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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

The viscosity plate thrust bearing  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests on a viscosity plate thrust bearing indicated that serious differences existed between theoretical predictions by existing methods and experimental values. In particular the load carrying capacity at any speed and plate gap was much overestimated by calculation, and the variation of load with speed, at constant gap, appeared to be quite different in theory and experiment. While the theoretical load speed curve departed by only a small amount from linearity, the experimental curves indicated a definite flattening out at high speed, and corresponding to a given gap, a maximum load was reached and maintained independent of speed. It is the aim of this investigation to find the reason for this flattening out of the curve, and to indicate why it is not shown by the theoretical methods. The aerodynamic theory of viscosity plate bearings is considered, and taking into account as many aerodynamic effects as possible, a new method of performance prediction is developed. Results by this method agree quite well with those of existing methods, and therefore the effect which is being looked for cannot be an aerodynamic one already included in the method. Other possible explanations are considered including centrifugal action on the gas, heating up the gas due to frictional losses, a comparison of the plate gap with the mean free path of molecules of the gas, and distortion of the grooved plate under pressure load. Of these it is shown that the first three are not important, but that with the type of plate mounting used in the experiments very serious deflections of the stationary plate can be expected at high speed. At 21,000 rpm and a plate gap of 2.0 x 10/sup -4/ in. and with the theoretically predicted load, the plate deflection reaches a maximum of about five times the nominal gap and moreover varies considerably with radius and around the disc. Because of these distortions the theoretical methods discussed are not applicable to the experimental conditions and the calculated and measured results cannot be compared. It will be seen that constant plate clearance is not involved in the theories in a simple manner and a method which took into account both aerodynamic and elastic effects would be most complex. Although it has not been demonstrated that these additional elastic effects would lead to the flattening out of the calculated curves, it seems most likey that they are responsible for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental results. This could be most easily shown by tests on a similar bearing with the grooved plate considerably thicker to increase its stiffness. (auth)

Wordsworth, D.V.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Phlogopite and Quartz Lamellae in Diamond-bearing Diopside from Marbles of the Kokchetav Massif Kazakhstan: Exsolution or Replacement Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exsolution lamellae of pyroxene in garnet (grt), coesite in titanite and omphacite from UHPM terranes are widely accepted as products of decompression. However, interpretation of oriented lamellae of phyllosilicates, framework silicates and oxides as a product of decompression of pyroxene is very often under debate. Results are presented here of FIB-TEM, FEG-EMP and synchrotron-assisted infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of phlogopite (Phlog) and phlogopite + quartz (Qtz) lamellae in diamond-bearing clinopyroxene (Cpx) from ultra-high pressure (UHP) marble. These techniques allowed collection of three-dimensional information from the grain boundaries of both the single (phlogopite), two-phase lamellae (phlogopite + quartz), and fluid inclusions inside of diamond included in K-rich Cpx and understanding their relationships and mechanisms of formation. The Cpx grains contain in their cores lamellae-I, which are represented by topotactically oriented extremely thin lamellae of phlogopite (that generally are two units cell wide but locally can be seen to be somewhat broader) and microdiamond. The core composition is: (Ca{sub 0.94}K{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.06}Fe{sub 0.08}Mg{sub 0.88})(Si{sub 1.98}Al{sub 0.02})O{sub 6.00}. Fluid inclusions rich in K and Si are recognized in the core of the Cpx, having no visible connections to the lamellae-I. Lamellar-II inclusions consist of micron-size single laths of phlogopite and lens-like quartz or slightly elongated phlogopite + quartz intergrowths; all are situated in the rim zone of the Cpx. The composition of the rim is (Ca{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.03}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 0.05}Mg{sub 0.90})Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and the rim contains more Ca, Mg than the core, with no K there. Such chemical tests support our microstructural observations and conclusion that the phlogopite lamellae-I are exsolved from the K-rich Cpx-precursor during decompression. It is assumed that Cpx-precursor was also enriched in H{sub 2}O, because diamond included in the core of this Cpx contains fluid inclusions. The synchrotron IR spectra of such diamond record the presence of OH{sup -} stretching and H{sub 2}O bending motion regions. Lamellar-II inclusions are interpreted as forming partly because of modification of the lamellae-i in the presence of fluid enriched in K, Fe and Si during deformation of the host diopside; the latter is probably related to the shallower stage of exhumation of the UHP marble. This study emphasizes that in each case to understand the mechanism of lamellar inclusion formation more detailed studies are needed combining both compositional, structural and three-dimensional textural features of lamellar inclusions and their host.

L Dobrzhinetskaya; R Wirth; D Rhede; Z Liu; H Green

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDF (1.02 MB) 2011 Diamond, Richard C.. "The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency." In The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency....

5

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bearing construction for refrigeration compresssor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings.

Middleton, Marc G. (Wyoming, MI); Nelson, Richard T. (Worthington, OH)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

Kalsi, Manmohan S. (Houston, TX); Somogyi, Dezso (Sugar Land, TX); Dietle, Lannie L. (Stafford, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thrusts in High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in HPC 1 Thrusts in High Performance Computing Science at Scale Petaflops to Exaflops Science through Volume Thousands to Millions of Simulations Science in Data Petabytes to...

10

Electrically conductive diamond electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Micro thrust and heat generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

Garcia, E.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Delbert D. (Los Alamos, NM); Evans, Christopher J. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of Eu/HNO{sub 3} aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to {approx}900 deg. C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly.

Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, St. Francis Xavier University, P.O. Box 5000, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); MS 954, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Diamond nucleation using polyethene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Study of Catcher Bearings for High Temperature Magnetic Bearing Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electron Energy Corporation (EEC) along with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with Vibration Control and Electro mechanics Lab (VCEL), Texas A & M University, College Station, TX are researching on high temperature permanent magnet based magnetic bearings. The magnetic bearings are made of high temperature resistant permanent magnets (up to 1000 degrees F). A test rig has been developed to test these magnetic bearings. The test rig mainly consists of two radial bearings, one axial thrust bearing and two catcher bearings. The test rig that the catcher bearing is inserted in is the first ultra-high temperature rig with permanent magnet biased magnetic bearings and motor. The magnetic bearings are permanent magnet based which is a novel concept. The Graphalloy bearings represent a new approach for ultra-high temperature backup bearing applications. One of the main objectives of this research is to insure the mechanical and electrical integrity for all components of the test rig. Some assemblies and accessories required for the whole assembly need to be designed. The assembly methods need to be designed. The preliminary tests for coefficient of friction, Young's modulus and thermal expansion characteristics for catcher bearing material need to be done. A dynamic model needs to be designed for studying and simulating the rotor drop of the shaft onto the catcher bearing using a finite element approach in MATLAB. The assembly of the test rig was completed successfully by developing assembly fixtures and assembly methods. The components of the test rig were tested before assembly. Other necessary systems like Sensor holder system, Graphalloy press fit system were designed, fabricated and tested. The catcher bearing material (Graphalloy) was tested for coefficient of friction and Young's modulus at room and high temperatures. The rotor drop was simulated by deriving a dynamic model, to study the effect of system parameters like clearance, coefficient of friction, negative stiffness, initial spin speed on system behavior. Increasing the friction increases the backward whirl and decreases the rotor stoppage time. Increasing the clearance reduces the stoppage time and increases the peak bearing force. Increasing the initial spin speed increases the rotor stoppage time. The maximum stress encountered for as built conditions is more than allowable limits.

Narayanaswamy, Ashwanth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage Wind Energy Solar Energy Smart Grids Smart Buildings For our industrial partners, the Energy Scholars program is an opportunity to connect with the talent of Rensselaer. Sponsoring a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute undergraduate as an Energy Scholar enables a company

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

18

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

19

PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

Dugdale, R.A.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Diamond Schottky barrier diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With superior physical and electrical properties, diamond became a potential competitor to SiC soon after Element Six reported in 2002 the successful synthesis of single crystal plasma deposited diamond with high catTier mobility. This thesis discusses... the fabrication of silicon thyristors able to block more than 5000V and to conduct 2000A when forward-biased. However, due to their bipolar conduction mechanism, these devices suffered from serious limitations in terms of high frequency operation [2...

Brezeanu, Mihai

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Center Thrusts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thrusts Science-Based Solutions for Enduring NNSA Mission Needs Collective Hierarchical Systems Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology Nanosciences Optical Sciences...

23

Black Diamond Internal network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? ? ??Ð ? ? ? ?? ?????Ð ´? µ Ð ? Ð ?? ? ? ?? #12;Black Diamond Internet 123456 789101112 A B 12x 6x

Imperial College, London

24

Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Gutierrez, Humberto (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA); Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. (State College, PA); Jain, Puja (King Of Prussia, PA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

CUSHIONED BEARING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

Rushing, F.C.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Diamond Wire Technology LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wire Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Wire Technology LLC Place Colorado Springs, Colorado Zip 80916 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of diamond...

29

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond`s performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Phillips, W. [Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Diamond-turning HP-21 beryllium to achieve an optical surface  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of diamond turning on beryllium was made in anticipation of obtaining an optical finish. Although results of past experiences were poor, it was decided to continue diamond turning on beryllium beyond initial failures. By changing speed and using coolant, partial success was achieved. Tool wear was the major problem. Tests were made to establish and plot wear as a function of cutting speed and time. Slower speeds did cause lower wear rates, but at no time did wear reach an acceptable level. The machine, tools, and procedure used were chosen based on the results of preliminary attempts and on previous experience. It was unnecessary to use an air-bearing spindle because tool failure governed the best finish that could be expected. All tools of diamond composition, whether single crystal or polycrystalline, wore at unacceptable rates. Based on present technology, it must be concluded that beryllium cannot be feasibly diamond turned to achieve an optical finish. (22 fig.) (auth)

Allen, D.K.; Hauschildt, H.W.; Bryan, J.B.

1975-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

High efficiency diamond solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE SNAP II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM. Topical Report No. 6, Bearing Design and Development  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary analysis conducted on various types of bearings indicated that hydrodynamic type journal and thrust bearings lubricated with a portion of the mercury from the condensate return pump would best suit the SNAP II requirements. Experimental rssults confirmed the bearing design approach. Stable bearing operation was obtained at speeds in excess of the 40,000 rpm design objective with simulated loads of 1 to 10 g in the radial direction, and 0 to 2 g in the axial direction. Total power consumption of the bearing system is approximately 550 watts at the design speed. (auth)

Waldron, W.D.

1960-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bearing Material Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Single-metal bearing material systems...Bronze C C C D B 14 2 Electric motor bushings, home appliance bearings,

34

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Science Thrust Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Thrust Areas Science Thrust Areas User research at the Lujan Center is focused in four science thrust areas. Each has a contact person who is available to discuss proposed experiments and to provide advice on the appropriate instrument and instrument scientist, available sample environments, and other details for planned experiments. Lujan Center instrument scientists welcome questions and discussions about new experiments and are happy to provide guidance for proposal development. New users are encouraged to contact the appropriate instrument scientist before submitting a proposal. Primary Instruments and Contacts: Surfaces and Interfaces Rex Hjelm - Principal Contact Neutron reflectivity and small angle scattering probe interfaces, surfaces, defects, and their influence on material properties and functionality.

35

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Passive magnetic bearing configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reactor thrust during boost in a low altitude trajectory  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents thrust calculations for low altitude trajectories for a Tory II-C type propulsion reactor.

Moyer, J.H.

1962-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Axial inlet conversion to a centrifugal compressor with magnetic bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOVA's Alberta Gas Transmission Division transports natural gas via pipeline throughout the province of Alberta, Canada, exporting it to eastern Canada, US, and British Columbia. There is a continuing effort to operate the facilities and pipeline at the highest possible efficiency. One area being addressed to improve efficiency is compression of the gas. By improving compressor efficiency, fuel consumption and hence operating costs can be reduced. One method of improving compressor efficiency is by converting the compressor to an axial inlet configuration, a conversion that has been carried out more frequently in the past years. Concurrently, conventional hydrodynamic bearings have been replaced with magnetic bearings on many centrifugal compressors. This paper discusses the design and installation for converting a radial overhung unit to an axial inlet configuration, having both magnetic bearings and a thrust reducer. The thrust reducer is required to reduce axial compressor shaft loads, to a level that allows the practical installation of magnetic bearings within the space limitations of the compressor (Bear and Gibson, 1992).

Novecosky, T. (NOVA Corp., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method for forming diamonds from carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone (Slidell, LA); Lewis, Roy (Evanston, IL); Rehn, Lynn (LaGrange, IL); Kirk, Marquis (Hinsdale, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Method of Forming Diamonds from Carbonaceous Material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone; Lewis, Roy; Rehn, Lynn; Kirk, Marquis

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond's performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Phillips, W. (Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late...

45

Powder Metallurgy Bearing Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bearings were oil impregnated, porous, powder metallurgy bushings. Even after the fire, lubricant ... Failure Analysis of Four Graphite Pump Seal Faces.

46

Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

48

DRAFT Bear Safety Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bear Safety Plan June 2010 Bear Safety Plan June 2010 NSA_bsp_Rev9.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Bear Safety Plan Background As a major part of DOE's participation in the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (AAO) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) exists on the North Slope of Alaska with its Central Facility near the town of Barrow. A secondary facility exists at Atqasuk, a town 100km inland from Barrow. Other instrumentation locations in more remote areas on the North Slope may be established in later stages of the project. Polar bears, and to a lesser extent, brown bears (barren ground grizzly) are significant hazards within the ACRF/NSA/AAO

49

Technical Communique: Optimal control of the thrusted skate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper derives optimal controls for the thrusted skate between any two points in the plane. The thrusted skate consists of a skate, which steers the motion in R^2, and a fixed-orientation thruster which provides the power to move the system. This ... Keywords: Optimal trajectory planning, Workless steering actuators

Kevin M. Lynch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

Moss, W.C.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Black Bear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Bear Black Bear Nature Bulletin No. 286-A December 9, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BLACK BEAR The most amusing and human-like of all our American wild animals is the Black Bear. Slow, clumsy and loose-jointed in appearance, with a shambling gait, he can be very swift and nimble. Like any good clown he is also a good acrobat with a fine sense of balance and timing. He is a great climber in spite of his bulk. Shrewd and droll, he is very popular in menageries and as a performer in circuses and side shows because he learns tricks easily. He can stand on his hind legs to wrestle, box, dance, or beg for food and, occasionally, one becomes a graceful artist on roller skates. They love applause.

53

American Black Bear: Ursus americanus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3/21/2011 1 USFWS American Black Bear: Ursus americanus www.bear.org LDWF Historic Distribution, forested regions (Pelton et al. 1994) Glacier Kenai Queen Charlotte Island. Kermode Dall American Black regions (Pelton et al. 1994) #12;3/21/2011 2 Historic Range Louisiana black bear Louisiana Black Bear

Gray, Matthew

54

Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode  

SciTech Connect

Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

Moeller, Trevor [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, Tennessee 37388 (United States); Polzin, Kurt A. [NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrogen chemisorption on diamond surfaces. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we demonstrated the ability to measure submonolayer quantities of surface hydrogen on insulating glasses. The present study builds on this by examining hydrogen coverages on another insulating material: the technologically important diamond (100) surface. The information to be obtained in the present study will allow us to deduce the correct structures for the diamond (100)-(1X1) and -(2X1) surface phases and provide information on the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the (100) surface. Such experiments are essential for a complete understanding of hydrogen surface chemistry during the chemical vapor deposition of thin diamond films. This report summarizes progress made in FY93 for measuring surface hydrogen concentrations on the diamond (100) surface. Although the available LDRD resources were insufficient to finish this study in FY93, completion of the study is planned using other resources and this detailed report as a reference.

Daley, R.; Musket, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Free energy and shock compression of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new approach has been developed to calculate the free energy in quasiharmonic approximation for homogeneous condensed matter. Common result has been demonstrated on an example of solid and liquid diamond at high pressures and temperatures of shock compression.

A. M. Molodets; M. A. Molodets; S. S. Nabatov

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Woolly Bear Caterpillar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Woolly Bear Caterpillar Woolly Bear Caterpillar Name: Colton Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in N.J. and found a Woolly Bear Caterpillar that was all black. We would like to keep it but are worried that it may "NEED" to hibernate to live. Also: We love to collect bugs (live) and learn about them, but most of the books don't have all the information we need ie. what does it eat, how long does it live, identifying caterpillar stages of insects. Could you please reccomend a good book, that has pictures of all life stages and information that would be of interest to children? Thank you for your time. Replies: Good books on caterpillars are hard to find. Try the Peterson Guide to Butterflies, Audubon Guide to Butterflies, etc. You will probably just have to browse in libraries and see what you can find. Good luck. By the way, the more black on the wooly bear, so the legend goes, the harder the winter will be. One was recently seen around here (NE Illinois) that was almost, but not quite, all black.

64

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rotating plug bearing and seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

68

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Diamond-like Coating Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Feature Archive Diamond-like Coating Improves Electron Microscope Images By Mike Ross November 26, 2012 Coating the surface of a material with a single layer of diamond-like...

69

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Superhard Diamond-Denting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pressed between the flattened tips of two opposing diamonds. Scientists can shine lasers or X-rays through the transparent diamonds to observe and identify any atomic-scale...

70

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus Department of Electrical Theory, 27(1):122­125, January 1981. [8] R. Tandon and S. Ulukus. Diamond channels with partially

Ulukus, Sennur

71

n-Type diamond and method for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

73

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

74

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

75

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Place Melbourne, Australia Zip 3124 Product Victoria based clean energy project developer. Coordinates -37.817532°, 144.967148° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.817532,"lon":144.967148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Digital field trip to the Central Nevada Thrust Belt  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Nevada Thrust Belt is still in its infancy. However, this thrust belt contains all the elements necessary for hydrocarbon accumulations: thick, organically-rich shales; reefs, regional unconformities, karst surfaces, porous sandstones, and extensive and pervasive fractures; anticlines tens of miles long by miles wide; thrust faults that juxtapose potential source and reservoir rocks; and oil seeps. Along a fairway from Las Vegas to Elko, for example, thick Mississippian shales contain 4-6% total organic carbon and are oil-prone and thermally mature. This presentation from a laptop computer and LCD projector is a multimedia version of our October 12-14, 1995 field trip to document the hydrocarbon potential of the thrust belt in Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties. Outcrop images were recorded by a digital camera that has a resolution equivalent to a 14 inch computer screen; these images were then downloaded to the computer. All of the images were processed digitally on location to enhance picture quality and color contrast. Many were annotated on location with our observations, measurements, and interpretations. These field annotations are supplemented in this presentation by laboratory analyses. The presentation includes full-color, annotated outcrop images, sounds, and animations. The results show the viability of the new, inexpensive digital cameras to geologic field work in which a multimedia report, ready for presentation to management, can be generated in the field.

Chamberlain, A.K. (Cedar Strat Corp., Hiko, NV (United States)); Hook, S.C. (Texaco E P Technology Department, Houston, TX (United States)); Frost, K.R. (Texaco Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reactor thrust during boost in a high altitude trajectory  

SciTech Connect

Reactor startup of a submarine based missile must be accomplished during boost., so that at burnout the reactor maximum wall temperature is at or near the design value. Because cooling air must be supplied during this period, there exists the possibility of obtaining some thrust to augment the booster. To find how much reactor thrust might be available, a representative high altitude boost trajectory was selected. This is shown together with an estimated pressure recovery curve for the inlet. It has been assumed that by some appropriate means the flow rate passed by the inlet exactly matches that demanded by the reactor and nozzle. Hot day conditions are assumed. The missile power plant was the Tory II-C reactor with its design point-optimized nozzle throat area of 750 square inches. Nozzle expansion is complete. The reactor maximum wall temperature was assumed to be constant at design (2500 degrees F) from time zero. Thus the thrust computed at any time is the maximum possible within the reactor design temperature limitation, and provides a guide to a desirable startup time. Available thrust and reactor exit conditions were obtained with the digital codes Dash N and Nomac.

Moyer, J.H.

1962-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Shock Compressing Diamond to a Conducting Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser generated shock reflectance data show that diamond undergoes a continuous transition from optically absorbing to reflecting between Hugoniot pressures 600diamond having a thermal population of carriers at P{sub H}{approx}600 GPa, undergoing band overlap metallization at P{sub H}{approx}1000 GPa and melting at 800

Bradley, D K; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Moon, S J; Cauble, R C; Collins, G W

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

Langland, R. T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downer Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a made-from approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the teams designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Geomorphometric features and tectonic activities in sub-Himalayan thrust belt, Pakistan, from satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sub-Himalayan thrust belt is an active thrust wedge which progresses southward over the north-dipping Indian plate. The north-south compression resulted in severe deformation of sedimentary rocks in this belt. Distinct thrust geometries and topography ... Keywords: DEM, Himayayas, Landsat ETM+, Tectonics, Topography

Lize Chen; Shuhab D. Khan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Field Guide: Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021780, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment, 2011 Update, is a comprehensive document on the subject of fluid film bearing damage modes. This field guide provides a pocket reference based upon the content of that report. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend April 17, 2012 - 11:43am Addthis Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science How does it work? As computer performance has improved, engineers have had a hard time dissipating the heat produced. Diamond film may be the answer, as it's much better at absorbing and

88

Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walnut Biomass Facility Walnut Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility Facility Diamond Walnut Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Diamond Willow Extension | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extension Extension Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Extension Facility Diamond Willow Extension Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.281621°, -104.271355° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.281621,"lon":-104.271355,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Comparison of Fast Amplifiers for Diamond Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors requests for novel signal amplifiers, capable to match the superb signal-to-noise ratio and timing response of these detectors. Existing amplifiers are still far away from this goal and are the dominant contributors to the overall system noise and the main source of degradation of the energy and timing resolution. We tested a number of commercial amplifiers designed for diamond detector readout to identify the best solution for a particular application. This application required a deposited energy threshold below 100 keV and timing resolution of the order of 200 ps at 200 keV. None of tested amplifiers satisfies these requirements. The best solution to such application found to be the Cividec C6 amplifier, which allows 100 keV minimal threshold, but its coincidence timing resolution at 200 keV is as large as 1.2 ns.

M. Osipenko; S. Minutoli; P. Musico; M. Ripani; B. Caiffi; A. Balbi; G. Ottonello; S. Argir; S. Beol; N. Amapane; M. Masera; G. Mila

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

92

Boron-doped Diamond Synthesis Using Mode-conversion Type ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DC Arc Plasma Jet Growth of Large Area High Quality Freestanding Diamond Films and ... Hybrid Nanoporous Metal/Oxide Films for Energy Storage.

93

Argonne CNM News: Medical applications of diamond particles and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical applications of diamond particles and surfaces TEM image of nanodiamond particles TEM image of nanodiamond particles Scientists in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group...

94

Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

95

Alloy Development for Copper Diamond Composites for Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One approach to meeting the challenges is to add diamond particles to a copper matrix to improve thermal conductivity and lower CTE simultaneously.

96

Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Brian Smith, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Skylar Cox Indoor Environment...

97

Thin Sheet of Diamond Has Worlds of Uses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new technique from Argonne National Laboratory creates thin diamond films that are helping industry save energy and could even be used in heart and eye implants.

Sagoff, Jared

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocrystalline diamond aerogel Peter J. Pauzauskie a,1,2 ,Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Aerogel materials have myriadcreating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an

Pauzauskie, Peter J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Black Diamond Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Diamond Power Co Black Diamond Power Co Place West Virginia Utility Id 1764 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.0685/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Black Diamond Power Co (West Virginia). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

100

Optimizing journal bearing bit performance  

SciTech Connect

This article explains that continuous progress in the field of rock bit technology has produced many new designs and improved features in the tri-cone rock bits used today. Much of the research and advancements have centered around journal bearing systems, seals and lubricants leading to greatly extended bearing life. These improved bearing systems, incorporated into both tooth and insert-type bits, have not only increased the effective life of a rock bit, but have also allowed greater energy levels to be applied. This, in turn, has allowed for higher rates of penetration and lower costs per foot of hole drilled. Continuous improvements in journal bearing bits allowing them to run longer and harder have required similar advancements to be made in cutting structures. In tooth bit designs, these improvements have been basically limited to the areas of gauge protection and to application of hardfacing materials.

Moerbe, O.E.; Evans, W.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster  

SciTech Connect

It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Takahashi, K. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

White, J.E.

1990-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

Diamond and Related Materials 6 ( 1997) 1759-I771 Simulation of morphological instabilities during diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and hydrogen are activated with energetic sources such as microwaves to generate plasmas, direct current (DC include the hot filament [2] and many types of microwave plasma [3], which typically have *Corresponding is expected to be negligible since the diamond phase of carbon is very stable and gasification of dia- mond

Dandy, David

104

NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

Robert Radtke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

Performance Analysis of J85 Turbojet Engine Matching Thrust with Reduced Inlet Pressure to the Compressor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Jet engines are required to operate at a higher rpm for the same thrust values in cases such as aircraft landing and military loitering. High (more)

Yarlagadda, Santosh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

Fincke, J.R.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

Chin, R.P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions  

SciTech Connect

With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

True, W.R.

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

Manufacturing of diamond windows for synchrotron radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diamond window construction is presented and explicit manufacturing details are given. This window will increase the power dissipation by about a factor of 4 over present day state of the art windows to absorb 600 W of power. This power will be generated by in-vacuum undulators with the storage ring ALBA operating at a design current of 400 mA. Extensive finite element (FE) calculations are included to predict the windows behavior accompanied by explanations for the chosen boundary conditions. A simple linear model was used to cross-check the FE calculations.

Schildkamp, W.; Nikitina, L. [Synchrotron ALBA, CELLS, Carretera BP 1413, km 3.3, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Diamond Detectors for Heavy Ion Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1999, the accelerator facility at GSI is scheduled to deliver beam intensities of about 10 10 particles/spill for all available ions up to 238 U. This necessitates the development of a new generation of radiation-resistant and ultra-fast detectors, in conjunction with new high-speed and low-noise electronics. Preliminary results confirm the suitability of CVD-diamond detectors for both, beam diagnostics, and heavy-ion experiments with projectiles in the energy region from 50 MeV/amu to 2 GeV/amu. Various test measurements

E. Berdermann; K. Blasche; P. Moritz; H. Stelzer; F. Zeytouni

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1 H. Mutschke,2 L. Binette3 , S. Höfner4 1 NORDITA, SE-75120 Uppsala Sweden The first direct evidence for nano-diamonds in space came from meteorites. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues from primitive meteorites have shown that nano- diamonds

Andersen, Anja C.

114

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Thrust Area | Local Structure, Magnetism, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Instruments User Instruments Reflectometers Asterix SPEAR Powder Diffractometers HIPD HIPPO NPDF Engineering Diffraction SMARTS Chemical Spectroscopy FDS Small Angle Scattering LQD Protein Crystallography PCS Inelastic Neutron Spectrometer Pharos Single Crystal Diffractometer SCD Contacts Lujan Center Leader Mark Bourke 505.667.6069 Deputy Leader (Interim) Anna Llobet 505.665.1367 Experimental Area Manager) Charles Kelsey 505.665.5579 Experiment Coordinator Leilani Conradson 505.665.9505 User Office Administrator Lisa Padilla 505.667.5649 Administrative Assistant Melissa Martinez 505.665.0391 Thrust Area Local Structure, Magnetism, and Nanomaterials The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center encompasses a set of powder diffractometers, instrument scientist specialists, and sample environments (pressure, temperature, and magnetic field) equipped to address challenges

115

Gravity as Archimedes' thrust and a bifurcation in that theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Euler's interpretation of Newton's gravity (NG) as Archimedes' thrust in a fluid ether is presented in some detail. Then a semi-heuristic mechanism for gravity, close to Euler's, is recalled and compared with the latter. None of these two "gravitational ethers" can obey classical mechanics. This is logical since the ether defines the very reference frame, in which mechanics is defined. This concept is used to build a scalar theory of gravity: NG corresponds to an incompressible ether, a compressible ether leads to gravitational waves. In the Lorentz-Poincar\\'e version, special relativity is compatible with the ether, but, with the heterogeneous ether of gravity, it applies only locally. A correspondence between metrical effects of uniform motion and gravitation is assumed, yet in two possible versions (one is new). Dynamics is based on a (non-trivial) extension of Newton's second law. The observational status for the theory with the older version of the correspondence is summarized.

Mayeul Arminjon

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines R.C. Blasdell, L. A. Assoufid, and D. M. Mills TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................1 2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DIAMONDS ..................................................5 2.1 Varieties of Diamonds ....................................................................5 2.2 The Lattice Parameter .....................................................................5 2.3 Bulk Thermal and Mechanical Properties ...............................................6 2.4 Typical Surface and Lattice Plane Morphology ......................................8 2.5 The Liquid-GaIn/Diamond Interface ...................................................10 3. DIFFRACTION PROPERTIES OF DIAMOND

117

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Printable, flexible and stretchable diamond for thermal management  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various heat-sinked components and methods of making heat-sinked components are disclosed where diamond in thermal contact with one or more heat-generating components are capable of dissipating heat, thereby providing thermally-regulated components. Thermally conductive diamond is provided in patterns capable of providing efficient and maximum heat transfer away from components that may be susceptible to damage by elevated temperatures. The devices and methods are used to cool flexible electronics, integrated circuits and other complex electronics that tend to generate significant heat. Also provided are methods of making printable diamond patterns that can be used in a range of devices and device components.

Rogers, John A; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Dae Hyeong; Meitl, Matthew; Menard, Etienne; Carlisle, John

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Epitaxial synthesis of diamond layers on a monocrystalline diamond substrate in a torch microwave plasmatron  

SciTech Connect

The epitaxial growth of a diamond single-crystal film in a torch microwave discharge excited by a magnetron of a domestic microwave oven with the power of {<=}1 kW in an argon-hydrogen-methane mixture with a high concentration of methane (up to 25% with respect to hydrogen) at atmospheric pressure on a sub-strate of a synthetic diamond single crystal (HPHP) with the orientation (100) and 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 mm in size is obtained. A discharge with the torch diameter of {approx}2 mm and the concentration of the microwave power absorbed in the torch volume of >10{sup 3} W/cm{sup 3} is shown to be effective for epitaxial enlargement of a single crystal of synthetic diamond. The structure of the deposited film with the thickness up to 10 {mu}m with high-quality morphology is investigated with an optical microscope as well as using the methods of the Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy.

Sergeichev, K. F., E-mail: kserg@fpl.gpi.ru; Lukina, N. A. [Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Self-bearing motor design & control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design, implementation and control of a new class of self-bearing motors. The primary thesis contributions include the design and experimental demonstration of hysteresis self-bearing motors, novel ...

Imani Nejad, Mohammad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Design of a low cost hydrostatic bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design and manufacturing method for a new surface self compensating hydrostatic bearing. A lumped resistance model was used to analyze the performance of the bearing and provide guidance on laying ...

Wong, Anthony Raymond

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

124

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-Loaded Accelerating Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE S. Antipov, C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, P. Schoessow Euclid TechLabs LLC, Solon, OH, 44139 USA M. Conde, W. Gai, S....

125

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-loaded Accelerating Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE AT THE AWA S. Antipov, C. Jing, P. Schoessow, J. E. Butler, S. Zuo and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC,...

126

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Diamond: a storage architecture for early discard in interactive search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the concept of early discard for interactive search of unindexed data. Processing data inside storage devices using downloaded searchlet code enables Diamond to perform efficient, applicationspecific filtering of large data collections. ...

Larry Huston; Rahul Sukthankar; Rajiv Wickremesinghe; M. Satyanarayanan; Gregory R. Ganger; Erik Riedel; Anastassia Ailamaki

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Self-Lubricating Sintered Bronze Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...interconnected porosity of the bearing as an oil reservoir. Figure 8 shows schematically the mechanism of this type

129

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400°C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

130

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT)

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Technical assessment of Engineering`s Manufacturing Technology Thrust Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document investigates the connection between the Manufacturing Technology Thrust Area and its market and concludes that the connection should include the programs internal to LLNL and customers outside of LLNL. The thrust area`s existing mission is reviewed and while it remains relevant to the future, it is too broad for the assigned resources. The scope of the thrust area`s mission is therefore narrowed to more specifically address precision in manufacturing. The course to pursue the new focus is plotted, and the projects for FY95 are briefly discussed.

Blaedel, K.L.

1995-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Yankee Mine oil seep: New research yields additional evidence of thrusting; original oil volume in the seep was possibly two orders of magnitude greater than previously calculated  

SciTech Connect

Mesomic thrusting combined with subsequent Eocene hydrothermal activity have created a regime favorable to major accumulation of both oil and gold in the Long Valley - Buck Mountain - Maverick Springs Range area of northeastern Nevada. Discoveries from ongoing exploration include: Numerous economic accumulations of hydrocarbon associated gold; various thrust relationships from surface geologic mapping and drill holes identifying Devonian rocks faulted onto Permian, Pennsylvanian (?) and Mississippian age rocks; numerous small scale compressional folds and faults indicative of both cast vergent (expected) and west vergent (unexpected) structural elements. Seismic data indicates that oil source rocks, primarily Chainman Shale and Pilot Shale formations, are present to the west in a downdip, subthrust position where hydrocarbon generation and migration would provide large oil volumes to migrate easterly (updip) prior to the formation of the Basin and Range. The Eocene age hydothermal cell which emplaced gold and oil bearing fluids into the Yankee and associated gold mines probably initiated directly below or east of the Yankee area, but certainly not west of it since no hydrothermal mineralization is present in the Yankee Mine 27-23X Well drilled by Pioneer Oil and Gas west of the mines.

Pinnell, M.L. [Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States); Anderson, D.W. [Anderson Geological Corp., Westminster, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

Fincke, J.R.

1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

Combustion Chamber Fluid Dynamics and Hypergolic Gel Propellant Chemistry Simulations for Selectable Thrust Rocket Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Army is developing gelled bipropellants and tactical missile propulsion systems that utilize these propellants for future combat systems. The use of hypergolic gel propellants introduces new capabilities for selectable thrust missiles while at the ...

Michael J. Nusca; Michael J. McQuaid

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source  

SciTech Connect

A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory, College of Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Orbit determination using modern filters/smoothers and continuous thrust modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of electric propulsion technology for spacecraft has led to reduced costs and longer lifespans for certain types of satellites. Because these satellites frequently undergo continuous thrust, predicting their ...

Folcik, Zachary James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microstructures and Rheology of a Limestone-Shale Thrust Fault  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Copper Creek thrust fault in the southern Appalachians places Cambrian over Ordovician sedimentary strata. The fault accommodated displacement of 15-20 km at 100-180 C. Along the hanging wall-footwall contact, microstructures within a ~2 cm thick calcite and shale shear zone suggest that calcite, not shale, controlled the rheology of the shear zone rocks. While shale deformed brittley, plasticity-induced fracturing in calcite resulted in ultrafine-grained (shale into the shear zone, shows the evolution of rheology within the shear zone. Sedimentary laminations 1 cm below the shear zone are cut by minor faults, stylolites, and fault-parallel and perpendicular calcite veins. At vein intersections, calcite grain size is reduced (to ~0.3 ?m), and microstructures include inter-and-intragranular fractures, four-grain junctions, and interpenetrating boundaries. Porosity rises to 6 percent from shale clasts (5-350 ?m) lie within an ultrafine-grained calcite (shale matrix. Ultrafinegrained calcite (shale. Calcite vein microstructures suggest veins continued to form during deformation. Fractures at twin-twin and twin-grain boundary intersections suggest grain size reduction by plasticity-induced fracturing, resulting in <1 ?m grains. Interpenetrating boundaries, four-grain junctions, and no LPO indicate the ultrafine-grained calcite deformed by viscous grain boundary sliding. The evolution of the ultrafine-grain shear zone rocks by a combination of plastic and brittle processes and the deformation of the interconnected network of ultrafine-grained calcite by viscous GBS enabled a large displacement along a narrow fault zone.

Wells, Rachel Kristen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A particle bed reactor based NTP in the 112,500 N thrust class  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the application of a Particle bed Reactor (PBR) to a 112,500 N thrust Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Engine. The method of analysis is described, followed by a presentation of the results. It is concluded that the PBR would result in a very competitive NTP engine. In addition, due to the high power densities possible with a PBR, high thrust/weight ratios are possible. This conclusion can be used to satisfy a variety of mission goals.

Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Lazareth, O.W. Jr.; Todosow, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

Tushar K Ghosh

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Melting temperature of iron in the core diamond cell experiments Guoyin Shen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1998. 3. Boehler, R., High pressure experiments and the phase diagram of lower mantle and core. Manghnani and Y. Syono (Terra Scientific Publishing Company/American Geophysical Union, Tokyo, Washington DC materials, Rev. Geophysics, 38, 221-245, 2000. Diamond cell technique Diamond as anvil and window Diamond

Shen, Guoyin

143

Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... microstructure, both surface and subsurface, and the statistics of bearing life. ... and Manufacturing Selection for the New AP1000 Nuclear Power Plant Design.

144

Microstructural Characterisation of Bainitic Bearing Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Bainitic heat treatments are applied for rolling bearings where there are typically high demands on toughness and crack propagation resistance .

145

Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

Devlin, David James (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Archuleta, Thomas Arthur (Espanola, NM); Barbero, Robert Steven (Santa Cruz, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

SciTech Connect

Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

148

Is Graphite a Diamonds Best Friend? New Information on Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 18th, 2003 November 18th, 2003 Is Graphite a Diamond's Best Friend? New Information on Material Transformation Science has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turning lead into gold. But a group of re-searchers using the GeoSoilEn-viroCARS (GSECARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to turn ordinary soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the

149

Designed Diamond Ground State via Optimized Isotropic Monotonic Pair Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply inverse statistical-mechanical methods to find a simple family of optimized isotropic, monotonic pair potentials, under certain constraints, whose ground states for a wide range of pressures is the diamond crystal. These constraints include desirable phonon spectra and the widest possible pressure range for stability. We also ascertain the ground-state phase diagram for a specific optimized potential to show that other crystal structures arise for other pressures. Cooling disordered configurations interacting with our optimized potential to absolute zero frequently leads to the desired diamond crystal ground state, revealing that the capture basin for the global energy minimum is large and broad relative to the local energy minima basins.

Etienne Marcotte; Frank H. Stillinger; Salvatore Torquato

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

E. Ampem-Lassen; D. A. Simpson; B. C. Gibson; S. Trpkovski; F. M. Hossain; S. T. Huntington; K. Ganesan; L. C. L. Hollenberg; S. Prawer

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

Ampem-Lassen, E; Gibson, B C; Trpkovski, S; Hossain, F M; Huntington, S T; Ganesan, K; Hollenberg, L C L; Prawer, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

van Dam, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SOME MECHANISMS OF DRY BEARING CHATTER  

SciTech Connect

Much study has been devoted to the motion of shafts in lubricated journal bearings. In contrast, the work done on the motion of shafts in unlubricated or dry bearings is negligible. The reason is obvious: in most applications, lubrication of the bearings is relatively simple. This is not the case in nuclear power plant appliciltion where bearings operate in low viscosity primary coolants of liquid metal or water without the benefit of coolant contaminating lubricants. For this reason, an analytical study was made to determine what motions would be excited in a shaft mounted in a dry bearing. The study splits naturally into two parts: (a) the shaft maintains continuous contact with the bearing, either rolling or sliding or a combination of the two; (b) the shaft dances (or chatters) about the bearing in a series of impacts. Typical motions in each of these cases (rolling oscillations, sliding oscillations, stick- slip oscillations, chatter) are calculated and plotted. Except for the stick- slip oscillation, none of the motions studied is self-sustaining; rolling and sliding oscillations will damp out due to frictional and other losses, and chatter degenerates into a rolling whirl of the shaft around the bearing. (auth)

Jahsman, W.E.; Miller, D.R.

1956-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Self-adjusting magnetic bearing systems  

SciTech Connect

A self-adjusting magnetic bearing automatically adjusts the parameters of an axially unstable magnetic bearing such that its force balance is maintained near the point of metastable equilibrium. Complete stabilization can be obtained with the application of weak restoring forces either from a mechanical bearing (running at near-zero load, thus with reduced wear) or from the action of residual eddy currents in a snubber bearing. In one embodiment, a torque is generated by the approach of a slotted pole to a conducting plate. The torque actuates an assembly which varies the position of a magnetic shunt to change the force exerted by the bearing. Another embodiment achieves axial stabilization by sensing vertical displacements in a suspended bearing element, and using this information in an electrical servo system. In a third embodiment, as a rotating eddy current exciter approaches a stationary bearing, it heats a thermostat which actuates an assembly to weaken the attractive force between the two bearing elements. An improved version of an electromechanical battery utilizing the designs of the various embodiments is described.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Self-adjusting magnetic bearing systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-adjusting magnetic bearing automatically adjusts the parameters of an axially unstable magnetic bearing such that its force balance is maintained near the point of metastable equilibrium. Complete stabilization can be obtained with the application of weak restoring forces either from a mechanical bearing (running at near-zero load, thus with reduced wear) or from the action of residual eddy currents in a snubber bearing. In one embodiment, a torque is generated by the approach of a slotted pole to a conducting plate. The torque actuates an assembly which varies the position of a magnetic shunt to change the force exerted by the bearing. Another embodiment achieves axial stabilization by sensing vertical displacements in a suspended bearing element, and using this information in an electrical servo system. In a third embodiment, as a rotating eddy current exciter approaches a stationary bearing, it heats a thermostat which actuates an assembly to weaken the attractive force between the two bearing elements. An improved version of an electromechanical battery utilizing the designs of the various embodiments is described. 7 figs.

Post, R.F.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Machine Vision System for Inspecting Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a machine vision system for inspecting bearings, which are an important part of electro-mechanical kWh meters. The system consists of a personal computer with a frame grabber, a black and white progressive scan CCD camera, ... Keywords: machine vision, quality control, bearing, eccentricity

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Nanostructure diamond cathodes can operate at relatively moderate vacuum pressures due to the inert surface/vacuum interface. September 27, 2013 A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Researchers at LANL have developed a novel, ultra-high-quality, robust electron source, which uses nanostructured polycrystalline diamond in a matrix with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode

159

Abstract Moving average algorithms for diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped window operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents fast moving window algorithms for calculating local statistics in a diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped windows of an image which is important for real-time applications. The algorithms for a diamond shaped window requires only seven or eight additions and subtractions per pixel. A fast sparse algorithm only needs four additions and subtractions for a sparse diamond shaped window. A number of other shapes of diamond windows such as skewed or parallelogram shaped diamond, long diamond, and lozenged diamond shaped, are also investigated. Similar algorithms are also developed for hexagon shaped windows. The computation for a hexagon window only needs eight additions and subtractions for each pixel. Fast algorithms for general polygonal shaped windows are also developed. The computation cost of all these algorithms is independent of the window size. A variety of synthetic and real images have been tested.

Changming Sun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Natural gas exploration associated with fracture systems in Alleghenian thrust faults in the Greenbrier Formation, southern West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hydrocarbon play of southern West Virginia targets the intersection of thrust faults with specific Mississippian reservoirs. Typical study area wells yield initial production rates (more)

Edmonds, Craig A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex, located in the Sevier belt hinterland, preserve a structural and metamorphic history that predates the middle Tertiary extension of the region. In the eastern Raft River Mountains, Cambrian-Permian rocks form two allochthons that occur in the hanging wall of the mid-Miocene Raft River detachment fault. Dramatically attenuated, metamorphosed Cambrian-Pennsylvanian strata

162

The Diamond Beamline Controls and Data Acquisition Software Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The software for the Diamond Light Source beamlines[1] is based on two complementary software frameworks: low level control is provided by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) framework[2][3] and the high level user interface is provided by the Java based Generic Data Acquisition or GDA[4][5]. EPICS provides a widely used

N. Rees; Diamond Controls Group; Diamond Data Acquisition Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fabrication of Aluminum Alloy-Based Diamond Grinding Wheel by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moreover, ability of CFRP drilling of the aluminum alloy-based diamond grinding wheel ... Accelerated Post-Weld Natural Ageing in Ultrasonic Welding Aluminium ..... Powder Metallurgy of High Strength Al84Gd6Ni7Co3 Gas-atomized Powder.

164

Faulting, fracturing, and sealing in foreland thrust belts: Examples from the subalpine chains  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of foreland thrust belts arises from source and reservoir rocks juxtaposed by the movement of thrust sheets, promoting maturation by loading and generating structural traps. Deformation in thrust belts can be localized on fault zones or distributed throughout thrust sheets; different deformation mechanisms operate to increase and decrease permeability. Migration and reservoir properties may be enhanced or reduced by faulting and fault-related deformation. These processes are examined in detail using examples from the northwest subalpine chains of France, a fold-and-thrust belt of well-differentiated Mesozoic shales and carbonates. Seeps of bitumen in foreland basin sediments indicate some migration of hydrocarbons along faults linking probable source and reservoir areas. Detailed examination of fault rocks and thrust sheets shows that fracture formation is an important strain mechanism which has the potential to form regions of enhanced permeability in structures such as hanging wall anticlines. However, the fractures observed are in general recemented, forming with crack-seal crystal growth. The faults themselves are complex zones up to tens of meters thick of subparallel anastomosing gouge, fractures, stylolites, and crystalline calcite, indicating synchronous cataclasis and pressure solution. The range of scales of fracturing suggests stick-slip (microseismic) fault activity. Permeability of the fault zones is enhanced during seismic fault slip and is otherwise steadily decreased by pressure solution and calcite deposition. The available migration pathways, and hence the location of potential reservoirs, is controlled by the timing, mechanisms, and extent of fault activity in this common and productive tectonic regime.

Bowler, S.; Butler, R.W.H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears  

SciTech Connect

Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CX-005128: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Categorical Exclusion Determination 28: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005128: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/25/2011 Location(s): Orem, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office United States Synthetic Corporation is proposing to use federal funding to design, fabricate and test polycrystalline diamond (PCD) thrust bearings for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) systems. A key design element in most MHK strategies would be robust bearings, which can operate for extended periods of time in the harsh marine environments. The goal of the proposed project is to demonstrate how PCD thrust bearings would reduce the cost of

168

CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84: Categorical Exclusion Determination 84: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Machines CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/28/2011 Location(s): Orem, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office United States Synthetic Corporation is proposing to use federal funding to design, fabricate and test polycrystalline diamond (PCD) thrust bearings for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) systems. A key design element in most MHK strategies would be robust bearings, which can operate for extended periods of time in the harsh marine environments. The goal of the proposed project is to demonstrate how PCD thrust bearings would reduce the cost of

169

Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

Elpern, David G. (Los Angeles, CA); McCabe, Niall (Torrance, CA); Gee, Mark (South Pasadena, CA)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Diamond Wire Saw for Precision Machining of Laser Target Components  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of precision laser targets requires a wide variety of specialized mesoscale manufacturing techniques. The diamond wire saw developed in this study provides the capability to precisely section meso-scale workpieces mounted on the assembly stations used by the Target Fabrication Group. This new capability greatly simplifies the fabrication of many types of targets and reduces the time and cost required to build the targets. A variety of materials are used to fabricate targets, including metals, plastics with custom designed chemical formulas, and aerogels of various densities. The materials are usually provided in the form of small pieces or cast rods that must be machined to the required shape. Many of these materials, such as metals and some plastics, can be trimmed using a parting tool on a diamond turning machine. However, other materials, such as aerogels and brittle materials, cannot be adequately cut with a parting tool. In addition, the geometry of the parts often requires that the workpieces be held in a special assembly station, which excludes the use of a parting tool. In the past, these materials were sectioned using a small, handheld coping saw that used a diamond-impregnated wire as a blade. This miniature coping saw was effective, but it required several hours to cut through certain materials. Furthermore, the saw was guided by hand and often caused significant damage to fragile aerogels. To solve these problems, the diamond wire saw shown in Figure 1 was developed. The diamond wire saw is designed to machine through materials that are mounted in the Target Fabrication Group's benchtop assembly stations. These assembly stations are the primary means of aligning and assembling target components, and there is often a need to machine materials while they are mounted in the assembly stations. Unfortunately, commercially available saws are designed for very different applications and are far too large to be used with the assembly stations. Therefore, a custom diamond wire saw was designed and constructed. The diamond wire saw cuts through workpieces using a continuous loop of diamond-impregnated wire of length 840 mm. The wire loop runs around several idler pulleys and is driven by a simple geared DC motor that rotates at 17 rpm. The linear speed of the wire is 107 inches/minute. The saw is oriented at an angle of 20{sup o} from horizontal, so the operator can view the wire through the cutout at the front end of the saw. When looking through a microscope or camera with a horizontal line of sight, the operator can clearly see the wire as it cuts through the workpiece, as shown in the right side of Figure 1. The saw is mounted on a two-axis stage that allows the operator to align the wire with the workpiece. To cut through the workpiece, the operator drives the wire through the workpiece by turning the feed micrometer. An image of the interior of the diamond wire saw appears in Figure 2. This picture was taken after removing the protective cover plate from the saw.

Bono, M J; Bennett, D W

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermal and Structural Constraints on the Tectonic Evolution of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah Thrust Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing of motion on thrust faults in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah (IWU) thrust belt comes from synorogenic sediments, apatite thermochronology and direct dating of fault rocks coupled with good geometrical constraints of the subsurface structure. The thermal history comes from the analyses of apatite thermochronology, thermal maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks and isotope analysis of fluid inclusions from syntectonic veins. New information from zircon fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He analysis provide constraints on the thermal evolution of the IWU thrust belt over geological time. These analyses demonstrate that the time-temperature pathway of the rocks sampled never reached the required conditions to reset the thermochronometers necessary to provide new timing constraints. Previous thermal constraints for maximum temperatures of IWU thrust belt rocks, place the lower limit at ~110C and the upper limit at ~328C. New zircon fission track results suggest an upper limit at ~180C for million year time scales. ID-TIMS and LA-ICPMS of syntectonic calcite veins suggest that new techniques for dating times of active deformation are viable given that radiogenic isotope concentrations occur at sufficient levels within the vein material.

Chapman, Shay Michael

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Bear Creek and Hwy 95 Intersection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plantation and presented aesthetic impact. * Kudzu treated with high-volume foliar spray of Tordon 101 by CSC in 2004 through 2006. Invasive Non-native Plant Management: Bear...

173

Sun Bear Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sun Bear Solar Ltd Place Hong Kong Sector Solar Product Hong Kong-based firm that manufactures solar product equipment, such as PV glass,...

174

A carbon nanotube bearing and Stodola rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nano-scale rotor supported on a cantilevered multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) shaft (Stodola configuration) is proposed. The nanotube is also expected to function as the bearing, since individual walls of a MWNT are not ...

Cook, Eugene Hightower

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Bear Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bear Creek Wind Farm Bear Creek Wind Farm Facility Bear Creek Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown owns majority Developer CEI Iberdrola Energy Purchaser PPL Corp. Location Near Bear Creek Village PA Coordinates 41.1801°, -75.7216° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1801,"lon":-75.7216,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

RUBBER BEARINGS FOR DOWN-HOLE PUMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synopsis of project activity: 1998--Awarded cost share grant from DOE. 1st Qtr 1999--Developed fail safe lubricating system. 2nd Qtr 1999--Performed first large scale test with nitrile based bearings. It failed due to material swelling. Failure was blamed on improper tolerance. 3rd Qtr 1999--Material tests were performed with autoclaves and exposure tests to Casa Diablo fluids. Testing of Viton materials began. Alternate bearing designs were developed to limit risk of improper tolerances. 4th Qtr 1999--Site testing indicated a chemical attack on the bearing material caused the test failure and not improper bearing tolerance. 1st Qtr 2000--The assistance of Brookhaven National Laboratory was obtained in evaluating the chemical attack. The National Laboratory also began more elaborate laboratory testing on bearing materials. 2nd Qtr 2000--Testing indicated Viton was an inappropriate material due to degradation in Casa Diablo fluid. Testing of EPDM began. 3rd Qtr 2001--EPDM bearings were installed for another large scale test. Bearings failed again due to swelling. Further testing indicated that larger then expected oil concentrations existed in lubricating water geothermal fluid causing bearing failure. 2002-2003--Searched for and tested several materials that would survive in hot salt and oil solutions. Kalrez{reg_sign}, Viton{reg_sign}ETP 500 and Viton{reg_sign}GF were identified as possible candidates. 2003-2005--Kalrez{reg_sign}has shown superior resistance to downhole conditions at Casa Diablo from among the various materials tested. Viton ETP-500 indicated a life expectancy of 13 years and because it is significantly less expensive then Kalrez{reg_sign}, it was selected as the bearing material for future testing. Unfortunately during the laboratory testing period Dupont Chemical chose to stop manufacturing this specific formulation and replaced it with Viton ETP 600S. The material is available with six different fillers; three based on zinc oxide and three based on silicon oxide. Samples of all six materials have been obtained and are being tested at the National Laboratory in Brookhaven, New York. This new material's properties as a bearing material and its ability to adhere to a bearings shell must be reviewed, but cost information deemed the material to be too expensive to be economical.

Bob Sullivan Mammoth Pacific, L.P.

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Passive magnetic bearings for vehicular electromechanical batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design of a passive magnetic bearing system to be used in electromechanical batteries (flywheel energy storage modules) suitable for vehicular use. One or two such EMB modules might, for example, be employed in a hybrid-electric automobile, providing efficient means for power peaking, i.e., for handling acceleration and regenerative braking power demands at high power levels. The bearing design described herein will be based on a ''dual-mode'' operating regime.

Post, R

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Flywheel energy storage with superconductor magnetic bearings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flywheel having superconductor bearings has a lower drag to lift ratio that translates to an improvement of a factor of ten in the rotational decay rate. The lower drag results from the lower dissipation of melt-processed YBCO, improved uniformity of the permanent magnet portion of the bearings, operation in a different range of vacuum pressure from that taught by the art, and greater separation distance from the rotating members of conductive materials.

Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reference Poster: Turbine Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to turbine and generator bearings accounts for a significant amount of lost generation in the power industry. There are numerous known damage mechanisms affecting these bearings, and as part of EPRIs technology transfer efforts, we have developed a reference poster. This poster provides clear, concise, and visual information for a wide variety of mechanisms and is meant to supplement related EPRI projects. By providing an overview of various issues as well as information on how to ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550.degree. C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Black Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.3087121°, -122.0031691° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.3087121,"lon":-122.0031691,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Particle? and photoinduced conductivity in type?IIa diamonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single?crystal natural type?IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle?induced conductivity and time?resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle?induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility ? and lifetime ? throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the materialsurface. For each technique

L. S. Pan; S. Han; D. R. Kania; S. Zhao; K. K. Gan; H. Kagan; R. Kass; R. Malchow; F. Morrow; W. F. Palmer; C. White; S. K. Kim; F. Sannes; S. Schnetzer; R. Stone; G. B. Thomson; Y. Sugimoto; A. Fry; S. Kanda; S. Olsen; M. Franklin; J. W. Ager III; P. Pianetta

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

I17: Surface Modification of Boron-doped Diamond with H2O Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the other hand, the wettability of diamond film surfaces can be altered by plasma exposure treatments. Investigation was carried on the surface modification...

185

Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

Mark A. Prelas

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Raman Shift of Stressed Diamond Anvils: Pressure Calibration and Culet Geometry Dependence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pressure dependence of the Raman shift of diamond for highly stressed anvils at the diamond-anvil sample interface has been measured for different culet shapes up to 180 GPa at ambient temperature. By using hydrogen samples, which constitute both a quasi-hydrostatic medium and a sensitive pressure sensor, some of the effects of culet and tip size have been determined. We propose that the divergent results in the literature can be partly ascribed to different anvil geometries. Experiments show increasing second order dependence of the diamond Raman shift with pressure for decreasing tip size. This is an important consideration when using the diamond anvils as a pressure sensor.

Baer, B J; Chang, M E; Evans, W J

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

Corrosion Resistance of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Lined Pipe to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Peter F. Ellis, Brian Chambers, Bill Boardman. On-Site Speaker ( Planned), Peter F. Ellis. Abstract Scope, Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings applied...

188

Study of bound hydrogen in powders of diamond nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to access feasibility of increasing albedo of very cold neutrons from powder of diamond nanoparticles, we studied hydrogen bound to surface of diamond nanoparticles, which causes unwanted losses of neutrons. We showed that one could decrease a fraction of hydrogen atoms from a ratio C{sub 7.4{+-}0.15}H to a ratio C{sub 12.4{+-}0.2}H by means of thermal treatment and outgasing of powder. Measurements of atomic excitation spectra of these samples, using a method of inelastic incoherent neutron scattering, indicate that residual hydrogen is chemically bound to carbon, while a removed fraction was composed of adsorbed water. The total cross section of scattering of neutrons with a wavelength of 4.4 Angstrom-Sign on residual hydrogen atoms equals 108 {+-} 2 b; it weakly changes with temperature. Thus preliminary cleaning of powder from hydrogen and its moderate cooling do not improve considerably neutron albedo from powder of nano-diamonds. An alternative approach is isotopic replacement of hydrogen by deuterium.

Krylov, A. R.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzychka, A. Yu. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Nesvizhevsky, V. V., E-mail: nesvizhevsky@ill.eu [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A. S. [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays  

SciTech Connect

To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Annealing dependence of diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights probed by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. The platinum contacts on oxygen-terminated diamond was found to provide a higher Schottky barrier and therefore a better blocking contact than that of the silver contact in diamond-based electronic devices.

Gaowei, M.; Muller, E. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Rumaiz, A. K. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Weiland, C.; Cockayne, E.; Woicik, J. C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, J. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Smedley, J. [Instrumentation Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Geothermal Facility Canyon Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility General Information Name Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility Facility Bear Canyon Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Clear Lake, California, Coordinates 38.762851116528°, -122.69217967987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.762851116528,"lon":-122.69217967987,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

Numerical investigation of the thrust efficiency of a laser propelled vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flow situation for a thruster propelled by ablated gas which is energized by a laser pulse is numerically simulated. The flow is axisymmetric and nonsteady, and is assumed to be inviscid due to its high Reynolds number. The high pressure expansion of the laser heated gas generates thrust as it pushes against the vehicle. Gas expansion lateral to the thrust vector causes performance to decrease. The vehicle geometry and the laser pulse characteristics determine the degree to which the flow is one dimensional. As the thruster's parameters are varied, its impulse is calculated and compared to the limiting impulse of a one-dimensional system, and thus the thrust efficiency is computed. Lateral expansion losses computed by simulating the flow of the expanding gas time-accurately on a computer are far less than losses predicted using the method of characteristics, which is the best alternate means of computation. Flows which exhibit a substantial amount of lateral expansion can still yield an expansion efficiency which exceeds 70%. This finding has significant implications on the eventual design of flight hardware. Steger and Warming's flux split numerics for the Euler equations are modified for blast simulations into near vacuum ambient conditions. At the interface between the near vacuum ambient and the wave front, the solution is first order accurate but sufficiently robust to handle pressure ratios exceeding one million and density ratios exceeding 10,000 between the thrust gas and the ambient gas. Elsewhere the solution is second order accurate. The majority of the calculations performed assume an ideal gas equation of state with {gamma} = 1.2. The propellant Lithium Hydride has shown excellent promise in the laboratory, yielding I{sub sp} = 800-1000 sec. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of LiH is undertaken, with a variable {gamma} of from 1.25 to 1.66 resulting from the kinetic assumptions of ionization equilibrium and frozen chemistry. These additional mechanisms are then incorporated into the efficiency calculations.

mulroy jr

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chemical foaming of water-bearing explosives  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for preparing foamed semi-solid colloidal dispersions of water-bearing blasting agents, especially water gels or thickened water-bearing explosives, and emulsion-type blasting agents. It consists of mixing inorganic oxidizing salt, fuel, and water. The improvement consists of separately incorporating into the mix each component of a 2-component foaming agent composition: (1) a hydrazine or derivative and (2) an oxidizing agent that aids in decomposing the hydrazine or derivative to produce gas. This foams and sensitizes the blasting agent. When thickener is added to the mix, the thickener should be nonoxidizable in the mix during preparation of the blasting agent. (20 claims)

Chrisp, J.D.

1972-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame K Abstract Diamond growth in low pressure combustion flames was studied using a safer, more economical and chemical kinetic time scales in the combustion reactor. 1 Present Address: 3M Corporation, Bldg. 60-1N-01

Dandy, David

196

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds Shohei Chiashi diameter attract attention. Here, we perform CVD growth by using nano-diamond particles as the catalyst [1] and investigate the CVD condition dependence of SWNT tube diameter. The average diameter of the as-received nano

Maruyama, Shigeo

197

Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Design and Application of CVD Diamond Windows for X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Yifei [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg 401, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cookson, David [University of Chicago, CARS, APS Sector 15, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg. 434D, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Design and application of CVD diamond windows for x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Y.; Cookson, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Chicago

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sleeping Bear Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sleeping Bear Wind Farm Sleeping Bear Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sleeping Bear Wind Farm Facility Sleeping Bear Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Chermac Energy Corp./Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser AEP - Public Service of Oklahoma Location Harper County OK Coordinates 36.63°, -99.5° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.63,"lon":-99.5,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

The Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears Grizzly and the Big Brown Bears Nature Bulletin No. 655-A November 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GRIZZLY AND THE BIG BROWN BEARS In the early days, more tall tales were told about "Old Ephraim, " the grizzly bear, than any other animal. It had the reputation of being a bloodthirsty enemy of man and was given the scientific name Ursus horribilis by a taxonomist who had never seen a live one but had heard and read some of those yarns about its terrible ferocity and prodigious strength. The Grizzly is very intelligent and shrewd but, actually, has a rather phlegmatic disposition. It avoids people and will not attack unless provoked. Then, a female with cubs is unpredictable, and big game hunters say that a wounded grizzly is the most dangerous animal on earth. But ordinarily, as Earnest Thompson Seton observed, Ephraim is a peaceful giant who is perfectly satisfied to let you alone if you leave him alone.

204

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

Pern, Fu-Jann (Golden, CO); Touryan, Kenell J. (Indian Hills, CO); Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos (Yerevan, AM); Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich (Moscow, RU)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Charging characteritiscs of ultrananocrystalline diamond in RF MEMS capacitive switches.  

SciTech Connect

Modifications to a standard capacitive MEMS switch process have been made to allow the incorporation of ultra-nano-crystalline diamond as the switch dielectric. The impact on electromechanical performance is minimal. However, these devices exhibit uniquely different charging characteristics, with charging and discharging time constants 5-6 orders of magnitude quicker than conventional materials. This operation opens the possibility of devices which have no adverse effects of dielectric charging and can be operated near-continuously in the actuated state without significant degradation in reliability.

Sumant, A. V.; Goldsmith, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J.; Zheng, H.; Hwang, J. C. M.; Palego, C.; Wang, W.; Carpick, R.; Adiga, V.; Datta, A.; Gudeman, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The effect of fractures, faults, and sheared shale zones on the hydrology of Bear Creek Burial Grounds A-South, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous hydrologic models of flow in Bear Creek Valley have presented lateral flow as occurring through the Nolichucky Shale in parallel to strike fractures within thin carbonate beds; the effects of faults were not considered. This study presents a ground water flow model that incorporates lateral flow through parallel-to-strike fractures and thrust faults, and perpendicular-to-strike cross valley strike-slip faults. These latter cross-valley structures cause flow to be diverted to other strikeparallel zones of enhanced permeability towards the south side of the valley. Using core, geophysical and hydrologic data from five boreholes in the Bear Creek Burial Grounds three types of potential fluid-flow conduits were identified: fractures, faults, and shale shear zones. Open fractures decrease in abundance with depth and tend to occur most frequently in oolitic limestone beds relative to other carbonate lithologies. Fractures below 1 00 ft BGS in the Nolichucky Shale and below 250 ft in the Maynardville Limestone do not appear to be caused by dissolution; instead, they appear to be the result of a change in the local stress field due to erosion effects. Faults, both cross-valley and thrust faults, and sheared shale zones are interpreted to disrupt the lateral continuity of the bedding and increase the rock-mass permeability of the Nolichucky Shale, permitting ground water to flow these structural zones. This study provided opportunity to interpret DNAPL migration patterns from Burial Ground A-South. DNAPL migration parallel to the valley's axis is affected by parallel-to-strike fractures and thrust faults, and its lateral migration perpendicular to strike is influenced by cross valley strike-slip faults and decreasing collect at depth because of decreasing fracture occurrence and reduced permeability and then migrate laterally along the cross valley strike-slip faults until it encounters and enters a zone of higher permeability parallel to strike.

Hollon, Dwight Mitchell

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radial Air Bearing Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

209

Design and control of a linear bearing durability tester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to better understand the characteristics of linear bearings under high load and high speed conditions, a machine capable of testing bearings under these conditions was created. The machine is flexible in its design, ...

Pope, Benjamin J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.268046°, -104.201742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.268046,"lon":-104.201742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind (07) Wind Farm Wind (07) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.274903°, -104.183013° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.274903,"lon":-104.183013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Sparkling Diamonds Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under construction. The focus on a construction site tends to be on keeping the project on schedule, and not on energy matters although the two can, and need to, complement each other. There were two motivating factors in completing an energy review during the construction phase: cost and environmental responsibilities. De Beers Canada is working to identify a long term strategy to manage their business in a sustainable manner while mitigating the energy costs of their on-site power usage. The paper will highlight the: Approach De Beers took; Challenges of conducting an energy assessment at a construction site; Energy issues exposed by a sub-arctic climate Results achieved; Next steps to achieve a sustainable energy management program. The paper will also discuss how De Beers Canada is incorporating the learning and the systems development benefits from the energy review. The organization is building these aspects into their overall Carbon Emissions and Energy Management System that will be implemented at their three new sites across Canada.

Feldman, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond micro-resonators.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of {approx}800 C. The films have {approx}4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, {approx}1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Sumant, A. V.; Adiga, V. P.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlis, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Supporting Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure Analysis of Glass Breakage Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

215

Bear, Delaware: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bear, Delaware: Energy Resources Bear, Delaware: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.6292788°, -75.6582628° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6292788,"lon":-75.6582628,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Buffalo Bear Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Buffalo Bear Wind Farm Facility Buffalo Bear Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser Western Farmers Electric Coop Location OK Coordinates 36.573681°, -99.573275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.573681,"lon":-99.573275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

217

Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.  

SciTech Connect

Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

219

Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar diamond accelerating structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have directly measured THz wakefields induced by a subpicosecond, intense relativistic electron bunch in a diamond loaded accelerating structure via the wakefield acceleration method. We present here the beam test results from the diamond based structure. Diamond has been chosen for its high breakdown threshold and unique thermoconductive properties. Fields produced by a leading (drive) beam were used to accelerate a trailing (witness) electron bunch, which followed the drive bunch at a variable distance. The energy gain of a witness bunch as a function of its separation from the drive bunch describes the time structure of the generated wakefield.

Antipov, S.; Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kanareykin, A.; Butler, J. E. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gai, W. [Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent experiments were carried out to determine the transport of the electrons within the diamond and their emission at the surface. In transmission mode measurements, the diamond amplifier was coated with metal on both sides, so results simply depend only on the electron transport within the diamond. The SEY for this mode provides one secondary electron per 20eV energy, which gives the gain of more than 200 for 4.7keV (effective energy) primary electrons under 2MV/m. Laser detrapping can help the signal maintain the gain with lops pulse and duty cycle of 1.67 x 10{sup -7}. In emission mode measurements, in which the diamond is prepared as in the actual application, the SEY is {approx}20 for 700eV (effective energy) primary electrons under 1.21MV/m. The electric field applied and the primary electron energy is limited by the experiment setup, but the results show good trend toward large gain under high field. Thermal emittance of the diamond secondary emission is critical for the beam application. A careful design is setup to measure with very fine precision and accuracy of 0.01eV.

Wu,Q.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

STATIC SODIUM TEST OF WESTINGHOUSE FLOW CONTROLLER BEARING  

SciTech Connect

Tests were carried out to determine the action of a static sodium environment on a special high-temperature ball bearing while operating at the specified speed and loading. The test bearing was operated at 85 rpm and 870 pounds axial load for 385 hr at 1000 deg F. Visual inspection of the test bearing showed a very marked increase in roughness of both the balls and the ball races. Details of the measurements and a photograph of the bearing parts after test are given. On the basis of this test it did not appear that this bearing will be satisfactory for the service intended. (M.C.G.)

Cygan, R.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of Designer Diamond Anvils for High Pressure-High-Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is to develop the next generation of designer diamond anvils that can perform simultaneous joule heating and temperature profile measurements in a diamond anvil cell. A series of tungsten-rhenium thermocouples will be fabricated onto to the anvil and encapsulated by a chemical vapor deposited diamond layer to allow for a complete temperature profile measurement across the anvil. The tip of the diamond anvil will be engineered to reduce the thermal conductivity so that the tungsten-heating coils can be deposited on top of this layer. Several different approaches will be investigated to engineer the tip of the diamond anvil for reduction in thermal conductivity (a) isotopic mixture of 12C and 13C in the diamond layer, (b) doping of diamond with impurities (nitrogen and/or boron), and (c) growing diamond in a higher concentration of methane in hydrogen plasma. Under this academic alliance with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), PI and his graduate students will use the lithographic and diamond polishing facility at LLNL. This proposed next generation of designer diamond anvils will allow multi-tasking capability with the ability to measure electrical, magnetic, structural and thermal data on actinide materials with unparallel sensitivity in support of the stockpile stewardship program.

Yogesh K. Vohra

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

A novel numerical analysis of Hall Effect Thruster and its application in simultaneous design of thruster and optimal low-thrust trajectory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) are a form of electric propulsion device which uses external electrical energy to produce thrust. When compared to various other electric (more)

Kwon, Kybeom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microsoft Word - DiamondB_Easement_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2011 16, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to purchase the Diamond B conservation easement. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-800-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there will be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 28N, Range 20W, Sections 28 and 33 in Flathead County, MT

226

Creation of multiple identical single photon emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single photon emitters are also required. However typical solid-state single photon sources are dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here, we present controllable growth of bright silicon-vacancy (SiV-) centres in bulk diamond which intrinsically show almost identical emission (spectral overlap of up to 83%) and near transform-limited excitation linewidths. We measure the photo-physical properties of defects at room and cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate incorporation into a solid immersion lens (SIL). Our results have impact upon the application of single photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography, and the production of next generation fluorophores for bio-imaging.

Lachlan J. Rogers; Kay D. Jahnke; Luca Marseglia; Christoph. Mller; Boris Naydenov; Hardy Schauffert; C. Kranz; T. Teraji; Junichi Isoya; Liam P. McGuinness; Fedor Jelezko

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Experimental Design for Laser Produced Shocks in Diamond Anvil Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on pre-compressed samples. A diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been used to statically compress water to 1 GPa and then strong shocked with an energetic laser. The use of intense laser irradiation can drive shocks in targets making it possible to study the equation of state (EOS) of samples well into the hundreds of GPQ regime. Generally, such experiments employ a sample initially at normal density and standard pressure. Therefore providing data on the principal Hugoniot. In this experiment the initial state of the sample was varied to provide data off the principal Hugoniot. We report the work that was done on the Vulcan laser and describe a method to achieve off principal Hugoniot data.

Moon, S J; Cauble, R; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M; Hicks, D; Da Silva, L B; Mackinon, A; Wallace, R; Hammel, B; Hsing, W; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K M; Benedetti, L R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi, A; Huser, G; Henry, E; Batani, D; Willi, O; Pasley, J; Henning, G; Loubeyre, P; Neely, D; Notley, M; Danson, C

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

230

Orbital ice: An exact Coulomb phase on the diamond lattice  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the existence of an orbital Coulomb phase as the exact ground state of a p-orbital exchange Hamiltonian on the diamond lattice. The Coulomb phase is an emergent state characterized by algebraic dipolar correlations and a gauge structure resulting from local constraints (ice rules) of the underlying lattice models. For most ice models on the pyrochlore lattice, these local constraints are a direct consequence of minimizing the energy of each individual tetrahedron. On the contrary, the orbital ice rules are emergent phenomena resulting from the quantum orbital dynamics. We show that the orbital ice model exhibits an emergent geometrical frustration by mapping the degenerate quantum orbital ground states to the spin-ice states obeying the 2-in-2-out constraints on the pyrochlore lattice. We also discuss possible realization of the orbital ice model in optical lattices with p-band fermionic cold atoms.

Chern Giawei [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wu Congjun [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ultrafast QND measurements based on diamond-shape artificial atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a Quantum Non Demolition (QND) read-out scheme for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a resonator in a circuit QED architecture, for which we estimate a very high measurement fidelity without Purcell effect limitations. The device consists of two transmons coupled by a large inductance, giving rise to a diamond-shape artificial atom with a logical qubit and an ancilla qubit interacting through a cross-Kerr like term. The ancilla is strongly coupled to a transmission line resonator. Depending on the qubit state, the ancilla is resonantly or dispersively coupled to the resonator, leading to a large contrast in the transmitted microwave signal amplitude. This original method can be implemented with state of the art Josephson parametric amplifier, leading to QND measurements in a few tens of nanoseconds with fidelity as large as 99.9 %.

I. Diniz; E. Dumur; O. Buisson; A. Auffves

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-center in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited in the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and its beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-center as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

Andreas Albrecht; Guy Koplovitz; Alex Retzker; Fedor Jelezko; Shira Yochelis; Danny Porath; Yuval Nevo; Oded Shoseyov; Yossi Paltiel; Martin B. Plenio

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Characterization and Qualification of a Precision Diamond Saw  

SciTech Connect

A precision diamond saw was characterized and qualified for production using the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network. This characterization was performed in three steps. First the equipment was evaluated and characterized, and then a process was developed and characterized to saw cofire networks. Finally, the characterized process was qualified for production using the MET network. During the development of the low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) processes needed to build the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network, a problem was uncovered. The laser process planned for scribing and separating was found to weaken the LTCC material by about 30%. A replacement process was needed, and precision diamond sawing was chosen. During the equipment evaluation and characterization, several parameters were investigated. These were cut depth, feed rate, spindle speed, and saw blade thickness. Once these were understood the process was then developed. Initially 24 variables were identified for the process, and eventually 12 of these variables were found to be critical. These variables were then adjusted until a process envelope was found that produced acceptable product. Finally parameters were chosen from the middle of the process envelope for production. With the production process set, the next step was to qualify it for production. Two criteria had to be met: visual acceptability and bending strength. The parts were examined under a microscope and found to be visually acceptable. Parts were then put through a four-point bend test, and the strengths recorded were equivalent to those measured in the past. With the completion of this work and the acceptable results, this process was qualified for production use.

Morgenstern, H.A.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Diamond amplified photocathode Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York Developed in: 2004-2007 Result of NP research:

235

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Growth and electrical characterisation of {delta}-doped boron layers on (111) diamond surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition protocol for the growth of {delta}-doping of boron in diamond is presented, using the (111) diamond plane as a substrate for diamond growth. AC Hall effect measurements have been performed on oxygen terminated {delta}-layers and desirable sheet carrier densities ({approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) for field-effect transistor application are reported with mobilities in excess of what would expected for equivalent but thicker heavily boron-doped diamond films. Temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that the grown layers have metallic-like electrical properties with high cut-off frequencies and low thermal impedance activation energies with estimated boron concentrations of approximately 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}.

Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Sato, Syunsuke; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi [Department of Electronic and Photonic Systems, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Morris, Richard [Advanced SIMS Projects, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information August 2012 New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond Squeezing creates new class of...

238

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Cutoff Energies, and Tuning Range .......................27 3.3 Absorption .............................................................36 4.2 Direct Cooling of Diamonds ............................................................39 4.3 Operation at Cryogenic Temperatures .................................................39 4.4 Cooling through

Kemner, Ken

239

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond: electronic properties and hyperfine parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond have been studied using first principles calculations. We computed the symmetry, formation and transition energies, and hyperfine parameters of cobalt impurities in isolated configurations and in complexes involving vacancies and nitrogen atoms. We found that the Co impurity in a divacant site is energetically favorable and segregates nitrogen atoms in its neighborhood. Our results were discussed in the context of the recently observed Co-related electrically active centers in synthetic diamond.

Larico, R; Machado, W V M; Justo, J F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flywheel energy storage advances using HTS bearings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-Temperature-Superconducting (HT) bearings have the potential to reduce idling losses and make flywheel energy storage economical. Demonstration of large, high-speed flywheels is key to market penetration. Toward this goal, a flywheel system has been developed and tested with 5-kg to 15-kg disk-shaped rotors. Rlm speeds exceeded 400 mls and stored energies were >80 W-hr. Test implementation required technological advances in nearly all aspects of the flywheel system. Features and limitations of the design and tests are discussed, especially those related to achieving additional energy storage.

Mulcahy, T. M.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pulsed ion beam methods for in situ characterization of diamond film deposition processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) have properties which in principle make them ideally suited to a wide variety of thin-film applications. Their widespread use as thin films, however, has been limited for a number of reasons related largely to the lack of understanding and control of the nucleation and growth processes. Real-time, in situ studies of the surface of the growing diamond film are experimentally difficult because these films are normally grown under a relatively high pressure of hydrogen, and conventional surface analytical methods require an ultrahigh vacuum environment. It is believed, however, that the presence of hydrogen during growth is necessary to stabilize the corrugated diamond surface structure and thereby prevent the formation of the graphitic phase. Pulsed ion beam-based analytical methods with differentially pumped ion sources and particle detectors are able to characterize the uppermost atomic layer of a film during, growth at ambient pressures 5-7 orders of magnitude higher than other surface-specific analytical methods. We describe here a system which has been developed for the purpose of determining the hydrogen concentration and bonding sites on diamond surfaces as a function of sample temperature and ambient hydrogen pressure under hot filament CVD growth conditions. It is demonstrated that as the hydrogen partial pressure increases, the saturation hydrogen coverage of the surface of a CVD diamond film increases, but that the saturation level depends on the atomic hydrogen concentration and substrate temperature.

Krauss, A.R.; Smentkowski, V.S.; Zuiker, C.D.; Gruen, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Im, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Schultz, J.A.; Waters, K. [Ionwerks Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Chang, R.P.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Positive contact, self retaining bearing seals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra-low friction bearing including an inner race, an outer race, bearing elements engaged between the inner and outer races and a seal between the inner and outer races is disclosed. The seal includes first and second sealing washers. The first washer has an outer diameter greater than an inner diameter of the outer race and an inner diameter greater than the outer diameter of the inner race. The second washer has an inner diameter less than the outer diameter of the inner race and an outer diameter less than the inner diameter of the outer race. The first washer slidably engages the outer race, the second washer slidably engages the inner race and the washers overlap and slidably engage one another. One of the washers snap fits into its respective inner or outer race while the other washer engages a stepped surface of the other of the inner and outer races. The grooved and stepped surface are offset from one another in a longitudinal direction of the races such that the washers are conically loaded thus providing a seal between the inner and outer races sufficient to prevent lubricant and contaminating particles from passing therethrough. The washers are made from a non-metallic semi-flexible low-modulus material.

Johnson, Bruce H. (Kansas City, MO); Larsen, Lawrence E. (Kansas City, MO); Welch, Edmund F. (Kansas City, MO)

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) radial air bearing heat exchangers. Rotary air bearing heat exchanger technology simultaneously solves four long standing problems of conventional "fan-plus-finned-heat-sink" heat exchangers. Project Description This project seeks to design, fabricate, and test successive generations of prototype radial air bearing heat exchanger devices based on lessons learned and further insights into device optimization, computational fluid dynamic studies for parametric optimization and determination of scaling laws, and laboratory measurement of flow field and heat transfer

244

Hydrogen trapping in bearing steels: mechanisms and alloy design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal by white structure flaking on wind turbine bearing inner ring [3]. This type of failure demands complete replacement of the bearing. In addition, mon- itoring the development of damage is difficult when it starts under the surface, so it is hardly... diffusion into steel may cause premature cracking in various components such as tempered martensitic and bainitic bearing parts, pearlitic and bainitic rail tracks, gear boxes, wind turbines, aerospace and marine engine parts. The damage caused by hydrogen...

Szost, Blanka Angelika

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which

246

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Hydrate-Bearing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and EngineeringGeological Implications Last Reviewed 6192013 DE-FE0009897 Goal The primary goal of...

247

Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fretting Corrosion Induced Fracture of a Floating Bearing Base Plate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will decribe the case of the rupture of a 250 Tons Yankee drum free bearing floating base plate made in a hardened low alloyed carbon steel...

249

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project ? Countdown to Startup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date: March 19, 2012 Media Contact: Natalie Packer, 208-533-0253 Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Countdown to Startup Marking completion of another major...

250

Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in US Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled ``Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System.`` The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity. 8 figs.

Post, R.F.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

Bear Valley Electric Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Name Bear Valley Electric Service Place California Utility Id 17612 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 General Service, less than 20 kW A-1 General Service, less than 20 kW - Direct Access Commercial A-2 General Service, 20 to 50 kW A-2 General Service, 20 to 50 kW - Direct Access A-3 General Service, more than 50 kW Commercial

252

Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection.

Khuri-Yakub, B. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Hsieh, Chung-Kao (Stanford, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection. 5 figures.

Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chungkao Hsieh.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

Particle- and photoinduced conductivity in type-IIa diamonds  

SciTech Connect

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single-crystal natural type-IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle-induced conductivity and time-resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle-induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility [mu] and lifetime [tau] throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the material surface. For each technique, the [mu][tau] product was determined by integration of the respective signals. The collection distance that a free carrier drifts in an electric field was extracted by each technique. As a result, a direct comparison of bulk and surface electrical properties was performed. The data from these two techniques are in agreement, indicating no difference in the electrical properties between the bulk and the surface of the material. The collection distance continues to increase with field up to 25 kV/cm without saturation. Using the transient photoconductivity technique the carrier mobility was measured separately and compared with a simple electron-phonon scattering model. The general characteristics of carrier mobility, lifetime, and collection distance at low electric field appear to be adequately described by the model.

Pan, L.S.; Han, S.; Kania, D.R. (Laser Division, L-476, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Zhao, S.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Palmer, W.F.; White, C. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)); Kim, S.K.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Thomson, G.B. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)); Sugimoto, Y. (KEK Laboratory, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305 (Japan)); Fry, A. (Physics Division, SSC Laboratory, Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States)); Kanda, S.; Olsen, S. (Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)); Franklin, M. (Department of Physics, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)); Ager, J.W. III (Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Pianetta, P

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (<500 fs FWHM) broadband THz pulses. The spectrum of this source presents an ideal probe for many low energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the techno logy was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. 10 complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D activity.

Rule, Keith; Perry, Erik; Parsells, Robert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

Ladwig, Angela

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Recent developments in polycrystalline diamond-drill-bit design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of design criteria for polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits for use in severe environments (hard or fractured formations, hot and/or deep wells) is continuing. This effort consists of both analytical and experimental analyses. The experimental program includes single point tests of cutters, laboratory tests of full scale bits, and field tests of these designs. The results of laboratory tests at simulated downhole conditions utilizing new and worn bits are presented. Drilling at simulated downhole pressures was conducted in Mancos Shale and Carthage Marble. Comparisons are made between PDC bits and roller cone bits in drilling with borehole pressures up to 5000 psi (34.5 PMa) with oil and water based muds. The PDC bits drilled at rates up to 5 times as fast as roller bits in the shale. In the first field test, drilling rates approximately twice those achieved with conventional bits were achieved with a PDC bit. A second test demonstrated the value of these bits in correcting deviation and reaming.

Huff, C.F.; Varnado, S.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L. (China University of Geosciences)

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

Swain; Greg M.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Condition Monitoring of Fans With Rolling Element Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on high-frequency vibration caused by the impacts of bearing pits and spalls can help utilities schedule equipment maintenance. One data collection technique, developed through long-term monitoring of combustion air axial fans at the Pennsylvania Electric Company Homer City station, helps plant personnel anticipate failures of draft fan antifriction bearings by several months.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as

264

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for

265

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

266

Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison); (INTEL)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Analytical and experimental investigations of hybrid air foil bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air foil bearings offer several advantages over oil-lubricated bearings in high speed micro-turbomachinery. With no contact between the rotor and bearings, the air foil bearings have higher service life and consequently lesser standstills between operations. However, the foil bearings have reliability issues that come from dry rubbing during start-up/shutdown and limited heat dissipation capability. Regardless of lubricating media, the hydrodynamic pressure generated provides only load support but no dissipation of parasitic energy generated by viscous drag and the heat conducted from other parts of the machine through the rotor. The present study is a continuation of the work on hybrid air foil bearings (HAFB) developed by Kim and Park, where they present a new concept of air foil bearing combining hydrodynamic air foil bearing with hydrostatic lift. Their experimental studies show that HAFB has superior performance compared to its hydrodynamic counterpart in load capacity and cooling performance. In this article, the bearing stiffness and damping coefficients of HAFB are calculated using a linear perturbation method developed for HAFB. The study focuses on circular HAFB with a single continuous top foil supported by bump foil. The research also includes a parametric study which outlines the dependence of the stiffness and damping coefficients on various design parameters like supply pressure ( P s ), feed parameter ( ? s ), excitation frequency (v), and bearing number (?). Furthermore the present research also includes experimental investigation of HAFB with bump foil as compliant structure. In the first phase of the experimental research a high speed test facility was designed and fabricated. The facility has the capability of running up to 90,000 RPM and has an electric motor drive. This article gives detailed description of this test rig and also includes data acquired during the commissioning phase of the test rig. The test rig was then used to measure the load capacity of HAFB.

Kumar, Manish

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Rainer Wallny

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

A new diamond biosensor with integrated graphitic microchannels for detecting quantal exocytic events from chromaffin cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantal release of catecholamines from neuroendocrine cells is a key mechanism which has been investigated with a broad range of materials and devices, among which carbon-based materials such as carbon fibers, diamond-like carbon, carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline diamond. In the present work we demonstrate that a MeV-ion-microbeam lithographic technique can be successfully employed for the fabrication of an all-carbon miniaturized cellular bio-sensor based on graphitic micro-channels embedded in a single-crystal diamond matrix. The device was functionally characterized for the in vitro recording of quantal exocytic events from single chromaffin cells, with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, opening promising perspectives for the realization of monolithic all-carbon cellular biosensors.

Picollo, Federico; Vittone, Ettore; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nano-fabricated solid immersion lenses registered to single emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a technique for fabricating micro- and nano-structures incorporating fluorescent defects in diamond with a positional accuracy in the hundreds of nanometers. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) etching we first locate a suitable defect with respect to registration marks on the diamond surface and then etch a structure using these coordinates. We demonstrate the technique here by etching an 8 micron diameter hemisphere positioned such that a single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect lies at its origin. This type of structure increases the photon collection efficiency by removing refraction and aberration losses at the diamond-air interface. We make a direct comparison of the fluorescence photon count rate before and after fabrication and observe an 8-fold increase due to the presence of the hemisphere.

L. Marseglia; J. P. Hadden; A. C. Stanley-Clarke; J. P. Harrison; B. Patton; Y. -L. D. Ho; B. Naydenov; F. Jelezko; J. Meijer; P. R. Dolan; J. M. Smith; J. G. Rarity; J. L. O'Brien

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

Greg M. Swain, PI

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

New Empirical Relationship between Thrust Coefficient and Induction Factor for the Turbulent Windmill State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines sometimes experience the turbulent windmill state during startup or shutdown. This rarely happens during normal operation, so it has little effect on power curves or energy production. However, for completeness we need to be able to model situations where the axial induction factor exceeds 0.5. Classical momentum theory, which shows a relationship between the thrust coefficient and the axial induction factor, is not valid in this region. Glauert plotted some experimental data taken by Lock in the 1920s against this parabolic relationship and found very poor agreement for operation in this high-induction state. He proposed a new empirical relationship to fit the experimental data. Unfortunately, the new empirical curve does not account for tip or hub losses. Others have proposed multiplying the axial induction factor by the loss factor to correct the curve, but this still leaves a mathematical no-man's-land between the classical curve and the modified version of Glauert's empirical curve. The purpose of this paper is to document the derivation of a new curve that accounts for tip and hub losses and eliminates the numerical problems of the previous approaches.

Buhl, M.L., Jr.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sodium Bearing Waste Processing Alternatives Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A multidisciplinary team gathered to develop a BBWI recommendation to DOE-ID on the processing alternatives for the sodium bearing waste in the INTEC Tank Farm. Numerous alternatives were analyzed using a rigorous, systematic approach. The data gathered were evaluated through internal and external peer reviews for consistency and validity. Three alternatives were identified to be top performers: Risk-based Calcination, MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange. A dual-path through early Conceptual design is recommended for MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange since Risk-based Calcination does not require design. If calcination alternatives are not considered based on giving Type of Processing criteria significantly greater weight, the CsIX/TRUEX alternative follows CsIX in ranking. However, since CsIX/TRUEX shares common uncertainties with CsIX, reasonable backups, which follow in ranking, are the TRUEX and UNEX alternatives. Key uncertainties must be evaluated by the decision-makers to choose one final alternative. Those key uncertainties and a path forward for the technology roadmapping of these alternatives is provided.

Murphy, James Anthony; Palmer, Brent J; Perry, Keith Joseph

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Calculation of the charge-carrier mobility in diamond at low temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrepancies between the quasi-elastic and inelastic approaches to the calculation of the electron and hole mobilities in diamond at low temperatures when the carrier scattering from acoustic phonons becomes significantly inelastic have been numerically estimated. The calculations showed that the mobility described by a close-to-equilibrium distribution function differs several times from that obtained within the quasi-elastic approach even at 20 K. The results obtained are important for interpreting the low-temperature electrical experiments on high-purity diamond single crystals.

Baturin, A. S.; Gorelkin, V. N.; Soloviev, V. R.; Chernousov, I. V., E-mail: ichernousov@inbox.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Paramont's Black Bear No. 4 mine does it right, again  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paramont Coal Company Virginia, LLC, a subsidiary of Alpha Natural Resources, recently won the '2007 overall award for excellence in mining and reclamation from the Virginia Division of Mined Land Reclamation and the Virginia Mining Association. Coal People Magazine recently visited Black Bear No. 4 mine where a settling pond was being removed and stream bed placed to drain the area, part of the 451-acre award winning reclamation project. The article recounts discussions with mining engineers about the company's operations with emphasis on the Black Bear No. 4 mine. Black Bear No. 1 mine won five state and national awards last year for conservation and land management practices. 8 photos.

Sanda, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

Fittje, James E. [Analex Corporation, Cleveland Ohio (United States); Buehrle, Robert J. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Brookpark Ohio 44135 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Bearing Corp - IN 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bearing Corp - IN 09 Bearing Corp - IN 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Bearing Corp. (IN.09 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 429 South Harding Street , Indianapolis , Indiana IN.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 IN.09-3 Site Operations: Uranium metal fabrication work during the mid-1950s IN.09-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC licensed IN.09-2 IN.09-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium IN.09-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC IN.09-4 Also see Documents Related to American Bearing Corp. IN.09-1 - National Lead Company of Ohio Memorandum; Ciborski to

282

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

283

Timken XEMC Hunan Bearings Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Timken XEMC Hunan Bearings Co Ltd Timken XEMC Hunan Bearings Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Timken XEMC (Hunan) Bearings Co Ltd Place Xiangtan, Hunan Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Manufacturer of ultra-large-bore bearings for large scale wind turbines. Coordinates 27.859819°, 112.892067° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.859819,"lon":112.892067,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor  

SciTech Connect

In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

Abboud, R.G.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

Abboud, Robert G. (Barrington Hills, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach is based on software that generates a sequence of test signals for new and retrofit projects. Introduction The performance of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor

Diamond, Richard

288

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project

289

Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

Post, R.F.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optimization of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of blade type X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, configuration and operation principle was analyzed to improve XBPM performance. Optimization is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission blades, Diamond Detector Blade (DDB) was analyzed as XBPM signal source. Analyses revealed, that Diamond Detector Blade XBPM would allow overcoming drawbacks of the photoemission type XBPMs.

Ilinski, Petr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Stailization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-3013-2012 MARCH 2012 DOE STANDARD STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA PACK Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-3013-2012 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the stabilization, packaging, and safe storage of plutonium- bearing metals and oxides containing at least 30 wt% plutonium plus uranium. It supersedes DOE-STD-3013-2004, "Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials," and is approved for use by all DOE organizations and their contractors. Metals are stabilized by

293

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal - June 2012 Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for the SBWTP-IWTU. This review also provides additional data regarding

294

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor - June 2012 Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as opportunities for improvement (OFIs) and items identified for further

295

Seismic base isolation: Elastomer characterization, bearing modeling and system response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses several major aspects of seismic base isolation systems that employ laminated elastomer bearings. Elastomer constitutive models currently being used to represent the nonlinear elastic and hysteretic behavior are discussed. Some aspects of mechanical characterization testing of elastomers is presented along with representative tests results. The development of a finite element based mesh generator for laminated elastomer bearings is presented. Recent advances in the simulation of base isolated structures to earthquake motions are presented along with a sample problem. 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Kulak, R.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Hughes, T.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is the most commonly used device for obtaining static high pressures above 3 GPa. Experiments in the DAC are frequently performed at the APS, in particular at GSECARS (Sector 13), HP-CAT (Sector 16), and at XOR sectors 1 and 3. In order to have the sample in the DAC be subject to a quasi-hydrostatic pressure it is necessary to surround the

297

Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 08.27.12 Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential Office of Science supported researchers develop new material with amazing hardness and exciting possibilities. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60 Image courtesy of Carnegie Institute of Washington Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60

298

Diamond as a solid state quantum computer with a linear chain of nuclear spins system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By removing a $^{12}C$ atom from the tetrahedral configuration of the diamond, replace it by a $^{13}C$ atom, and repeating this in a linear direction, it is possible to have a linear chain of nuclear spins one half and to build a solid state quantum computer. One qubit rotation and controlled-not (CNOT) quantum gates are obtained immediately from this configuration, and CNOT quantum gate is used to determined the design parameters of this quantum computer.

G. V. Lpez

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500 deg. C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950 deg. C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M. [Department of Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ariga, T. [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

PRESSURE DEVELOPMENT IN SEALED CONTAINERS WITH PLUTONIUM BEARING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation by plutonium-bearing materials in sealed containers has been studied. The gas composition and pressure are determined over periods from months to years. The Pu-bearing materials studied represent those produced by all of the major processes used by DOE in the processing of plutonium and include the maximum amount of water (0.5% by weight) allowed by DOE's 3013 Standard. Hydrogen generation is of high interest and the Pu-bearing materials can be classed according to how much hydrogen is generated. Hydrogen generation by high-purity plutonium oxides packaged under conditions typical for actual 3013 materials is minimal, with very low generation rates and low equilibrium pressures. Materials with chloride salt impurities have much higher hydrogen gas generation rates and result in the highest observed equilibrium hydrogen pressures. Other materials such as those with high metal oxide impurities generate hydrogen at rates in between these extremes. The fraction of water that is converted to hydrogen gas as equilibrium is approached ranges from 0% to 25% under conditions typical of materials packaged to the 3013 Standard. Generation of both hydrogen and oxygen occurs when liquid water is present. The material and moisture conditions that result in hydrogen and oxygen generation for high-purity plutonium oxide and chloride salt-bearing plutonium oxide materials have been characterized. Other gases that are observed include nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane.

Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High Speed Shaft Tapered Roller Bearing Calibration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is a project investigating gearbox reliability primarily through testing and modeling. Previous dynamometer testing focused upon acquiring measurements in the planetary section of the test gearbox. Prior to these tests, the strain gages installed on the planetary bearings were calibrated in a load frame.

Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Test of Conductive Carbon Fiber Enhancing the Structural Bearing Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research mechanism of conductive carbon fiber concrete, including mechanical intelligent properties, electrical properties, thermo-sensitive properties and mechanical properties. Put forward intelligent programs of carbon fiber concrete bridge, and do ... Keywords: conductive carbon fiber, CFRP concrete, intelligent programs, properties test, structural bearing capacity

Xiao-ming He; Jie Liang; Peng Guan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Supercomputers, materials and bears: ORNL marks eventful 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIENCE Supercomputers, materials and bears: ORNL marks eventful 2012 Oak Ridge National Laboratory and became a showpiece for renewable energy technology during 2012. ORNL's 2012 maintained a string of achievements in both research and support that is expected to continue into 2013. Among the highlights: ORNL

304

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone Sediments at the Hanford 300 collected beneath the former North Process Pond (NPP) in the 300 Area of the Hanford site (Washington the Hanford site in the state of Washington (U.S.). The 300 Area is one of many

305

A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON GAS LUBRICATED BEARINGS-REVISED. Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of 290 references on gas bearings is presented. In most cases an English resume' of each reference is included a translation being made when required. The references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Indexes included are the year of origin corporate author, subject, patent number, and country of origin. (J.R.D.)

Sciulli, E.B.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

307

The effects of diamond injector angles on flow structures at various Mach numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of a three dimensional diamond jet interaction flowfield at various diamond injector half angles into a supersonic crossflow were presented in this thesis. The numerical study was performed to improve the understanding of the flame holding potential by extending the numerical database envelop to include different injector half angles and examine the flow at Mach 2 and Mach 5. The configuration of a diamond injector shape was found to reduce the flow separation upstream, and produce an attached shock at the initial freestream interaction and the injection fluid has an increased field penetration as compared to circular injectors. The CFD studies were also aimed at providing additional information on the uses of multiple injectors for flow control. The numerical runs were performed with diamond injectors at half angles of 10?° and 20?° at a freestream Mach number of 5. The transverse counter-rotating pair of vortices found in the 15?° does not form within the 10?° and 20?° cases at freestream Mach number 5. The 10?° case had a barrel shock that became streamlined in the lateral direction. The 20?° barrel shock had a very large spanwise expansion and became streamlined in the transverse direction. In both cases the trailing edge of their barrel shocks did not form the flat â??Vâ? shape, as found in the baseline case. At Mach 2 the 10?° and 15?° cases both formed the flat â??Vâ? shape at the trailing edge of the barrel shocks, and formed the transverse counter rotating vortex pairs. The 10?° multiple injector case successfully showed the interaction shocks forming into a larger planer shock downstream of the injectors. The swept 15?° case produced interaction shocks that were too weak to properly form a planar shock downstream. This planar shock has potential for flow control. Depending on the angle of incidence of the injector fluid with the freestream flow and the half angle of the diamond injector, the planar shocks will form further upstream or downstream of the injector.

McLellan, Justin Walter

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Beijing Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Wind energy Product Beijing-based wind turbine bearing maker. References Beijing Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Beijing Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd is a company located in Beijing Municipality, China . References ↑ "Beijing Jingye Bearing Manufacture for Rolling Mills Co Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Beijing_Jingye_Bearing_Manufacture_for_Rolling_Mills_Co_Ltd&oldid=342621

309

SNAP I POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM BEARINGS DEVELOPMENT. Period covered: February 1, 1957 to June 30, 1959  

SciTech Connect

Development of bearings for use in the SNAP I power conversion system is described. Liquid mercury, lubricated hydrosphere bearings were selected. Design and performance data are given along with conclusions. (J.R.D.)

Meredith, R.; Ono, G.Y.; Reemsnyder, D.C.

1960-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advances in hybrid water-lubricated journal bearings for use in ocean vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The outboard bearings that support shafts in naval ships and submarines present unique challenges to designers, shipbuilders, and operators. Such bearings must operate continuously and reliably in demanding environments ...

Heberley, Brian Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbine bearing failures in electric utilities can be responsible for outages resulting in significant lost generation time. In addition to bearing failures in the turbogenerators, failures may occur in other rotating equipment, such as pumps, fans, and auxiliary systems. Knowledge of bearing failure mechanisms and causes allows utilities to introduce safeguards into their occurrence and take faster remedial action. EPRI released the initial report, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Ro...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for water cooled oil free magnetic bearing compressors within the Federal sector.

313

Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange, at which the surface street system and the free-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange signal and the ramp-metering signal. The proposed control algorithm, including an adaptive diamond inter- change control and a traffic-responsive ramp-metering control were programmed with VISSIM's vehicle

Tian, Zong Z.

315

Development of a cryogenic induction motor for use with a superconducting magnetic bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a cryogenic induction motor for use with a superconducting magnetic bearing Tomotake of a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB). Both the motor and the SMB are operated at liquid He temperatures. We give Keywords: Astrophysical polarimeter; Induction motor; Superconducting magnetic bearings 1. Introduction

Oxley, Paul

316

Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Characteristics of a Model Representative of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle at Angles of Attack From 0 to 70  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the multiaxis thrust-vectoring characteristics of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A wingtip supported, partially metric, 0.10-scale jet-effects model of ...

Asbury Scott C.; Capone Francis J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery  

SciTech Connect

A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Failure Atlas for Rolling Bearings in Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T.E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2nd edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The content of the atlas comprises plate pages from the book that contain bearing failure images, application data, and descriptions of failure mode, image, and suspected failure causes. Rolling bearings are a critical component of the mainshaft system, gearbox and generator in the rapidly developing technology of power generating wind turbines. The demands for long service life are stringent; the design load, speed and temperature regimes are demanding and the environmental conditions including weather, contamination, impediments to monitoring and maintenance are often unfavorable. As a result, experience has shown that the rolling bearings are prone to a variety of failure modes that may prevent achievement of design lives. Morphological failure diagnosis is extensively used in the failure analysis and improvement of bearing operation. Accumulated experience shows that the failure appearance and mode of failure causation in wind turbine bearings has many distinguishing features. The present Atlas is a first effort to collect an interpreted database of specifically wind turbine related rolling bearing failures and make it widely available. This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T. E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2d edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The main body of that book is a comprehensive collection of self-contained pages called Plates, containing failure images, bearing and application data, and three descriptions: failure mode, image and suspected failure causes. The Plates are sorted by main failure mode into chapters. Each chapter is preceded by a general technical discussion of the failure mode, its appearance and causes. The Plates part is supplemented by an introductory part, describing the appearance classification and failure classification systems used, and by several indexes. The present Atlas is intended as a supplement to the book. It has the same structure but contains only Plate pages, arranged in chapters, each with a chapter heading page giving a short definition of the failure mode illustrated. Each Plate page is self contained, with images, bearing and application data, and descriptions of the failure mode, the images and the suspected causes. Images are provided in two resolutions: The text page includes 6 by 9 cm images. In addition, high resolution image files are attached, to be retrieved by clicking on their 'push pin' icon. While the material in the present Atlas is self-contained, it is nonetheless a supplement to the book and the complete interpretation of the terse image descriptions and of the system underlying the failure code presupposes familiarity with the book. Since this Atlas is a supplement to the book, its chapter numbering follows that of the book. Not all failure modes covered in the book have been found among the observed wind turbines. For that reason, and because of the omission of introductory matter, the chapter numbers in this Atlas are not a continuous sequence.

Tallian, T. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Applying Case-Based Reasoning to Mechanical Bearing Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) provides a promising methodology for solving many complex engineering design problems. CBR is based on the idea that past problem-solving experiences can be reused and learned from in solving new problems. This paper presents an overview of a CBR design system to assist human engineers in performing mechanical bearing design. It retrieves previously designed cases from a case-base and uses adaptation techniques to adapt them to satisfy the current problem requirements. Our approach combines parametric adaptations and constraint satisfaction adaptations. The technique of parametric adaptation considers not only parameter substitution, but also the interrelationships between the problem definition and its solution. The technique of constraint satisfaction adaptation provides a method to globally check the design requirements to assess case adaptability. Currently, our system has been tested in the rolling bearing domain.

Xiaoli Qin; William C. Regli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A diamond anvil cell with resistive heating for high pressure and high temperature x-ray diffraction and absorption studies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe a prototype of a diamond anvil cell (DAC) for high pressure/high temperature studies. This DAC combines the use of a resistive oven of 250 W power in a very small volume, associated with special conical seats for Boehler-type diamond anvils in order to have a large angular acceptance. To protect the diamond anvils from burning and to avoid the oven oxidation, the heated DAC is enclosed in a vacuum chamber. The assemblage was used to study the melting curve of germanium at high pressure (up to 20 GPa) and high temperature (up to 1200 K) using x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Pasternak, Sebastien; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Pascarelli, Sakura; Zhang Lin [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Poloni, Roberta [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona Spain (Spain); Canny, Bernard [IMPMC-CNRS UMR, 7590 Universite Paris VI, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Coulet, Marie-Vanessa [IM2NP-UMR CNRS, 6242 Universite Paul Cezanne Campus de St Jerome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electron emission and defect formation in the interaction of slow,highly charged ions with diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on electron emission and defect formation in theinteraction between slow (v~;0.3 vBohr) highly charged ions (SHCI) withinsulating (type IIa) and semiconducting (type IIb) diamonds. Electronemission induced by 31Pq+ (q=5 to 13), and 136Xeq+ (q=34 to 44) withkinetic energies of 9 kVxq increase linearly with the ion charge states,reaching over 100 electrons per ion for high xenon charge states withoutsurface passivation of the diamond with hydrogen. Yields from bothdiamond types are up to a factor of two higher then from reference metalsurfaces. Crater like defects with diameters of 25 to 40 nm are formed bythe impact of single Xe44+ ions. High secondary electron yields andsingle ion induced defects enable the formation of single dopant arrayson diamond surfaces.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Shrivastava, S.; Rebuli, D.B.; Persaud, A.; Schneider, D.H.; Schenkel, T.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites of the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program designed to identify criteria favorable for the occurrence of the world's significant uranium deposits. This project deals specifically with uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States and, in particular, their distribution and origin. From an extensive literature survey and field examination of 44 pegmatite localities in the United States and Canada, the authors have compiled an index to about 300 uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States, maps giving location of these deposits, and an annotated bibliography to some of the most pertinent literature on the geology of pegmatites. Pegmatites form from late-state magma differentiates rich in volatile constituents with an attendant aqueous vapor phase. It is the presence of an aqueous phase which results in the development of the variable grain size which characterizes pegmatites. All pegmatites occur in areas of tectonic mobility involving crustal material usually along plate margins. Those pegmatites containing radioactive mineral species show, essentially, a similar distribution to those without radioactive minerals. Criteria such as tectonic setting, magma composition, host rock, and elemental indicators among others, all serve to help delineate areas more favorable for uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. The most useful guide remains the radioactivity exhibited by uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. Although pegmatites are frequently noted as favorable hosts for radioactive minerals, the general paucity and sporadic distribution of these minerals and inherent mining and milling difficulties negate the resource potential of pegmatites for uranium and thorium.

Adams, J.W.; Arengi, J.T.; Parrish, I.S.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Numerical studies on the geomechanical stability ofhydrate-bearing sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal and mechanical loading of oceanicHydrate-Bearing Sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and asignificant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences onthe integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and thebounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled withinsufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence ofpredictive capabilities, have resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBSwhen locating offshore production platforms, and can impede thedevelopment of hydrate deposits as gas resources.In this study weinvestigate in three cases of coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic andgeomechanical behavior of oceanic hydrate-bearing sediments. The firstinvolves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper conventionalreservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipesintersecting the HBS. The second case describes system response duringgas production from a hydrate deposit, and the third involves mechanicalloading caused by the weight of structures placed on the ocean flooroverlying hydrate-bearing sediments.For the analysis of the geomechanicalstability of HBS, we developed and used a numerical model that integratesa commercial geomechanical code and a simulator describing the coupledprocesses of fluid flow, heat transport and thermodynamic behavior in theHBS. Our simulation results indicate that the stability of HBS in thevicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially if thesediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Gas production fromoceanic deposits may also affect the geomechanical stability of HBS underthe conditions that are deemed desirablefor production. Conversely, theincreased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floorincreases the stability of underlying hydrates.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Moridis, George J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Report on phase I on the development of improved seals and bearings for downhole drilling motors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New bearing and seal designs are outlined, as well as the progress made on developing test facilities for full-size bearing and seal assemblies. (MHR)

Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Matson, L.W.; Maurer, W.C.; Nielsen, R.R.; Nixon, J.D.; Wilson, J.G.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Diamond-like atomic-scale composite films: Surface properties and stability studied by STM and AFM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous ``diamond-like/quartz-like`` composites a-(C:H/Si:O) and metal containing a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) constitute a novel class of diamond-related materials with a number of unique bulk and surface properties. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the surface properties and stability of these solids we have performed a scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy investigation of both a-(C:H/Si:O) and a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) films, including the effects of ion bombardment and annealing.

Dorfman, B.; Abraizov, M. [SUNY, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Pollak, F.H. [CUNY, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Eby, R. [TopoMetrix, Bedminster, NJ (United States); Rong, Z.Y. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Strongin, M.; Yang, X.Q. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Grain size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films with a thickness of {approx}6 {micro}m and with average grain sizes ranging from 60 to 9 nm were deposited on silicon wafers using a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. These samples were then characterized with the goal to identify correlations between grain size, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The characterization reveals that our films are phase pure and exhibit a relatively smooth surface morphology. The levels of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and hydrogen impurities are low, and showed a systematic variation with the grain size. The hydrogen content increases with decreasing grain size, whereas the sp{sup 2} carbon content decreases with decreasing grain size. The material is weaker than single crystalline diamond, and both stiffness and hardness decrease with decreasing grain size. These trends suggest gradual changes of the nature of the grain boundaries, from graphitic in the case of the 60 nm grain size material to hydrogen terminated sp{sup 3} carbon for the 9 nm grain size material. The films exhibit low levels of internal stress and freestanding structures with a length of several centimeters could be fabricated without noticeable bending.

Wiora, M; Bruehne, K; Floeter, A; Gluche, P; Willey, T M; Kucheyev, S O; Van Buuren, A W; Hamza, A V; Biener, J; Fecht, H

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Single-photon emission from Ni-related color centers in CVD diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color centers in diamond are very promising candidates among the possible realizations for practical single-photon sources because of their long-time stable emission at room temperature. The popular nitrogen-vacancy center shows single-photon emission, but within a large, phonon-broadened spectrum (~100nm), which strongly limits its applicability for quantum communication. By contrast, Ni-related centers exhibit narrow emission lines at room temperature. We present investigations on single color centers consisting of Ni and Si created by ion implantation into single crystalline IIa diamond. We use systematic variations of ion doses between 10^8/cm^2 and 10^14/cm^2 and energies between 30keV and 1.8MeV. The Ni-related centers show emission in the near infrared spectral range (~770nm to 787nm) with a small line-width (~3nm FWHM). A measurement of the intensity correlation function proves single-photon emission. Saturation measurements yield a rather high saturation count rate of 77.9 kcounts/s. Polarization dependent measurements indicate the presence of two orthogonal dipoles.

David Steinmetz; Elke Neu; Christian Hepp; Roland Albrecht; Wolfgang Bolse; Jan Meijer; Detlef Rogalla; Christoph Becher

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J. [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

FEA analysis of diamond as IMCA{close_quote}s monochromator crystal  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of effort has been make in recent years in the field of undulator high heat load optics, and currently there are several tractable options [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 69}, 2792 (1994); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 266}, 517 (1988); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 239}, 555 (1993)]. Diamond crystals offer some attractive options{endash}water as the coolant, the use of established monochromator mechanisms, simpler monochromator design as compared to the use of liquid nitrogen or gallium. The use of diamond crystals as the optical elements in a double-crystal monochromator for the IMCA-CAT and MR-CAT ID beamlines has been studied. A first crystal mounting scheme using an indium-gallium eutectic as the heat transfer medium developed in collaboration with DND-CAT and M. Hart will be presented. A FEA analysis of the IMCA-CAT ID beamline arrangement using the APS undulator A as the radiaiton source will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Chrzas, J.; Cimpoes, S.; Ivanov, I.N. [CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3301 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Temperature dependence of mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond films grown by the HFCVD techinque.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of -800 C. The films have -4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, -1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Adiga, V. P.; Sumant, A. V.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Innovative Micro Tech.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electrolytic Treatment of ICPP Sodium-Bearing Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Two proof-of-principle tests were conducted to determine if nitrate can be destroyed electrochemically in a simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Sodium-Bearing waste. Both tests demonstrated the destruction of nitrate as well as the removal of other metals in the simulant. Metals removal is believed to be due to precipitation as a result of a change in the pH of the waste solution from strongly acidic to highly alkaline and reduction to a metal or metal oxide. Although gas evolution at the cathode was visible during each test, there were no visible signs of NO{sub x} formation in either test.

Hobbs, D.T.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, C.M.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil are described. The foil may be substantially pure uranium, or may be a uranium alloy such as a uranium-molybdenum alloy. The method typically includes a series of hot rolling operations on a cast plate material to form a thin sheet. These hot rolling operations are typically performed using a process where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant percentage. The sheet is typically then annealed and then cooled. The process typically concludes with a series of cold rolling passes where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant thickness amount to form the foil.

Gooch, Jackie G. (Seymour, TN); DeMint, Amy L. (Kingston, TN)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W. BRENNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube Structures O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W precursors", Nature 364, 607. [6] Shenderova, O. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Coexistence of two carbon phases.T. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Mechanical Properties of nanotubule fibers and composites determined from

Brenner, Donald W.

344

Program plan for the development of advanced synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight companys have teamed with Sandia Labs to work on five projects as part of a cooperative effort to advance the state of the ar in synthetic-diamond drill bit design and manufacture. DBS (a Baroid Company), Dennis Tool Company, Hughes Christensen Company, Maurer Engineering, Megadiamond, Security Diamond Products, Slimdril International, and Smith International. Objective of each project is to develop advanced bit technology that results in new commercial products with longer bit life and higher penetration rates in hard formations. Each project explores a different approach to synthetic-diamond cutter and bit design and, consequently, uses different approaches to developing the technology. Each of these approaches builds or the respective companies` capabilities and current product interests. Sandia`s role is to assure integration of the individual projects into a coherent program and tc provide unique testing and analytical capabilities where needed. One additional company, Amoco Production Research, will provide synthetic-diamond drill bit research expertise and field testing services for each project in the program.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Salsbury and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning -1 -Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning - 1 - Automated Testing of HVAC Systems This paper describes an approach to the automation of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor installation, commissioning, and maintenance than by poor

346

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National and System Development Climate Data Management Tropical Cyclone Data and Information Work Communicating System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

347

A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm{sup 3} regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Inoue, Toru [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Published in J. Mat. Sci. Lettr. 18 (1999) 427-430 Selective Patterned Deposition of Diamond using a New Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of centrifugation on diamond deposition. It is generally believed that atomic hydrogen at the growth surface deposition were unsuitable for experiments on a centrifuge. Thus, a new closed chemical vapor transport and removal of gas [4]. Graphite was used as a carbon source in the presence of hydrogen at low pressure

Regel, Liya L.

349

A comparative study of three different chemical vapor deposition techniques of carbon nanotube growth on diamond films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power ...

Betty T. Quinton, Paul N. Barnes, Chakrapani V. Varanasi, Jack Burke, Bang-Hung Tsao, Kevin J. Yost, Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two. Therefore, there is a lack of both analysis tools and operational strategies for considering them as an integrated system. One drawback of operating the ramp-metering system and the diamond interchange system in isolation is that traffic from the ramp, particularly if it is metered, can spill back into the diamond interchange, causing both congestion and safety concerns at the diamond interchange. While flushing the ramp queues by temporarily suspending ramp metering has been the primary strategy for preventing queue spillback, it can result in freeway system breakdown, which would affect the entire system's efficiency. The aim of this research was to develop operational strategies for managing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering system (IDIRMS). Enhanced modeling methodologies were developed for an IDIRMS. A computer model named DRIVE (Diamond Interchange and Ramp Metering Integration Via Evaluation) was developed, which was characterized as a mesoscopic simulation and analysis model. DRIVE incorporated the enhanced modeling methodologies developed in this study and could be used to perform system analysis for an IDIRMS given a set of system input parameters and variables. DRIVE was validated against a VISSIM microscopic simulation model, and general agreement was found between the two models. System operational characteristics were investigated using DRIVE to gain a better understanding of the system features. Integrated control strategies (ICS) were developed based on the two commonly used diamond interchange phasing schemes, basic three-phase and TTI four-phase. The ICS were evaluated using VISSIM microscopic simulation under three general traffic demand scenarios: low, medium, and high, as characterized by the volume-to-capacity ratios at the metered ramps. The results of the evaluation indicate that the integrated operations through an adaptive signal control system were most effective under the medium traffic demand scenario by preventing or delaying the onset of ramp-metering queue flush, thereby minimizing freeway breakdown and system delays.

Tian, Zongzhong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Data report: resource ratings of the RARE II tracts in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah and the central Appalachian thrust belts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assessment forms contained in this report constitute the data used in two resource assessments described in A Systematic Method for Resource Rating with Two Applications to Potential Wilderness Areas (Voelker et al. 1979). The assessments were performed for two geologic subprovinces containing proposed wilderness areas identified in the Forest Service Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) program. The subprovinces studied are the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt and the central Appalachians thrust belt. Each assessment form contains location data, resource ratings, and supporting information for a single tract. A unique dual rating that reflects geologic favorability and certainty of resource occurrence is assigned to each resource category evaluated. Individual ratings are synthesized into an overall tract-importance rating. Ratings created by others are included for comparative purposes wherever available. Supporting information consists of commentary and references that explain and document the ratings listed.

Voelker, A.H.; Wedow, H.; Oakes, E.; Scheffler, P.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Emergent Phenomena -  

SciTech Connect

Even a small fraction of fine particles can have a significant effect on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments and sediment stability. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of fine particles on gas production using a soil chamber that allows for the application of an effective stress to the sediment. This chamber was instrumented to monitor shear-wave velocity, temperature, pressure, and volume change during CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and gas production. The instrumented chamber was placed inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), which was used to control the fluid pressure and temperature. Experiments were conducted with different sediment types and pressure-temperature histories. Fines migrated within the sediment in the direction of fluid flow. A vuggy structure formed in the sand; these small cavities or vuggs were precursors to the development of gas-driven fractures during depressurization under a constant effective stress boundary condition. We define the critical fines fraction as the clay-to-sand mass ratio when clays fill the pore space in the sand. Fines migration, clogging, vugs, and gas-driven fracture formation developed even when the fines content was significantly lower than the critical fines fraction. These results show the importance of fines in gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments, even when the fines content is relatively low.

Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The BEAR program NRL plasma physics instrumentation measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BEAR program was a joint effort to launch, and demonstrate the feasibility of operating, a 1 MeV 10 ma Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator from a space platform. The accelerator design and manufacture were the responsibility of Los Alamos National Lab (LANL); diagnostics associated with accelerator operation and beam-plasma effects were also to be undertaken by LANL and NRL. Payload Integration and Telemetry was provided by the Air Force Geophysical Lab (AFGL) and Northeastern University (NEU). Beam effects on the local plasma in addition to accelerator produced vehicle effects (e.g., charging) were the responsibility of NRL as outlined herein. The BEAR rocket was launched successfully during the early morning hours of July 13 from White Sands Missile Range, White Sands, N.M. The NRL contribution to this effort included three instrument packages designed to diagnose beam-plasma and vehicle-plasma interactions. The instruments included: (1) Langmuir probe (LP) design consisting of 4 separate sensors; (2) High voltage (HIV) Langmuir Probe designed to monitor vehicle charging through current polarity changes; and (3) Plasma Wave Receive (PWR) designed to characterize the plasma wave emissions covering a broad frequency range from near DC to 50 MHz.

Walker, D.N.; Baumback, M.M.; Haas, D.G.; Rodriguez, P.; Siefring, C.L.; Doggett, R.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1989-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pu-bearing materials - from fundamental science to storage standards.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of plutonium (Pu) oxides in the presence of water/moisture in a confined space and the associated issues of hydrogen and oxygen generation due to radiolysis have important implications for the storage and transportation of Pu-bearing materials. This paper reviews the results of recent studies of gas generation in the Pu-O-H system, including the determination of release rates via engineering-scale measurement. The observations of the significant differences in gas generation behavior between 'pure' Pu-bearing materials and those that contain salt impurities are addressed. In conjunction with the discussion of these empirical observations, the work also addresses recent scientific advances in the investigations of the Pu-O-H system using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations, as well as advanced synchrotron techniques to determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases. The role of oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical from the radiolysis of water is examined. Discussed also is the challenge in the predictive ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure of the Pu-H-O system, due to the nature of the 5f valence electrons in Pu. Coupled with the continuing material surveillance program, it is anticipated that this work may help determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases and the role of impurity salts on gas generation and the long-term stability of oxygen/hydrogen-containing plutonium oxides beyond PuO{sub 2}.

Tam, S. W.; Liu, Y.; Decision and Information Sciences; Michigan Technical Univ.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Combined passive magnetic bearing element and vibration damper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium and dampen transversely directed vibrations. Mechanical stabilizers are provided to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. In a improvement over U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,221, a magnetic bearing element is combined with a vibration damping element to provide a single upper stationary dual-function element. The magnetic forces exerted by such an element, enhances levitation of the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations, and suppresses the effects of unbalance or inhibits the onset of whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. Concurrently, this equilibrium is made stable against displacement-dependent drag forces of the rotating object from its equilibrium position.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision---Making.., 2012. Download: PDF (18.47 MB) Ingle, Aaron, Mithra M. Moezzi,...

358

Thermal degradation of the performance of elastomeric bearings for seismic isolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL ENERGY .THAT PRESERVES THE THERMAL ENERGY WITHIN THE BEARING FOR AIN LOCAL ACCUMULATION OF THERMAL ENERGY WHICH CAUSES LEAD TO

Shirazi, Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

G2: Antibacterial Ceramic Fabricated by the Ti-bearing Blast ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Ang Tian. Abstract Scope, The comprehensive utilization of Ti-bearing blast furnace slag was a technological problem that was...

360

High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Theoretical tool movement required to diamond turn an off-axis paraboloid on axis  

SciTech Connect

High-quality, off-axis parabolic reflectors, required by the CTR and laser-fusion programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) and other ERDA laboratories, are currently manufactured by hand. There are several drawbacks to this method, including lead times of up to a year, costs in excess of $75,000 for a small reflector, and unsatisfactory limits to the tolerances obtainable. This situation has led to a search for cheaper and more accurate methods of manufacturing off-axis paraboloids. An alternative method, turning the workpiece about its axis on a diamond-turning machine, is presented, and the equations describing the necessary tool movement are derived. A discussion of a particular case suggests that the proposed technique is feasible. (auth)

Thompson, D.C.

1975-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Controlling the quantum dynamics of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding and mitigating decoherence is a key challenge for quantum science and technology. The main source of decoherence for solid-state spin systems is the uncontrolled spin bath environment. Here, we demonstrate quantum control of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond at room temperature that is composed of electron spins of substitutional nitrogen impurities. The resulting spin bath dynamics are probed using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre electron spin as a magnetic field sensor. We exploit the spin bath control to dynamically suppress dephasing of the NV spin by the spin bath. Furthermore, by combining spin bath control with dynamical decoupling, we directly measure the coherence and temporal correlations of different groups of bath spins. These results uncover a new arena for fundamental studies on decoherence and enable novel avenues for spin-based magnetometry and quantum information processing.

G. de Lange; T. van der Sar; M. S. Blok; Z. H. Wang; V. V. Dobrovitski; R. Hanson

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

High-precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3%-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance-matching analysis, incorporating systematic uncertainties in the equation of state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2%-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations, which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments, which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar, the present measurements indicate that the mixed phase is a few percent more dense than what would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Eggert, J. H.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McWilliams, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

Application of polycrystalline diamond compact bits in the Kuparuk River Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

In soft to medium-hard clays and shales, polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have proved economically successful in the Kuparuk River field, AK. Through the redesign and modification of PDC bits and rig equipment, the necessary operating parameters have been achieved, and the use of PDC bits has become routine. These bits are typically run with a bit weight of 30,000 to 40,000 lbf (133 to 178 kN), a standpipe pressure of 4,000 psi (27 MPa), a pump rate of 400 to 450 gal/min (1.5 to 1.7 m/sup 3//min), and a rotary speed of 150 to 200 rev/min. Use of these high operating parameters saves about $50,000 per PDC bit when compared with roller-cone bits.

Balkenbush, R.J.; Onisko, J.E.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Enlarge image The Trojan Goat incorporates recycled materials, including copper cladding reclaimed from a roof, wood panels reclaimed from shipping pallets, and paving stones reclaimed from the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. (Credit: Chris Gunn/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: University of Virginia What: Trojan Goat Where: Private residence Crozet, VA 22932 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2002 University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts Like the Trojan horse that launched the Greeks to victory, the Trojan Goat earned the University of Virginia second place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2002. Since then, the house has gone on to inspire

368

Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3028-2000 3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3028-2000 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the packaging and long-term (50 years) storage of stabilized, separated uranium-233(

369

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes  

SciTech Connect

Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-3013-2000 September 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-3013-99 November 1999 DOE STANDARD STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA PACK Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3013-2000 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the stabilization, packaging and safe storage of plutonium-

374

Pu-Bearing Materials - From Fundamental Science to Storage Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of plutonium (Pu) oxides in the presence of water/moisture in a confined space and the associated issues of hydrogen and oxygen generation due to radiolysis have important implications for the storage and transportation of Pu-bearing materials. This paper reviews the results of recent studies of gas generation in the Pu-O-H system, including the determination of release rates via engineering-scale measurement. The observations of the significant differences in gas generation behavior between 'pure' Pu-bearing materials and those that contain salt impurities are addressed. In conjunction with the discussion of these empirical observations, this work also addresses recent scientific advances in the investigations of the Pu-O-H system using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations, as well as advanced synchrotron techniques to determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases. The role of oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical from the radiolysis of water is examined. Discussed also is the challenge in the predictive ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure of the Pu-H-O system, due to the nature of the 5f valence electrons in Pu. Coupled with the continuing material surveillance program, it is anticipated that this work may help determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases and the role of impurity salts on gas generation and the long-term stability of oxygen/hydrogen-containing plutonium oxides beyond PuO{sub 2}. (authors)

Shiu-Wing Tam; Yung Liu [Decision and Information Sciences Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Bldg. 900, MS-12, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Bearing Fault Detection in DFIG-Based Wind Turbines Using the First Intrinsic Mode Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bearing Fault Detection in DFIG-Based Wind Turbines Using the First Intrinsic Mode Function Y become a focal point in the research of renewable energy sources. In order to make the DFIG-based wind for bearing fault detection in DFIG-based wind turbines. The proposed method uses the first Intrinsic Mode

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Notes 12. (a) Annular pressure (damper) seals, and (b) Hydrostatic journal bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of centering stiffness in seals. Force coefficients for short-length pressure seals. Design of annular seals: swirl brakes, impact on rotordynamics. Hydrostatic bearings in modern applications. The principle of hydrostatic lubrication. Effects of recess volume-fluid compressibility on force coefficients for operation at low and high frequencies. Applications of hydrostatic bearings

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Dynamic Analysis and Control of an Energy Storage Flywheel Rotor with Active Magnetic Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage is a promising technology for providing intermediate energy storage. An energy storage flywheel is supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs) to achieve high speed running and increase energy efficiency of the energy storage ... Keywords: Flywheel, Energy Storage, Magnetic Bearing, Rotor Dynamics

Zhang Kai; Dai Xingjian; Zhang Xiaozhang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bearing failures are a leading cause of unavailability for power plant rotating machinery, often resulting in prolonged forced outages and costly repairs. This manual, which assists utilities in identifying bearing failure modes and selecting remedial actions to prevent future failures, provides guidelines for repair techniques.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

From psychophysics to management of noise?disturbance in a large, Arctic carnivore, the polar bear.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50% of maternal dens excavated by pregnant female polar bears on Alaskas North Slope occur on land or land?fast ice. Management agencies and the public have raised concerns that noise from human activities could adversely affect denning female polar bears

Ann E. Bowles; Megan A. Owen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Observability-based local path planning and obstacle avoidance using bearing-only measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an observability-based local path planning and obstacle avoidance technique that utilizes an extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to estimate the time-to-collision (TTC) and bearing to obstacles using bearing-only measurements. To ensure ... Keywords: Collision avoidance, Miniature air vehicle, Observability, Path planning

Huili Yu, Rajnikant Sharma, Randal W. Beard, Clark N. Taylor

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Finite element analysis of elastohydrodynamic circular journal bearing with micropolar lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the effect of deformation of the bearing liner on the static characteristics of a circular journal bearing operating with micropolar fluid is analysed. Lubricating oil containing additives and contaminants is modeled as micropolar fluid. ... Keywords: deformation coefficient, elastohydrodynamic, micropolar lubricant

V. P. Sukumaran Nair; K. Prabhakaran Nair

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Review: Estimation of California bearing ratio by using soft computing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the application of different methods (simple-multiple analysis and artificial neural networks) for the estimation of the California bearing ratio (CBR) from sieve analysis, Atterberg limits, maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Atterberg limits, California bearing ratio (CBR), Correlation, Maximum dry unit weight, Optimum moisture content, Sieve analysis

B. Yildirim; O. Gunaydin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Method for increasing the pressure in oil-bearing geological structures  

SciTech Connect

A method for increasing pressure in geological oil-bearing structures by gas production due to microbial activity comprising adding to a geological oil-bearing structure, an aneorobic microorganism (Methanobacterium termoautotroficum), a culture medium and formic acid. The formic acid is converted to carbon dioxide and methane gases resulting in increased pressure in the structures.

Hellman, B.G.; Ronnow, P.H.; Tengblad, P.F.; Wiberger, L.I.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Position regulator for spindle of milling machine by embedded magnetic bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to concurrently counter-balance the dynamic cutting force and regulate the spindle position deviation by integrating active magnetic bearing (AMB) technique, fuzzy logic algorithm and an adaptive self-tuning feedback loop. The ... Keywords: Active magnetic bearing, Cutting process, Fuzzy logic algorithm

Nan-Chyuan Tsai; Li-Wen Shih; Rong-Mao Lee

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect

Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Dynamic polarization of single nuclear spins by optical pumping of NV color centers in diamond at room temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a versatile method to efficiently polarize single nuclear spins in diamond, which is based on optical pumping of a single NV color center and mediated by a level-anti crossing in its excited state. A nuclear spin polarization higher than 98% is achieved at room temperature for the 15N nuclear spin associated to the NV center, corresponding to $\\mu$K effective nuclear spin temperature. We then show simultaneous deterministic initialization of two nuclear spins (13C and 15N) in close vicinity to a NV defect. Such robust control of nuclear spin states is a key ingredient for further scaling up of nuclear-spin based quantum registers in diamond.

V. Jacques; P. Neumann; J. Beck; M. Markham; D. Twitchen; J. Meijer; F. Kaiser; G. Balasubramanian; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X. (X-Ray Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology  

SciTech Connect

The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of {le} 0.8 {micro}m absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

Pigott, Jeffrey S.; Reaman, Daniel M.; Panero, Wendy R. (OSU)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Modeling of microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} for diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} in a moderate-pressure quartz bell jar reactor used for diamond deposition are studied numerically. Special attention was devoted to high-power densities which provide the most effective way for producing high-quality diamond films. First, a one-dimensional radial model describing the coupled phenomena of chemistry, energy transfer, as well as species and energy transport along the reactor's radial coordinate was developed. Species densities predicted with the model were compared with measurements with infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy, resulting in validation of the model. Second, a one-dimensional axial model was used to describe the plasma flow along the reactor axis in a region between the reactor end wall and the substrate surface. This model was particularly useful for studying the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the substrate surface, where thermal and composition gradients are large. Both the radial and axial transport models are based on the same discharge model in which the plasma is described as a thermochemically nonequilibrium flow with different energy distributions for heavy species and electrons. The chemistry was described with a model containing 28 species and 131 reactions. The electron temperature, the gas temperature, and the species concentration were determined by solving a coupled set of equations. A wide range of experimental conditions used for diamond deposition was simulated, from low microwave power density (9 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 600 W, 2500 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}2200 K) to high-power density (30 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 2 kW, 12 000 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}3200 K). The main chemical paths were identified, and the major species, transport effects, and reaction pathways that govern diamond deposition plasmas are discussed.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Stancu, G.-D.; Mechold, L.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laser Components GmbH, 82140 Olching, Werner-von-Siemens-Strasse 15 (Germany); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We then used TOUGH + Hydrate to simulate the observed gas production and reservoir pressure field data at Messoyakha. We simulated various scenarios that help to explain the field behavior. We have evaluated the effect of reservoir parameters on gas recovery from hydrates. Our work should be beneficial to others who are investigating how to produce gas from a hydrate capped gas reservoir. The results also can be used to better evaluate the process of producing gas from offshore hydrates. The Schlumberger PETREL model is used in industry to the description of geologic horizons and the special distribution of properties. An interface between FLAC3D and Petrel was built by Schlumberger to allow for efficient data entry into TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D.

Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Dynamic Response of a Rotor-air Bearing System Due to Base Induced Periodic Motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-free microturbomachinery (MTM) are inevitably subjected to base or foundation excitations: multiple periodic load excitations from internal combustion (IC) engines in turbochargers, for example. Too large base excitations can produce severe damage, even failure, due to hard collision or rubbing contact between a rotor and its bearings. Therefore, it is paramount to evaluate the reliability of rotor-air bearing systems to withstanding base load excitations. In 2008, intermittent shock excitations, up to 30 g (pk-pk), were introduced to a test rig consisting of a rotor (0.825 kg) supported on two hybrid flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings (FPTPBs). The experiments demonstrated the reliability of the gas bearings to withstanding external transient load excitations. Presently, a shaker delivers periodic load excitations to the base plate supporting the test rig. The whole system, weighing 48 kg, is supported on two soft coil springs and its lowest natural frequency is ~5 Hz. The rod connecting the shaker to the base plate is not affixed rigidly to the test rig base. The rod merely pushes on the base plate and hence the induced based motions are intermittent with multiple impacts and frequencies. As with most practical conditions, the base motion frequencies (5-12 Hz) are low respective to the operating speed of the rotor-bearing system. Rotor speed coast down tests evidence the rotor-bearing system natural frequency when the gas bearings are supplied with feed pressures increasing from 2.36 to 5.08 bar (ab). Shaker excitation induced rotor response, relative to the bearing housings, contains the main input frequency (5-12 Hz) and its super harmonics; and because of the intermittency of the base motions, it also excites the rotor-bearing system natural frequency, with smaller motion amplitudes than synchronous motion components. The excitation of the system natural frequency does not mean rotordynamic instability. With base induced motions, the rotor motion amplitude at the system natural frequency increases as the gas bearing feed pressure decreases, as the rotor speed increases, and as the shaker input excitation frequency increases (5-12 Hz). Hence, the test rotor-air bearing system is highly sensitive to base motions, intermittent in character, in particular when the gas bearings are supplied with a low feed pressure. Predicted rotor motion responses obtained from XLTRC2 and an analytical rigid rotor model, both including the (measured) periodic base motions, show good correlation with the measurements. The research results demonstrate further the applicability of gas bearings into oil-free high speed MTM.

Niu, Yaying

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Offices (NE-ID) and State of Idahos top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

HYDROSTATIC JOURNAL BEARING WATER TESTS CONDUCTED IN MODIFIED PK-A PUMP  

SciTech Connect

A hydrostatic journal bearing mounted near the impeller of an overhung vertical shaft centrifugal pump was subjected to water testing as a part of the molten salt lubrication investigation at ORNL. Three tests were performed with bearings having radial clearances of 0.003 in., 0.0075 in., and 0.005 in. The first journal and bearing (0.003 in. radial clearance) were found to be heavily scored after testing. Only faint localized scratches were found on tho second journal (0.0075 in. radial clearance) and these may have been caused by the many test starts and stops. Localized scratches, somewhat deeper than those on the second journal, were observed on the third journal, but no measurable wear had occurred from testing. An apparent inconsistency was noted in that at the same pump operating condition the bearing load as computed from pocket pressure data increased by a factor of 1.2 to 1.7 as bearing radial clearance was increased from 0.005 in. to 0.0075 in. The configuration of the submerged hydrostatic bearing used in these tests appears to be satisfactory for use as a lower journal bearing in this size and type of centrifugal pump, at least insofar as operation in water is concerned. (auth)

Gilkey, H.E.; Smith, P.G.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL- BEARING STRATA: A PALEOECOLOGICAL APPROACH USING AGGLUTINATED, Holyoke, Massachusetts 01040, U.S.A. ABSTRACT: Microfossils from Cretaceous coal-bearing strata can

Leckie, Mark

400

Shock-Compressed Diamond: Melt, Insulator-Conductor and Polymeric-Atomic Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperatures measured on the shock-Hugoniot of diamond reveal melting between 650 ({+-} 60) GPa and 9000 ({+-} 800) K and 1090 ({+-} 50) GPa and 8400 ({+-} 800) K, with a heat of fusion of {approx} 25 {+-} 10 kJ/mole and a negative Clapeyron slope {partial_derivative}T/{partial_derivative}P|{sub melt} = -5 {+-} 3 K/GPa. Thus, the fluid is denser than the compressed solid, and optical reflectivity measurements show it to be metallic. Hugoniot-temperature measurements extending to over 4000 GPa (40 Mbar) and 115,000 K suggest de-polymerization of a dense covalently-bonded fluid to an atomic state between 10,000 and 30,000 K. These experimental results indicate that carbon present deep inside planets such as Uranus and Neptune could be solid for through-going convection, whereas stable stratification would allow for the presence of fluid metallic carbon at depth; in either case, the presence of carbon could potentially affect planetary seismic normal modes.

Eggert, J; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Bradley, D K; McWilliams, R S; Jeanloz, R; Miller, J E; Boehly, T R

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermal conductivity of diamond-loaded glues for the ATLAS particle physics detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. ATLAS has been collecting data from the collisions of protons since December 2009, in order to investigate the conditions that existed during the early Universe and the origins of mass, and other topics in fundamental particle physics. The innermost layers of the ATLAS detector will be exposed to the most radiation over the first few years of operation at the LHC. In particular, the layer closest to the beam pipe, the B-layer, will degrade over time due to the added radiation. To compensate for its degradation, it will be replaced with an Insertable B-Layer (IBL) around 2016. The design of and R&D for the IBL is ongoing, as the hope is to use the most current technologies in the building of this new sub-detector layer. One topic of interest is the use of more thermally conductive glues in the construction of the IBL, in order to facilitate in the dissipation of heat from the detector. In this paper the measurement and use of highly thermally conductive glues, in particular those that are diamond-loaded, will be discussed. The modified transient plane source technique for thermal conductivity is applied in characterizing the glues across a wide temperature range.

E. A. Ouellette; A. Harris

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Andrault, D. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire des Magmas and Volcans, 5 rue Kessler 63038, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effect of gigaelectron volt Au-ion irradiation on the characteristics of ultrananocrystalline diamond films  

SciTech Connect

The effect of 2.245 GeV Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes on the electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films was investigated. Au-ion irradiation with a fluence of around 8.4x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} is required to induce a large improvement in the EFE properties of the UNCD films. Postannealing the Au-ion irradiated films at 1000 deg. C for 1 h slightly degraded the EFE properties of the films but the resulting EFE behavior was still markedly superior to that of pristine UNCD films. Transmission electron microscopy examinations revealed that the EFE properties of the UNCD films are primarily improved by Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes because of the formation of nanographites along the trajectory of the irradiating ions, which results in an interconnected path for electron transport. In contrast, the induction of grain growth process due to Au-ion irradiation in UNCD films is presumed to insignificantly degrade the EFE properties for the films as the aggregates are scarcely distributed and do not block the electron conducting path.

Chen, Huang-Chin; Teng, Kuang-Yau; Tang, Chen-Yau; Lin, I-Nan [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251 (China); Sundaravel, Balakrishnan [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Amirthapandian, Sankarakumar [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Nonlinear Transient Approach for Morton Synchronous Rotordynamic Instability and Catcher Bearing Life Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation deals with three research topics; i) the catcher bearings life prediction method, ii) the Morton effect, and iii) the two dimensional modified Reynolds equation. Firstly, catcher bearings (CB) are an essential component for rotating machine with active magnetic bearings (AMBs) suspensions. The CB's role is to protect the magnetic bearing and other close clearance component in the event of an AMB failure. The contact load, the Hertzian stress, and the sub/surface shear stress between rotor, races, and balls are calculated, using a nonlinear ball bearing model with thermal growth, during the rotor drop event. Fatigue life of the CB in terms of the number of drop occurrences prior to failure is calculated by applying the Rainflow Counting Algorithm to the sub/surface shear stress-time history. Numerical simulations including high fidelity bearing models and a Timoshenko beam finite element rotor model show that CB life is dramatically reduced when high-speed backward whirl occurs. Secondly, the theoretical models and simulation results about the synchronous thermal instability phenomenon known as Morton Effect is presented in this dissertation. A transient analysis of the rotor supported by tilting pad journal bearing is performed to obtain asymmetric temperature distribution of the journal by solving variable viscosity Reynolds equation, energy equation, heat conduction equation, and equations of motion for rotor. The tilting pad bearing is fully nonlinear model. In addition, thermal mode approach and staggered integration scheme are utilized in order to reduce computation time. The simulation results indicate that the temperature of the journal varies sinusoidally along the circumferential direction and linearly across the diameter, and the vibration envelope increased and decreased, which considers as a limit cycle that is stable oscillation of the envelope of the amplitude of synchronous vibration. Thirdly, the Reynolds equation plays an important role to predict pressure distribution in the fluid film for the fluid film bearing analysis. One of the assumptions on the Reynolds equation is that the viscosity is independent of pressure. This assumption is still valid for most fluid film bearing applications, in which the maximum pressure is less than 1 GPa. In elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) which the lubricant is subjected to extremely high pressure, however, the pressure independent viscosity assumption should be reconsidered. With considering pressure-dependent viscosity, the 2D modified Reynolds equation is derived in this study. The solutions of 2D modified Reynolds equation is compared with that of the classical Reynolds equation for the plain journal bearing and ball bearing cases. The pressure distribution obtained from modified equation is slightly higher pressures than the classical Reynolds equations.

Lee, Jung Gu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Storing Hydrogen, by Enhancing Diamond Powder Properties under Hydrogen Plasma with CaF2 and KF for Use in Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell is like a battery that instead of using electricity to recharge itself, it uses hydrogen. In the fuel cell industry, one of the main problems is storing hydrogen in a safe way and extracting it economically. Gaseous hydrogen requires high pressures which could be very dangerous in case of a collision. The success of hydrogen use depends largely on the development of an efficient storage and release method. In an effort to develop a better hydrogen storage system for fuel cells technology this research investigates the use of 99% pure diamond powder for storing hydrogen. Mixing this powder with a calcium fluoride and potassium fluoride compound in its solid form and treating the surface of the powder with hydrogen plasma, modifies the surface of the diamond. After some filtration through distilled water and drying, the modified diamond is treated with hydrogen. We expect hydrogen to be attracted to the diamond powder surface in higher quantities due to the CaF2 and KF treatment. Due to the large surface area of diamond nanopowder and the electronegative terminal bonds of the fluorine particles on the structure's surface, to the method shows promise in storing high densities of hydrogen.

Ochoa, Franklyn E. Colmenares [Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

In-AMBA in Human Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Chung-Li Ho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Molecular imaging with promise of personalized medicine can provide patient-specific information noninvasively, thus enabling treatment to be tailored to the specific biological attributes of both the disease and the patient. This study was to investigate the characterization of DO3A-CH2CO-G-4-aminobenzoyl-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-NH2 (AMBA) in vitro, MicroSPECT/CT imaging, and biological activities of 111 In-AMBA in PC-3 prostate tumor-bearing SCID mice. The uptake of 111 In-AMBA reached highest with 3.87 0.65 % ID/g at 8 h. MicroSPECT/CT imaging studies suggested that the uptake of 111 In-AMBA was clearly visualized between 8 and 48 h postinjection. The distribution half-life (t1/2?) and the elimination half-life (t1/2?)of 111 In-AMBA in mice were 1.53 h and 30.7 h, respectively. The Cmax and AUC of 111 In-AMBA were 7.57 % ID/g and 66.39 h ? % ID/g, respectively. The effective dose appeared to be 0.11 mSv/MBq ?1. We demonstrated a good uptake of 111 In-AMBA in the GRPR-overexpressed PC-3 tumorbearing SCID mice. 111 In-AMBA is a safe, potential molecular image-guided diagnostic agent for human GRPR-positive tumors, ranging from simple and straightforward biodistribution studies to improve the efficacy of combined modality anticancer therapy. 1.

Chung-li Ho; I-hsiang Liu; Yu-hsien Wu; Liang-cheng Chen; Chun-lin Chen; Wan-chi Lee; Cheng-hui Chuang; Te-wei Lee; Wuu-jyh Lin; Lie-hang Shen; Chih-hsien Chang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hilbert Transform-Based Bearing Failure Detection in DFIG-Based Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilbert Transform-Based Bearing Failure Detection in DFIG-Based Wind Turbines Yassine Amirat1 modulation, Hilbert transform. Nomenclature WT = Wind Turbine; DFIG = Doubly-Fed Induction Generator; HT

Brest, Université de

410

Design of transmission mechanisms for the head of the 'Huggable' robotic teddy bear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The head of the Huggable teddy bear, a robotic companion for use in hospitals, schools, and other locations, must contain three degrees of freedom. It must contain transmissions allowing it to nod up and down, tilt side ...

Akraboff, Nicolina Alden

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Study of Free-Fluoride Mold Powder Based on Titanium-Bearing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2004 ... Study of Free-Fluoride Mold Powder Based on Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag by G.H. Wen, P. Tang, L. Zhang, Y. Liu, and S. Miao...

412

Vibration characterization of an active magnetic bearing supported rotor / J. Bean.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The McTronX Research group at the Potchefstroom campus of the North-West University, aims to establish a knowledge base on active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems. Up (more)

Bean, Jaco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Sensitivity of Convective Initiation to the Lapse Rate of the Active Cloud-Bearing Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments are conducted using an idealized cloud-resolving model to explore the sensitivity of deep convective initiation (DCI) to the lapse rate of the active cloud-bearing layer [ACBL; the atmospheric layer above the level of free ...

Adam L. Houston; Dev Niyogi

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Identification of factors that influence the stiffness of high-damping elastomer seismic isolation bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, high-damping elastomer, steel-laminated seismic isolation bearings have gained acceptance as a device for isolating large buildings and structures from earthquake damage. In the United States, architectural engineering firms custom design isolators for each project and ten have the isolators manufactured by one of less than a hand-full of manufactures. The stiffness of the bearing is the single most important design parameter that the molded bearing must meet because it determines the fundamental frequency of the isolation system. This paper reports on recent research that examined several factors that cause real and potential variations to the stiffness of the bearing. The resulting changes to the fundamental frequency of the isolated structure are quantified for each factor. The following were examined: (1) dimensional tolerances, (2) frequency effects, (3) temperature effects, (4) cyclical effects, and (5) aging effects. It was found that geometric variations barely affect the stiffness whereas temperature variations greatly affect the stiffness.

Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A design of actuation mechanisms for use in 'huggable' robotic teddy bear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silent, back drivable actuators were necessary for the Huggable teddy bear, a robotic companion for use in therapeutic applications. The benefits of pet therapy include a reduction in stress and an increase in rate of ...

Lalla, Levi (Levi J.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Dynamic friction and wear in a planar-contact encapsulated microball bearing using an integrated microturbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demonstration and characterization of a novel planar-contact encapsulated microball bearing using a radial in-flow microturbine are presented. Stable operation of the air-driven silicon microturbine is shown for over ...

McCarthy, Matthew

417

An Investigation of the Thermal and Energy Balance Regimes of Great Slave and Great Bear Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great Slave Lake and Great Bear Lake have large surface areas, water volumes, and high latitudinal positions; are cold and deep; and are subject to short daylight periods in winter and long ones in summer. They are dissimilar hydrologically. ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Peter D. Blanken; Normand Bussires; Anne E. Walker; Claire J. Oswald; William M. Schertzer; Christopher Spence

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Bear Lake County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bear Lake County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE...

419

Bias in hard disk drive rotary actuator pivot bearings: measurements and lubrication phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bias in disk drive rotary actuator bearings exhibits complex behavior related to the history of the actuator movement. This paper investigates the hysteresis component of bias present after seeks. Measurements of bias during full stroke actuator movements ...

Daniel Helmick; William Messner; C. Fred Higgs, III

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Experimental response of a rotor supported on Rayleigh step gas bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas bearings enable successful applications in high speed oil-free microturbomachinery. This thesis presents analysis and experiments of the dynamic performance of a rotor supported on Rayleigh step gas bearings. Comprehensive experiments demonstrate that Rayleigh step hybrid gas bearings exhibit adequate stiffness and damping capability in a narrow range of shaft speeds, up to ~ 20 krpm. Rotor coastdown responses were performed for two test bearing sets with nominal radial clearance of 25.4 ?m and 38.1 ?m, respectively. A near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating was applied on the rotor to reduce friction against its bearings at liftoff and touchdown. However, the rotor still experienced dry friction at low shaft speeds (below ~ 4,000 rpm). Experiments show that the supply pressure raises the rotor critical speed and decreases the system damping ratio. The geometry of the Rayleigh steps distributed on the rotor surface generates a time varying pressure field and results in a sizable 4X super synchronous component of bearing transmitted load. The external supply gas pressure affects slightly the onset speed of instability of the rotor-bearing system. The unstable whirl frequencies are nearly fixed at the system natural frequency (~ 120 Hz). Analysis with a finite element model predicts the stiffness and damping force coefficients for the bearing accounting for a purely hydrodynamic operation condition. Predictions show the synchronous stiffness and damping coefficients decrease with shaft speed. Predicted threshold speeds of instability are lower, ~ 50% or less than the measurement due to the analytical model limitations assuming a grooved stator. The predicted synchronous responses to imbalance correlate well with the measurements, however. The Rayleigh step gas bearing shows similar characteristics to the flexure pivot tilting pad bearing (FPTPB) tested in 2003. However, the test Rayleigh step gas bearings exhibit a much reduced stable operating speed range, below 20 krpm. The maximum speed achieved is much lower to that determined with an identical rotor supported on FPTPBs, i.e. rotor dynamically stable up to 100 krpm. The FPTPB is more reliable in high speed oil-free applications due to its excellent stability characteristics.

Zhu, Xuehua

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond thrust bearings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Temperature and frequency effects in a high-performance superconducting bearing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing was fabricated and tested by itself and as a component in a 1-kWh and a 10-kWh flywheel energy system (FES). The rotational losses of the HTS bearing as a function of rotational rate and HTS temperature were determined. The 1-kWh FES was tested with a motor/generator and with an eddy current clutch to determine the motor/generator losses.

Day, A. C.; Hull, J. R.; Strasik, M.; Johnson, P. E.; McCrary, K. E.; Edwards, J.; Mittleider, J.; Schindler, J. R.; Hawkins, R. A.; Yoder, M.

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bearing design for flywheel energy storage using high-TC superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature superconductor material bearing system (38) This system (38) includes a rotor (50) having a ring permanent magnet (60), a plurality of permanent magnets (16, 20 and 70) for interacting to generate levitation forces for the system (38). This group of magnets are a push/pull bearing (75). A high temperature superconductor structure (30) interacts with the ting permanent magnet (60) to provide stabilizing forces for the system (38).

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Thermal Energy Storage: Assessment of Ice Bear 30 Hybrid Air Conditioner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and documents the construction, performance, and application of a thermal energy storage system that uses ice as the storage medium. The system, Ice Bear 30 manufactured by Ice Energy Inc. located in Windsor, Colorado, is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard roof-top air conditioner. Ice storage systems exist, but what makes the Ice Bear 30 unique is its relatively small size (5 ton) for us...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Polar Bear Aerial Survey in the Eastern Chukchi Sea: A Pilot Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bering Seas population, shared with Russia. Currently a reliable population estimate for the Chukchi/Bering Seas population does not exist. Land-based aerial and mark-recapture population surveys may not be possible in the Chukchi Sea because variable ice conditions, the limited range of helicopters, extremely large polar bear home ranges, and severe weather conditions may limit access to remote areas. Thus line-transect aerial surveys from icebreakers may be the best available tool to monitor this polar bear stock. In August 2000, a line-transect survey was conducted in the eastern Chukchi Sea and western Beaufort Sea from helicopters based on a U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker under the Ship of Opportunity program. The objectives of this pilot study were to estimate polar bear density in the eastern Chukchi and western Beaufort Seas and to assess the logistical feasibility of using shipbased aerial surveys to develop polar bear population estimates. Twenty-nine polar bears in 25 groups were sighted on 94 transects (8257 km). The density of bears was estimated as 1 bear per 147 km 2 (CV = 38%). Additional aerial surveys in late fall, using dedicated icebreakers, would be required to achieve the number of sightings, survey effort, coverage, and precision needed for more effective monitoring of population trends in the Chukchi Sea. Key words: aerial survey, Ursus maritimus, polar bear, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi Sea, line transect, icebreaker RSUM. LAlaska a deux populations dours polaires: celle du sud de la mer de Beaufort, commune avec le Canada, et celle de la mer des Tchouktches / mer de Bring, commune avec la Russie. lheure actuelle, on ne possde pas destimation fiable de la population de la mer des Tchouktches / mer de Bring. En raison des conditions variables de la glace, de la porte limite

Susanne Kalxdorff; Geoff York

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

Nix, W.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TRUEX partitioning from radioactive ICPP sodium bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in Southeast Idaho is currently evaluating several treatment technologies applicable to waste streams generated over several decades of-nuclear fuel reprocessing. Liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), generated primarily during decontamination activities, is one of the waste streams of interest. The TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed at Argonne National Laboratory is currently being evaluated to separate the actinides from SBW. On a mass basis, the amount of the radioactive species in SBW are low relative to inert matrix components. Thus, the advantage of separations is a dramatic decrease in resulting volumes of high activity waste (HAW) which must be dispositioned. Numerous studies conducted at the ICPP indicate the applicability of the TRUEX process has been demonstrated; however, these studies relied on a simulated SBW surrogate for the real waste. Consequently, a series of batch contacts were performed on samples of radioactive ICPP SBW taken from tank WM-185 to verify that actual waste would behave similarly to the simulated waste. The test results with SBW from tank WM-185 indicate the TRUEX solvent effectively extracts the actinides from the samples of actual waste. Gross alpha radioactivity, attributed predominantly to Pu and Am, was reduced from 3.14E+04 dps/mL to 1.46 dps/mL in three successive batch contacts with fresh TRUEX solvent. This reduction corresponds to a decontamination factor of DF = 20,000 or 99.995% removal of the gross a activity in the feed. The TRUEX solvent also extracted the matrix components Zr, Fe, and Hg to an appreciable extent (D{sub Zr} > 10, D{sub Fe} {approx} 2, D{sub Hg} {approx}6). Iron co-extracted with the actinides can be successfully scrubbed from the organic with 0.2 M HNO{sub 3}. Mercury can be selectively partitioned from the actinides with either sodium carbonate or nitric acid ({ge} 5 M HNO{sub 3}) solutions.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Offshore Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to develop the necessary knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus is on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. To achieve this objective, we have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. To be sure our geomechanical modeling is realistic, we are also investigating the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. In Phase II of the project, we will review all published core data and generate additional core data to verify the models. To generate data for our models, we are using data from the literature and we will be conducting laboratory studies in 2007 that generate data to (1) evaluate the conceptual pore-scale models, (2) calibrate the mathematical models, (3) determine dominant relations and critical parameters defining the geomechanical behavior of HBS, and (4) establish relationships between the geomechanical status of HBS and the corresponding geophysical signature. The milestones for Phase I of this project are given as follows: Literature survey on typical sediments containing gas hydrates in the ocean (TAMU); Recommendations on how to create typical sediments in the laboratory (TAMU); Demonstrate that typical sediments can be created in a repeatable manner in the laboratory and gas hydrates can be created in the pore space (TAMU); Develop a conceptual pore-scale model based on available data and reports (UCB); Test the developed pore-scale concepts on simple configurations and verify the results against known measurements and observations (UCB); Complete the FLAC3D routines that will be linked with the reservoir model (LBNL); Complete the TOUGH+/HYDRATE modifications and extensions (LBNL); Complete the TOUGH+/FLAC3D interaction interface (LBNL); Integrate and test the coupled geomechanical numerical model TFxH/FLAC3D (LBNL); and Demonstrate that Petrel can be used to develop an earth model for providing data to the TOUGH+/FLAC3D (SLB).

Stephen A. Holditch

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy levels and decoherence properties of single electron and nuclear spins in a defect center in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coherent behavior of the single electron and single nuclear spins of a defect center in diamond and a 13C nucleus in its vicinity, respectively, are investigated. The energy levels associated with the hyperfine coupling of the electron spin of the defect center to the 13C nuclear spin are analyzed. Methods of magnetic resonance together with optical readout of single defect centers have been applied in order to observe the coherent dynamics of the electron and nuclear spins. Long coherence times, in the order of microseconds for electron spins and tens of microseconds for nuclear spins, recommend the studied system as a good experimental approach for implementing a 2-qubit gate.

I. Popa; T. Gaebel; M. Domhan; C. Wittmann; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mn-Stabilized Zirconia: From Imitation Diamonds to a New Potential High-T{sub C} Ferromagnetic Spintronics Material  

SciTech Connect

From the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations which include the effects of thermally excited magnetic fluctuations, we predict Mn-stabilized cubic zirconia to be ferromagnetic above 500 K. We find this material, which is well known both as an imitation diamond and as a catalyst, to be half-metallic with the majority and minority spin Mn impurity states lying in zirconia's wide gap. The Mn concentration can exceed 40%. The high-T{sub C} ferromagnetism is robust to oxygen vacancy defects and to how the Mn impurities are distributed on the Zr fcc sublattice. We propose this ceramic as a promising future spintronics material.

Ostanin, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Ernst, A.; Sandratskii, L. M.; Bruno, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Daene, M.; Hergert, W.; Mertig, I. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Fachbereich Physik, D-06099 Halle (Germany); Hughes, I. D.; Staunton, J. B. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kudrnovsky, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Conformational flexibility and molecular interactions of an archaeal homologue of the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK and 7Current address: Architcture et Fonction des Macromolcules Biologiques UMR 9068, Case 932, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 9, France Email: C Leong Ng - clng@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk; David G Waterman - david... .waterman@diamond.ac.uk; Eugene V Koonin - koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Alison D Walters - adw501@york.ac.uk; James PJ Chong - jpjc1@york.ac.uk; Michail N Isupov - M.Isupov@exeter.ac.uk; Andrey A Lebedev - lebedev@ysbl.york.ac.uk; David HJ Bunka - bmbdhjb@bmb.leeds.ac.uk; Peter G...

Ng, C Leong; Waterman, David G; Koonin, Eugene V; Walters, Alison D; Chong, James P J; Isupov, Michail N; Lebedev, Andrey A; Bunka, David H J; Stockley, Peter G; Ortiz-Lombardia, Miguel; Antson, Alfred A

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Robust control of entanglement in a Nitrogen-vacancy centre coupled to a Carbon-13 nuclear spin in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address a problem of generating a robust entangling gate between electronic and nuclear spins in the system of a single nitrogen-vacany centre coupled to a nearest Carbon-13 atom in diamond against certain types of systematic errors such as pulse-length and off-resonance errors. We analyse the robustness of various control schemes: sequential pulses, composite pulses and numerically-optimised pulses. We find that numerically-optimised pulses, produced by the gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm (GRAPE), are more robust than the composite pulses and the sequential pulses. The optimised pulses can also be implemented in a faster time than the composite pulses.

R. S. Said; J. Twamley

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structure and Energy of the 90 degree sign Partial Dislocation in Diamond: A Combined Ab Initio and Elasticity Theory Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core structure and stability of the 90 degree sign partial dislocation in diamond is studied within isotropic elasticity theory and ab initio total energy calculations. The double-period reconstruction is found to be more stable than the single-period reconstruction for a broad range of stress states. The analysis of the ab initio results shows further that elasticity theory is valid for dislocation spacings as small as 10-20 Angstrom, thus allowing ab initio calculations to provide reliable parameters for continuum theory analysis. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Blase, X. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Departement de Physique des Materiaux, U.M.R. No. 5586, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, (France); Lin, Karin [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Canning, A. [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Louie, S. G. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chrzan, D. C. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Agile machining and inspection thrust area team-on-machine probing / compatibility assessment of Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) pro/CMM DMIS with Zeiss DMISEngine.  

SciTech Connect

The charter goal of the Agile Machining and Inspection Thrust Area Team is to identify technical requirements, within the nuclear weapons complex (NWC), for Agile Machining and Inspection capabilities. During FY 2008, the team identified Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) Pro/CMM as a software tool for use in off-line programming of probing routines--used for measurement--for machining and turning centers. The probing routine would be used for in-process verification of part geometry. The same Pro/CMM program used on the machine tool could also be employed for program validation / part verification using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Funding was provided to determine the compatibility of the Pro/CMM probing program with CMM software (Zeiss DMISEngine).

Wade, James Rokwel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fundamentals and technology for monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches with ultra-nanocrystaline diamond dielectric/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

Most current capacitive RF-MEMS switch technology is based on conventional dielectric materials such as SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. However, they suffer not only from charging problems but also stiction problems leading to premature failure of an RF-MEMS switch. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{sup (R)}) (2-5 nm grains) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) (10-100 nm grains) films exhibit one of the highest Young's modulus ({approx} 980-1100 GPa) and demonstrated MEMS resonators with the highest quality factor (Q {ge} 10,000 in air for NCD) today, they also exhibit the lowest force of adhesion among MEMS/NEMS materials ({approx}10 mJ/m{sup 2}-close to van der Waals attractive force for UNCD) demonstrated today. Finally, UNCD exhibits dielectric properties (fast discharge) superior to those of Si and SiO{sub 2}, as shown in this paper. Thus, UNCD and NCD films provide promising platform materials beyond Si for a new generation of important classes of high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A.; Goldsmith, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.; Gudeman, C; Wang, W.; Hwang, J.; Swonger, J.; Carlisle, J.; Balachandran, S.; MEMtronics Corp.; Innovative Micro Technology; Lehigh Univ.; Peregrine Semiconductor; Advanced Diamond Technologies

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Diamond Particle Detector Properties during High Fluence Material Damage Tests and their Future Applications for Machine Protection in the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience with LHC machine protection (MP) during the last three years of operation shows that the MP systems sufficiently protect the LHC against damage in case of failures leading to beam losses with a time constant exceeding 1ms. An unexpected fast beam loss mechanism, called UFOs [1], was observed, which could potentially quench superconducting magnets. For such fast losses, but also for better understanding of slower losses, an improved understanding of the loss distribution within a bunch train is required [2]. Diamond particle detectors with bunch-by-bunch resolution and high dynamic range have been developed and successfully tested in the LHC and in experiments to quantify the damage limits of LHC components. This paper will focus on experience gained in use of diamond detectors. The properties of these detectors were measured during high-fluence material damage tests in CERNs Hi-RadMat facility. The results will be discussed and compared to the cross-calibration with FLUKA simulations. Future app...

Burkart, F; Borburgh, J; Dehning, B; Di Castro, M; Griesmayer, E; Lechner, A; Lendaro, J; Loprete, F; Losito, R; Montesano, S; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Development of a Beam Condition Monitor System for the Experimental Areas of the LHC Using CVD Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, each bunch consisting of 10^11 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damages not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond has been studied for use as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with a Sr-90 source and high intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. The results from these investigations are p...

Fernndez-Hernando, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

U-bearing particles in miners' and millers' lungs  

SciTech Connect

The size distribution of uranium-bearing particles in air particulates in occupational areas of active uranium mines and mills is largely uninvestigated. Investigation of the size of residual uranium-bearing particles in uranium miners' and millers' lungs is warranted because significant inhalation of uranium can occur in certain occupational areas. Average uranium concentrations of about 0.3 ppM U in uranium miners' and millers' lungs have been reported. Local uranium concentrations in uranium-bearing particles inhaled and regionally deposited in the lungs of uranium miners and millers are orders of magnitude larger than the average uranium concentrations reported. The feasibility of using microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) techniques to search for such uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues has been demonstrated. Proton microbeams 20 ..mu..m in diameter, scanning in 5 ..mu..m steps, were used to irradiate sections of lung tissues 10 to 40 ..mu..m thick. The paper will briefly describe the method, and present and discuss the results obtained in an extensive search for uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues, collected at autopsy, of former uranium miners and millers. 13 references, 1 table.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Miller, S.C.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Saccomanno, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Bear Lake Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bear Lake Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bear Lake Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bear Lake Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location St Charles, Idaho Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

444

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Hydrate-Bearing Clayey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-FE0009897 Goal The primary goal of this research effort is to contribute to an in-depth understanding of hydrate bearing, fine-grained sediments with a focus on investigation of their potential for hydrate-based gas production. Performer Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta GA Background Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. Yet hydrate formation in clay-dominated sediments is less understood and characterized than other types of hydrate occurrence. There is an inadequate understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms, segregation structures, hydrate-lense topology, system connectivity, and physical