrate, HT was reconstituted by the “memory effect.” During this procedure, the catalyst particle surface was modified by MgO-doping, leading to a high sustainability. Contrarily, cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al prepared by Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Al3+ co-precipitation as a control exhibited high activity but low sustainability. Mg2+ ions were enriched in the surface layer of m-Mg–Cu/Zn/Al, whereas Mg2+ ions were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles of cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al. CuO particles were significantly sintered on the m-catalyst during the dispersion, whereas CuO particles were highly dispersed on the cp-catalyst. However, the m-catalyst was more sustainable against sintering than the cp-catalyst. Judging from TOF, the surface doping of MgO more efficiently enhanced an intrinsic activity of the m-catalyst than the cp-catalyst. Trace amounts of MgO on the catalyst surface were enough to enhance both activity and sustainability of the m-catalyst by accelerating the reduction–oxidation between Cu0 and Cu+ and by suppressing Cu0 (or Cu+) oxidation to Cu2+.

Kazufumi Nishida; Dalin Li; Yingying Zhan; Tetsuya Shishido; Yasunori Oumi; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts: X-ray photoemission investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to study Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts that have been developed to respond to increased NO x emissions of lean-burn engines. Lean-burn engines critical components of low and zero emission vehicles produce much higher levels of engine-out NO x and current three-way catalytic converters are not sufficient to meet Clean Air Act standards. Platinum catalysts were formed by the reaction of modified Pt coordination compounds with selected transition–metal alkoxides through sol–gel techniques into aerogels. Photoemission measurements of the Pt 4f Si 2p Ti 2p O 1s and C 1s core lines were used to evaluate the chemistry of the material after each processing step. Results indicate Pt–O bonding and reduced Pt disbursed in the aerogel. In addition Si 2p Ti 2p and O 1s binding energies indicate an oxo-bridged network structure.

A. J. Nelson; John G. Reynolds; R. D. Sanner; P. R. Coronado; L. M. Hair

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum chemical study of nitric oxide reduction by ammonia (SCR reaction) on V2O5 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide by ammonia on (0 1 0) V2O5 surface represented by a V2O9/6-31G** level. The computations indicated that SCR reaction consisted of three main parts

Senkan, Selim M.

208

Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1 , M. Bouchard1 catalytic properties in the oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid is examined. Solids based on Mo and nanosize of MoO3 and (VNbMo)5O14 crystals. The high global selectivity to ethylene and acetic acid (90

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Activation of Au/TiO2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation Jeff H. Yang, Juan D. Henao, Mpfunzeni C. Raphulu, Yingmin Wang, Tiziana Caputo,|  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activation of Au/TiO2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation Jeff H. Yang, Juan D. Henao, Mpfunzeni C. Raphulu; In Final Form: March 29, 2005 Changes in a Au/TiO2 catalyst during the activation process from an as and FTIR spectroscopy, complemented with XPS, microcalorimetry, and TEM characterization. When the catalyst

Marks, Laurence D.

210

Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mesoporous tantalum oxide as catalyst for dehydration of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mesoporous tantalum oxide was prepared by acid hydrolysis of tantalum penta-ethoxide in the presence of a triblock co-polymer Pluronic L-121, a non-ionic surfactant, at room temperature and subsequent calcination at 550 °C for 6 h. This solid exhibits a suitable specific surface area (79 m2 g?1) and a high acidity (353 ?mol NH3 g?1) with the presence of both Brönsted and Lewis acid sites, demonstrating to be active as solid acid catalyst in the dehydration of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), in a biphasic water/methyl-iso-butyl ketone (MIBK) system. Thus, by using a glucose:catalyst weight ratio of 3:1, a glucose conversion of 69% and a HMF yield of 23% were achieved at 175 °C, and after only 90 min of reaction time. The catalytic process is selective toward HMF, which is preserved from ulterior hydration to levulinic acid. Fructose was also detected as by-product of glucose isomerisation with 14% of selectivity. The catalyst is very stable, since no leaching of tantalum species to the liquid phase was found; moreover, the catalytic performance of this acid solid is well recovered after calcination at 550 °C for 2 h.

I. Jiménez-Morales; M. Moreno-Recio; J. Santamaría-González; P. Maireles-Torres; A. Jiménez-López

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

SISGR-Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts with significant reduction of expensive noble metal contents (E.g. IrO2, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance as the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a major breakthrough in the generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis. Accomplishing such a system would not only result reduction of the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, but also help attain the targeted hydrogen production cost [< $ 3.0 / gallon gasoline equivalent (gge)] comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, it was demonstrated that fluorine doped IrO2 thin films and nanostructured high surface area powders display remarkably higher electrochemical activity, and comparable durability as pure IrO2 electro-catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis. Furthermore, corrosion resistant SnO2 and NbO2 support has been doped with F and coupled with IrO2 or RuO2 for use as an OER electro-catalyst. A solid solution of SnO2:F or NbO2:F with only 20 - 30 mol.% IrO2 or RuO2 yielding a rutile structure in the form of thin films and bulk nanoparticles displays similar electrochemical activity and stability as pure IrO2/RuO2. This would lead to more than 70 mol.% reduction in the noble metal oxide content. Novel nanostructured ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 thin films of different compositions FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRO-CATALYSTS WITH REDUCED NOBLE METAL CONTENT FOR PEM BASED WATER ELECTROLYSIS 4 have also been studied. It has been shown that (Ir0.40Sn0.30Nb0.30)O2 shows similar electrochemical activity and enhanced chemical robustness as compared to pure IrO2. F doping of the ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 catalyst helps in further decreasing the noble metal oxide content of the catalyst. As a result, these reduced noble metal oxide catalyst systems would potentially be preferred as OER electro-catalysts for PEM electrolysis. The excellent performance of the catalysts coupled with its robustness would make them great candidates for contributing to significant reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers. This s.thesis provides a detailed fundamental study of the synthesis, materials, characterization, theoretical studies and detailed electrochemical response and potential mechanisms of these novel electro-catalysts for OER processes.

Kumta, Prashant [University of Pittsburgh

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mercury oxidation over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Mercury oxidation by hydrochloric acid over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(WO{sub 3})/TiO{sub 2} commercial SCR catalyst was investigated. Both fresh and aged catalysts with honeycomb structure, which were exposed to a coal combustion flue gas in a coal-fired boiler for over 71 000 h. were examined. The aged catalysts were characterized by X-ray and SEM-EDX analysis to examine the presence of ash deposition on the surface. The mercury oxidation rate was enhanced by increasing HCl concentrations and inhibited strongly by the presence of NH{sub 3}. This behavior could be explained by a kinetic model assuming that HCl competes for the catalyst active sites against NH{sub 3}. As the catalyst operation time increased, the mercury oxidation rate was observed to decrease considerably in the presence of NH{sub 3} while NO reduction rate was apparently nearly unchanged. By examining aged catalysts, deposits stemming from fly ash and SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} were observed to accumulate continuously on the catalyst surface. The ash deposited on the surface may partially block the active catalyst sites and decrease their number. The decrease of the number of active sites on the catalyst surface caused NH{sub 3} to remain unreacted in the honeycomb catalyst. The decrease of the Hg{sup 0} oxidation rate was caused by the inhibition effect of NH{sub 3} remaining in the catalyst.

Kamata, H.; Ueno, S.; Naito, T.; Yukimura, A [IHI Corp, Kanagawa (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Novel Au-TiC Catalysts for CO Oxidation and Desulfurization Processes  

SciTech Connect

Recent articles dealing with the physical and chemical properties of novel Au-TiC catalysts are reviewed. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles periodic density-functional calculations were used to study the deposition of gold on a TiC(0 0 1) surface. Gold grows forming two-dimensional (very low coverage) and three-dimensional (medium and large coverage) islands on the carbide substrate. A positive shift in the binding energy of the C 1s core level is observed after the deposition of Au on TiC(0 0 1). The results of the density-functional calculations corroborate the formation of Au-C bonds. In general, the bond between Au and the TiC(0 0 1) surface exhibits very little ionic character, but there is a substantial polarization of electrons around Au that facilitates bonding of the adatoms with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, thiophene, etc.). Experimental measurements indicate that Au/TiC(0 0 1) is a very good catalysts for the oxidation of CO, the destruction of SO{sub 2} and the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC(0 0 1) is able to perform the 2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2} reaction and the full decomposition of SO{sub 2}. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(0 0 1) or Au(1 1 1), a Au/TiC(0 0 1) surface displays a hydrodesulfurization activity higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS{sub x} catalysts. Metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical reactivity of gold. The Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces.

J Rodriguez; P Liu; Y Takahashi; F Vines; L Feria; E Florez; K Nakamura

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

SCR-DPF Integrations for Diesel ExhaustPerformance and Perspectives for High SCR Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents laboratory and engine bench test results from integrating the SCR catalyst into the diesel filter as one multifunctional unit.

217

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

218

Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic catalysts for water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis: a review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Review articles 1004 30 36 15 Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic...of about approximately 0.5 nm. Thus, nano-sized manganese compounds might be good...particles. In this paper, we focus on nano-sized manganese oxides as functional...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending  

SciTech Connect

Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice  

SciTech Connect

Background: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m{sup 3}, 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results: Addition of CeO{sub 2} to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions: These results imply that addition of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

Cassee, Flemming R., E-mail: flemming.cassee@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Campbell, Arezoo, E-mail: acampbell@westernu.edu [Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA (United States)] [Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA (United States); Boere, A. John F., E-mail: john.boere@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); McLean, Steven G., E-mail: smclean1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger, E-mail: Rodger.Duffin@ed.ac.uk [MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Krystek, Petra, E-mail: petra.krystek@philips.com [Philips Innovation Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Philips Innovation Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gosens, Ilse, E-mail: Ilse.gosens@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Miller, Mark R., E-mail: Mark.Miller@ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effect of Thermal Neutron Irradiation on Oxide Catalysts for the Decomposition of Nitrous Oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... alpha-particles which are produced by an (n, a) reaction with lithium-6 or boron-10 atoms. Nickel oxide contains excess oxygen ions as a Ł-type semiconductor and probably ...

YASUKAZU SAITO; YUKIO YONEDA; SHOJI MAKISHIMA

1959-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed species on mixed metal oxide catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was utilized to identify adsorbed species on Zn/Cu/Cr oxide and potassium carbonate-promoted Zn/Cu/Cr oxide catalysts at 285/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. Adsorption of various molecules on catalysts provided information about the nature of the adsorbed species. As a result of CO/H/sub 2/ mixture, methanol and formaldehyde adsorption two types of species formed, namely a methoxy and a formate. The adsorption of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid at 285/sup 0/C revealed stable acetate species. Ethanol and acetaldehyde adsorption also produced an ethoxy species whose formation was much favored on promoted catalysts. 136 refs., 46 figs., 14 tabs.

Baysar, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report 10, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is the tenth quarterly technical progress report under Contract No. DE-AC22-92PC92110 {open_quotes}Development of Vanadium-Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane{close_quotes}. Activities focused on testing of additional modified and promoted catalysts and characterization of these materials. Attempts at improving the sensitivity of our GC based analytical systems were also made with some success. Methanol oxidation studies were initiated. These results are reported. Specific accomplishments include: (1) Methane oxidation testing of a suite of catalysts promoted with most of the first row transition metals was completed. Several of these materials produced low, difficult to quantify yields of formaldehyde. (2) Characterization of these materials by XRD and FTIR was performed with the goal of correlating activity and selectivity with catalyst properties. (3) We began to characterize catalysts prepared via modified synthesis methods designed to enhance acidity using TGA measurements of acetonitrile chemisorption and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether as a test reaction. (4) A catalyst prepared in the presence of naphthalene methanol as a structural disrupter was tested for activity in methane oxidation. It was found that this material produced low yields of formaldehyde which were difficult to quantify. (5) Preparation of catalysts with no Bronsted acid sites. This was accomplished by replacement of exchangeable protons with potassium, and (6) Methanol oxidation studies were initiated to provide an indication of catalyst activity for decomposition of this desired product and as a method of characterizing the catalyst surface.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

XAFS Characterization of Pt–Fe/zeolite Catalysts for Preferential Oxidation of CO in Hydrogen Fuel Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a new Pt–Fe/mordenite (Pt–Fe/M) catalyst which shows remarkably high activity and selectivity for the oxidation of CO in H2-rich gas compared with Pt/M. In the present work, to understand the ro...

Masashi Kotobuki; Takafumi Shido; Mizuki Tada; Hiroyuki Uchida…

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hysteresis phenomena in CO catalytic oxidation system in the presence of inhomogeneities of the catalyst surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hysteresis phenomena in the CO catalytic oxidation system are studied by Monte Carlo simulation in the presence of the inhomogeneities of the catalyst surface. We show that the O-passivated state is destroyed due to the inhomogeneities of the surface, in contrast to the classical Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model. The defects on the surface have a significant effect on the hysteresis transition points. Most importantly, the supercritical nucleation and growth of the O adatom island during the transition from a low reactivity to a high reactivity states are closely related to the inhomogeneities of the catalyst surface. It is shown that the width of the hysteresis loop shrinks as the scan rate ?CO of yCO (the fraction of CO in gas phase) decreases, but there exists a finite width of the hysteresis loop even if ?CO becomes infinitely small. On the other hand, the width of the hysteresis loop decreases with decreasing the diffusion rate, and even the hysteresis loop may disappear for a slow diffusion. These simulation results are in good consistency with the previous relevant experimental results.

Da-yin Hua and Yu-qiang Ma

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Subnanometer platinum clusters highly active and selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.  

SciTech Connect

Small clusters are known to possess reactivity not observed in their bulk analogues, which can make them attractive for catalysis. Their distinct catalytic properties are often hypothesized to result from the large fraction of under-coordinated surface atoms. Here, we show that size-preselected Pt{sub 8-10} clusters stabilized on high-surface-area supports are 40-100 times more active for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane than previously studied platinum and vanadia catalysts, while at the same time maintaining high selectivity towards formation of propylene over by-products. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that under-coordination of the Pt atoms in the clusters is responsible for the surprisingly high reactivity compared with extended surfaces. We anticipate that these results will form the basis for development of a new class of catalysts by providing a route to bond-specific chemistry, ranging from energy-efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis strategies to the replacement of petrochemical feedstocks by abundant small alkanes.

Vajda, S; Pellin, M. J.; Greeley, J. P.; Marshall, C. L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ballentine, G. A.; Elam, J. W.; Catillon-Mucherie, S.; Redfern, P. C.; Mehmood, F.; Zapol, P.; Yale Univ.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, L. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Xanes Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Shiju, N.R. [University of Cincinnati; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

XANES Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of Propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Shuju, N.; Rondinone, A; Mullins, D; Schwartz, V; Overbury, S; Gulaints, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Xanes Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of Propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Mullins, David R [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim [ORNL; Shiju, N.R. [University of Cincinnati

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Evaluation of oxides of nitrogen emissions for the purpose of their transient regulation from a direct injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of defining a regulatory standard for the maximum allowable emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a heavy-duty diesel engine on an instantaneous basis is presented. The significance of this concept from a regulatory point of view is the possibility to realise a steady brake specific NOx emissions result independent of the test schedule used. The emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a state-of-the-art direct injection diesel engine have been examined on an integral as well as on an instantaneous basis over the Federal Test Procedure as well as over several other arbitrary transient cycles generated for this study. Three candidate standards of specific NOx emissions have been evaluated on a real-time, continuous basis. These include brake power specific, fuel mass specific, and carbon dioxide mass specific NOx emissions. Retaining the stock engine control module, the carbon dioxide specific emissions of NOx have been shown to be the most uniform, varying only by about 30% of its mean value regardless of the test schedule or engine operation. The instantaneous fuel specific NOx emissions are shown to be relatively less invariant and the least steady are the brake power specific emissions with a coefficient of variation of up to 200%. Advancing injection timing has been shown to have a wide range of authority over the specific emissions of oxides of nitrogen regardless of the units used, when operating at full load in the vicinity of peak torque speeds. The carbon dioxide specific NOx emissions have shown a linear dependence on the power specific emissions, independent of the examined operating conditions. The trade-off between better brake thermal efficiency, lower exhaust gas temperature at advanced timing and lower NOx emissions has also been shown to be independent of the units of the specific standard used.

Yasser Yacoub; Chris Atkinson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use in Medium-Duty Diesel Engines A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use in Medium-Duty Diesel...

233

Influence of Oxidized Biodiesel Blends on Regulated and Unregulated Emissions from a Diesel Passenger Car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few studies are available on modern passenger cars, employed common-rail engine systems, and after-treatment technologies, and even fewer studies report results, which are not necessarily representative of actual driving conditions, making it difficult to assess the fuel impact on diesel car fleet emissions. ... Although gasoline engines are expected to be replaced by hydrogen-powered fuel cells, compression-ignition engines, the diesel engines, are expected to remain in use for high-power applications because of limitations of hydrogen-storage densities. ... transesterification and sequential esterification-transesterification, followed by washing in water in both cases, in order to set out the most suitable operational conditions to achieve the highest FAME percentage in the shortest time. ...

Georgios Karavalakis; Evangelos Bakeas; Stamos Stournas

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Combustion and emission characteristics of a turbocharged diesel engine using high premixed ratio of methanol and diesel fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine with high premixed ratio of methanol (PRm) were investigated. Experiments were performed on a 6-cylinder turbocharged, inter-cooling diesel engine. Methanol was injected through the intake port and ignited by direct injected diesel in the cylinder, the maximum \\{PRm\\} was over 70%. The experimental results showed that with high PRm, the maximum in-cylinder pressure increased from medium to high engine load but varied little or even decreased at low engine speed and load. High \\{PRm\\} prolonged the ignition delay but shortened the combustion duration and decreased the in-cylinder gas temperature at ignition timing. Hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde emissions and the proportion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen oxides (NOX) increased significantly with the increase of \\{PRm\\} while NOX and dry soot emissions were significantly reduced, which meant the trade-off relationship between NOX and soot emissions disappeared. The increased HC, CO and formaldehyde emissions could be effectively reduced by diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) when the exhaust gas temperature reached the light off temperature of the DOC. After DOC, the NO2 proportion in NOX was greatly reduced to less than that of baseline engine at methanol premixed mode but increased slightly at pure diesel mode. The maximum \\{PRm\\} was confined by in-cylinder pressure at high engine speed and load. But at low engine speed and load, it was confined by the high emissions of HC, CO and formaldehyde even after DOC.

Lijiang Wei; Chunde Yao; Quangang Wang; Wang Pan; Guopeng Han

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SCRT Technology for Retrofit of Heavy-Duty Diesel Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the Four-Way Emission Control SCRTTM System Application Experience with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy Duty Diesel Retrofit Effects of Catalysts on Emissions...

236

Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap (DCPT) Design and Optimization Tom Harris, Donna McConnell and Danan Dou Delphi Catalyst Tulsa, Oklahoma 2 Euro 45 Light Duty...

237

2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

with a Combined SCR and DPF Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofit Ray Conway Johnson Matthey Environmental Catalysts & Technologies (PDF 287 KB) A Soot Formation Model...

238

Pd modified Au on carbon as an effective and durable catalyst for the direct oxidation of HMF to FDCA  

SciTech Connect

We show that the modification of a gold/carbon catalyst with Pt or Pd produces stable and recyclable catalysts for the selective oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA). This finding is a significant advance over current conversion technology because of the technological importance of FDCA. Indeed, FDCA has been identified as one of twelve potential building blocks for the production of value added chemicals derived from biosources.1 FDCA is a potential replacement source of terephthalic acid, the monomer presently used for the production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and derived from hydrocarbon sources.2

Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Schiavoni, Marco [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Campisi, Sebastiano [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design Principles for Oxygen-Reduction Activity on Perovskite Oxide Catalysts for Fuel Cells and Metal-air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to {sigma}*-orbital (e{sub g}) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the {sigma}* orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O{sub 2}{sup 2-}/OH{sup -} displacement and OH{sup -} regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

J Suntivich; H Gasteiger; N Yabuuchi; H Nakanishi; J Goodenough; Y Shao-Horn

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparative study of polyoxometalates and semiconductor metal oxides as catalyst. Photochemical oxidative degradation of thioethers  

SciTech Connect

The photochemical degradation of thioether substrates catalyzed by representative semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides (anatase TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, cubic WO{sub 3}, and CdS) and photoredox-active early-transition-metal polyometalates (W{sub 10}O{sub 32}{sup 4{minus}}, PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}}, PV{sub 2}Mo{sub 10}O{sub 10}{sup 5{minus}}, and P{sub 2}W{sub 18}O{sub 62}{sup 6{minus}}) have been examined under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, all the semiconductors are completely ineffective at photochemically oxidizing or degrading the exemplary thioether substrate tetrahydrothiophene (THT) in the oxidatively resistant solvent acetonitrile. In contrast, all the homogeneous polyoxometalate systems under the same reaction condition, except the neutral tetra-n-butylammonium (Q) salt of PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, are quite effective. The latter systems generate products derived from the carbon-based radical {alpha} to the sulfur atom and not sulfoxide or sulfone, the usual products of thioether oxidation by oxometal species. The rate for the most active anaerobic system, that involving the photochemical degradation of THT by Q{sub 4}W{sub 10}O{sub 32}, under optically dilute conditions, is first order in W{sub 10}O{sub 32} {sup 4{minus}} and light intensity and variable order in THT substrate. A rate law consistent with these data is given. Upon addition of O{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} (with or without Pt(O)) becomes highly active, SnO{sub 2} becomes active, but WO{sub 3} and CdS remain inactive. Reactivity in thioether oxidation is dominated by the interactions of the semiconductors with O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}-derived intermediates; there is no correlation between reactivity and semiconductor band gap. Upon addition of O{sub 2}, all the polyoxometalate systems become more active. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Chambers, R.C.; Hill, C.L. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States))

1991-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of 0-A12O3- Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts for Butane Dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction; Structure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Quantification of Surface VOx Species on Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Conclusion; Acknowledgements; and References.

Wu, Zili [ORNL; Kim, Hack-Sung [Northwestern University, Evanston; Stair, Peter [Northwestern University, Evanston

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

High-oxidation-state molybdenum and tungsten monoalkoxide pyrrolide alkylidenes as catalysts for olefin metathesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 describes work toward solid-supported W olefin metathesis catalysts. Attempts to tether derivatives of the known Z-selective catalyst W(NAr)(C?H?)(pyr)(OHIPT) (Ar = 2,6- diisopropylphenyl, pyr = pyrrolide; HIPT ...

Townsend, Erik Matthew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung  

SciTech Connect

The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Uses for structured catalytic supports, such as ceramic straight-channel monoliths and ceramic foams, have been established for a long time. One of the most prominent examples is the washcoated ceramic monolith as a three-way catalytic converter for gasoline-powered automobiles. A distinct alternative to the ceramic monolith is the metal foam, with potential use in fuel cell-powered automobiles. The metal foams are characterized by their pores per inch (ppi) and density ({rho}). In previous research, using 5 wt% platinum (Pt) and 0.5 wt% iron (Fe) catalysts, washcoated metal foams, 5.08 cm in length and 2.54 cm in diameter, of both varying and similar ppi and {rho} were tested for their activity (X{sub CO}) and selectivity (S{sub CO}) on a CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reaction in the presence of a H{sub 2}-rich gas stream. The variances in these metal foams' activity and selectivity were much larger than expected. Other structured supports with 5 wt% Pt, 0-1 wt% Fe weight loading were also examined. A theory for this phenomenon states that even though these structured supports have a similar nominal catalyst weight loading, only a certain percentage of the Pt/Fe catalyst is exposed on the surface as an active site for CO adsorption. We will use two techniques, pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), to characterize our structured supports. Active metal count, metal dispersion, and other calculations will help clarify the causes for the activity and selectivity variations between the supports. Results on ceramic monoliths show that a higher Fe loading yields a lower dispersion, potentially because of Fe inhibition of the Pt surface for CO adsorption. This theory is used to explain the reason for activity and selectivity differences for varying ppi and {rho} metal foams; less active and selective metal foams have a lower Fe loading, which justifies their higher metal dispersion. Data on the CO desorption temperature and average metal crystallite size for TPD are also collected.

Paul Chin; George W. Roberts; James J. Spivey

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Modeling of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using four modern catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ammonia and Oxygen Exponents for V Catalyst........................ 36 Table 6.20 Experimental Data at 150 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.21 Experimental Data at 200 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst... [28].................................. 40 Table 6.22 Experimental Data at 250 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28].................................. 40 Table 6.23 Experimental Data at 300 o C for V-Ti Based PILC Catalyst [28...

Sharma, Giriraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DPF regeneration experiments verified the effects of NO2 and O2 emissions found from the thermogravimetric analyzer soot oxidation.

247

Renewable Diesel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Diesel Paraffinic (C 13 -C 18 ) No Oxygen No Double Bonds In Heart of Diesel Fuel (C 10 -C 22 ) High Cetane Feedstock Independent Cold Flow...

248

The first combinatorially prepared and evaluated inorganic catalysts. Polyoxometalates for the aerobic oxidation of the mustard analog tetrahydrothiophene (THT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combinatorial synthesis and evaluation of inorganic catalysts is described. The catalysts are an array of early-transition-metal-oxygen-anion clusters (polyoxometalates) and the reaction is the aerobic oxidation of a mustard thioether analog, tetrahydrothiophene (THT). Selective oxidation of THT to the desired sulfoxide, THTO, was achieved in high selectivity (?; 99%) and under relatively mild conditions (95°C, 1.52 atm). Solutions with a molar ratio of 1:2 (phosphorus:vanadium) had the highest catalytic activity. 51V NMR and IR were used not only to identify the self assembling polyoxometalates in several representative precursor combinations (columns in the combinatorial gallery of Fig. 1) but also to assess the stability of one representative polyoxometalate catalyst, 1P:2V:10W, under catalytic conditions (no decomposition after 50 turnovers). Gas chromatography was sufficient to rapidly quantify the product (THTO) yields and selectivities of representative reactions. Combinatorial methodology should be applicable to and provide the same advantages for discovery and optimization of catalysts as it has for pharmaceuticals.

Craig L Hill; Robin Damico Gall

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Single crystal flow reactor for studying reactivities on metal oxide model catalysts at atmospheric pressure to bridge the pressure gap to the adsorption properties determined under UHV conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A flow reactor for the investigation of heterogeneous catalytic reactions on single crystalline metal oxide model catalysts has been designed. It is located in a high pressure cell attached to an UHV analysis cha...

C. Kuhrs; M. Swoboda; W. Weiss

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Au/MxOy/TiO2 catalysts for CO oxidation: promotional effect of main-group, transition, and rare-earth metal oxide additives.  

SciTech Connect

Au/TiO2 catalysts are active for CO oxidation, but they suffer from high-temperature sintering of the gold particles, and few attempts have been made to promote or stabilize Au/TiO2. Our recent communication addressed these issues by loading gold onto Al2O3/TiO2 prepared via surface-sol-gel processing of Al(sec-OC4H9)3 on TiO2. In our current full paper, Au/Al2O3/TiO2 catalysts were prepared alternatively by thermal decomposition of Al(NO3)3 on TiO2 followed by loading gold, and the influences of the decomposition temperature and Al2O3 content were systematically surveyed. This facile method was subsequently extended to the preparation of a battery of metal oxide-modified Au/TiO2 catalysts virtually not reported. It was found that Au/TiO2 modified by CaO, NiO, ZnO, Ga2O3, Y2O3, ZrO2, La2O3, Pr2O3, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Eu2O3, Gd2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, Er2O3, or Yb2O3 could retain significant activity at ambient temperature even after aging in O2-He at 500 C, whereas unmodified Au/TiO2 lost its activity. Moreover, some 200 C-calcined promoted catalysts showed high activity even at about -100 C. The deactivation and regeneration of some of these new catalysts were studied. This work furnished novel catalysts for further fundamental and applied research.

Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Uncatalysed and catalysed soot combustion under NO{sub x} + O{sub 2}: Real diesel versus model soots  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the uncatalysed and catalysed combustion of two commercial carbon blacks and three diesel soot samples were analysed and related to the physico-chemical properties of these carbon materials. Model soot samples are less reactive than real soot samples, which can be attributed, mainly, to a lower proportion in heteroatoms and a higher graphitic order for the case of one of the carbon blacks. Among the diesel soot samples tested, the most relevant differences are the volatile matter/fixed carbon contents, which are directly related to the engine operating conditions (idle or loaded) and to the use of an oxidation catalyst or not in the exhaust. The soot collected after an oxidation catalyst (A-soot) is more reactive than the counterpart virgin soot obtained under the same engine operating modes but before the oxidation catalyst. The reactivity of the different soot samples follows the same trend under uncatalysed and catalysed combustion, the combustion profiles being always shifted towards lower temperatures for the catalysed reactions. The differences between the soot samples become less relevant in the presence of a catalyst. The ceria-zirconia catalysts tested are very effective not only to oxidise soot but also to combust the soluble organic fraction emitted at low temperatures. The most reactive soot (A-soot) exhibits a T{sub 50%} parameter of 450 C when using the most active catalyst. (author)

Atribak, I.; Bueno-Lopez, A.; Garcia-Garcia, A. [MCMA Group, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Alicante, Ap.99-E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons on platinum and palladium catalysts in the presence of sulfur dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on a study of the effect of sulfur dioxide on the activity of platinum and palladium catalysts with respect to oxidation of the principal toxic components in the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines: carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons (propylene (C/sub 3/H/sub 6/) and propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/)). The experiments were carried out in a flow system equipped with Beckman infrared analyzers to monitor the concentrations of CO and hydrocarbons and of sulfur dioxide. A series of thermal desorption experiments was carried out in a low-pressure flow system with mass spectrometric analysis of the gas phase. The results indicate that the low-temperature adsorption of sulfur dioxide on platinum (and also palladium) catalysts inhibits the oxidation of carbon monoxide and propylene. The poisoning effect of O/sub 2/ is due to blockage of the platinum centers for adsorption of the oxidizable compounds and oxygen.

Panchishnyi, V.I.; Bondareva, N.K.; Sklyarov, A.V.; Rozanov, V.V.; Chadina, G.P.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions ... A sustainable process with a one-step conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 1,2,6-hexanetriol is presented. ... The conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was examined over Ni–Co–Al mixed oxide catalysts derived from corresponding hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs). ...

Shengxi Yao; Xicheng Wang; Yijun Jiang; Feng Wu; Xinguo Chen; Xindong Mu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Lithium phosphate catalyst, III. New supported catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some new non-stoichiometric Li3PO4 supported on ?-Al2O3, ?-Al2O3, TiO2 and SiO2 are described as catalysts. The catalysts are used in the isomerization of propene oxide. The catalyst supported on SiO2...is more a...

A. M. Delgado; J. V. Sinisterra

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Methods of making textured catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

Werpy, Todd (West Richland, WA); Frye, Jr., John G. (Richland, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oxidation Of H2S To S By Air With Fe(III)-NTA As A Catalyst: Catalyst Degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation of H2S to S by air is represented by the overall reaction: $$ 2{{\\rm{H}}_2}{\\rm{S}} + {{\\rm{O}}_2} \\to 1/4{{\\rm{S}}_{{8^ \\downar...

Dian Chen; Ramunas J. Motekaitis…

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Vanadium Mesoporous Silica Catalyst Prepared by Direct Synthesis as High Performing Catalyst in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of n-Butane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of light alkanes has great potential to be used for production of alkenes instead classically used dehydrogenation. We report successful direct synthesis of vanadi...

Michal Setni?ka; Pavel ?i?manec; Roman Bulánek; Arnošt Zukal…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 2008 contacts thomas J. Feeley III Technology Manager Environmental & Water Resources National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov charles E. Miller Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5745 charles.miller@netl.doe.gov Gary Blythe Principal Investigator URS Corp. 9400 Amberglen Blvd. P.O. Box 201088 Austin, Texas 78720 512-419-5321 gary_blythe@urscorp.com Environmental and Water Resources Full-Scale TeSTing oF a Mercury oxidaTion caTalyST upSTreaM oF a WeT Fgd SySTeM Background To provide alternatives for power plant owners to comply with the Clean Air Mercury Rule promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NETL is

259

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Final technical report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The most advanced and proven technology for NO{sub x} control for stationary sources is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). In SCR, NO{sub x} is reduced by NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The commercial catalysts are based on V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}, and the vanadium-based catalysts are patented by the Japanese (Mitsubishi). However, there are three main advantages for the vanadium-based SCR catalyst: (a) a tendency to be poisoned in the flue gas; (b) oxidation of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, this is a particularly severe problem due to the higher sulfur content of American coals compared with coals used in Japan (from Australia) and in Europe; (c) environmental problems involved in the disposal of the spent catalyst (due to the toxicity of vanadium). In order to overcome these problems, in addition to the undesirable dominance by the Japanese patent position, the authors have studied in this project a new type of catalyst for the SCR reaction; namely, pillared clays, which have adjustable, unique structures and acidity. Three types of catalysts were developed and tested for this reaction, i.e. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clays, and ion-exchanged pillared clays. The project was divided into sixteen tasks, and will be reported as such.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Cheng, L.S.; Kikkinides, E.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the past quarter, progress has been made in four tasks as summarized below: Task 1: A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay was synthesized and carefully characterized. The chemical composition was measured by ICP atomic emission spectrometry. The structural changes in the clay as well as the iron oxide particle sizes were characterized by X-ray diffraction techniques. Task 2: The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR, i.e., NO reduction with NH{sub 3}) activities of the delaminated pillared clay were tested and compared with four other most active SCR catalysts: a commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, a Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay, and two supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts (on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}). The delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay exhibited the highest SCR activities. Catalyst stability test showed that the delaminated sample was also stable. Task 3: To further increase the SCR activity of the delaminated pillared clay, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was doped as a promoter by incipient wetness. Task 4: Deactivation effects of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on the SCR activities of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay were studied, and compared with other SCR catalysts. The delaminated clay catalyst showed the least deactivation.

Chen, J.P.; Cheng, L.S.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY CARBON MONOXIDE OVER A SILICA SUPPORTED PLATINUM CATALYST: INFRARED AND KINETIC STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System. • B. Procedures. Catalyst Preparation Infrared DiskPreparation. Catalyst Characterization. PreliminaryReduction by CO Over a Pt Catalyst," M.S. thesis, Department

Lorimer, D.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light duty diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC and selective catalytic reduction catalyst on filter (SCRF), close coupled to the engine with direct gaseous ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions

263

Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the past quarter, progress was made in three tasks. The poisoning effects of alkali metals (as Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}0 and Cs{sub 2}O) on iron oxide pillared clay (Fe-Bentonite) catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} were investigated. The effects of sulfur dioxide and water vapor on the performance of the high activity catalyst, that is, Ce-doped Fe-Bentonite pillared clay (Ce-Fe-Bentonite) were examined. In addition, an iron ion-exchanged titania pillared clay (Ti-PILC) was prepared and its catalytic activity for the SCR of NO with NH{sub 3} was studied, which showed a high activity and a high S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0 resistance at high temperatures (i.e., above 400{degree}C).

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Treatment of \\{VOCs\\} with molecular sieve catalysts in regenerative catalytic oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work prepares molecular sieve catalysts with various metal species and various metal weight loadings by impregnation, and then screens them in a catalytic combustion system. The current study further investigates the molecular sieve catalyst in an RCO system after it performed well in combustion efficiency. This work tests its performances in terms of CO2 yield, pressure drop, the difference between temperatures of the inlet and outlet gases (Td), and thermal recovery efficiency (TRE), with various operational conditions. Experimental results demonstrate that the 10 wt% Cu/(MS) catalyst was the most active because it has the greatest combustion efficiency to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than Co/(MS) catalysts and Mn/(MS) catalysts. The 10 wt% Cu/(MS) catalyst used in an RCO system reaches over 95% CO2 yields under the heating zone temperature (Tset) = 400 °C, gas velocity (Ug) = 0.37 m/s, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) concentration = 200–400 ppm conditions. Moreover, the RCO system performed well in economic efficiency with the RCO with in terms of TRE, Td and pressure drop. The TRE ranged from 90.4% to 94.6% and Td ranged from 14.0 to 34.2 °C under various conditions at Tset = 300–450 °C. Finally, the results of the stability test demonstrated that the catalyst was very stable at various Ug values and various Tset values.

Shih-Wei Huang; Jie-Chung Lou; Yung-Chang Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Selective production of hydrogen for fuel cells via oxidative steam reforming of methanol over CuZnAl(Zr)-oxide catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel cell powered vehicles using hydrogen (H2) as a fuel are currently being developed in an effort to mitigate the emissions of green house gases such as CO2, NOx, and hydrocarbons. The H2 fuel is extracted from methanol onboard a vehicle by steam reforming of methanol (SRM) reaction. A considerable amount of CO is produced as a by-product, which is a poison to the Pt anode of the fuel cell. Very recently, we have demonstrated that a combined SRM and partial oxidation of methanol (POM), which we labeled as “oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM)” reaction is more efficient for the selective production of H2 relatively at a lower temperature of around 230°C over CuZnAl(Zr)-oxide catalysts derived from hydroxycarbonate precursors containing hydrotalcite (HT)-like layered double hydroxides (LDHs)/aurichalcite phases. There are several operating parameters such as catalyst composition, reaction temperature, O2/CH3OH and H2O/CH3OH molar ratios and methanol injection rate that are need to be optimized in order to produce H2 suitable for fuelling a fuel cell. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of these variable parameters on the catalytic performance over a series of CuZnAl- and CuZnAlZr-oxide catalysts. Our study indicated that among the CuZn-based catalysts, those containing Zr were the most active. The optimum O2/CH3OH and H2O/CH3OH molar ratios should be in the ranges 0.20–0.30 and 1.3–1.6, respectively, in order to achieve a better catalytic performance. Studies of the effect of methanol contact time on the catalytic performance over a Zr-containing catalyst revealed that the OSRM reaction proceeds through the formation of formaldehyde intermediate. CO was produced as a secondary product by the decomposition of formaldehyde and it is subsequently transformed into CO2 and H2 by the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction.

S Velu; K Suzuki; M.P Kapoor; F Ohashi; T Osaki

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment Using Catalyst/Zeolite-II-collaborative UAB/UA project funded by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an electrostatic diesel injector. Micro-Pilot Ignition Studies for Alternative Fueled Engines- five-year project with/without electrical heating and with/without secondary air injection. Alabama Alternative Fuel base, develop and disseminate alternative fuels information to Alabama citizens, and coordinate

Carver, Jeffrey C.

269

Activation of Pd-Ag Catalyst for Selective Hydrogenation of Acetylene via Nitrous Oxide Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of a large excess of ethylene has been investigated on the Pd-Ag catalyst under 60°C and a space velocity...?1.... It was found that an enhancement in the performance of...

Piyasan Praserthdam; Suphot Phatanasri…

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermodynamic stability and activity volcano for perovskite-based oxide as OER catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial for the development of electrochemical conversion technologies. Recent experiments show that perovskite transition-metal ...

Rong, Xi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effect of catalyst structure on oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane on alumina-supported vanadia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

catalysts: (a) ethane ODH, (b) propane ODH (663 K, 14 kPa CDehydrogenation of Ethane and Propane on Alumina-Supporteddehydrogenation of ethane and propane. UV-visible and Raman

Argyle, Morris D.; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

A single-cylinder diesel engine with an emissions control system - diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), Fe-zeolite selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF) - was used to perform accelerated thermal aging of the SCR catalyst. Cyclic aging is performed at SCR inlet temperatures of 650, 750 and 850 degrees C for up to 50 aging cycles. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated thermal aging protocol, a field-aged SCR catalyst of similar formulation was also evaluated. The monoliths were cut into sections and evaluated for NO{sub x} performance in a bench-flow reactor. While the rear section of both the field-aged and the accelerated engine-aged SCR catalysts maintained high NO{sub x}conversion, 75-80% at 400 degrees C, the front section exhibited a drastic decrease to only 20-35% at 400 degrees C. This two-tiered deactivation was also observed for field-aged samples that were analyzed in this study. To understand the observed performance changes, thorough materials characterization was performed which revealed two primary degradation mechanisms. The first mechanism is a general Fe-zeolite deterioration which led to surface area losses, dealumination of the zeolite, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal growth. This degradation accelerated above 750 degrees C, and the effects were generally more severe in the front of the catalyst. The second deactivation mechanism is linked to trace levels of Pt that are suspected to be volatizing from the DOC and depositing on the front section of the SCR catalyst. Chemical evidence of this can be seen in the high levels of NH{sub 3} oxidation (80% conversion at 400 degrees C), which coincides with the decrease in performance.

Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Foster, Adam [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W [ORNL; Jiao, Jian [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High performance robust F-doped tin oxide based oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts comprising compositions with significantly reduced amounts of expensive noble metal contents (e.g. IrO{sub 2}, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance to the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would signify a major breakthrough in hydrogen generation via water electrolysis. Development of such systems would lead to two primary outcomes: first, a reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, and second, attainment of the targeted hydrogen production costs (<$3.00/gge delivered by 2015) comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, by exploiting a two-pronged theoretical first principles and experimental approach herein, we demonstrate for the very first time a solid solution of SnO{sub 2}:10 wt% F containing only 20 at.% IrO{sub 2} [e.g. (Sn{sub 0.80}Ir{sub 0.20})O{sub 2}:10F] displaying remarkably similar electrochemical activity and comparable or even much improved electrochemical durability compared to pure IrO{sub 2}, the accepted gold standard in oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis. We present the results of these studies.

Datta, Moni Kanchan; Kadakia, Karan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Jampani, Prashanth H.; Chung, Sung Jae; Poston, James A.; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Kumta, Prashant N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Infrared spectroscopic studies of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a series of silica-supported copper catalysts in different oxidation states  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide (358-493 K, 0.1-20 kPa) on four copper-on-silica (2-10 wt% Cu) catalysts prepared by the ion-exchange technique. The measurements are made for each sample in three different states: unreduced (predominantly Cu{sup 2+}), and reduced (Cu{sup 0}), and partially reoxidized in nitrous oxide (Cu{sup +}). On unreduced samples, a major absorption band between 2127 and 2132 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO adsorbed on small CuO particles and a weak band at 2199 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO on isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions incorporated in the silica surface have been identified. The former adsorption obeys a Langmuir isotherm with a heat of adsorption of 29 kJ/mol independent of CuO particle size and surface coverage. After catalyst reduction, the major absorption band lies between 2090 and 2113 cm{sup {minus}1} and arises from CO linearly bound to very small (1- to 5-nm) copper metal clusters. The observed frequency shifts indicate the presence of steps and terraces similar to low index Cu planes in very small particles (1- to 2-nm), and the presence of similar higher index Cu planes on larger clusters (2- to 5-nm). The absorption is described by a Freundlich isotherm with the heat of CO adsorption decreasing with coverage from 50 to 22 kJ/mol on bigger particles but more constant (27 to 22 kJ/mol) on small particles. A surface copper/CO atomic ratio increasing from 5 to 12 is established at equilibrium saturation between 358 and 493 K using extinction coefficients determined in this study. In the reduced catalysts, a weakly adsorbed ({Delta}H{sub a} = {minus}20 kJ/mol) species assigned to CO bound to isolated Cu{sup +} ions is also found and absorbs at 2175 cm{sup {minus}1}. The frequency of this band does not vary with catalyst loading and is not affected by reoxidation of the catalyst in nitrous oxide.

Kohler, M.A.; Wainwright, M.S.; Trimm, D.L.; Cant, N.W. (Macquarie Univ., New South Wales (Australia) Univ. of South Wales (Australia))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthesis of Co oxide doped carbon aerogel catalyst and catalytic performance in heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co oxide doped carbon aerogel (Co/CA) was prepared, characterised by several techniques, and tested for heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution using oxone as an oxidant. For a comparison, homogeneous oxidation of phenol in Co2+/oxone was also investigated. It was found that homogeneous oxidation of phenol using Co2+/oxone was more effective than Co2+/H2O2 and homogeneous oxidation was faster than heterogeneous Co/CA–oxone. Heterogeneous oxidation of phenol in Co/CA–oxone system followed first order kinetics and the activation energy of the heterogeneous system was estimated to be 62.9 kJ/mol. Several factors influencing phenol degradation in the heterogeneous oxidation were studied. Co/CA loading played a more important role in phenol degradation than oxone concentration, and the presence of other organics in solution resulted in a lower phenol oxidation.

Yasnessya Hardjono; Hongqi Sun; Huyong Tian; C.E. Buckley; Shaobin Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reinforced nickel and nickel-platinum catalysts for performing the thermally coupled reactions of methane steam reforming and hydrogen oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation of composite nickel and nickel-platinum catalysts reinforced with steel gauze was studied. The catalysts were prepared by sintering powdered nickel metal and a supported nickel catalyst (GIAP-3 or N...

M. M. Danilova; Z. A. Sabirova; N. A. Kuzin; V. A. Kirillov…

279

Production of syngas via partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas over a Ni catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas (COG) to syngas was investigated on differently sized Ni catalysts in a fluidized-bed reactor. It was found that the catalytic performance of Ni depends strongly on its particle size. The small-sized Ni catalyst exhibited higher activity and higher selectivity in the partial oxidation of COG. The conversion of CH{sub 4} was kept at 80.7% at a lower temperature (750{sup o}C) and a wide space velocity (from 8000 to 80 000 h{sup -1}). CO{sub 2} reforming of COG is also an efficient route for syngas production. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the COG-derived syngas could be controlled by manipulating the concentration of O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} added in the feed. The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. 19 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Institute of Catalysis, Department of Chemistry

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microwave Regenerated DPF for Auxiliary Power Units and Diesel Hybrid Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Microwave regeneration of the DPF can be done without diesel fuel or a catalyst in less than 5 minutes with the engine off.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reduction of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust via Two-Step Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light duty diesel exhaust has been achieved over a broad temperature window by combining atmospheric plasma with appropriate catalysts. The technique relies on the addition of...

282

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of innovative Ce–Mn/Ti-pillared-clay (Ce–Mn/Ti-PILC) catalysts combining the advantages of PILCs and Ce–Mn were investigated for elemental mercury (Hg0) capture at 100–350 °C in the absence of HCl in the flue gas. ...

R. T. Yang; J. P. Chen; E. S. Kikkinides; L. S. Cheng; J. E. Cichanowicz

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Wet oxidation of phenol on Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalysts with 0.05 < x < 0.20 for catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in aqueous solutions have been synthesized using the coprecipitation method. The three most important synthesis parameters, the concentration of the mixed metal salt solution, the rate of coprecipitant addition and the stirrer speed during coprecipitation, were optimized with central composite design using the catalytic activity as a response function. The catalytic activity strongly depends on stirrer speed during coprecipitation. A high mutual dispersion of copper oxide and ceria, having the average crystallite size of about 9 nm, enhances solid solution formation. The unit cell parameter of ceria decreases when the overall concentration of copper in the catalyst increases, most probably obeying Vegard`s law. The catalysts proved to be very stable in hydrothermal reaction conditions at low pH values. After 5 h of reaction in the semibatch CST reactor less than 100 ppm of Cu was leached out of catalyst samples that were calcined in a flow of air for 2 h above 1033 K, and only a very low quantity of carbonaceous deposits were formed on the surface of the catalysts (0.6 wt%). The kinetics of phenol degradation could be interpreted by an equation valid for homogeneous autocatalytic reactions, in which the rate constant depends linearly on the heterogeneous catalyst (Cu) concentrations. This demonstrates that the reaction proceeds through a heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-branched chain mechanism.

Hocevar, S.; Batista, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering] [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering] [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bruce, Richard Catlow and Peter Edwards Catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel...durability in fuel cells is to discover catalyst supports that do not corrode, or corrode...black support. fuel cells|oxides|catalyst supports|nanoparticles|conductivity...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Study of mercury oxidation by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst in a pilot-scale slipstream reactor at a utility boiler burning bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

One of the cost-effective mercury control technologies in coal-fired power plants is the enhanced oxidation of elemental mercury in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) followed by the capture of the oxidized mercury in the wet scrubber. This paper is the first in a series of two in which the validation of the SCR slipstream test and Hg speciation variation in runs with or without SCR catalysts inside the SCR slipstream reactor under special gas additions (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 3}) are presented. Tests indicate that the use of a catalyst in a SCR slipstream reactor can achieve greater than 90% NO reduction efficiency with a NH{sub 3}/NO ratio of about 1. There is no evidence to show that the reactor material affects mercury speciation. Both SCR catalysts used in this study exhibited a catalytic effect on the elemental mercury oxidation but had no apparent adsorption effect. SCR catalyst 2 seemed more sensitive to the operational temperature. The spike gas tests indicated that HCl can promote Hg{sup 0} oxidation but not Cl{sub 2}. The effect of Cl{sub 2} on mercury oxidation may be inhibited by higher concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NO, or H{sub 2}O in real flue-gas atmospheres within the typical SCR temperature range (300-350{sup o}C). SO{sub 2} seemed to inhibit mercury oxidation; however, SO{sub 3} may have some effect on the promotion of mercury oxidation in runs with or without SCR catalysts. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bobby Chen; Jiang Wu; Hong Cui; John Smith; Chi-Kuan Chen; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia over Fe{sup 3+}-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Fe-exchanged TiO{sub 2}-pillared clay (PILC) catalysts were prepared and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by ammonia. They were also characterized for surface area, pore size distribution, and by XRD, H{sub 2}-TPR, and FT-IR methods. The Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts showed high activities in the reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen. SO{sub 2} further increased the catalytic activities at above 350 C, whereas H{sub 2}O decreased the activity slightly. The catalysts were about twice as active as commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Moreover, compared to the commercial catalyst, the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts had higher N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O product selectivities (e.g., 0--1% vs 9% N{sub 2}O at 400 C) and substantially lower activities (by 74--88%) for SO{sub 2} oxidation to SO{sub 3} under the same reaction conditions. The activity was further increased to over three times that of the vanadia-based catalyst when Ce was added. The high activity and low N{sub 2}O selectivity for the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were attributed to their low activity in the oxidation of ammonia, as compared with vanadia catalysts. XRD patterns of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC were similar to those of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, showing no peaks due to iron oxide, even when the iron content reached 20.1%. The TPR results indicated that iron in the Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts with lower iron contents existed in the form of isolated Fe{sup 3+} ions. The activities of Fe-TiO{sub 2}-PILC catalysts were consistent with their surface acidities, which were identified by FT-IR of the NH{sub 3}-adsorbed samples. The enhancement of activities by H{sub 2}O + SO{sub 2} was attributed to the increase of surface acidity resulting from the formation of surface sulfate species of iron.

Long, R.Q.; Yang, R.T. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

288

Catalyst systems and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

Ozkan, Umit S. (Worthington, OH); Holmgreen, Erik M. (Columbus, OH); Yung, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Basic metal oxides as cocatalysts for Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts in the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic behavior of Cu catalysts supported on ultrapure silica and promoted with Ca, Zn, and La oxides was investigated in the hydrogenation of CO and CO{sub 2} to methanol at high pressure. Cu on very pure silica produces hardly any methanol, while the addition of basic oxides and the use of {gamma}-alumina as support improve the catalyst performance. The strong promoting effect of Ca and La oxide on the silica-supported Cu and the weak promoting effect for alumina-supported Cu suggest that the basic oxide additives must be close to or in contact with the Cu particles to be effective in methanol synthesis. The methanol activity of Zn/Cu/SiO{sub 2} increased with increasing CO{sub 2} content in a CO-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture, suggesting that CO{sub 2} is the main carbon source for methanol.

Gotti, A.; Prins, R. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Oxidation of propylene in the presence of catalysts containing copper compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the very significant effect of temperature on catalytic activity, it seems appar? ent that energy transfer sometimes can be of extreme impor? tance, particularly in cases involving highly exothermic reactionso In these cases, failure to remove energy... of control of temperature that exothermic reactions produce? Catalyst behavior has been shown to depend upon many factors other than the chemical nature of the catalytically active agent? Factors such as surface area, crystalling structure, the physical...

Woodham, John Frank

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based and pillared interlayer clay-based catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated...

Oh, Hyuk Jin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comparison of lipid oxidation, iron catalysts, and flavor deterioration in beef, chicken, and pork  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to flavor deterioration in stored meat Reported studies indicate that susceptibility of muscle tissue to undergo lipid oxidation differs among meat animal species. However, the species effect is not consistent among research studies reported... to assess lipid oxidation. The objectives of this study were to compare lipid oxidation and flavor deterioration potential of beef, pork, and chicken muscles with the aforementioned experimental variables controlled. In addition, nonheme and heme iron...

Burchell, Lisa Michelle

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Diesel Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Diesel Vehicles and Manufacturers Audi A3 (TDI models) A6 (TDI models) A7 (TDI models) A8 L (TDI model) Q5 (TDI models) Q7 (TDI models) BMW 328d Sedan 328d xDrive Sedan 328d xDrive Sports Wagon 535d Sedan 535d xDrive Sedan Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel Mercedes-Benz E250 BlueTEC GL350 BlueTEC GLK250 BlueTEC ML350 BlueTEC Porsche Cayenne Diesel Volkswagen Beetle (TDI models) Beetle Convertible (TDI models) Golf (TDI models) Jetta (TDI models) Jetta Sportwagen (TDI models) Passat (TDI models) Touareg (TDI models) Diesel-Related Information

294

Activation of Noble Metals on Metal-Carbide Surfaces: Novel Catalysts for CO Oxidation, Desulfurization and Hydrogenation Reactions  

SciTech Connect

This perspective article focuses on the physical and chemical properties of highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions generated by depositing noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces. To rationalize structure-reactivity relationships for these novel catalysts, well-defined systems are required. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles periodic density-functional (DF) calculations have been used to study the interaction of metals of Groups 9, 10 and 11 with MC(001) (M = Ti, Zr, V, Mo) surfaces. DF calculations give adsorption energies that range from 2 eV (Cu, Ag, Au) to 6 eV (Co, Rh, Ir). STM images show that Au, Cu, Ni and Pt grow on the carbide substrates forming two-dimensional islands at very low coverage, and three-dimensional islands at medium and large coverages. In many systems, the results of DF calculations point to the preferential formation of admetal-C bonds with significant electronic perturbations in the admetal. TiC(001) and ZrC(001) transfer some electron density to the admetals facilitating bonding of the adatom with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, thiophene, etc.). For example, the Cu/TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) systems are able to cleave both S-O bonds of SO{sub 2} at a temperature as low as 150 K, displaying a reactivity much larger than that of TiC(001) or extended surfaces of bulk copper and gold. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC is able to dissociate O{sub 2} and perform the 2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2} reaction. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) surface displays an activity for the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS{sub x} catalysts. In general, the Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces. Thus, metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical reactivity of noble metals.

Rodriguez J. A.; Illas, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control  

SciTech Connect

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

An In-Situ XAS Study of the Structural Changes in a CuO-CeO2/Al2O3 Catalyst during Total Oxidation of Propane  

SciTech Connect

A CuOx-CeOx/Al2O3 catalyst was studied with in-situ transmission Cu K XAS for the total oxidation of propane as model reaction for the catalytic elimination of volatile organic compounds. The local Cu structure was determined for the catalyst as such, after pre-oxidation and after reduction with propane. The catalyst as such has a local CuO structure. No structural effect was observed upon heating in He up to 600 deg. C or after pre-oxidation at 150 deg. C. A full reduction of the Cu2+ towards metallic Cu0 occurred, when propane was fed to the catalyst. The change in local Cu structure during propane reduction was followed with a time resolution of 1 min. The {chi}(k) scans appeared as linear combinations of start and end spectra, CuO and Cu structure, respectively. However, careful examination of the XANES edge spectra indicates the presence of a small amount of additional Cu1+ species.

Silversmith, Geert; Poelman, Hilde; Poelman, Dirk; Gryse, Roger de [Ghent University, Department of Solid State Sciences, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Olea, Maria; Balcaen, Veerle; Heynderickx, Philippe; Marin, Guy B. [Ghent University, Laboratorium voor Petrochemische Techniek, Krijgslaan 281 S5, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3 ... (30, 31) To start the reaction, a Bunsen burner was used to heat the catalyst bed to its ignition temperature. ... for fuel-efficient, lean-burn vehicles, both diesel and spark-ignited. ...

Rainer J. Bass; Timothy M. Dunn; Yu-Chuan Lin; Keith L. Hohn

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Impact of the Fuel Molecular Structure on the Oxidation Process...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oxidation Process of Real Diesel fuels According to Storage Conditions and Biodiesel Content Impact of the Fuel Molecular Structure on the Oxidation Process of Real Diesel fuels...

300

Efficient and selective conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over metal exchanged heteropoly tungstate supported on tin oxide catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of Al exchanged heteropoly tungstate (AlTPA) supported on SnO2...catalysts were prepared and characterized by FT-Infrared, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed desorption of ammonia. The catalyst...

G. Raveendra; M. Srinivas; P. S. Sai Prasad…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EPA Diesel Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

engines - Diesel vehicles have been available in Europe for many years - Diesel market penetration increased significantly coincidental with new diesel technologies * Industry...

302

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Semiannual report, Apr 1, 1998--Oct 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823--900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures. The sorbents consisting of cerium oxide and copper oxide impregnated on alumina have been prepared and characterized. Their sulfation performance has been investigated in a TGA setup, studying mainly the effects of temperature and sorbent composition. The results of the sulfation experiments have been evaluated and presented in this report. A study to model the sulfation selectivity of the two constituents of the sorbents is also underway.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity  

SciTech Connect

The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on transition metal oxide catalysts for high temperature fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with its high energy conversion efficiency, low emissions, silent operation and its ability to utilize commercial fuels has the potential to create a large impact on the energy landscape. ...

La O', Gerardo Jose Cordova

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Autothermal oxidative pyrolysis of biomass feedstocks over noble metal catalysts to liquid products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two thermal processing technologies have emerged for processing biomass into renewable liquid products: pyrolysis and gasification/Fischer-Tropsch processing. The work presented here will demonstrate oxidative pyrolysis… (more)

Balonek, Christine Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Diesel Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Sprays Diesel Sprays Chris Powell and fuel spray xray beamline Christopher Powell, an engine research scientist, fits a specially designed X-ray pressure window to a high-pressure chamber used in diesel spray research. These windows allow Argonne researchers to use X-rays to probe diesel sprays under the high-density conditions found in diesel engines. Diesel sprays Diesel engines are significantly more fuel-efficient than their gasoline counterparts, so wider adoption of diesels in the U.S. would decrease the nationÂ’s petroleum consumption. However, diesels emit much higher levels of pollutants, especially particulate matter and NOx (nitrogen oxides). These emissions have prevented more manufacturers from introducing diesel passenger cars. Researchers are exploring ways to reduce pollution formation in the engine

307

Production of elemental sulfur and ammonium thiosulfate by the oxidation of H2S containing water vapor and ammonia over V/Zr-PILC catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of water and ammonia was studied over V2O5 supported on Zr-pillared clay catalysts (V/Zr-PILCs). The synthesized catalysts were examined using a variety of characterization techniques. A catalytic performance study using V/Zr-PILC catalysts showed that H2S was successfully converted to elemental sulfur and ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) without considerable emission of sulfur dioxide. The H2S conversion over V/Zr-PILCs increased with increasing the content of vanadia up to 6 wt.%. This superior catalytic performance might be related to the uniform dispersion of vanadia species on the Zr-PILC support.

Kanattukara Vijayan Bineesh; Moon-il Kim; Goo-Hwa Lee; Manickam Selvaraj; Kyu Hyun; Dae-Won Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pollution duality in turbocharged heavy duty diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engine designers are faced with increasingly stringent social demands to reduce emissions while maintaining high performance. Several strategies are considered, such as the advanced fuel system, the cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), the particulate filter, the NOx after-treatment, the oxidation catalyst, the advanced control techniques and the alternative combustion. These strategies have been tuned to achieve the lowest engine exhaust gas emissions. The major problem of diesel engine pollution is the NOx and soot formation. Their antagonistic evolution according to the air/fuel ratio is well-known, and requires a good compromise. In this article, a numerical investigation was carried out using the KIVA-3v code. The aim deals with the influence of some engine parameters on the performances and the pollutant (NOx-soot) formation of a turbocharged heavy duty direct injection diesel engine. The numerical simulations were achieved to capture independently the effects of engine operating parameters such as the fuel injection timing, the fuel injection duration, the piston bowl diameter and the EGR rate. The obtained results are discussed and some conclusions are developed.

M. Bencherif; A. Liazid; M. Tazerout

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Studies on the Surface Oxygen Species and the Catalytic Activity for CO Oxidation of La1-xSrxCo1-xMnxO3, a Perovskite-Type Oxides Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface oxygen distribution the active oxygen species for CO on the perovskite-type catalyst La1-xSrxCo1-xMnxO3...and its catalytic oxidation activity with CO as probe were investigated by means of XRD, TPD a...

Rong Li; Jiantai Ma; Jingli Xu; Xia Zhou…

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

311

Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and Other Reductants Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and Other Reductants 2004 Diesel Engine...

312

Enlaces Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enlaces Diesel Enlaces Diesel Los siguientes enlaces no son parte del sitio ahorremosgasolina.gov. Le ofrecemos estos enlaces externos para que a su conveniencia tenga acceso a informaciĂłn adicional que puede serle Ăştil o interesante para usted. VehĂ­culos y Fabricantes Diesel Audi A3 (modelos TDI) Q7 (modelos TDI) Mercedes-Benz Mercedes E350 BlueTEC Mercedes GL350 BlueTEC Mercedes ML350 BlueTEC Mercedes R350 BlueTEC Volkswagen Golf (modelos TDI) Jetta (modelos TDI) Jetta Sportwagen (modelos TDI) Touareg (modelos TDI) InformaciĂłn Sobre el Diesel Biodiesel Abundante informaciĂłn sobre el biodiesel proporcionada por el Centro de Datos de Combustibles Alternativos y VehĂ­culos Avanzados (AFDC) Mezclas de Biodiesel ĂŤcono de Adobe Acrobat Informe sobre el debate de las mezclas de biodiesel desarrollado por el programa de Ciudades Limpias del EERE.

313

Rhodium Catalysts in the Oxidation of CO by O2 and NO: Shape, Composition, and Hot Electron Generation  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that the activity, selectivity, and deactivation behavior of heterogeneous catalysts are strongly affected by a wide variety of parameters, including but not limited to nanoparticle size, shape, composition, support, pretreatment conditions, oxidation state, and electronic state. Enormous effort has been expended in an attempt to understand the role of these factors on catalytic behavior, but much still remains to be discovered. In this work, we have focused on deepening the present understanding of the role of nanoparticle shape, nanoparticle composition, and hot electrons on heterogeneous catalysis in the oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide. These reactions were chosen because they are important for environmental applications, such as in the catalytic converter, and because there is a wide range of experimental and theoretical insight from previous single crystal work as well as experimental data on nanoparticles obtained using new state-of-the-art techniques that aid greatly in the interpretation of results on complex nanoparticle systems. In particular, the studies presented in this work involve three types of samples: {approx} 6.5 nm Rh nanoparticles of different shapes, {approx} 15 nm Rh1-xPdx core-shell bimetallic polyhedra nanoparticles, and Rh ultra-thin film ({approx} 5 nm) catalytic nanodiodes. The colloidal nanoparticle samples were synthesized using a co-reduction of metal salts in alcohol and supported on silicon wafers using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. This synthetic strategy enables tremendous control of nanoparticle size, shape, and composition. Nanoparticle shape was controlled through the use of different organic polymer capping layers. Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by careful choice of metal salt precursors. Rh/TiO{sub x} and Rh/GaN catalytic nanodiodes were fabricated using a variety of thin film device fabrication techniques, including reactive DC magnetron sputtering, electron beam evaporation, and rapid thermal annealing. The combination of these techniques enabled control of catalytic nanodiode morphology, geometry, and electrical properties.

Renzas, James R.

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Study of Co/CeO2-?-Al2O3 catalysts for steam and oxidative reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cobalt catalysts supported on ?Al2O3, CeO2 and CeO2-?Al2O3 were prepared by the impregnation method and applied to steam and oxidative reforming of ethanol. The catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction with H2 (TPR-H2), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2-physisorption and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the ultra-violet visible range (DRS-UV–Vis). Steam reforming of ethanol was carried out at 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C with an ethanol/water feed in a molar ratio of 1:3. The oxidative reforming of ethanol was carried out at 500 °C with an ethanol/H2O/O2 feed in molar proportion 1:3:0.20. Analysis of the gaseous products showed that the Co/?Al2O3 and Co/CeO2-?Al2O3 catalysts were highly selective for H2 and CO2, and this was attributed to the high specific surface area of these catalysts. The addition of O2 to the feed improved the hydrogen selectivity and reduced the carbon formation on Co/?Al2O3, which suffered fast deactivation in the SRE reaction at low temperature.

Thaisa A. Maia; José M. Assaf; Elisabete M. Assaf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CHEMISTRY OF SO{sub 2} ON MODEL METAL AND OXIDE CATALYSTS: PHOTOEMISSION AND XANES STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution synchrotron based photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to study the interaction of SO{sub 2} with a series of metals and oxides. The chemistry of SO{sub 2} on metal surfaces is rich. At low coverages, the molecule fully decomposes into atomic S and O. At large coverages, the formation of SO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} takes place. The following sequence was found for the reactivity of the metals towards SO{sub 2}: Pt {approx} Rh < Ru < Mo << Zn, Sn, Cs. Alloying can be useful for reducing the chemical affinity of a metal for SO{sub 2} and controlling S poisoning. Pd atoms bonded to Rh and Pt atoms bonded to Sn interact weakly with SO{sub 2}. In general, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers of metal oxides. SO{sub 4} is formed on CeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on ZnO. On these systems there is no decomposition of SO{sub 2}. Dissociation of the molecule is observed after introducing a large amount of Ce{sup 3+} sites in ceria, or after depositing Cu or alkali metals on the oxide surfaces. These promote the catalytic activity of the oxides during the destruction of SO{sub 2}.

RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; JIRSAK,T.; CHATURVEDI,S.; HRBEK,J.; FREITAG,A.; LARESE,J.Z.

2000-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Influence of interactions between chromium and cerium on catalytic performances of CrO x –CeO2/Ti-PILC catalysts for deep oxidation of n-butylamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of CrO x –CeO2/Ti-PILC (PILC is pillared interlayered clay) catalysts for n-butylamine oxidation were prepared using an impregnation method, and the structures, surface ...

Shanshan Yang; Qinqin Huang; Renxian Zhou

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Crystalline titanate catalyst supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

On the mechanism of the reverse water gas shift reaction: Dynamic TAP reactor studies of the oxidizing capability of CO2 on a Au/CeO2 catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the oxidizing capability of CO2 on a Au/CeO2 catalyst L.C. Wang, M. Tahvildar Khazaneh, D. Widmann, and R the role of the redox mechanism, was investigated by exploring the activity of CO2 for Au assisted CeO2 that the surface reduced Au/CeO2 catalyst can be (partially) re-oxidized by exposure to CO2 pulses, and the surface

Pfeifer, Holger

319

Chelating agent assisted heat treatment of carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticle for use as cathode catalyst of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cobalt-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) have been successfully incorporated cobalt oxide (Co3O4) onto Vulcan XC-72 carbon powder by thermal decomposition of Co–ethylenediamine complex (ethylenediamine, NH2CH2CH2NH2, denoted en) at 850 °C. The catalysts were prepared by adsorbing the cobalt complexes [Co(en)(H2O)4]3+, [Co(en)2(H2O)2]3+ and [Co(en)3]3+ on commercial XC-72 carbon black supports, loading amount of Co with respect to carbon black was about 2%, the resulting materials have been pyrolyzed under nitrogen atmosphere to create CoOx/C catalysts, donated as E1, E2, and E3, respectively. The composite materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical compositions of prepared catalysts were determined using inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The catalytic activities for ORR have been analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction of E2 is superior to that of E1 and E3. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) containing the synthesized CoOx/C cathode catalysts were fabricated and evaluated by single cell tests. The E2 cathode performed better than that of E1 and E3 cathode. This can be attributed to the enhanced activity for ORR, in agreement with the composition of the catalyst that CoO co-existed with Co3O4. The maximum power density 73 mW cm?2 was obtained at 0.3 V with a current density of 240 mA cm?2 for E2 and the normalized power density of E2 is larger than that that of commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C-ETEK.

Chia-Hung Huang; Shyh-Jiun Liu; Weng-Sing Hwang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Mechanisms of Oxidation-Enhanced Wear in Diesel Exhaust Valves Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

322

Diesel Reforming for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

SciTech Connect

This objective of this project was to develop technology suitable for onboard reforming of diesel. The approach was to examine catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming.

Borup, R.; Parkinson, W. J.; Inbody, M.; Brosha, E.L.; Guidry, D.R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Diesel exhaust emissions from engines for use in underground mines  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data were obtained from two medium-duty diesel engines derated to qualify for use in underground mines. Gaseous and particulate emissions from these engines were measured and results provide information on the effect of exhaust treatment devices on the emissions. The devices in the study were a catalyst, a particulate trap, and an exhaust gas cooler of the water scrubber type. Emission levels of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were observed to be very low in comparison with emission levels of comparable engines in full-rated operation. Oxides of nitrogen and benzo(a)pyrene content of the exhaust also were found to be somewhat low in comparison with previous findings. For particulate reduction, the combination of a particulate trap and a scrubber was observed to be the most effective combination tried; in some cases, over 60% particulate reduction was effected by the trap-scrubber combination.

Eccleston, B.H.; Seizinger, D.E.; Clingenpeel, J.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Modified carbon-fiber material as a low-temperature catalyst for the oxidation of CO to CO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

The authors used a carbon-fiber material (CFM) as the base and study, the preparation structure, and properties of metal-carbon catalysts derived from this material. Cobalt, copper, manganese, chromium, nickel, and iron compounds supported on a nontextured CFM were used. Tables give the conditions for preparation of adsorption-active CFM containing Co, Mn, Ni, Cr, and Fe compounds as the active component. Another table shows that all the samples of adsorption-active CFM (with the exception of the iron-containing CFM) have catalytic activity. Other tables indicate that the activity of the synthesized catalysts depends significantly on the means of preparation. The authors report a new adsorption-active CFM having high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO to CO/sub 2/.

Morozova, A.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The effect of SnO{sub 2} addition to Li/MgO catalysts for the oxidative coupling of methane  

SciTech Connect

The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) to produce C{sub 2} hydrocarbons has been a subject of intense research during the past decade and will be especially important when the oil price shall be high. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of SnO{sub 2} addition to Li/MgO catalysts by using several characterization methods such as XPS, IR, and XRD. Activity measurements were carried out at 923 K, where the C{sub 2} yield over Li/MgO catalyst was rather low. The effect of SnO{sub 2} addition was analyzed by XPS with respect to the surface oxygen state and by XRD with respect to the bulk phase change.

Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Karasuda, Takashi; Aika, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Midori, Yokohama (Japan)] [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Midori, Yokohama (Japan)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Au/PO43-/TiO2 and PO43-/Au/TiO2 catalysts for CO oxidation: effect of synthesis details on catalytic performance  

SciTech Connect

Supported gold catalysts are active for CO oxidation, but the high-temperature deactivation is a shortcoming that may constrain their applications. Herein, we attempted to address this problem by using phosphate-doped Au/TiO{sub 2} synthesized via two routes. In route I, Au/PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by treating TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P25) with diluted H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, followed by loading gold via deposition-precipitation. In route II, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}/Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by treating H{sub 2}-reduced Au/TiO{sub 2} with diluted H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. These catalysts were systematically pretreated at 200 or 500 C before reaction testing. The overall CO conversion on 200 C-pretreated Au/PO43-/TiO2 or PO43-/Au/TiO2 was always lower than that on 200 C-pretreated Au/TiO2. However, the advantage of the phosphate addition became apparent after thermal treatment at a higher temperature. Both Au/PO43-/TiO2 and PO43-/Au/TiO2 pretreated at 500 C retained significant activities at room temperature, whereas 500 C-pretreated Au/TiO2 lost its activity. Control experiments and catalyst characterization were performed to investigate the impact of synthesis details on catalytic performance.

Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cleaning Up Diesel Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Mobile Sources Off-Road Diesel Equipment Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Diesel Ships, Trains PM 2.5 Emissions Trend PM 2.5 Emissions Trend California Emissions From the 2005...

328

Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

Govindasamy, Agalya [University of Cincinnati; Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Why is a Noble Metal Catalytically Active? The Role of the O-Ag Interaction in the Function of Silver as an Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive density-functional theory calculations, and taking into account temperature and pressure, afford a comprehensive picture of the behavior and interaction of oxygen and Ag(111), and provides valuable insight into the function of silver as an oxidation catalyst. The obtained phase diagram reveals the most stable species present in a given environment and thus identifies (and excludes) possibly active oxygen species. In particular, for the conditions of ethylene epoxidation, a thin oxidelike structure is most stable, suggesting that such atomic O species are actuating the catalysis, in contrast to hitherto proposed molecularlike species.

Wei-Xue Li; Catherine Stampfl; Matthias Scheffler

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide ... Studies at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute (ETH), Zurich, have produced results that, if confirmed by further research, could pose problems for the developers of catalytic converters that reduce emissions from diesel and leanburn gasoline engines. ... Use of low molecular weight olefins as reductants for selective removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases, either by bleeding the olefins into the exhaust stream or blending them into the fuel itself, has attracted the interest of engine makers and regulatory agencies. ...

JOSEPH HAGGIN

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pyrochem Catalysts for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the recipent of a 2011 Federal Laboratory Consortium award for "Excellence in Technology Transfer". NETL Technology Transfer techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact 2011 FLC...

332

Changes of hygroscopicity and morphology during ageing of diesel soot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soot particles are an important component of atmospheric aerosol and their interaction with water is important for their climate effects. The hygroscopicity of fresh and photochemically aged soot and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from diesel passenger car emissions was studied under atmospherically relevant conditions in a smog chamber at sub-and supersaturation of water vapor. Fresh soot particles show no significant hygroscopic growth nor cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Ageing by condensation of SOA formed by photooxidation of the volatile organic carbon (VOC) emission leads to increased water uptake and CCN activity as well as to a compaction of the initially non-spherical soot particles when exposed to high relative humidity (RH). It is important to consider the latter effect for the interpretation of mobility based measurements. The vehicle with oxidation catalyst (EURO3) emits much fewer VOCs than the vehicle without after-treatment (EURO2). Consequently, more SOA is formed for the latter, resulting in more pronounced effects on particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity. Nevertheless, the aged soot particles did not reach the hygroscopicity of pure SOA particles formed from diesel VOC emissions, which are similarly hygroscopic (0.06 H ? TDMA CCN

Torsten Tritscher; Zsófia Jurányi; Maria Martin; Roberto Chirico; Martin Gysel; Maarten F Heringa; Peter F DeCarlo; Berko Sierau; André S H Prévôt; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hydrotreating studies involving NiMo/silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-coated alumina catalysts  

SciTech Connect

For hydrotreating a petroleum-derived liquid feed at 400 C, LHSV = 2. 5 g/g{sub cat}/h, and 1500 psig hydrogen (H) pressure, both HDS and HDN activities were roughly equivalent for a name/TO:Si-coated Amocat catalyst and a commercial alumina-supported name catalyst (Amocat 1C). Superior HDN performance was exhibited by the name/TO: Si-coated Amocat catalyst at low H pressure (500 psig) and after H pressure cycling (1500-500-1500 psig) relative to Amocat 1C. Consistent with previous results obtained on a coal-derived liquid feed, the HDS/HDN results with the petroleum-derived liquid showed that the performance of the name/TO:Si-coated Amocat catalyst on an active metals weight basis exceeded the performance of Amocat 1C at all test conditions. The name/TO:Si-coated Amocat catalyst also showed potentially increased hydrogenation activity, increased resistance to deactivation, and increased yields of lower boiling point distillate fractions, although further work is needed.

Gardner, T.J.; Miller, J.E.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Trudell, D.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Experimental investigation of regulated and unregulated emissions from a diesel engine fueled with ultralow-sulfur diesel fuel blended with ethanol and dodecanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted on a four-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine using ultralow-sulfur diesel as the main fuel, ethanol as the oxygenate additive and dodecanol as the solvent, to investigate the regulated and unregulated emissions of the engine under five engine loads at an engine speed of 1800 rev min?1. Blended fuels containing 6.1%, 12.2%, 18.2% and 24.2% by volume of ethanol, corresponding to 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% by mass of oxygen in the blended fuel, were used. The results indicate that with an increase in ethanol in the fuel, the brake specific fuel consumption becomes higher while there is little change in the brake thermal efficiency. Regarding the regulated emissions, HC and CO increase significantly at low engine load but might decrease at high engine load, \\{NOx\\} emission slightly decreases at low engine load but slightly increases at high engine load, while particulate mass decreases significantly at high engine load. For the unregulated gaseous emissions, unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde increase but formaldehyde, ethene, ethyne, 1,3-butadiene and BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene) in general decrease, especially at high engine load. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) is found to reduce significantly most of the pollutants, including the air toxics.

C.S. Cheung; Yage Di; Zuohua Huang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Particle size effects of methylcyclopentane hydrogenolysis and SMSI in lanthanide oxide-supported 1%-platinum metal catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen- olysis at 250'C and 300'C on 1%-Pt/La 0 catalysts as a function of hydrogen reduction temperature. 105 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Recirculation ? batch reactor. . . . . . . . . . 30 2 Rates of ethylene hydrogenation on various catalysts... for calculations. The computer was inter- faced to a Micro-Term Co. ACT-5A display terminal, Digital Equipment Co. Model II DEC writer and two flexible disk drives. 4. Adsor tion S stem. Hydrogen and carbon monox- ide single point adsorptions were obtained...

Terhune, Kyte Hamilton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Catalyst Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

constrains on engine-out NOx emissions and allowing engines to be tuned for optimal fuel efficiency, cost and durability - Increases acceptance of clean diesel by the public....

337

Water Content in Biodiesel, Diesel, and Biodiesel–Diesel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Content in Biodiesel, Diesel, and Biodiesel–Diesel Blends ... In what concerns road transportation, biodiesel is being considered a good alternative to conventional diesels. ...

Patricia Bogalhos Lucente Fregolente; Leonardo Vasconcelos Fregolente; Maria Regina Wolf Maciel

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel...

339

Large Diesel Engine Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Centralized lubrication for slow-speed internal combustion engines ; Marine diesel engine lubrication ...

Hans Gaca; Jan Ruiter; Götz Mehr; Theo Mang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

displays a container of the diesel DeNOx catalyst, while Argonne researchers prepare to test it. NOx emissions represent one of a handful of the most abundant greenhouse gases that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comprehensive catalyst management  

SciTech Connect

From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

Pritchard, S. [Cormetech (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Synthesis of Ammonium Cyanate and Urea by Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Platinum, Rhodium, and Ruthenium Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E.G., RECOVERY OF NITROGEN...FIXATION OF ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN IN...as NO, the recovery of NO from...pre-vent condensation of solid NH4OCN...through the water-gas shift...results for the recovery of fixed nitrogen...catalyst. Water, 02, and...Presumably, near-atmospheric partial pressures...

R. J. H. VOORHOEVE; L. E. TRIMBLE; D. J. FREED

1978-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Influence of OH/metal ratio on the stability of alfe-pilc catalyst for wet peroxide oxidation of phenol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AlFe-pillared clay catalyst with OH/metal = 4; 5 mmol metal/g clay and Al : Fe = 5:5 swells intensively in phenol-water solution and has no measurable catalytic activity in phenol removal from water solutions,...

Ern? E. Kiss; Tatjana J. Vuli?…

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Annual technical report, September 30, 1993--September 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay catalyst was prepared for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} at above 300{degrees}C. The delaminated pillard clay was characterized by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) chemical analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction) structure and line broadening analyses, micropore size probing, and Moessbauer analysis. These analyses showed that the catalyst contained fragmented Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay forming {open_quotes}house-of-cards{close_quotes} structure with dispersed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles approximately 170 {angstrom} in size. The SCR activity of the delaminated pillard clay was higher than the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst, and also higher than the undelaminated pillard clay and supported Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, under conditions with SO{sub 2}. Infrared measurements of adsorbed NH{sub 3} showed strong Bronsted acidity which was caused possibly by interactions between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and clay.

Chen, J.P.; Hausladen, M.C.; Yang, R.T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CO Oxidation on Inverse CeOx/Cu(111) Catalysts: High Catalytic Activity and Ceria-Promoted Dissociation of O2  

SciTech Connect

A Cu(111) surface displays a low activity for the oxidation of carbon monoxide (2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2}). Depending on the temperature, background pressure of O{sub 2}, and the exposure time, one can get chemisorbed O on Cu(111) or a layer of Cu{sub 2}O that may be deficient in oxygen. The addition of ceria nanoparticles (NPs) to Cu(111) substantially enhances interactions with the O{sub 2} molecule and facilitates the oxidation of the copper substrate. In images of scanning tunneling microscopy, ceria NPs exhibit two overlapping honeycomb-type moire structures, with the larger ones (H{sub 1}) having a periodicity of 4.2 nm and the smaller ones (H{sub 2}) having a periodicity of 1.20 nm. After annealing CeO{sub 2}/Cu(111) in O{sub 2} at elevated temperatures (600-700 K), a new phase of a Cu{sub 2}O{sub 1+x} surface oxide appears and propagates from the ceria NPs. The ceria is not only active for O{sub 2} dissociation, but provides a much faster channel for oxidation than the step edges of Cu(111). Exposure to CO at 550-750 K led to a partial reduction of the ceria NPs and the removal of the copper oxide layer. The CeO{sub x}/Cu(111) systems have activities for the 2CO + O{sub 2} {yields} 2CO{sub 2} reaction that are comparable or larger than those reported for surfaces of expensive noble metals such as Rh(111), Pd(110), and Pt(100). Density-functional calculations show that the supported ceria NPs are able to catalyze the oxidation of CO due to their special electronic and chemical properties. The configuration of the inverse oxide/metal catalyst opens new interesting routes for applications in catalysis.

F Yang; J Graciani; J Evans; P Liu; J Hrbek; J Fdez. Sanz; J Rodriguez

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Renewable Diesel | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Renewable Diesel Renewable Diesel Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan....

347

Natta catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

\\¦nät-(¦)tä-\\ n. Any of several catalysts used in the stereospecific polymerization of olefins, ... .g., ethylene and propylene, particularly a catalyst made from titanium chloride and aluminum alkyl...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Natta Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

\\?nät-(?)tä-\\ n Any of several catalysts used in the stereospecific polymerization of olefins, ... .g., ethylene and propylene, particularly a catalyst made from titanium chloride and aluminum alkyl...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and...

350

Direct Atomic-Scale Observation of Redox-Induced Cation Dynamics in an Oxide-Supported Monolayer Catalyst: WOx/r-Fe2O3(0001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst: WOx/r-Fe2O3(0001) Zhenxing Feng, Chang-Yong Kim,§ Jeffrey W. Elam,| Qing Ma, Zhan Zhang catalysts for industrial processes.1 Typically, a catalyst exhibits greater activity as a monolayer (ML the structure of the catalyst affects chemical reactions, as, for example, in the proposed case

Mohseni, Hooman

351

Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x-ray spectroscopy EOR: Ethanol oxidation reaction EGOR:in catalysts for MOR, ethanol (EOR), and ethylene glycolreported as an alkaline EOR catalyst, often with activity

Alia, Shaun Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ethanol/gasoline blends over a silver/alumina catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Lean gasoline engines running on ethanol/gasoline blends and equipped with a silver/alumina catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ethanol provide a pathway to reduced petroleum consumption through both increased biofuel utilization and improved engine efficiency relative to the current stoichiometric gasoline engines that dominate the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. A pre-commercial silver/alumina catalyst demonstrated high NOx conversions over a moderate temperature window with both neat ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol. Selectivity to NH3 increases with HC dosing and ethanol content in gasoline blends, but appears to saturate at around 45%. NO2 and acetaldehyde behave like intermediates in the ethanol SCR of NO. NH3 SCR of NOx does not appear to play a major role in the ethanol SCR reaction mechanism. Ethanol is responsible for the low temperature SCR activity observed with the ethanol/gasoline blends. The gasoline HCs do not deactivate the catalyst ethanol SCR activity, but they also do not appear to be significantly activated by the presence of ethanol.

Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

STEM HAADF Image Simulation of the Orthorhombic M1 Phase in the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O Propane Oxidation Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A full frozen phonon multislice simulation of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images from the M1 phase of the Mo-V-Nb-Te-O propane oxidation catalyst has been performed by using the latest structural model obtained using the Rietveld method. Simulated contrast results are compared with experimental HAADF images. Good agreement is observed at ring sites, however significant thickness dependence is noticed at the linking sites. The remaining discrepancies between the model based on Rietveld refinement and image simulations indicate that the sampling of a small volume element in HAADF STEM and averaging elemental contributions of a disordered site in a crystal slab by using the virtual crystal approximation might be problematic, especially if there is preferential Mo/V ordering near the (001) surface.

D Blom; X Li; S Mitra; T Vogt; D Buttrey

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of NO by Hydrocarbons Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis...

355

Diesel prices flat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices flat The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel saw no movement from last week. Prices remained flat at 3.89 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly...

356

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.05 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

357

Diesel prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

358

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's down a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

359

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

360

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

362

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides; Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Work was done in three tasks during the first quarter. In Task 1, a new SCR reactor system has been built, complete with on-line GC and MS analyses. The GC is used to monitor the N{sub 2} product so the NO{sub x} > N{sub 2} conversion can be calculated. The MS is used to analyze the N{sub 2}0 concentration. In addition, a wet analytical technique has been established for SO{sub 3} analysis. The new SCR system and the SO{sub 3} analytical technique have been subjected to shakedown tests with success. Along with the existing SCR reactor system, there are now two systems that are being run independently. In Task 2, a procedure for the synthesis of stable Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} Pillared clay has been established. Inductive coupled plasma spectrometric analysis (ICP) has been used to analyze the chemical composition of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} Pillared clay. Preliminary results for the SCR activities of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} pillared clay are obtained in Task 3. The results show that the activities are near that of the commercial V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. However, the SO{sub 2}-to-SO{sub 3} conversion is substantially lower with the pillared clay catalyst, which could be an important advantage.

Chen, J.P.; Cheng, L.S.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

SciTech Connect

In the last Quarterly Technical Progress Report the authors reported the synthesis and (partial characterization) and SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO) activity for a delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-pillared clay (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC). The SCR activity for this PILC was substantially higher than that of the commercial-type V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst. During the past quarter, the authors first completed the characterization of the delaminated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PILC catalyst. Both physical characterization (micropore probing by adsorption and Moessbauer spectroscopy) and chemical characterization (by IR spectroscopy) were performed. Since the synthesis of this PILC sample was undertaken under a specific set of conditions and it is known that the PILC properties depend strongly on the synthesis conditions, they then proceeded to examine in a systematic manner the dependence of the catalytic properties of the PILC on its synthesis conditions. Four parameters in the synthesis were studied: Fe precursors, pH of the pillaring solution, concentration of the pillaring solution, and the starting clay. Finally, the effect of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoter on the SCR activity of the pillar clay was studied. Results are reported.

Chen, J.P.; Li, W.B.; Hausladen, M.C.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Yang, R.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reduction of particulate matter and gaseous emission from marine diesel engines using a catalyzed particulate filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engines are used widely as the power sources of coastal ships and international vessels primarily due to their high thermal efficiency, high fuel economy and durable performance. However, the gaseous and solid substances exhausted from diesel engines during the combustion process cause air pollution, in particular around harbor regions. In order to effectively reduce particulate matter and gaseous pollution emissions, a catalyzed particulate filter was equipped in the tail pipe of a marine diesel engine. The engine's performance and emission characteristics under various engine speeds and torques were measured using a computerized engine data control and acquisition system accompanied with an engine dynamometer. The effectiveness of installing a catalyzed particulate filter on the reduction of pollutant emissions was examined. The experimental results show that the exhaust gas temperature, carbon monoxide and smoke opacity were reduced significantly upon installation of the particulate filter. In particular, larger conversion of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide — and thus larger CO2 and lower CO emissions — were observed for the marine diesel engine equipped with a catalyzed particulate filter and operated at higher engine speeds. This is presumably due to enhancement of the catalytic oxidation reaction that results from an exhaust gas with stronger stirring motion passing through the filter. The absorption of partial heating energy from the exhaust gas by the physical structure of the particulate filter resulted in a reduction in the exhaust gas temperature. The particulate matter could be burnt to a greater extent due to the effect of the catalyst coated on the surface of the particulate filter. Moreover, the fuel consumption rate was increased slightly while the excess oxygen emission was somewhat decreased with the particulate filter.

Cherng-Yuan Lin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of Gaseous Sulphuric Acid on Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticle Formation and Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Gaseous Sulphuric Acid on Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticle Formation and Characteristics ... Diesel exhaust gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) concentrations and particle size distributions, concentrations, and volatility were studied at four driving conditions with a heavy duty diesel engine equipped with oxidative exhaust after-treatment. ... The submicrometer diesel exhaust particles are typically divided into two separate groups, which are frequently seen in exhaust particle number size distribution as separate modes, usually called as an accumulation or a soot mode and a nucleation mode. ...

Topi Rönkkö; Tero Lähde; Juha Heikkilä; Liisa Pirjola; Ulrike Bauschke; Frank Arnold; Hans Schlager; Dieter Rothe; Jaakko Yli-Ojanperä; Jorma Keskinen

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Oxygen Reactivity of Devolatilized Diesel Engine Particulates from Conventional and Biodiesel Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxygen Reactivity of Devolatilized Diesel Engine Particulates from Conventional and Biodiesel Fuels ... Abatement of diesel particulates has led to an overall decrease in the fuel efficiency of diesel engines, and overcoming these losses has been one of the more challenging problems in exhaust aftertreatment. ... (16-18) Establishing a general physical basis for modeling diesel particulate oxidation is especially challenging because of the large variations in microscopic structure that it can have. ...

Andrea Strzelec; Todd J. Toops; C. Stuart Daw

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

A study of Mo-modified Pd/MWCNT catalysts for ethanol oxidation in the alkaline solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of the modification of Pd-based electrocatalysts by molybdenum on the catalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation in the alkaline solution is investigated. ... the poison resistance of Pd-based nano...

Weimin Chen; Yu Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel May 19, 2006 - 10:46am Addthis Available free of Licensing Fees, Cleaner for the Environment WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it has developed, patented, and made commercially available reformulated diesel fuels which when used can reduce nitrogen oxides up to 10% and particulate matter up to 22% compared to those currently available. The diesel fuel formulations covered under this patent will be commercially available for use without licensing or royalty fees. This reformulated diesel fuel patent resulted from research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its subcontractors. "DOE's personnel continue to bring to the forefront technologies and

369

Light Induced Water Oxidation on Cobalt-Phosphate (Co-Pi) Catalyst Modified Semi-Transparent, Porous SiO2-BiVO4 Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A facile and simple procedure for the synthesis of semi-transparent and porous SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrodes is reported. The method involves a surfactant assisted metal-organic decomposition at 500 C. An earth abundant oxygen evolution catalyst (OEC), cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi), has been used to modify the SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrode by electrodeposition (ED) and photoassisted electrodeposition (PED) methods. Modified electrodes by these two methods have been examined for light induced water oxidation and compared to the unmodified SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrodes by various photoelectrochemical techniques. The PED method was a more effective method of OEC preparation than the ED method as evidenced by an increased photocurrent magnitude during photocurrent-potential (I-V) characterizations. Electrode surfaces catalyzed by PED exhibited a very large cathodic shift (420 mV) in the onset potential for water oxidation. The chopped-light I-V measurements performed at different intervals over 24-hour extended testing under illumination and applied bias conditions show a fair photostability for PED Co-Pi modified SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4}.

Pilli, S. K.; Deutsch, T. G.; Furtak, T. E.; Turner, J. A.; Brown, L. D.; Herring, A. M.

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx  

SciTech Connect

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

PILC-based monolithic catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by methane in oxygen excess  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work was the study and development of aluminum-pillared clay (Al-PILC)-based monolithic Pd catalysts for reducing \\{NOx\\} emissions from natural gas-fired power plants using methane as a selective reductant. During preparation of the support, the same raw material used to synthesize the pillared clays was used as a permanent inorganic binder. This confers high surface area and acidity to the extrudates, in addition to high hydrothermal resistance and mechanical strength. The influence of the method used for active phase incorporation on the physico-chemical properties and DeNOx activity and selectivity was studied. Conclusions were drawn from the use of different solution pH values and precursors in relation to the isoelectric point of the solid. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, and NH3 and CO chemisorption.

F. Mohino; P. Avila; P. Salerno; A. Bahamonde; S. Mendioroz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Catalytic studies of supported Pd-Au catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reaction conditions is the ultimate goal. This thesis is mainly focused on the application of Pd-Au supported catalysts for vinyl acetate synthesis and CO oxidation reactions using highsurface area catalysts. We have attempted to improve the conventional Pd...

Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel on three emission control devices: the diesel particulate filter, diesel oxidation catalyst, and zeolyte-based SCR catalyst

374

Stability of ruthenium catalysts supported by aerogel mixed oxides during the wet air oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in a continuous reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous catalytic wet air oxidation was investigated as a suitable treatment of p-hydroxybenzoic acid chosen as a phenolic compound typically found in olive mill wastewater. The reaction was conducted in a con...

Mohamed Triki; Anton Dafinov; Jordi Llorca…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Changes in the catalytic properties of a multicomponent molybdenum catalyst under vibro-fluidized catalyst bed conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activation effect of oxidative dehydrogenation of butene-l on a multicomponent molybdenum catalyst at various temperatures has been studied by ... only reactive but also adsorption properties of the catalyst surf...

A. V. Simakov; S. A. Veniaminov; W. Walkov…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Active oxygen species and mechanism for low-temperature CO oxidation reaction on a TiO{sub 2}-supported Au catalyst prepared from Au(PPh{sub 3})(NO{sub 3}) and as-precipitated titanium hydroxide  

SciTech Connect

The active oxygen species and mechanism for catalytic CO oxidation with O{sub 2} on a highly active TiO{sub 2}-supported Au catalyst (denoted as Au/Ti(OH){sub 4}{sup *}), which was prepared by supporting a Au-phophine complex on as-precipitated wet titanium hydroxide followed by calcination at 673 K, have been studied by means of oxygen isotope exchange, O{sub 2} temperature-programmed desorption (O{sub 2} TPD), electron spin resonance (ESR), and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Surface lattice oxygen atoms on the Au/Ti(OH){sub 4}{sup *} catalyst were inactive for oxygen exchange with O{sub 2} and CO and also for CO oxidation at room temperature. The surface lattice oxygen atoms were exchanged only with the oxygen atoms of CO{sub 2}, probably via carbonates. O{sub 2} did not dissociate to atomic oxygen on the catalyst. The catalyst showed a paramagnetic signal at g = 2.002 due to unpaired electrons trapped at oxygen vacancies mainly at the surface. O{sub 2} adsorbed on the oxygen vacancies to form superoxide O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} with g{sub 1} = 2.020, g{sub 2} = 2.010, and g{sub 3} = 2.005, which are characteristic of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} with an angular arrangement. Upon CO exposure, all the adsorbed oxygen species disappeared. The mechanism for the catalytic CO oxidation on the active Au/Ti(OH){sub 4}{sup *} catalyst is discussed in detail and compared with mechanisms reported previously.

Liu, H.; Kozlov, A.I.; Kozlova, A.P.; Shido, Takafumi; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reduction of NOx emission on NiCrAl-Titanium Oxide coated direct injection diesel engine fuelled with radish (Raphanus sativus) biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the experimental investigation of single cylinder DI diesel engine with and without coating. Diesel and radish (Raphanus sativus) oil Methyl Ester are used as fuels and the results are compared to find the effect of biodiesel in a thermal barrier coating engine. For this purpose engine cylinder head valves and piston crown are coated with 100??m of nickel-chrome-aluminium bond coat and 450??m of TiO2 by the plasma spray method. Radish oil methyl ester is produced by the transesterification process method. From the experimental investigation slight increase in specific fuel consumption in thermal barrier coating engine is observed when compared with the uncoated engine whereas NOx HC Smoke and CO emissions decreased with coated engine for all test fuels used in the coated engine when compared with that of the uncoated engine.

V. Ravikumar; D. Senthilkumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Single-Site Vanadyl Activation, Functionalization, and Reoxidation Reaction Mechanism for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on the Cubic V4O10 Cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and mixed metal oxide (MMO) catalysts for selective oxidation and ammoxida- tion of propene to acrolein

Goddard III, William A.

379

Low emissions diesel fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ED-XAS Data Reveal In-situ Time-Resolved Adsorbate Coverage on Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts during Propane Dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

Energy-Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (ED-XAS) data combined with UV/Vis, Raman, and mass spectrometry data on alumina- and silica-supported molybdenum oxide catalysts under propane dehydrogenation conditions have been previously reported. A novel {delta}{mu} adsorbate isolation technique was applied here to the time-resolved (0.1 min) Mo K-edge ED-XAS data by taking the difference of absorption, {mu}, at t>1 against the initial time, t=0. Further, full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF 8.0 code are performed to interpret the {delta}{mu} signatures. The resulting difference spectra and interpretation provide real time propane coverage and O depletion at the MoOn surface. The propane coverage is seen to correlate with the propene and/or coke production, with the maximum coke formation occurring when the propane coverage is the largest. Combined, these data give unprecedented insight into the complicated dynamics for propane dehydrogenation.

Ramaker, David; Gatewood, Daniel [Department of Chemistry, George Washington University, Washington D.C. 20052 (United States); Beale, Andrew M.; Weckhuysen, Bert M. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Dept. of Chem., Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Marine Diesel Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine diesel engines need reserve power to compensate for ... and decreased efficiency of the engine caused by wear and contamination. Minimum efficiency reserves must be...

Michael Palocz-Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Fuel Pump Components History WHAT WE PAY FOR IN A GALLON OF DIESEL FUEL Mon-yr Retail Price (Dollars per gallon) Refining (percentage) Distribution & Marketing (percentage)...

383

Comment on “Hysteresis phenomena in CO catalytic oxidation system in the presence of inhomogeneities of the catalyst surface”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scrutinizing the Monte Carlo algorithm, used by D.-Y. Hua and Y.-Q. Ma [Phys. Rev. E 66, 066103 (2002)] in order to simulate the effect of defect sites on bistable kinetics of CO oxidation on single-crystal surfaces, we show that in their study (i) the rules for describing CO adsorption, desorption, and surface diffusion contradict the detailed balance principle and (ii) the ratio of the rates of CO diffusion and reaction between adsorbed CO and O species is opposite compared to that observed in reality.

V. P. Zhdanov

2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimization of combustion bowl geometry for the operation of kapok biodiesel – Diesel blends in a stationary diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this research work is to optimize the combustion bowl geometry of a single cylinder stationary diesel engine for the effective operation of KME (kapok methyl ester) – diesel blends. Considering that the reported design modification would render the benefit of adaptation of higher blends of KME, in this study, two different combustion chamber geometries such as TRCC (trapezoidal combustion chamber) and TCC (toroidal combustion chamber) were chosen in addition to the convention design of HCC (hemispherical combustion chamber). In the experimental investigation, suitable blends such as B25 (25% KME + 75% diesel), B50 (50% KME + 50% diesel), B75 (75% KME + 25% diesel) and B100 (100% KME) were tested in a diesel engine with various combustion chamber geometries as mentioned above. Based on the results obtained from this study, TCC was shown to exhibit better performance and emission than TRCC and HCC for all test blends. Further, when compared to diesel, B25 and B50 were found to be the optimum blends with HCC and TCC, respectively, while TRCC seldom evinced better engine characteristics for any of the blends. Categorically, B50 showed a 5.2% increase in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) than diesel with TCC, whereas emissions such as CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke were reduced by 15.7% and 7.8%, respectively, with a comparable NOX (nitrogen oxides) emission with diesel. Similarly, combustion for B50 with TCC was found to be better than diesel, manifesting an increase in maximum heat release rate that that of diesel. Conclusively, from the experimental study, TCC was recognized as an ideal choice of combustion chamber design for the operation of blends up to B50 in a diesel engine.

S. Vedharaj; R. Vallinayagam; W.M. Yang; C.G. Saravanan; P.S. Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new computational tools that will guide the formulation of novel heterogeneous catalyst materials. An important class of reactions involving CO hydrogenation and oxidation...

386

Surface characterization studies of TiO2 supported manganese oxide catalysts for low temperature SCR of NO with NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCR of NO with NH3 Padmanabha Reddy Ettireddy a , Neeraja Ettireddy a , Sergey Mamedov b , Punit-impregnation method for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia as a reductantO2 supported catalysts for low temperature SCR reaction at catalyst bed temperature 175 8C under

Boolchand, Punit

387

Diesel engine reference book  

SciTech Connect

This book is a reference on the design, operation, and maintenance of all types of diesel engines, ranging from the smallest automotive and ancillary engines to the largest marine diesels. Nearly 900 line drawings, graphs and photos illustrate the book. Major Sections: Theory; Engine Design Practice; Lubrication; Environmental Pollution; Crankcase Explosions; Engine Types; Engine Testing; Maintenance; Index.

Lilly, I.R.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect

Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ? To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ? ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ? PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ? The findings suggest that ELF has a protective role against PM. ? The synthetic ELF system could reduce the use of animals in PM-driven ROS testing.

Chuang, Hsiao-Chi [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hui-Hsien [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Understanding the Distributed Intra-Catalyst Impact of Sulfation on Water Gas Shift in a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Lean NOx Trap catalyst is an aftertreatment technology for abatement of nitrogen-oxide emissions from lean-burn vehicle engines.

390

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Argonne Transportation - Diesel Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti Recent DOE Award winners, (L-R) Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti, stand in front of their fuel spray injection chamber. Using the synchrotron beam at the APS, the team is able to probe the fuel spray and study the process of combustion. A team of Argonne scientists (Jin Wang, Steve Ciatti, Chris Powell, and Yong Yue) recently won the 2002 National Laboratory Combustion and Emissions Control R&D Award for groundbreaking work in diesel fuel sprays. For the first time ever, the team used x-rays to penetrate through gasoline and diesel sprays and made detailed measurements of fuel injection systems for diesel engines. This technology uncovered a previously unknown

392

Diesel fuel oils, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1980 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute. Tests of 192 samples of diesel fuel oils from 95 refineries throughout the country were made by 28 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the four types of diesel fuels for the years 1960-1980. Summaries of the results of the 1980 survey, compared with similar data for 1979, are shown.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Catalyst performance of novel Pt/Mg(Ga)(Al)O catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation Georges Siddiqi, Pingping Sun, Vladimir Galvita, Alexis T. Bell *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst performance of novel Pt/Mg(Ga)(Al)O catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation Georges Siddiqi dehydrogenation Pt Hydrotalcite a b s t r a c t The dehydrogenation of ethane and propane using a Pt catalyst supported on a novel Mg(Ga)(Al)O mixed oxide support was investigated. Catalyst performance is strongly

Bell, Alexis

394

High-energy mechanical synthesis of nanophase fluorite-structured mixed oxide catalysts with a high redox activity  

SciTech Connect

A series of nanostructured, highly defective, ternary solid solutions containing CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and MnO{sub 2} or CuO were prepared by high-energy mechanical milling of individual components. Morphological and redox properties were studied by XRD, HRTEM and temperature-programmed reduction techniques. It was shown that the introduction of small amounts of copper and manganese strongly promotes the redox behavior of cerium at lower temperatures in comparison with CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}. High temperature treatment of up to 1,400 K was also shown to further promote overall redox capacity without affecting low-temperature redox behavior. Moreover, evidence is provided to show that Cu and Mn are dissolved within the CeO{sub 2} lattice structure. Addition of dopants enhances catalytic redox properties in the oxidation of CO at low temperatures, which is associated with the high concentration of oxygen vacancies that form on the introduction of aliovalent elements into the ceria-zirconia lattice.

Primavera, A.; Trovarelli, A.; Terribile, D.; Leitenburg, C. de; Dolcetti, G. [Univ. di Udine (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche; Llorca, J. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Catalyst for methanol synthesis: Preparation and activation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase composition and structure of the initial and reduced forms of the copper-zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are discussed. The mechanism of the process is discussed.

T. M. Yurieva

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

398

Diesel Technology - Challenges & Opportunities for North America  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

diesel entries Passenger car and Class 1 truck diesel sales fall off quickly as diesel fuel price advantage disappears, overall fuel costs drop, and fuel rationing ceases ...

399

(1) Elements of Diesel Engineering: (2) Diesel and other Internal-Combustion Engines: (3) Diesel Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... publications arising from its importance from scientific, technical and commercial points of view, the Diesel ...

1937-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Experimental investigation on thermal barrier coated diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-ethanol-diethyl ether blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work diesel-biodiesel-ethanol (DBE) and diesel-biodiesel-diethyl ether (DBD) fuels are tested with normal diesel engine and the diesel engine coated with the layers of aluminum oxide (Al 2O3) of 0.3?mm and yttria-stabilized zirconia of 0.2?mm. The various performance and emission parameters are analyzed and determined. The experimental work was carried out in a single cylinder water cooled engine coupled with eddy current dynamometer. The AVL make five gas analyzer and smoke meter were used to measure the different exhaust pollutants. The result shows that the brake thermal efficiency of coated engine is more than that of base diesel at high loads. The thermal barrier coated engine using fuel as diesel biodiesel and ethanol (TDBE) produces the lowest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions among all the fuels that are selected. In addition it produces the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) at higher loads. Both the thermal barrier coated engine using fuel as diesel biodiesel and diethyl ether (TDBD) and TDBE have higher NOx emissions among almost all the fuels used. The TDBE and TDBD have higher smoke emissions at initial loads but eventually show lower smoke emissions at higher loads. The thermal barrier coated diesel engine fueled with DBE and DBD shows an increase in engine power and specific fuel consumption as well as significant improvements in exhaust gas emissions except NOx.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Improved catalyst loading reduces guard reactor fouling  

SciTech Connect

A new catalyst-loading strategy reduced the fouling tendency of the gas oil hydrotreater guard reactors at Syncrude Canada Ltd.'s heavy-crude upgrading facilities. Studies conducted on the guard reactors were designed to determine the thermal stability of the coker gas oil and to understand the properties of the fouling material. Small particles (described as fines) were present in the upper section of the removed catalyst bed. This part of the bed was then replaced in one of three ways. One way was to replace the catalyst with used, nonregenerated catalyst, and cover the catalyst with nonactive support balls, 10 and 13 mm in diameter. The second way was to fill the entire space with nonactive support balls, and the third way was to fill with regenerated oxidic catalyst combined with semiactive support balls (unsulfided).

Sanford, E.C.; Kirchen, R.P. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton (CA))

1988-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Characterization and catalytic performance of vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-PILC catalysts issued from different Ti-precursors in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-pillared clay catalysts (STi-PILCs) issued from different Ti-precursors were investigated for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2. The STi-PILC...

J. Arfaoui; L. Khalfallah Boudali; A. Ghorbel; G. Delahay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A combined ToF-SIMS and XPS study for the elucidation of the role of water in the performances of a Post-Plasma Process using LaMnO3+? as catalyst in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract LaMnO3+? which is an environment-friendly and inexpensive material has been previously used as catalyst in Post-Plasma Catalysis (PPC) in the total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) which is a solvent widely used in dry cleaning and degreasing processes. It has been shown that the process efficiency increases in moist air (RH = 18%).The issue we want to address herein is the effect of water on the location of chlorine at the surface of the catalyst as chlorine is able to alter the catalyst structure, activity and stability. Therefore, a combined Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) study has been carried out on the fresh LaMnO3+? catalyst (LM) and used catalysts after performing PPC with TCE diluted in dry synthetic air (LM0) or with industrial air containing water (LM18; 18 stands for the Relative Humidity) and CO2 (about 560 ppmv) at a temperature of 150 °C. XPS and ToF-SIMS results both show the presence of chlorine on the tested catalysts whose amount increases by exposure of the catalyst to the reactive mixture in dry synthetic air. XPS results reveal that chlorine is present as both chloride ion and covalent chlorine on LM0 while organic chlorinated residues are absent on LM18 catalyst. ToF-SIMS study indicates that lanthanum excess as oxide(hydroxide) partially covering the perovskite mainly transforms into LaOCl and to a minor extent into LaCl3. Extent of Mn chlorination seems to be favored over LM0 having a higher MnClx±/MnOCl± ionic ratio compared to LM18. Furthermore ToF-SIMS clearly identifies C1 chlorinated organic ions, mainly CH2Cl+ and CHCl2?, on LM0 which may contribute to the XPS Cl organic component. From the combined ToF-SIMS and XPS results it is found that water delays the surface degradation extent of the perovskite into related (oxy)(hydroxy)chlorinated inorganic phases by less molecular chlorine and related chlorine species on the catalyst surface. A reaction scheme of Cl removal over LaMnO3+? emphasing the role of water is given taking into account the detection of ToF-SIMS ions representative of the successive Mn intermediate states. As a consequence water allows tuning the degradation pathways of the main intermediate of the reaction, dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC), which decomposes to give phosgene, \\{HCCl3\\} and \\{CCl4\\} by a successive Cl incorporation over (oxy)(hydroxy)chorinated perovskite or/and Mn species while \\{COx\\} species are likely formed over the perovskite.

N. Nuns; A. Beaurain; M.T. Nguyen Dinh; A. Vandenbroucke; N. De Geyter; R. Morent; C. Leys; J.-M. Giraudon; J.-F. Lamonier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity  

SciTech Connect

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

What Makes a Good Catalyst for the Deacon Process?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic activity is to a large extent determined by the binding strength of the reaction intermediates to the catalyst’s surface (Sabatier principle). ... Therefore, a single metal oxide catalyst may not be improved according to the calculations performed in Norskov’s group. ... Reactor parameters that we have investigated in detail include the oxidizer and chlorinator temps., the catalyst circulation rate and its residence time in each fluidized-bed reactor, the HCl/O2 ratio in the oxidizer feed, and the fluid velocities in both reactors. ...

Herbert Over; Reinhard Schomäcker

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

Advanced diesel combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future emission norms will further reduce the vehicle emissions of diesel engines. To meet the goal of achieving these stringent limits while maintaining attractive attributes of marketability, the combustion ...

Dirk Adolph; Hartwig Busch; Stefan Pischinger; Andreas Kolbeck…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

diesel.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

differences, whereas stationary series can be estimated in level form. The unit root test could not reject the hypothesis that the retail and spot diesel fuel price series have...

408

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels ... The reforming efficiency was dependent on the fuel type and followed the general trend of bioethanol > rapeseed methyl ester > low-sulfur diesel fuel. ... The use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in diesel engines reduces nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions but results in an increased release of smoke and particulate matter (PM), as well as higher fuel consumption. ...

A. Tsolakis; A. Megaritis; S. E. Golunski

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Making premium diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect

For refiners, extra processing and blending is a practical, though not always easy, option for improving diesel fuel properties; however, it entails compromises. For example, ignition quality can be improved by including more paraffins, but this negatively impacts the required low-temperature operability properties. Another example is adding aromatics to increase the diesel`s Btu value, but aromatics burn poorly and tend to cause smoking. Due to these and other types of diametrical trade-offs, the scope of distillate processing and fuels blending at the refinery is often very limited. Therefore, fuel additives are rapidly becoming the only alternative for obtaining the superior quality necessary in a premium diesel fuel. If stabilizers, dispersants and other fuel additive components are used in the additive package, the product can be marketed as a premium diesel fuel additive. Engines using this additive-treated fuel will consistently have less emissions, produce optimum power from the fuel energy conversion process and perform to design specifications. And the user will truly have a premium diesel fuel. The paper discusses detergent additives, cetane or ignition improvers, fuel stabilizers, cold weather additives, and lubricity additives.

Pipenger, G. [Amalgamated Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Substrate Studies of an Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...

412

Characterization and analysis of diesel exhaust odor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization and analysis of diesel exhaust odor ... Carbonyl and Nitrogen Dioxide Emissions From Gasoline- and Diesel-Powered Motor Vehicles ...

Patricia A. Partridge; Francis J. Shala; Nicholas P. Cernansky; Irwin H. Suffet

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure in Genotoxicity Studies to Support Engineering Development of Emission Controls Preserving Diesel Exhaust...

414

Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at low temperatures

415

New life for old catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Technology originally developed in Europe is now being optimized to make an attractive catalyst rejuvenation option even better. SCR-Tech undertook a study with American Electric Power (AEP) and Southern Company to quantify the primary effects of five independent factors in SCR-Tech's catalytic regeneration process on the rate of CO{sub 2} oxidation. The study demonstrated the process could minimise CO{sub 2} conversion while maximising the restoration of NOx reduction activity. The team developed statistically valid linear models for SO{sub 2} conversion (K{sub 23}) on both honeycomb and plate catalyst as a function of controlled regeneration process parameters. 1 fig., 1 photo.

Cooper, M. [SCR-Tech (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Catalyst for hydrotreating carbonaceous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for denitrogenating and desulfurating carbonaceous liquid such as solvent refined coal includes catalytic metal oxides impregnated within a porous base of mostly alumina with relatively large pore diameters, surface area and pore volume. The base material includes pore volumes of 0.7-0.85 ml/g, surface areas of 200-350 m.sup.2 /g and pore diameters of 85-200 Angstroms. The catalytic metals impregnated into these base materials include the oxides of Group VI metals, molybdenum and tungsten, and the oxides of Group VIII metals, nickel and cobalt, in various combinations. These catalysts and bases in combination have effectively promoted the removal of chemically combined sulfur and nitrogen within a continuous flowing mixture of carbonaceous liquid and hydrogen gas.

Berg, Lloyd (Bozeman, MT); McCandless, Frank P. (Bozeman, MT); Ramer, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reduction in (pro-)inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed in vitro to diesel exhaust treated with a non-catalyzed diesel particle filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Increasingly stringent regulation of particulate matter emissions from diesel vehicles has led to the widespread use of diesel particle filters (DPFs), the effect of which on exhaust toxicity is so far poorly understood. We exposed a cellular model of the human respiratory epithelium at the air-liquid interface to non-catalyzed wall-flow DPF-filtered diesel exhaust and compared the resulting biological responses to the ones observed upon exposure to unfiltered exhaust. Filtered diesel exhaust acted highly oxidative, even though to a lesser extent than unfiltered exhaust (quantification of total reduced glutathione), and both exhaust types triggered comparable responses to oxidative stress (measurement of heme-oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) and superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) gene expression). Further, diesel exhaust filtration significantly reduced pro-inflammatory responses (measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression and quantification of the secretion of their gene products TNF-? and IL-8). Because inflammatory processes are central to the onset of adverse respiratory health effects caused by diesel exhaust inhalation, our results imply that \\{DPFs\\} may make a valuable contribution to the detoxification of diesel vehicle emissions. The induction of significant oxidative stress by filtered diesel exhaust however, also implies that the non-particulate exhaust components also need to be considered for lung cell risk assessment.

Sandro Steiner; Jan Czerwinski; Pierre Comte; Loretta L. Müller; Norbert V. Heeb; Andreas Mayer; Alke Petri-Fink; Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

Gorte, Raymond J.

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

Numerical Modeling and Experimental Study of Combustion and Soot Formation in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling and Experimental Study of Combustion and Soot Formation in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine ... The major problems associated with diesel engines are the high levels of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and particulate emissions. ... (11)?Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H. Fundamentals of Air Pollution Engineering; Prentice Hall Inc.:? New York, 1988. ...

T. L. Chan; X. B. Cheng

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Just the Basics: Diesel Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today's direct-injection diesel Today's direct-injection diesel engines are more rugged, powerful, durable, and reliable than gasoline engines, and use fuel much more efficiently, as well. Diesel Engines Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Diesels are workhorse engines. That's why you find them powering heavy- duty trucks, buses, tractors, and trains, not to mention large ships, bulldozers, cranes, and other construction equipment. In the past, diesels fit the stereotype of muscle-bound behe- moths. They were dirty and sluggish, smelly and loud. That image doesn't apply to today's diesel engines, however, and tomorrow's diesels will show even greater improvements. They will be even more fuel efficient, more flexible in the fuels they can use, and also much cleaner in emissions. How Diesel Engines Work

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to its highest average since September at 3.95 a gallon. That's up 4.7 cents from a week...

422

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's up 7-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based...

423

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.98 a gallon. That's up 2.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

424

Experimental and numerical analysis of transport phenomena in an internal indirect fuel reforming type Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Ni/SDC as a catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental and numerical studies on the fuel reforming process on an Ni/SDC catalyst. To optimize the reforming reactors, detailed data about the entire reforming process is required. In the present paper kinetics of methane/steam reforming on the Ni/SDC catalyst was experimentally investigated. Measurements including different thermal boundary conditions, the fuel flow rate and the steam-to-methane ratios were performed. The reforming rate equation derived from experimental data was implemented in into numerical model which was numerically solved in order to discuss this process in details.

G Brus; S Kimijima; J S Szmyd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

SciTech Connect

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Diesel fuel oils, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1982 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Tests of 184 samples of diesel fuel oils from 83 refineries throughout the country were made by 27 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the four types of diesel fuels for the years 1960 to 1982. Summaries of the results of the 1982 survey, compared with similar data for 1981, are shown in Tables 1 through 4 of the report. A summary of 1-D and 2-D fuels are presented in Tables 5 and 6 respectively.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Diesel fuel oils, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1981 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Tests of 160 samples of diesel fuel oils from 77 refineries throughout the country were made by 26 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the four types of diesel fuels for the years 1960 to 1981. Summaries of the results of the 1981 survey, compared with similar data for 1980, are shown.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

new catalysts, this research program will also target other issues crucial to PEMFC cathode electrocatalysis: novel electrode structures; catalyst durability meeting the...

429

Soybean Oil as Diesel Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soybean Oil as Diesel Fuel ... TESTS are reported from Japan on the use of soybean oil as Diesel fuel in a 12-horsepower engine of 150-mm. ... This trouble was overcome by passing through some of the Diesel cooling water to heat the fuel tank and supply line. ...

C.H.S. TUPHOLME

1940-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nickel-Borate Oxygen-Evolving Catalyst that Functions under Benign Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin catalyst films with electrocatalytic water oxidation properties similar to those of a recently reported Co-based catalyst can be electrodeposited from dilute Ni2+ solutions in borate electrolyte at pH 9.2 (Bi). The ...

Nocera, Daniel G.

431

Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions of a Diesel Engine From Various Biodiesel Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, vegetable oils, or recycled restaurant grease with alcohol and catalyst, is gaining popularity in recent years as a substitute for petroleum diesel. Ninety percent (90%) of U.S. biodiesel industry makes use of soybean oil as its feedstock. However, soybean...

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Ultralow platinum-loading PtPdRu@PtRuIr/C catalyst with excellent CO tolerance and high performance for the methanol oxidation reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalysts of Pd4%Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%@Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%Pt2%@Pt8%Ru5%Ir2%/C, and Pd4%Pt2%Ru2%@Pt8%Ru3%Ir2%/C were referred to as PDRI, D@PRI, PD@PRI, and PDR...

Yan-Ni Wu; Shi-Jun Liao; Hai-Fu Guo; Xiang-Ying Hao; Zhen-Xing Liang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Process evaluation - steam reforming of diesel fuel oil. Final technical report 24 Apr-24 Dec 79 on phases 1-4  

SciTech Connect

This project is an evaluation of a proprietary catalyst as a means of steam-reforming diesel fuel oil (Fed. Spec. VV-F-800B, symbol DF-2). A system for testing the catalyst has been designed, built and successfully used to screen operating conditions of temperature, space velocity, and H2O/C ratio. A duration test has been conducted showing the catalyst capable of steam reforming diesel fuel, but with the production of naphthalene after 30 hours. Hydrogen production remained stable through the 86 hours of the test.

Jarvi, G.A.; Bowman, R.M.; Camara, E.H.; Lee, A.L.

1980-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Conversion of synthesis gas and methanol to hydrocarbons using zeolite catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a... conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a...

Matthews, Michael Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tailoring key fuel properties of diesel–biodiesel–ethanol blends for diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alternative fuel research for the profusely growing number of diesel run automotive has intensified due to environmental reasons and turmoil in petroleum market. Government initiatives all around the world, their energy policies and steps to emphasis the use of biodiesel; proved biodiesel as a number one renewable substitute for No. 2 diesel fuels. Among all biodiesel feedstock, palm oil is a potential source with higher yield rate without much fertilizer use especially in tropical region. However, the application of transesterified palm biodiesel is objected by many auto-manufacturers due to adverse effects on engine in long term operation. The aim of this study was to modify the key fuel properties of palm biodiesel which causes engine fouling in long term operation. A significant amount of work is devoted to mix biodiesel and diesel at arbitrary percentages and test engine performance. Numerous fuel additives are developed for biodiesels automotive use. In this study, chemical properties of biodiesel are tailored by ethanol and an optimum formulation is derived mathematically. Ethanol is used at a controlled proportion (6%) with palm oil methyl ester (POME) as additive to reduce the higher viscosity of POME. This optimum palm biodiesel–ethanol blend was mixed at varying proportions (i.e. 0–30%) with No. 2 diesel to produce ternary blends of diesel–palm biodiesel–ethanol. Cold flow properties (such as, could point, pour point) of these ternary blends has improved and minute percentage of ethanol adding did not adversely affect the oxidation stability and corrosiveness of the fuel blend. Ethanol has significantly reduces the flash point, but the flammability of ternary blends is classified as Class II; similar to that of diesel. Cetane number is reduced in ternary blends by ethanol. So, palm biodiesel with minute percentage of anhydrous ethanol as additive in the ternary blend significantly improved key fuel properties significantly.

Md. Jayed Hussan; Masjuki Hj. Hassan; Md. Abul Kalam; Liaquat Ali Memon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Data Collection Procedures Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, retail on-highway diesel prices are collected by telephone and fax from a sample of approximately 350 retail diesel outlets, including truck stops and service stations. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all on-highway diesel sold be ULSD by December 1, 2010 (September 1, 2006 in California). In January 2007, the weekly on-highway diesel price survey began collecting diesel prices for low sulfur diesel (LSD) which contains between 15 and 500 parts-per-million sulfur and ULSD separately. Prior to January 2007, EIA collected the price of on-highway fuel without distinguishing the sulfur

437

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Diesel fuel is bascially the same product as home heating oil. The primary difference is that diesel has a lower sulfur content. When heating oil is in short supply, low sulfur diesel fuel can be diverted to heating oil supply. Thus, diesel fuel prices rise with heating heating oil prices. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. But prices in the Northeast jumped dramatically in the third week of January. Diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent, between January 17 and February 7. While EIA does not have

438

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions ... Gaseous and Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines at Idle and under Load: Comparison of Biodiesel Blend and Ultralow Sulfur Diesel Fuels ...

Matthew A. Ratcliff; A. John Dane; Aaron Williams; John Ireland; Jon Luecke; Robert L. McCormick; Kent J. Voorhees

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit,...

440

Practical implications of marine diesel engine emission regulations  

SciTech Connect

The main pollutants from marine diesel engines are oxides of nitrogen (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx) and particulates (soot). However, the proposed marine diesel engine emission regulations will primarily focus on the levels of NOx and SOx. In the future, once the proposed regulations are met, the limits and levels of other emissions will come under increasing scrutiny, such as particulates, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Regardless of the type of pollutant, there are generally two classes of emission control: (1) techniques that reduce the amount of pollutant formed in the combustion process, or (2) prevent the pollutants from reaching the atmosphere. Unfortunately, some of these control techniques will not be able to meet the incoming regulations. Therefore, this paper identifies the diesel engine emissions of concern, the impending regulations, and the merits of current and future emission control technologies required to meet these regulations.

Bowen, C.E.; Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diesel oxidation catalysts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Performance and Emissions of Direct Injection Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel Fuel Containing Dissolved Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, People's Republic of China ... soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solns., one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liq. ... (16)?Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill:? New York, 1988. ...

Junqiang Zhang; Deming Jiang; Zuohua Huang; Xibin Wang; Qi Wei

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

SciTech Connect

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Diesel Engine Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

There are basically three different modes of combustion possible for use in reciprocating engines. These include, diffusion burning, as occurs in current diesel engines, flame propagation combustion such as used in conventional SI engines, and homogeneous combustion such as is used in the SwRI HCCI engine. Diesel engines currently offer significant fuel consumption benefits relative to other powerplants for on and off road applications; however, costs and efficiency may become problems as the emissions standards become even more stringent. This presentation presents a discussion of the potentials of HCCI and flame propagation engines as alternatives to the diesel engines. It is suggested that as the emissions standards become more and more stringent, the advantages of the diesel may disappear. The potential for HCCI is limited by the availability of the appropriate fuel. The potential of flame propagation engines is limited by several factors including knock, EGR tolerance, high BMEP operation, and throttling. These limitations are discussed in the context of potential for improvement of the efficiency of the flame propagation engine.

Ryan, T

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Diesel Soot Toxification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) The second significant trend is the more defective bulk and surface structure as the result of alteration of the fuel combustion process. ... Although the development of improved particle filters and novel methods for particulate removal in diesel cars is an ongoing task for industry the ultimate answer could be given by the future statistical analysis of mortality due to soot exposition. ...

Benjamin Frank; Robert Schlögl; Dang Sheng Su

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Diesel Engine Idling Test  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The catalytic oxidation of propylene: investigation of the effects of composition on activities of Fe?O?, K?O promoted chromia-alumina catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with silver ox!r}e. -'thylenc oxi 'e and car}&en dioxide were the piochzcts. T'ne oitinum temperature ?as found to bc n the vicinity of 260 to 270 degrees Centi};rude for a neiz catalyst. It i&as found that a ?dgh air-eth?ilens ratio i~s most favorable... with silver ox!r}e. -'thylenc oxi 'e and car}&en dioxide were the piochzcts. T'ne oitinum temperature ?as found to bc n the vicinity of 260 to 270 degrees Centi};rude for a neiz catalyst. It i&as found that a ?dgh air-eth?ilens ratio i~s most favorable...

Perkins, Thomas Keeble

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

Definition: Diesel fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel fuel Diesel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Diesel fuel A liquid fuel produced from petroleum; used in diesel engines.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Diesel oil and Gazole (fuel) redirect here. Sometimes "diesel oil" is used to mean lubricating oil for diesel engines. Diesel fuel in general is any liquid fuel used in diesel engines. The most common is a specific fractional distillate of petroleum fuel oil, but alternatives that are not derived from petroleum, such as biodiesel, biomass to liquid (BTL) or gas to liquid (GTL) diesel, are increasingly being developed and adopted. To distinguish these types, petroleum-derived diesel is increasingly called petrodiesel. Ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) is a standard for defining diesel fuel with substantially lowered sulfur contents. As of 2007, almost

448

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

SciTech Connect

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Characteristics of the performance and emissions of a HSDI diesel engine running with cottonseed oil or its methyl ester and their blends with diesel fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to evaluate the use of various blends of cottonseed oil or its methyl ester (bio-diesel) with diesel fuel, in blend ratios from 10/90 up to 100/0, in a fully instrumented, four-stroke, High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI), Ricardo/Cussons 'Hydra' diesel engine. The tests were conducted using each of the above fuel blends or neat fuels, with the engine working at a medium and a high load. Volumetric fuel consumption, exhaust smokiness and exhaust-regulated gas emissions such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt hydrocarbons were measured. The differences in the performance and exhaust emissions from the baseline operation of the engine, that is, when working with neat diesel fuel, were determined and compared, as well as the differences between cottonseed oil or its methyl ester and their blends. Theoretical aspects of diesel engine combustion were used to aid the correct interpretation of the engine behaviour.

Constantine D. Rakopoulos; Kimon A. Antonopoulos; Dimitrios C. Rakopoulos; Emmanuel C. Kakaras; Efthimios G. Pariotis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

Bitterwolf, Thomas E. [University of Idaho

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology For Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Pump Components Methodology For Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Pump Components The components for the gasoline and diesel fuel pumps are calculated in the following manner in cents per gallon and then converted into a percentage: Crude Oil - the monthly average of the composite refiner acquisition cost, which is the average price of crude oil purchased by refiners. Refining Costs & Profits - the difference between the monthly average of the spot price of gasoline or diesel fuel (used as a proxy for the value of gasoline or diesel fuel as it exits the refinery) and the average price of crude oil purchased by refiners (the crude oil component). Distribution & Marketing Costs & Profits - the difference between the average retail price of gasoline or diesel fuel as computed from EIA's

452

Aerosol Science 38 (2007) 6982 www.elsevier.com/locate/jaerosci  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effective density and/or fractal dimension of diesel exhaust particles. These studies have generally used dimension of particles emitted from a light-duty diesel vehicle with a diesel oxidation catalyst J emitted from a light-duty diesel vehicle fitted with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). It was found

453

Reforming of Isooctane over Ni?Al2O3 Catalysts for Hydrogen Production:? Effects of Catalyst Preparation Method and Nickel Loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reforming of Isooctane over Ni?Al2O3 Catalysts for Hydrogen Production:? Effects of Catalyst Preparation Method and Nickel Loading ... Typically, hydrogen can be produced from hydrocarbons or oxygenated hydrocarbons. ... However, the effects of the catalyst preparation method and nickel loading on the performance of Ni?Al2O3 catalysts for the partial oxidation of gasoline to produce hydrogen have not been reported before in the literature. ...

Hussam H. Ibrahim; Prashant Kumar; Raphael O. Idem

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission...

455

Diesel fuel qualities  

SciTech Connect

As a result of rising fuel costs, many ship operators are turning to less expensive, heavier grade fuels for their diesel engines. Use of these lower quality fuels without adequate preparation can cause increased engine wear and damage to fuel systems. The oil properties which affect pretreatment and cleaning requirements, specifications that should be used when purchasing these fuels, and procedures for confirming that bought fuels meet purchase specifications are discussed. (LCL)

Blenkey, N.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Production of catalyst supports for coking and sorbents from brown coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal activation of brown coal for production of porous carbon materials in a set-up with fluidized oxidation catalyst has been studied.

M. L. Shchipko; V. B. Fenelonov; E. V. Shevtsov…

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Solid aluminiumalkyl-based isomerization catalysts. Surface acidity and catalytic activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isomerization catalysts with high activity and selectivity were prepared by chemical anchoring of aluminiumethyldichloride on the surface of inorganic oxides. Surface acidity was studied by calorimetric and IR...

Gerd S. Haegh; Trygve Riis

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

diesel | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

diesel diesel Dataset Summary Description The JodiOil World Database is freely available from the Joint Organisations Data Initiative (JODI) and is updated on or around the 20th of each month. Source JODI Date Released October 01st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated March 21st, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords crude oil diesel fuel oil gasoline kerosene LPG Data application/zip icon Text file, all JODI Database data: Jan 2002 - Jan 2011 (zip, 14.5 MiB) application/pdf icon Definitions of Abbreviations and Codes (pdf, 698.3 KiB) application/pdf icon Column Headings for Dataset (pdf, 13.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Some of the data has "some review" and some of the data has "no review"; the supplemental documentation provides definitions for the assessment codes for each piece of data in the datasets (essentially, 1 = some review, 2 = use with caution, 3 = not reviewed)

459

Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo ULSD LSD Off-Road Diesel para Carretera de Azufre Ultra Bajo (máximo de 15 ppm de azufre). Se requiere su uso en todos los motores y vehículos diesel de carretera modelos 2007 y posteriores. También se recomienda su uso en todos los vehículos y motores diesel. Diesel para Carretera Bajo en Azufre (máximo de 500 ppm de azufre). Aviso: La ley federal prohíbe su uso en vehículos y motores modelos 2007 y posteriores, su uso podría dañarlos. Combustible Diesel que no es para Carretera (puede exceder 500 ppm de azufre). Aviso: La ley federal prohíbe su uso en vehículos y motores que no son de carretera, su uso podría dañarlos. Los consumidores con vehículos modelo 2007 ó posteriores deben utilizar solo diesel ultra bajo de azufre (ULSD). El ULSD es un diesel de

460

Sandia National Laboratories: Diesel Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Combustion Caterpillar, Sandia CRADA Opens Door to Multiple Research Projects On April 17, 2013, in Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Materials...

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461

Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diesel Particulate Filter Regenerations," SAE Paper 2007-01-3970, SAE Fall Powertrain and Fluids Systems Conference, Chicago, IL, Oct. 2007. * "Comprehensive Characterization of...

462

Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

Lestz, S.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation pm041lance2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration Substrate Studies of an Electrically-Assisted Diesel...

464

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuel economy - Completely compatible with biodiesel Estimate diesel light-vehicle penetration to increase from 3% (2007) to 14% by 2017 * Problem: Diesel technology is...

466

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

467

Catalytic Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Filter for Diesel Exhaust Purification This project is developing a precious metal-free passive diesel particulate filter. deer09fokema.pdf More Documents & Publications...

468

Diesel vs Gasoline Production | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

vs Gasoline Production Diesel vs Gasoline Production A look at refinery decisions that decide "swing" between diesel and gasoline production deer08leister.pdf More Documents &...

469

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

SciTech Connect

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nanocatalysts for Diesel Engine Emissions Remediation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an understanding of the catalyst failure modes in order to synthesize new zeolite nano- catalyst systems. The catalysts are then characterized using modern characterization...

471

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is an attractive alternative as a feedstock for the production of renewable chemicals and fuels. Get Expertise Researcher Susan Hanson Inorganic Isotope & Actinide Chem Email Researcher Ruilian Wu Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Researcher Louis "Pete" Silks Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Vanadium is an inexpensive, earth-abundant metal that is well suited for promoting oxidations in air. Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is

472

Molecularly engineering homogenous catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have developed new strategies for homogeneous catalyst recovery. Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly (N-octadecylacrylamide) supports, for example, yield recoverable catalysts that are selectively soluble in the lower (polar) phase and the upper (non...

Hughes, Reagan Rebekah

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

473

Taking snapshots of different redox states of the water oxidation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural photosynthetic water oxidation mechanism empowers designers of artificial photosynthesis with knowledge to construct better water oxidation catalysts for solar fuel...

474

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change Toxic Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed and patented a novel catalyst capable of decomposing gas streams. "However, nitrous oxide can be decomposed at lower temperatures using a suitable catalyst

Escolano, Francisco

475

2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell been also developed for different reforming reactors: solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)7 , membrane reformer1 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

Boyer, Edmond

476

Development of the 2011MY Ford Super Duty Catalyst System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efforts leading to medium-duty truck aftertreatment system development, issues addressed, including catalyst layout to maximize NOx conversion and balance of precious metals for oxidation function during cold-start and filter regeneration

477

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Modeling of Catalyst Structure Degradation in PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, the requirements of a high-performance catalyst layer are examined in order to understand the ways in which the structure might degrade with operation. The formation of oxide species on the su...

Jeremy P. Meyers

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diesel fuel consumption, lubricant changes, and enginefuel consumption, and costs associated with diesel engineDiesel Idling diesel consumption Diesel fuel cost Lubricant cost Engine

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Catalyst Manufacturing Science and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst Manufacturing Science and Engineering Consortium (CMSEC) Rutgers University New Jersey, U, automotive, and energy industries makes and/or uses catalysts, there has been no academic program focusing on the operations required to make catalytic materials. Thus, catalyst manufacturing processes are often designed