Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar, California: Energy Resources Bar, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0286226°, -117.8103367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0286226,"lon":-117.8103367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Storing Hydrogen, by Enhancing Diamond Powder Properties under Hydrogen Plasma with CaF2 and KF for Use in Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell is like a battery that instead of using electricity to recharge itself, it uses hydrogen. In the fuel cell industry, one of the main problems is storing hydrogen in a safe way and extracting it economically. Gaseous hydrogen requires high pressures which could be very dangerous in case of a collision. The success of hydrogen use depends largely on the development of an efficient storage and release method. In an effort to develop a better hydrogen storage system for fuel cells technology this research investigates the use of 99% pure diamond powder for storing hydrogen. Mixing this powder with a calcium fluoride and potassium fluoride compound in its solid form and treating the surface of the powder with hydrogen plasma, modifies the surface of the diamond. After some filtration through distilled water and drying, the modified diamond is treated with hydrogen. We expect hydrogen to be attracted to the diamond powder surface in higher quantities due to the CaF2 and KF treatment. Due to the large surface area of diamond nanopowder and the electronegative terminal bonds of the fluorine particles on the structure's surface, to the method shows promise in storing high densities of hydrogen.

Ochoa, Franklyn E. Colmenares [Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

4

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDF (1.02 MB) 2011 Diamond, Richard C.. "The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency." In The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency....

5

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocrystalline diamond aerogel Peter J. Pauzauskie a,1,2 ,Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Aerogel materials have myriadcreating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an

Pauzauskie, Peter J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ca  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P O. Box 3090 P O. Box 3090 Ca rlsbad, New Mexico 88221 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau MAY 1 6 2012 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Bldg . 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Revised Calendar Year 2005-2008 Culebra Potentiometric Surface Map Package Dear Mr. Kieling: On August 5 , 2011 , the New Mexico Environmental Department (NMED) approved the Groundwater Work Plan submitted as a condition to the Final Stipulated Order dated December 1, 2009. An additional condition of the Order, upon approval of the Work Plan , is the submittal of a series of revised Culebra potentiometric surface maps within timeframes specified by the Order. Enclosed is the revised second submittal due to the NMED. The

9

Electrically conductive diamond electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Delbert D. (Los Alamos, NM); Evans, Christopher J. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Diamond nucleation using polyethene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

Dugdale, R.A.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Diamond Schottky barrier diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With superior physical and electrical properties, diamond became a potential competitor to SiC soon after Element Six reported in 2002 the successful synthesis of single crystal plasma deposited diamond with high catTier mobility. This thesis discusses... the fabrication of silicon thyristors able to block more than 5000V and to conduct 2000A when forward-biased. However, due to their bipolar conduction mechanism, these devices suffered from serious limitations in terms of high frequency operation [2...

Brezeanu, Mihai

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

17

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

18

Black Diamond Internal network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? ? ??Ð ? ? ? ?? ?????Ð ´? µ Ð ? Ð ?? ? ? ?? #12;Black Diamond Internet 123456 789101112 A B 12x 6x

Imperial College, London

19

Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Gutierrez, Humberto (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA); Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. (State College, PA); Jain, Puja (King Of Prussia, PA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal site is located on part of the former L-Bar ranch and is about 4 miles east-southeast of the village of Seboyeta. The site was previously owned and operated by SOHIO Western Mining Company . Mining and milling at L-Bar began in 1977 and continued until 1981, when the mine closed because of economic conditions of the uranium industry. About 2.1 million tons of ore was processed at the mill. The milling operation created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. Tailings and liquid wastes were pumped in slurry form into an onsite tailings impoundment for disposal. All aboveground structures, including the mine and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

$\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses for $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states are systematically studied in QCD sum rules. The interpolating currents representing the related molecular states are proposed. Technically, contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion (OPE). Mass spectra for molecular states with $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ configurations are obtained.

Zhang, Jian-Rong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Diamond Wire Technology LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wire Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Wire Technology LLC Place Colorado Springs, Colorado Zip 80916 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of diamond...

25

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar #12;Malay Archipelago · During Islam era: Malay) · Dutch and Portuguese traders arrived during the 15th century · Indonesia became a Dutch colony · Indonesia independent - 1945 #12;#12;Indonesian · Formed ­ 15th

Dershowitz, Nachum

26

High efficiency diamond solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

BaBar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Kollaboration gebaut. Er dient dazu, Paare von elektrisch neutralen B und anti-B Mesonen zu erzeugen. Das neutrale B enthält ein anti-b Quark und ein d Quark, während das neutrale anti-B ein b Quark und ein anti-d Quark enthält. Die Teilchenstrahlen werden so eingestellt, dass bei ihrer Kollision gerade die richtige Menge an Energie frei wird, um diese zwei Mesonen zu erzeugen. Weil Elektronen und Positronen mit verschiedenen Energien umlaufen, werden die so entstandenen B und anti-B Mesonen mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in derselben Richtung laufen. Dabei bewegen sie sich in gleicher Richtung wie die schneller laufenden Elektronen. Das macht es möglich, ihre Lebensdauer durch die Wegstrecke, die sie bis zu ihrem

28

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Rainer Wallny

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method for forming diamonds from carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone (Slidell, LA); Lewis, Roy (Evanston, IL); Rehn, Lynn (LaGrange, IL); Kirk, Marquis (Hinsdale, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Method of Forming Diamonds from Carbonaceous Material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone; Lewis, Roy; Rehn, Lynn; Kirk, Marquis

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

35

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

Moss, W.C.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode  

SciTech Connect

Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

42

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydrogen chemisorption on diamond surfaces. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we demonstrated the ability to measure submonolayer quantities of surface hydrogen on insulating glasses. The present study builds on this by examining hydrogen coverages on another insulating material: the technologically important diamond (100) surface. The information to be obtained in the present study will allow us to deduce the correct structures for the diamond (100)-(1X1) and -(2X1) surface phases and provide information on the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the (100) surface. Such experiments are essential for a complete understanding of hydrogen surface chemistry during the chemical vapor deposition of thin diamond films. This report summarizes progress made in FY93 for measuring surface hydrogen concentrations on the diamond (100) surface. Although the available LDRD resources were insufficient to finish this study in FY93, completion of the study is planned using other resources and this detailed report as a reference.

Daley, R.; Musket, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Free energy and shock compression of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new approach has been developed to calculate the free energy in quasiharmonic approximation for homogeneous condensed matter. Common result has been demonstrated on an example of solid and liquid diamond at high pressures and temperatures of shock compression.

A. M. Molodets; M. A. Molodets; S. S. Nabatov

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

50

P{bar P} collider physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

52

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/?\\to N \\bar{N} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} ?$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$, $p \\bar p \\eta$, $p \\bar p \\eta^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} \\omega$ decays are re-studied. Different contributions due to PS-PS and PS-PV couplings in the $\\pi$-N interaction and the effects of $NN\\pi$ form factors are investigated in the $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$ decay channel. It is found that when the ratio of $|F_0| /|F_M|$ takes small value, without considering the $NN\\pi$ form factor, the difference between PS-PS and PS-PV couplings are negligible. However, when the $NN\\pi$ form factor is included, this difference is greatly enlarged. The resultant decay widths are sensitive to the form factors. As a conclusion, the nucleon-pole contribution as a background is important in the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\pi$ decay and must be accounted. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\eta$ and $N\\bar{N}\\eta'$ decays, its contribution is less than 0.1% of the data. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\omega$ decay, it provides rather important contribution without considering form factors. But the contribution is suppressed greatly when adding the off-shell form factors. Comparing these results with data would help us to select a proper form factor for such kind of decay.

Wei-Hong Liang; Peng-Nian Shen; Bing-Song Zou; Amand Faessler

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bar Gadda LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bar-Gadda LLC Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94306 Sector Geothermal energy, Hydro, Hydrogen Product Has developed a new technology to produce hydrogen from...

54

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

55

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Diamond-like Coating Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Feature Archive Diamond-like Coating Improves Electron Microscope Images By Mike Ross November 26, 2012 Coating the surface of a material with a single layer of diamond-like...

56

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Superhard Diamond-Denting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pressed between the flattened tips of two opposing diamonds. Scientists can shine lasers or X-rays through the transparent diamonds to observe and identify any atomic-scale...

57

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus Department of Electrical Theory, 27(1):122­125, January 1981. [8] R. Tandon and S. Ulukus. Diamond channels with partially

Ulukus, Sennur

58

n-Type diamond and method for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Place Melbourne, Australia Zip 3124 Product Victoria based clean energy project developer. Coordinates -37.817532°, 144.967148° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.817532,"lon":144.967148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Shock Compressing Diamond to a Conducting Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser generated shock reflectance data show that diamond undergoes a continuous transition from optically absorbing to reflecting between Hugoniot pressures 600diamond having a thermal population of carriers at P{sub H}{approx}600 GPa, undergoing band overlap metallization at P{sub H}{approx}1000 GPa and melting at 800

Bradley, D K; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Moon, S J; Cauble, R C; Collins, G W

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downer Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cam-controlled boring bar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

CA.0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of_f$ergy of_f$ergy Washington, DC 20545 *. CA.0 MAY 2 9 1987 .r ,. Hr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Poli,cy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Installations Pentagon . ..&&&.@.&&;-D.C. 20301 Dear Mr.~:Schafer: As you know, the Department of Ene,rgy (DOE) is implementing a program to identify sites that may be radiologically contaminated as a result of DOE predecessor operations and to correct any pioblems associated with this contamination if there is DOE authority to do so. Reviews of historical materials from the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) era conducted in support of this program have identified number of active and former Department of Defense (DOD) installations and

65

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...

66

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing from ...

67

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend April 17, 2012 - 11:43am Addthis Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science How does it work? As computer performance has improved, engineers have had a hard time dissipating the heat produced. Diamond film may be the answer, as it's much better at absorbing and

69

Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walnut Biomass Facility Walnut Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility Facility Diamond Walnut Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Diamond Willow Extension | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extension Extension Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Extension Facility Diamond Willow Extension Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.281621°, -104.271355° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.281621,"lon":-104.271355,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Comparison of Fast Amplifiers for Diamond Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors requests for novel signal amplifiers, capable to match the superb signal-to-noise ratio and timing response of these detectors. Existing amplifiers are still far away from this goal and are the dominant contributors to the overall system noise and the main source of degradation of the energy and timing resolution. We tested a number of commercial amplifiers designed for diamond detector readout to identify the best solution for a particular application. This application required a deposited energy threshold below 100 keV and timing resolution of the order of 200 ps at 200 keV. None of tested amplifiers satisfies these requirements. The best solution to such application found to be the Cividec C6 amplifier, which allows 100 keV minimal threshold, but its coincidence timing resolution at 200 keV is as large as 1.2 ns.

M. Osipenko; S. Minutoli; P. Musico; M. Ripani; B. Caiffi; A. Balbi; G. Ottonello; S. Argir; S. Beol; N. Amapane; M. Masera; G. Mila

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

73

Boron-doped Diamond Synthesis Using Mode-conversion Type ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DC Arc Plasma Jet Growth of Large Area High Quality Freestanding Diamond Films and ... Hybrid Nanoporous Metal/Oxide Films for Energy Storage.

74

Argonne CNM News: Medical applications of diamond particles and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical applications of diamond particles and surfaces TEM image of nanodiamond particles TEM image of nanodiamond particles Scientists in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group...

75

Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

76

Alloy Development for Copper Diamond Composites for Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One approach to meeting the challenges is to add diamond particles to a copper matrix to improve thermal conductivity and lower CTE simultaneously.

77

Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Brian Smith, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Skylar Cox Indoor Environment...

78

Thin Sheet of Diamond Has Worlds of Uses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new technique from Argonne National Laboratory creates thin diamond films that are helping industry save energy and could even be used in heart and eye implants.

Sagoff, Jared

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Black Diamond Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Diamond Power Co Black Diamond Power Co Place West Virginia Utility Id 1764 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.0685/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Black Diamond Power Co (West Virginia). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

80

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Spontaneous formation of double bars in dark matter dominated galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although nearly one-third of barred galaxies host an inner, secondary bar, the formation and evolution of double barred galaxies remain unclear. We show here an example model of a galaxy, dominated by a live dark matter halo, in which double bars form naturally, without requiring gas, and we follow its evolution for a Hubble time. The inner bar in our model galaxy rotates almost as slowly as the outer bar, and it can reach up to half of its length. The route to the formation of a double bar may be different from that of a single strong bar. Massive dark matter halo or dynamically hot stellar disc may play an important role in the formation of double bars and their subsequent evolution.

Saha, Kanak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Diamond and Related Materials 6 ( 1997) 1759-I771 Simulation of morphological instabilities during diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and hydrogen are activated with energetic sources such as microwaves to generate plasmas, direct current (DC include the hot filament [2] and many types of microwave plasma [3], which typically have *Corresponding is expected to be negligible since the diamond phase of carbon is very stable and gasification of dia- mond

Dandy, David

83

NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

Robert Radtke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

The BaBar Drift Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central drift chamber for the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC is a cylindrical chamber with a length of 280 cm and outer radius of 81 cm. It consists of 40 layers of small hexagonal cells arranged in 10 axial and stereo super-layers. In order to minimize multiple scattering, light materials are used for the mechanical structure, and the gas mixture is Helium based. The pulse-height and timing electronics are mounted directly on the chamber rear end-plate. A full length prototype of the BaBar drift chamber has been built. The analysis of cosmic ray events measures the spatial resolution averaged in the cell to be 130 m and the dE/dx resolution to be 6.8%, meeting the performance goals for the BaBar central tracker. The mechanical assembly and stringing of the chamber was completed in December 1997 and the detector will be integrated into BaBar during summer 1998. 1

G. Sciolla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

Chin, R.P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions  

SciTech Connect

With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

True, W.R.

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Manufacturing of diamond windows for synchrotron radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diamond window construction is presented and explicit manufacturing details are given. This window will increase the power dissipation by about a factor of 4 over present day state of the art windows to absorb 600 W of power. This power will be generated by in-vacuum undulators with the storage ring ALBA operating at a design current of 400 mA. Extensive finite element (FE) calculations are included to predict the windows behavior accompanied by explanations for the chosen boundary conditions. A simple linear model was used to cross-check the FE calculations.

Schildkamp, W.; Nikitina, L. [Synchrotron ALBA, CELLS, Carretera BP 1413, km 3.3, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Diamond Detectors for Heavy Ion Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1999, the accelerator facility at GSI is scheduled to deliver beam intensities of about 10 10 particles/spill for all available ions up to 238 U. This necessitates the development of a new generation of radiation-resistant and ultra-fast detectors, in conjunction with new high-speed and low-noise electronics. Preliminary results confirm the suitability of CVD-diamond detectors for both, beam diagnostics, and heavy-ion experiments with projectiles in the energy region from 50 MeV/amu to 2 GeV/amu. Various test measurements

E. Berdermann; K. Blasche; P. Moritz; H. Stelzer; F. Zeytouni

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1 H. Mutschke,2 L. Binette3 , S. Höfner4 1 NORDITA, SE-75120 Uppsala Sweden The first direct evidence for nano-diamonds in space came from meteorites. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues from primitive meteorites have shown that nano- diamonds

Andersen, Anja C.

91

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Preserved in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to keep the BaBar virtual world safe and unchanging, isolated not only from the SLAC network, but from the rest of the World Wide Web. BaBar collaboration members can...

92

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines R.C. Blasdell, L. A. Assoufid, and D. M. Mills TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................1 2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DIAMONDS ..................................................5 2.1 Varieties of Diamonds ....................................................................5 2.2 The Lattice Parameter .....................................................................5 2.3 Bulk Thermal and Mechanical Properties ...............................................6 2.4 Typical Surface and Lattice Plane Morphology ......................................8 2.5 The Liquid-GaIn/Diamond Interface ...................................................10 3. DIFFRACTION PROPERTIES OF DIAMOND

93

Bar-code automated waste tracking system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ``stop-and-go`` operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste.

Hull, T.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Printable, flexible and stretchable diamond for thermal management  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various heat-sinked components and methods of making heat-sinked components are disclosed where diamond in thermal contact with one or more heat-generating components are capable of dissipating heat, thereby providing thermally-regulated components. Thermally conductive diamond is provided in patterns capable of providing efficient and maximum heat transfer away from components that may be susceptible to damage by elevated temperatures. The devices and methods are used to cool flexible electronics, integrated circuits and other complex electronics that tend to generate significant heat. Also provided are methods of making printable diamond patterns that can be used in a range of devices and device components.

Rogers, John A; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Dae Hyeong; Meitl, Matthew; Menard, Etienne; Carlisle, John

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Epitaxial synthesis of diamond layers on a monocrystalline diamond substrate in a torch microwave plasmatron  

SciTech Connect

The epitaxial growth of a diamond single-crystal film in a torch microwave discharge excited by a magnetron of a domestic microwave oven with the power of {<=}1 kW in an argon-hydrogen-methane mixture with a high concentration of methane (up to 25% with respect to hydrogen) at atmospheric pressure on a sub-strate of a synthetic diamond single crystal (HPHP) with the orientation (100) and 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 mm in size is obtained. A discharge with the torch diameter of {approx}2 mm and the concentration of the microwave power absorbed in the torch volume of >10{sup 3} W/cm{sup 3} is shown to be effective for epitaxial enlargement of a single crystal of synthetic diamond. The structure of the deposited film with the thickness up to 10 {mu}m with high-quality morphology is investigated with an optical microscope as well as using the methods of the Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy.

Sergeichev, K. F., E-mail: kserg@fpl.gpi.ru; Lukina, N. A. [Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Association Section on Environment Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name American Bar Association Section on Environment Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60610 Product The Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources is the premier forum for lawyers working in areas related to environment law, natural resources law, and energy law. References American Bar Association Section on Environment[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Bar Association Section on Environment is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "American Bar Association Section on Environment" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Bar_Association_Section_on_Environment&oldid=342108

97

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

98

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-Loaded Accelerating Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE S. Antipov, C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, P. Schoessow Euclid TechLabs LLC, Solon, OH, 44139 USA M. Conde, W. Gai, S....

99

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-loaded Accelerating Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE AT THE AWA S. Antipov, C. Jing, P. Schoessow, J. E. Butler, S. Zuo and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC,...

100

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Diamond: a storage architecture for early discard in interactive search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the concept of early discard for interactive search of unindexed data. Processing data inside storage devices using downloaded searchlet code enables Diamond to perform efficient, applicationspecific filtering of large data collections. ...

Larry Huston; Rahul Sukthankar; Rajiv Wickremesinghe; M. Satyanarayanan; Gregory R. Ganger; Erik Riedel; Anastassia Ailamaki

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Berkeley CA Site - CA 03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Berkeley CA Site - CA 03 Berkeley CA Site - CA 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Berkeley, CA Alternate Name(s): University of California Gilman Hall, University of California CA.03-1 Location: Gilman Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California CA.03-1 Historical Operations: Performed research and development on the synthesis and production of plutonium, resulting in uranium, plutonium, cesium and americium contamination. CA.03-3 CA.03-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible CA.03-1 CA.03-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys CA.03-3 CA.03-4 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis and Certification Statement CA.03-5 CA.03-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP Also see Berkeley, CA, Site

103

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400°C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

104

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bnger; O. Grnberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schrder; C. Vo; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a dramatic decrease in the bar size, decrease in the overall bar strength and a mild increase in its pattern speed, but is not expected to lead to a complete bar dissolution. The buckling instability appears primarily responsible for shortening the secular diffusion timescale to a dynamical one when building the boxy isophotes. The sufficiently long timescale of described evolution, ~1 Gyr, can affect the observed bar fraction in local universe and at higher redshifts, both through reduced bar strength and the absence of dust offset lanes in the bar.

Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Isaac Shlosman

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Minimally flavored colored scalar in $\\bar B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a colored scalar that is a weak doublet with fractional electric charges of $|Q|=2/3$ and $|Q|=5/3$ with mass below 1\\,TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in $B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \

Dorsner, Ilja; Kosnik, Nejc; Nisandzic, Ivan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a generalised El Farol Bar Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Preheating Collector Bars and Cathode Blocks Prior to Rodding with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrically heating collector bar/cathode block assemblies uses less than 15% of the energy required for propane gas burner heating. The method is quiet,...

110

1) Under the tool bar has a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Xcel: 30% by 2020) TX: 5,880 MW by 2015 AZ: 15% by 2025 CA: 20% by 2010 *NV: 20% by 2015 ME: 30 and shuts down. The automated protection system restores connections to the areas that had lost power The automated protection system restores connections. Too few seconds have passed for the control center to act

Boisvert, Jeff

111

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

Tushar K Ghosh

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Melting temperature of iron in the core diamond cell experiments Guoyin Shen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1998. 3. Boehler, R., High pressure experiments and the phase diagram of lower mantle and core. Manghnani and Y. Syono (Terra Scientific Publishing Company/American Geophysical Union, Tokyo, Washington DC materials, Rev. Geophysics, 38, 221-245, 2000. Diamond cell technique Diamond as anvil and window Diamond

Shen, Guoyin

114

Bi-Ca (Bismuth - Calcium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bi-Ca crystallographic data...Bi-Ca crystallographic data Phase Composition, wt% Ca Pearson symbol Space group (Bi) 0 hR 2 R m Bi 3 Ca 6 ? ? Bi 10 Ca 11 17.4 tI 84 I 4/ mmm Bi 3 Ca 5 24.2 oP 32 Pnma BiCa 2 27.8 tI 12 I 4/ mmm (αCa) 100 cF 4 Fm m (βCa) 100 cI 2 Im m...

115

Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

Devlin, David James (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Archuleta, Thomas Arthur (Espanola, NM); Barbero, Robert Steven (Santa Cruz, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

SciTech Connect

Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

118

Is Graphite a Diamonds Best Friend? New Information on Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 18th, 2003 November 18th, 2003 Is Graphite a Diamond's Best Friend? New Information on Material Transformation Science has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turning lead into gold. But a group of re-searchers using the GeoSoilEn-viroCARS (GSECARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to turn ordinary soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the

119

Designed Diamond Ground State via Optimized Isotropic Monotonic Pair Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply inverse statistical-mechanical methods to find a simple family of optimized isotropic, monotonic pair potentials, under certain constraints, whose ground states for a wide range of pressures is the diamond crystal. These constraints include desirable phonon spectra and the widest possible pressure range for stability. We also ascertain the ground-state phase diagram for a specific optimized potential to show that other crystal structures arise for other pressures. Cooling disordered configurations interacting with our optimized potential to absolute zero frequently leads to the desired diamond crystal ground state, revealing that the capture basin for the global energy minimum is large and broad relative to the local energy minima basins.

Etienne Marcotte; Frank H. Stillinger; Salvatore Torquato

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

E. Ampem-Lassen; D. A. Simpson; B. C. Gibson; S. Trpkovski; F. M. Hossain; S. T. Huntington; K. Ganesan; L. C. L. Hollenberg; S. Prawer

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

Ampem-Lassen, E; Gibson, B C; Trpkovski, S; Hossain, F M; Huntington, S T; Ganesan, K; Hollenberg, L C L; Prawer, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

562 South Coast Air Quality Mgmt Dist. EE UPS Ontario-Las Vegas LNG Corrid Vehicle Technology Division 2010 Mike Bednarz 12109 12312013 21865 Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, CA,...

123

ORKPROCESSINSELECTIVNEURON BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81 CATEGORIZ Figure 5: A sketch of the AIR system 3D interactive animation. Communications of the ACM 39.56{71. Rose, Daniel E., & Richard K. Belew of the 16th Annual Inter- national ACM/SIGIR Conference, 49{58, Pittsburgh, PA. ||, & Chris Buckley. 1992

Hearst, Marti

124

CA.O-O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3sR L C, C II Department of Energy -e ' Washington, DC 20545 CA.O-O - 0 MAY 2 9 1987 Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of...

125

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Nanostructure diamond cathodes can operate at relatively moderate vacuum pressures due to the inert surface/vacuum interface. September 27, 2013 A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Researchers at LANL have developed a novel, ultra-high-quality, robust electron source, which uses nanostructured polycrystalline diamond in a matrix with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode

126

Abstract Moving average algorithms for diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped window operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents fast moving window algorithms for calculating local statistics in a diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped windows of an image which is important for real-time applications. The algorithms for a diamond shaped window requires only seven or eight additions and subtractions per pixel. A fast sparse algorithm only needs four additions and subtractions for a sparse diamond shaped window. A number of other shapes of diamond windows such as skewed or parallelogram shaped diamond, long diamond, and lozenged diamond shaped, are also investigated. Similar algorithms are also developed for hexagon shaped windows. The computation for a hexagon window only needs eight additions and subtractions for each pixel. Fast algorithms for general polygonal shaped windows are also developed. The computation cost of all these algorithms is independent of the window size. A variety of synthetic and real images have been tested.

Changming Sun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a...

Martinez-Valpuesta, I

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Diamond Beamline Controls and Data Acquisition Software Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The software for the Diamond Light Source beamlines[1] is based on two complementary software frameworks: low level control is provided by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) framework[2][3] and the high level user interface is provided by the Java based Generic Data Acquisition or GDA[4][5]. EPICS provides a widely used

N. Rees; Diamond Controls Group; Diamond Data Acquisition Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fabrication of Aluminum Alloy-Based Diamond Grinding Wheel by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moreover, ability of CFRP drilling of the aluminum alloy-based diamond grinding wheel ... Accelerated Post-Weld Natural Ageing in Ultrasonic Welding Aluminium ..... Powder Metallurgy of High Strength Al84Gd6Ni7Co3 Gas-atomized Powder.

131

Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Production of htt_bar and htT_bar in littlest Higgs model with T-parity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which predicts a pair of T-even and T-odd partners for the top quark, the top quark interactions are altered with respect to the Standard Model predictions and deviation will manifest in various top quark processes. In this work we examine the effects in htt_bar productions at the ILC and LHC. We find that in the allowed parameter space, the cross sections can be significantly deviated from the Standard Model predictions and thus provide a good test for the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. We also examine the new production channel, the htT_bar or hTt_bar production, at the LHC, which give the same final states as htt_bar production due to the dominant decay T->Wb. We find that, compared with htt_bar production, this new production channel can have a sizable production rate for a T-quark below TeV scale. Such a production will be counted into htt_bar events or possibly extracted from htt_bar events, depending on if we can distinguish the T-quark from the top quark from mass reconstructions.

Lei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang; Huanjun Zhang

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

A quark model of {bar {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model which includes both scalar and vector contributions to the reaction mechanism (SV quark model) is used in a DWBA calculation of {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions. Total and differential cross-sections, polarizations, depolarizations, and spin-correlation coefficients are computed for laboratory momenta from threshold to 1695 MeV/c. The free parameters of the calculation are the scalar and vector strengths, a quark cluster size parameter, and the parameters of the unknown {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials. Good agreement with experiment is found for constructive interference of the scalar and vector terms, and for {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials which differ from those suggested by several authors on the basis of SU(3) arguments. The fit to the data is better than that obtained by other quark models, which use only scalar or vector annihilation terms. The agreement with experiment is also better than that found in meson-exchange models. The recent suggestion [1] that measurement of the depolarization parameter D{sub nn} can be used to discriminate between meson-exchange and quark models is examined in detail. We conclude that a measurement of D{sub nn} will provide a test of which of these models, as presently constructed, is the more appropriate description of strangeness production in the {bar p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction.

Alberg, M.A. [Seattle Univ., WA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Henley, E.M.; Wilets, L. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kunz, P.D. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Error Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate studies often involve comparisons between estimates of some parameter derived from different observed and/or model-generated datasets. It is common practice to present estimates of two or more statistical quantities with error bars about ...

John R. Lanzante

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Searches for New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2013 Scientists analyzing data from the BaBar experiment, which operated at SLAC between 1999 and 2008, recently published the results of a search for signs of...

138

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

139

Diamond Wire Saw for Precision Machining of Laser Target Components  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of precision laser targets requires a wide variety of specialized mesoscale manufacturing techniques. The diamond wire saw developed in this study provides the capability to precisely section meso-scale workpieces mounted on the assembly stations used by the Target Fabrication Group. This new capability greatly simplifies the fabrication of many types of targets and reduces the time and cost required to build the targets. A variety of materials are used to fabricate targets, including metals, plastics with custom designed chemical formulas, and aerogels of various densities. The materials are usually provided in the form of small pieces or cast rods that must be machined to the required shape. Many of these materials, such as metals and some plastics, can be trimmed using a parting tool on a diamond turning machine. However, other materials, such as aerogels and brittle materials, cannot be adequately cut with a parting tool. In addition, the geometry of the parts often requires that the workpieces be held in a special assembly station, which excludes the use of a parting tool. In the past, these materials were sectioned using a small, handheld coping saw that used a diamond-impregnated wire as a blade. This miniature coping saw was effective, but it required several hours to cut through certain materials. Furthermore, the saw was guided by hand and often caused significant damage to fragile aerogels. To solve these problems, the diamond wire saw shown in Figure 1 was developed. The diamond wire saw is designed to machine through materials that are mounted in the Target Fabrication Group's benchtop assembly stations. These assembly stations are the primary means of aligning and assembling target components, and there is often a need to machine materials while they are mounted in the assembly stations. Unfortunately, commercially available saws are designed for very different applications and are far too large to be used with the assembly stations. Therefore, a custom diamond wire saw was designed and constructed. The diamond wire saw cuts through workpieces using a continuous loop of diamond-impregnated wire of length 840 mm. The wire loop runs around several idler pulleys and is driven by a simple geared DC motor that rotates at 17 rpm. The linear speed of the wire is 107 inches/minute. The saw is oriented at an angle of 20{sup o} from horizontal, so the operator can view the wire through the cutout at the front end of the saw. When looking through a microscope or camera with a horizontal line of sight, the operator can clearly see the wire as it cuts through the workpiece, as shown in the right side of Figure 1. The saw is mounted on a two-axis stage that allows the operator to align the wire with the workpiece. To cut through the workpiece, the operator drives the wire through the workpiece by turning the feed micrometer. An image of the interior of the diamond wire saw appears in Figure 2. This picture was taken after removing the protective cover plate from the saw.

Bono, M J; Bennett, D W

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550.degree. C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar] , and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript * ] systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a study of the exclusive production of DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar], and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript *] in initial-state-radiation events, from e[superscript +]e[superscript -] annihilations ...

Zhao, M.

143

Black Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.3087121°, -122.0031691° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.3087121,"lon":-122.0031691,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Particle? and photoinduced conductivity in type?IIa diamonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single?crystal natural type?IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle?induced conductivity and time?resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle?induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility ? and lifetime ? throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the materialsurface. For each technique

L. S. Pan; S. Han; D. R. Kania; S. Zhao; K. K. Gan; H. Kagan; R. Kass; R. Malchow; F. Morrow; W. F. Palmer; C. White; S. K. Kim; F. Sannes; S. Schnetzer; R. Stone; G. B. Thomson; Y. Sugimoto; A. Fry; S. Kanda; S. Olsen; M. Franklin; J. W. Ager III; P. Pianetta

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

I17: Surface Modification of Boron-doped Diamond with H2O Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the other hand, the wettability of diamond film surfaces can be altered by plasma exposure treatments. Investigation was carried on the surface modification...

146

Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

Mark A. Prelas

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Raman Shift of Stressed Diamond Anvils: Pressure Calibration and Culet Geometry Dependence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pressure dependence of the Raman shift of diamond for highly stressed anvils at the diamond-anvil sample interface has been measured for different culet shapes up to 180 GPa at ambient temperature. By using hydrogen samples, which constitute both a quasi-hydrostatic medium and a sensitive pressure sensor, some of the effects of culet and tip size have been determined. We propose that the divergent results in the literature can be partly ascribed to different anvil geometries. Experiments show increasing second order dependence of the diamond Raman shift with pressure for decreasing tip size. This is an important consideration when using the diamond anvils as a pressure sensor.

Baer, B J; Chang, M E; Evans, W J

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Corrosion Resistance of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Lined Pipe to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Peter F. Ellis, Brian Chambers, Bill Boardman. On-Site Speaker ( Planned), Peter F. Ellis. Abstract Scope, Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings applied...

149

Study of bound hydrogen in powders of diamond nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to access feasibility of increasing albedo of very cold neutrons from powder of diamond nanoparticles, we studied hydrogen bound to surface of diamond nanoparticles, which causes unwanted losses of neutrons. We showed that one could decrease a fraction of hydrogen atoms from a ratio C{sub 7.4{+-}0.15}H to a ratio C{sub 12.4{+-}0.2}H by means of thermal treatment and outgasing of powder. Measurements of atomic excitation spectra of these samples, using a method of inelastic incoherent neutron scattering, indicate that residual hydrogen is chemically bound to carbon, while a removed fraction was composed of adsorbed water. The total cross section of scattering of neutrons with a wavelength of 4.4 Angstrom-Sign on residual hydrogen atoms equals 108 {+-} 2 b; it weakly changes with temperature. Thus preliminary cleaning of powder from hydrogen and its moderate cooling do not improve considerably neutron albedo from powder of nano-diamonds. An alternative approach is isotopic replacement of hydrogen by deuterium.

Krylov, A. R.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzychka, A. Yu. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Nesvizhevsky, V. V., E-mail: nesvizhevsky@ill.eu [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A. S. [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays  

SciTech Connect

To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Ca rlsbad Field Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

En ergy En ergy Ca rlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 AUG 2 9 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling , Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF

152

Phlogopite and Quartz Lamellae in Diamond-bearing Diopside from Marbles of the Kokchetav Massif Kazakhstan: Exsolution or Replacement Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exsolution lamellae of pyroxene in garnet (grt), coesite in titanite and omphacite from UHPM terranes are widely accepted as products of decompression. However, interpretation of oriented lamellae of phyllosilicates, framework silicates and oxides as a product of decompression of pyroxene is very often under debate. Results are presented here of FIB-TEM, FEG-EMP and synchrotron-assisted infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of phlogopite (Phlog) and phlogopite + quartz (Qtz) lamellae in diamond-bearing clinopyroxene (Cpx) from ultra-high pressure (UHP) marble. These techniques allowed collection of three-dimensional information from the grain boundaries of both the single (phlogopite), two-phase lamellae (phlogopite + quartz), and fluid inclusions inside of diamond included in K-rich Cpx and understanding their relationships and mechanisms of formation. The Cpx grains contain in their cores lamellae-I, which are represented by topotactically oriented extremely thin lamellae of phlogopite (that generally are two units cell wide but locally can be seen to be somewhat broader) and microdiamond. The core composition is: (Ca{sub 0.94}K{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.06}Fe{sub 0.08}Mg{sub 0.88})(Si{sub 1.98}Al{sub 0.02})O{sub 6.00}. Fluid inclusions rich in K and Si are recognized in the core of the Cpx, having no visible connections to the lamellae-I. Lamellar-II inclusions consist of micron-size single laths of phlogopite and lens-like quartz or slightly elongated phlogopite + quartz intergrowths; all are situated in the rim zone of the Cpx. The composition of the rim is (Ca{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.03}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 0.05}Mg{sub 0.90})Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and the rim contains more Ca, Mg than the core, with no K there. Such chemical tests support our microstructural observations and conclusion that the phlogopite lamellae-I are exsolved from the K-rich Cpx-precursor during decompression. It is assumed that Cpx-precursor was also enriched in H{sub 2}O, because diamond included in the core of this Cpx contains fluid inclusions. The synchrotron IR spectra of such diamond record the presence of OH{sup -} stretching and H{sub 2}O bending motion regions. Lamellar-II inclusions are interpreted as forming partly because of modification of the lamellae-i in the presence of fluid enriched in K, Fe and Si during deformation of the host diopside; the latter is probably related to the shallower stage of exhumation of the UHP marble. This study emphasizes that in each case to understand the mechanism of lamellar inclusion formation more detailed studies are needed combining both compositional, structural and three-dimensional textural features of lamellar inclusions and their host.

L Dobrzhinetskaya; R Wirth; D Rhede; Z Liu; H Green

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students January 7, 2010 - 2:58pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For 13 years, Tony Grahame has inspired students to pursue careers building sustainable, energy-efficient houses or to find other niches in the green-building industry. His Residential Building Technology program at Yavapai College in Prescott, Ariz., gets students out of the classroom and constructing real homes in a nearby subdivision. On the jobsite, they learn the skills and knowledge essential to launch their careers as the next generation of energy-efficient builders. Tony's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through

154

Annealing dependence of diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights probed by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. The platinum contacts on oxygen-terminated diamond was found to provide a higher Schottky barrier and therefore a better blocking contact than that of the silver contact in diamond-based electronic devices.

Gaowei, M.; Muller, E. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Rumaiz, A. K. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Weiland, C.; Cockayne, E.; Woicik, J. C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, J. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Smedley, J. [Instrumentation Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type p Manufacturing I ! fJ University 0 Research Organization ! 0 Government Sponsored F+ci li ty 0 Other ----~~-~~~----~------ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CUNTRKT ----~---~__----_ / w Prime

156

The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}})$ and muonic antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu})$ formation in low energy three-charge-particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few-body formalism is applied for computation of two different three-charge-particle systems. The first system is a collision of a slow antiproton, $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$, with a positronium atom: Ps$=(e^+e^-)$ $-$ a bound state of an electron and a positron. The second problem is a collision of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ with a muonic muonium atom, i.e. true muonium $-$ a bound state of two muons one positive and one negative: Ps$_{\\mu}=(\\mu^+\\mu^-)$. The total cross section of the following two reactions: $\\bar{\\rm p}+(e^+e^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}} + e^-$ and $\\bar{\\rm p}+(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu} + \\mu^-$, where $\\bar{\\rm{H}}=(\\bar{\\rm p}e^+)$ is antihydrogen and $\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu}=(\\bar{\\rm p}\\mu^+)$ is a muonic antihydrogen atom, i.e. a bound state of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ and $\\mu^+$, are computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original Faddeev approach the FH-type equations are formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: $\\...

Sultanov, Renat A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame K Abstract Diamond growth in low pressure combustion flames was studied using a safer, more economical and chemical kinetic time scales in the combustion reactor. 1 Present Address: 3M Corporation, Bldg. 60-1N-01

Dandy, David

159

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds Shohei Chiashi diameter attract attention. Here, we perform CVD growth by using nano-diamond particles as the catalyst [1] and investigate the CVD condition dependence of SWNT tube diameter. The average diameter of the as-received nano

Maruyama, Shigeo

160

Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Some aspects of $?^+$ parity determination in the reaction $? N\\to ?^+ \\bar{K}\\to N K \\bar{K}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of how to determine the parity of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark in the reaction $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta\\to NK\\bar{K}$, where $N=n,p$. Our model calculations indicate that the contribution of the non-resonant background of the reaction $\\gamma N\\to NK\\bar{K}$ cannot be neglected, and that suggestions to determine the parity based solely on the initial-stage process $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta$ cannot be implemented cleanly. We discuss the various mechanisms that contribute to the background, and we identify some spin observables which are sensitive.

A. I. Titov; H. Ejiri; H. Haberzettl; K. Nakayama

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message ... Keywords: Accessibility, Assistive technology, Graph summarization, Information graphics, Visual impairments

Seniz Demir; David Oliver; Edward Schwartz; Stephanie Elzer; Sandra Carberry; Kathleen F. Mccoy; Daniel Chester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Design and Application of CVD Diamond Windows for X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Yifei [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg 401, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cookson, David [University of Chicago, CARS, APS Sector 15, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg. 434D, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Design and application of CVD diamond windows for x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Y.; Cookson, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Chicago

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF BARRED GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x{sub 1}-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an 'L' shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x{sub 1}-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

Kim, Woong-Tae [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Stone, James M., E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

Pern, Fu-Jann (Golden, CO); Touryan, Kenell J. (Indian Hills, CO); Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos (Yerevan, AM); Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich (Moscow, RU)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Charging characteritiscs of ultrananocrystalline diamond in RF MEMS capacitive switches.  

SciTech Connect

Modifications to a standard capacitive MEMS switch process have been made to allow the incorporation of ultra-nano-crystalline diamond as the switch dielectric. The impact on electromechanical performance is minimal. However, these devices exhibit uniquely different charging characteristics, with charging and discharging time constants 5-6 orders of magnitude quicker than conventional materials. This operation opens the possibility of devices which have no adverse effects of dielectric charging and can be operated near-continuously in the actuated state without significant degradation in reliability.

Sumant, A. V.; Goldsmith, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J.; Zheng, H.; Hwang, J. C. M.; Palego, C.; Wang, W.; Carpick, R.; Adiga, V.; Datta, A.; Gudeman, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

CA IOUs Comment Letter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 19, 2012 June 19, 2012 Mr. Daniel Cohen U.S. Department of Energy Office of the General Council 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Room 6A245 Washington, DC 20585-0121 Dear Mr. Cohen: This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent some of the largest utility companies in the Western United States, serving over 35 million customers.

173

Assessing the Exposure and Health Risks of Secondhand Smoke in Restaurants and Bars by Workers and Patrons & Evaluating the Efficacy of Different Smoking Policies in Beijing Restaurants and Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ban in Minnesota Bars and Restaurants." American Journal ofof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five citiesof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five cities

Liu, Ruiling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users...

175

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Hint at Cracks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Archive BaBar Data Hint at Cracks in the Standard Model June 18, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Recently analyzed data from the BaBar experiment may suggest possible flaws...

176

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation

177

Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.268046°, -104.201742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.268046,"lon":-104.201742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind (07) Wind Farm Wind (07) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.274903°, -104.183013° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.274903,"lon":-104.183013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

Sparkling Diamonds Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under construction. The focus on a construction site tends to be on keeping the project on schedule, and not on energy matters although the two can, and need to, complement each other. There were two motivating factors in completing an energy review during the construction phase: cost and environmental responsibilities. De Beers Canada is working to identify a long term strategy to manage their business in a sustainable manner while mitigating the energy costs of their on-site power usage. The paper will highlight the: Approach De Beers took; Challenges of conducting an energy assessment at a construction site; Energy issues exposed by a sub-arctic climate Results achieved; Next steps to achieve a sustainable energy management program. The paper will also discuss how De Beers Canada is incorporating the learning and the systems development benefits from the energy review. The organization is building these aspects into their overall Carbon Emissions and Energy Management System that will be implemented at their three new sites across Canada.

Feldman, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond micro-resonators.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of {approx}800 C. The films have {approx}4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, {approx}1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Sumant, A. V.; Adiga, V. P.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlis, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Field Bend Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8967,"lon":-89.6897,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Analysis of B ? ?l? Decays With BaBar  

SciTech Connect

As part of the BaBar project at SLAC to study the properties of B mesons, we have carried out a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay mode B ? ?l?, which can be used to determine the magnitude of the Cabbibo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vub. Using simulated event samples, this study focuses on determining criteria on variables for selection of B ? ?l? signal and suppression of background from other types of BB events and continuum processes. In addition, we determine optimal cuts on variables to ensure a good neutrino reconstruction. With these selection cuts, we were able to achieve a signal-to-background ratio of 0.68 and a signal efficiency of the order of 1%. Applying these cuts to a sample of 83 million BB events recorded by BaBar in e+e collisions at the (4S) resonance, we obtain a yield of 115 19 B ? ?l? decays.

Chu, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Binfelder, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.  

SciTech Connect

Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar diamond accelerating structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have directly measured THz wakefields induced by a subpicosecond, intense relativistic electron bunch in a diamond loaded accelerating structure via the wakefield acceleration method. We present here the beam test results from the diamond based structure. Diamond has been chosen for its high breakdown threshold and unique thermoconductive properties. Fields produced by a leading (drive) beam were used to accelerate a trailing (witness) electron bunch, which followed the drive bunch at a variable distance. The energy gain of a witness bunch as a function of its separation from the drive bunch describes the time structure of the generated wakefield.

Antipov, S.; Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kanareykin, A.; Butler, J. E. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gai, W. [Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (?,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar?,?\\bar?)$ in the perturbative QCD approach beyond the leading order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we make a systematic study of the semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (\\eta,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar{\

Wen-Fei Wang; Ying-Ying Fan; Min Liu; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and $|V_{us}|$ using Tau Lepton Decays to $e^- \\bar{\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using 467 $fb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ annihilation data collected with the BaBar detector, we measure $\\frac{{\\cal{B}}(\\tau^- \\to \\mu^- \\bar{\

Aubert, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent experiments were carried out to determine the transport of the electrons within the diamond and their emission at the surface. In transmission mode measurements, the diamond amplifier was coated with metal on both sides, so results simply depend only on the electron transport within the diamond. The SEY for this mode provides one secondary electron per 20eV energy, which gives the gain of more than 200 for 4.7keV (effective energy) primary electrons under 2MV/m. Laser detrapping can help the signal maintain the gain with lops pulse and duty cycle of 1.67 x 10{sup -7}. In emission mode measurements, in which the diamond is prepared as in the actual application, the SEY is {approx}20 for 700eV (effective energy) primary electrons under 1.21MV/m. The electric field applied and the primary electron energy is limited by the experiment setup, but the results show good trend toward large gain under high field. Thermal emittance of the diamond secondary emission is critical for the beam application. A careful design is setup to measure with very fine precision and accuracy of 0.01eV.

Wu,Q.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Category:LA, CA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LA, CA LA, CA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "LA, CA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 89 KB SVHospital LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVHospital LA CA City ... 88 KB SVLargeHotel LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVLargeHotel LA CA Cit... 88 KB SVLargeOffice LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVLargeOffice LA CA Ci... 92 KB SVMediumOffice LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVMediumOffice LA CA C... 87 KB SVMidriseApartment LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png

192

Development of Designer Diamond Anvils for High Pressure-High-Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is to develop the next generation of designer diamond anvils that can perform simultaneous joule heating and temperature profile measurements in a diamond anvil cell. A series of tungsten-rhenium thermocouples will be fabricated onto to the anvil and encapsulated by a chemical vapor deposited diamond layer to allow for a complete temperature profile measurement across the anvil. The tip of the diamond anvil will be engineered to reduce the thermal conductivity so that the tungsten-heating coils can be deposited on top of this layer. Several different approaches will be investigated to engineer the tip of the diamond anvil for reduction in thermal conductivity (a) isotopic mixture of 12C and 13C in the diamond layer, (b) doping of diamond with impurities (nitrogen and/or boron), and (c) growing diamond in a higher concentration of methane in hydrogen plasma. Under this academic alliance with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), PI and his graduate students will use the lithographic and diamond polishing facility at LLNL. This proposed next generation of designer diamond anvils will allow multi-tasking capability with the ability to measure electrical, magnetic, structural and thermal data on actinide materials with unparallel sensitivity in support of the stockpile stewardship program.

Yogesh K. Vohra

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

Microsoft Word - DiamondB_Easement_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2011 16, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to purchase the Diamond B conservation easement. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-800-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there will be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 28N, Range 20W, Sections 28 and 33 in Flathead County, MT

195

Creation of multiple identical single photon emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single photon emitters are also required. However typical solid-state single photon sources are dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here, we present controllable growth of bright silicon-vacancy (SiV-) centres in bulk diamond which intrinsically show almost identical emission (spectral overlap of up to 83%) and near transform-limited excitation linewidths. We measure the photo-physical properties of defects at room and cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate incorporation into a solid immersion lens (SIL). Our results have impact upon the application of single photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography, and the production of next generation fluorophores for bio-imaging.

Lachlan J. Rogers; Kay D. Jahnke; Luca Marseglia; Christoph. Mller; Boris Naydenov; Hardy Schauffert; C. Kranz; T. Teraji; Junichi Isoya; Liam P. McGuinness; Fedor Jelezko

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

Experimental Design for Laser Produced Shocks in Diamond Anvil Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on pre-compressed samples. A diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been used to statically compress water to 1 GPa and then strong shocked with an energetic laser. The use of intense laser irradiation can drive shocks in targets making it possible to study the equation of state (EOS) of samples well into the hundreds of GPQ regime. Generally, such experiments employ a sample initially at normal density and standard pressure. Therefore providing data on the principal Hugoniot. In this experiment the initial state of the sample was varied to provide data off the principal Hugoniot. We report the work that was done on the Vulcan laser and describe a method to achieve off principal Hugoniot data.

Moon, S J; Cauble, R; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M; Hicks, D; Da Silva, L B; Mackinon, A; Wallace, R; Hammel, B; Hsing, W; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K M; Benedetti, L R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi, A; Huser, G; Henry, E; Batani, D; Willi, O; Pasley, J; Henning, G; Loubeyre, P; Neely, D; Notley, M; Danson, C

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Orbital ice: An exact Coulomb phase on the diamond lattice  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the existence of an orbital Coulomb phase as the exact ground state of a p-orbital exchange Hamiltonian on the diamond lattice. The Coulomb phase is an emergent state characterized by algebraic dipolar correlations and a gauge structure resulting from local constraints (ice rules) of the underlying lattice models. For most ice models on the pyrochlore lattice, these local constraints are a direct consequence of minimizing the energy of each individual tetrahedron. On the contrary, the orbital ice rules are emergent phenomena resulting from the quantum orbital dynamics. We show that the orbital ice model exhibits an emergent geometrical frustration by mapping the degenerate quantum orbital ground states to the spin-ice states obeying the 2-in-2-out constraints on the pyrochlore lattice. We also discuss possible realization of the orbital ice model in optical lattices with p-band fermionic cold atoms.

Chern Giawei [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wu Congjun [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ultrafast QND measurements based on diamond-shape artificial atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a Quantum Non Demolition (QND) read-out scheme for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a resonator in a circuit QED architecture, for which we estimate a very high measurement fidelity without Purcell effect limitations. The device consists of two transmons coupled by a large inductance, giving rise to a diamond-shape artificial atom with a logical qubit and an ancilla qubit interacting through a cross-Kerr like term. The ancilla is strongly coupled to a transmission line resonator. Depending on the qubit state, the ancilla is resonantly or dispersively coupled to the resonator, leading to a large contrast in the transmitted microwave signal amplitude. This original method can be implemented with state of the art Josephson parametric amplifier, leading to QND measurements in a few tens of nanoseconds with fidelity as large as 99.9 %.

I. Diniz; E. Dumur; O. Buisson; A. Auffves

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-center in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited in the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and its beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-center as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

Andreas Albrecht; Guy Koplovitz; Alex Retzker; Fedor Jelezko; Shira Yochelis; Danny Porath; Yuval Nevo; Oded Shoseyov; Yossi Paltiel; Martin B. Plenio

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characterization and Qualification of a Precision Diamond Saw  

SciTech Connect

A precision diamond saw was characterized and qualified for production using the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network. This characterization was performed in three steps. First the equipment was evaluated and characterized, and then a process was developed and characterized to saw cofire networks. Finally, the characterized process was qualified for production using the MET network. During the development of the low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) processes needed to build the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network, a problem was uncovered. The laser process planned for scribing and separating was found to weaken the LTCC material by about 30%. A replacement process was needed, and precision diamond sawing was chosen. During the equipment evaluation and characterization, several parameters were investigated. These were cut depth, feed rate, spindle speed, and saw blade thickness. Once these were understood the process was then developed. Initially 24 variables were identified for the process, and eventually 12 of these variables were found to be critical. These variables were then adjusted until a process envelope was found that produced acceptable product. Finally parameters were chosen from the middle of the process envelope for production. With the production process set, the next step was to qualify it for production. Two criteria had to be met: visual acceptability and bending strength. The parts were examined under a microscope and found to be visually acceptable. Parts were then put through a four-point bend test, and the strengths recorded were equivalent to those measured in the past. With the completion of this work and the acceptable results, this process was qualified for production use.

Morgenstern, H.A.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Diamond amplified photocathode Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York Developed in: 2004-2007 Result of NP research:

204

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond`s performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Phillips, W. [Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Growth and electrical characterisation of {delta}-doped boron layers on (111) diamond surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition protocol for the growth of {delta}-doping of boron in diamond is presented, using the (111) diamond plane as a substrate for diamond growth. AC Hall effect measurements have been performed on oxygen terminated {delta}-layers and desirable sheet carrier densities ({approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) for field-effect transistor application are reported with mobilities in excess of what would expected for equivalent but thicker heavily boron-doped diamond films. Temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that the grown layers have metallic-like electrical properties with high cut-off frequencies and low thermal impedance activation energies with estimated boron concentrations of approximately 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}.

Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Sato, Syunsuke; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi [Department of Electronic and Photonic Systems, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Morris, Richard [Advanced SIMS Projects, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information August 2012 New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond Squeezing creates new class of...

208

Diamond-turning HP-21 beryllium to achieve an optical surface  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of diamond turning on beryllium was made in anticipation of obtaining an optical finish. Although results of past experiences were poor, it was decided to continue diamond turning on beryllium beyond initial failures. By changing speed and using coolant, partial success was achieved. Tool wear was the major problem. Tests were made to establish and plot wear as a function of cutting speed and time. Slower speeds did cause lower wear rates, but at no time did wear reach an acceptable level. The machine, tools, and procedure used were chosen based on the results of preliminary attempts and on previous experience. It was unnecessary to use an air-bearing spindle because tool failure governed the best finish that could be expected. All tools of diamond composition, whether single crystal or polycrystalline, wore at unacceptable rates. Based on present technology, it must be concluded that beryllium cannot be feasibly diamond turned to achieve an optical finish. (22 fig.) (auth)

Allen, D.K.; Hauschildt, H.W.; Bryan, J.B.

1975-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Cutoff Energies, and Tuning Range .......................27 3.3 Absorption .............................................................36 4.2 Direct Cooling of Diamonds ............................................................39 4.3 Operation at Cryogenic Temperatures .................................................39 4.4 Cooling through

Kemner, Ken

210

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond: electronic properties and hyperfine parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond have been studied using first principles calculations. We computed the symmetry, formation and transition energies, and hyperfine parameters of cobalt impurities in isolated configurations and in complexes involving vacancies and nitrogen atoms. We found that the Co impurity in a divacant site is energetically favorable and segregates nitrogen atoms in its neighborhood. Our results were discussed in the context of the recently observed Co-related electrically active centers in synthetic diamond.

Larico, R; Machado, W V M; Justo, J F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Category:Arcata, CA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arcata, CA Arcata, CA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Arcata, CA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 76 KB SVHospital Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVHospital Arcata CA P... 83 KB SVLargeHotel Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Arcata CA... 78 KB SVLargeOffice Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Arcata C... 79 KB SVMediumOffice Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Arcata ... 79 KB SVMidriseApartment Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Arc... 71 KB SVOutPatient Arcata CA Pacific Gas & Electric Co.png

212

CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-YUROK CA TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Yurok Tribe of California proposes to conduct energy efficiency retrofits to the Klamath and Weitchpec Tribal Offices based on the results of the energy audits completed in 2006. The Klamath Office energy efficiency building retrofits would include repair/re-weatherstripping of exterior doors; installation of operable lovers on passive vents in the attic; replacement of double-pane windows; caulking; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system repair and tuning; installation of check valves in hot water lines; insulation of hot water lines; timer repair; delamping; and occupancy sensors. The Weitchpec Office

213

Pulsed ion beam methods for in situ characterization of diamond film deposition processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) have properties which in principle make them ideally suited to a wide variety of thin-film applications. Their widespread use as thin films, however, has been limited for a number of reasons related largely to the lack of understanding and control of the nucleation and growth processes. Real-time, in situ studies of the surface of the growing diamond film are experimentally difficult because these films are normally grown under a relatively high pressure of hydrogen, and conventional surface analytical methods require an ultrahigh vacuum environment. It is believed, however, that the presence of hydrogen during growth is necessary to stabilize the corrugated diamond surface structure and thereby prevent the formation of the graphitic phase. Pulsed ion beam-based analytical methods with differentially pumped ion sources and particle detectors are able to characterize the uppermost atomic layer of a film during, growth at ambient pressures 5-7 orders of magnitude higher than other surface-specific analytical methods. We describe here a system which has been developed for the purpose of determining the hydrogen concentration and bonding sites on diamond surfaces as a function of sample temperature and ambient hydrogen pressure under hot filament CVD growth conditions. It is demonstrated that as the hydrogen partial pressure increases, the saturation hydrogen coverage of the surface of a CVD diamond film increases, but that the saturation level depends on the atomic hydrogen concentration and substrate temperature.

Krauss, A.R.; Smentkowski, V.S.; Zuiker, C.D.; Gruen, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Im, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Schultz, J.A.; Waters, K. [Ionwerks Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Chang, R.P.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thermal and environmental effects on fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing bars and reinforced concrete elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel reinforcement in bridge decks results in high repair costs, unwanted traffic disruption, and unsafe structures. To help alleviate this problem, non-metallic fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars are being studied as an alternate type of reinforcement in bridge decks. In order to determine the suitability of the use of FRP bars, a number of tests have been performed on FRP bars to evaluate their long-term performance. These tests include uniaxial tension tests under a variety of environmental conditions and thermal expansion of the bars embedded in concrete. In an effort to characterize the FRP bars and to gain insight into their long-term performance, batteries of tests have been carried out. Samples from three different manufacturers were exposed under different environmental conditions and tested in uniaxial tension. For one of the bar types, the strength increased, while the other two bar types lost strength. In all cases, the modulus of the bars increased with exposure time. In addition, FRP reinforced concrete specimens were evaluated for thermal expansion. The results indicate that thermal cracking of the concrete by FRP bar expansion is not a significant problem.

Schaefer, Benjamin Carl

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern CA Area Southern CA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Southern CA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Southern CA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Southern CA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area Products and Services in the Southern CA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

216

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Particle- and photoinduced conductivity in type-IIa diamonds  

SciTech Connect

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single-crystal natural type-IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle-induced conductivity and time-resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle-induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility [mu] and lifetime [tau] throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the material surface. For each technique, the [mu][tau] product was determined by integration of the respective signals. The collection distance that a free carrier drifts in an electric field was extracted by each technique. As a result, a direct comparison of bulk and surface electrical properties was performed. The data from these two techniques are in agreement, indicating no difference in the electrical properties between the bulk and the surface of the material. The collection distance continues to increase with field up to 25 kV/cm without saturation. Using the transient photoconductivity technique the carrier mobility was measured separately and compared with a simple electron-phonon scattering model. The general characteristics of carrier mobility, lifetime, and collection distance at low electric field appear to be adequately described by the model.

Pan, L.S.; Han, S.; Kania, D.R. (Laser Division, L-476, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Zhao, S.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Palmer, W.F.; White, C. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)); Kim, S.K.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Thomson, G.B. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)); Sugimoto, Y. (KEK Laboratory, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305 (Japan)); Fry, A. (Physics Division, SSC Laboratory, Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States)); Kanda, S.; Olsen, S. (Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)); Franklin, M. (Department of Physics, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)); Ager, J.W. III (Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Pianetta, P

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (<500 fs FWHM) broadband THz pulses. The spectrum of this source presents an ideal probe for many low energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the techno logy was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. 10 complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D activity.

Rule, Keith; Perry, Erik; Parsells, Robert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

Ladwig, Angela

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recent developments in polycrystalline diamond-drill-bit design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of design criteria for polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits for use in severe environments (hard or fractured formations, hot and/or deep wells) is continuing. This effort consists of both analytical and experimental analyses. The experimental program includes single point tests of cutters, laboratory tests of full scale bits, and field tests of these designs. The results of laboratory tests at simulated downhole conditions utilizing new and worn bits are presented. Drilling at simulated downhole pressures was conducted in Mancos Shale and Carthage Marble. Comparisons are made between PDC bits and roller cone bits in drilling with borehole pressures up to 5000 psi (34.5 PMa) with oil and water based muds. The PDC bits drilled at rates up to 5 times as fast as roller bits in the shale. In the first field test, drilling rates approximately twice those achieved with conventional bits were achieved with a PDC bit. A second test demonstrated the value of these bits in correcting deviation and reaming.

Huff, C.F.; Varnado, S.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L. (China University of Geosciences)

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

Swain; Greg M.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

Wren, A

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

X-ray nuclear activity in S4G barred galaxies: No link between bar strength and co-occurrent supermassive black hole fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d nuclear 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6um imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q_b, taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing th...

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H; Kim, Taehyun; Daz-Garca, Simn; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Gonzlez-Martn, Omaira; Ho, Luis C; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, Albert; Comern, Sbastien; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; De Paz, Armando Gil; Hinz, Joannah L; Holwerda, Benne W; Laine, Jarkko; Meidt, Sharon; Menndez-Delmestre, Karn; Mizusawa, Trisha; Muoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Regan, Michael; Seibert, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison); (INTEL)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A new diamond biosensor with integrated graphitic microchannels for detecting quantal exocytic events from chromaffin cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantal release of catecholamines from neuroendocrine cells is a key mechanism which has been investigated with a broad range of materials and devices, among which carbon-based materials such as carbon fibers, diamond-like carbon, carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline diamond. In the present work we demonstrate that a MeV-ion-microbeam lithographic technique can be successfully employed for the fabrication of an all-carbon miniaturized cellular bio-sensor based on graphitic micro-channels embedded in a single-crystal diamond matrix. The device was functionally characterized for the in vitro recording of quantal exocytic events from single chromaffin cells, with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, opening promising perspectives for the realization of monolithic all-carbon cellular biosensors.

Picollo, Federico; Vittone, Ettore; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond's performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Phillips, W. (Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nano-fabricated solid immersion lenses registered to single emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a technique for fabricating micro- and nano-structures incorporating fluorescent defects in diamond with a positional accuracy in the hundreds of nanometers. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) etching we first locate a suitable defect with respect to registration marks on the diamond surface and then etch a structure using these coordinates. We demonstrate the technique here by etching an 8 micron diameter hemisphere positioned such that a single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect lies at its origin. This type of structure increases the photon collection efficiency by removing refraction and aberration losses at the diamond-air interface. We make a direct comparison of the fluorescence photon count rate before and after fabrication and observe an 8-fold increase due to the presence of the hemisphere.

L. Marseglia; J. P. Hadden; A. C. Stanley-Clarke; J. P. Harrison; B. Patton; Y. -L. D. Ho; B. Naydenov; F. Jelezko; J. Meijer; P. R. Dolan; J. M. Smith; J. G. Rarity; J. L. O'Brien

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

231

MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

Greg M. Swain, PI

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Search for low-mass Higgs and dark bosons at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present BaBar latest results for the direct search of a light CP-odd Higgs boson using radiative decays of the Y(nS) (n=1,2,3) resonances in different final states. I also present the results for the search of a hidden sector gauge and Higgs bosons using the full BaBar datasample.

Oberhof, Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Using Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Nuclear Dust Morphology to Rule Out Bars Fueling Seyfert Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If AGN are powered by the accretion of matter onto massive black holes, how does the gas in the host galaxy lose the required angular momentum to approach the black hole? Gas easily transfers angular momentum to stars in strong bars, making them likely candidates. Although ground-based searches for bars in active galaxies using both optical and near infrared surface brightness have not found any excess of bars relative to quiescent galaxies, the searches have not been able to rule out small-scale nuclear bars. To look for these nuclear bars we use HST WFPC2-NICMOS color maps to search for the straight dust lane signature of strong bars. Of the twelve Seyfert galaxies in our sample, only three have dust lanes consistent with a strong nuclear bar. Therefore, strong nuclear bars cannot be the primary fueling mechanism for Seyfert nuclei. We do find that a majority of the galaxies show an spiral morphology in their dust lanes. These spiral arms may be a possible fueling mechanism.

Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermodynamic Modeling of the CaO-FetO-CaF2 System for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the thermodynamic modeling of the CaO-CaF2-FeO system was carried out. First, all available thermodynamic data on the CaF2-FeO and...

238

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

239

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

240

Observation of ?_{cJ} decaying into the p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-} final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First measurements of the decays of the three $\\chi_{cJ}$ states to $p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-}$ final states are presented. Intermediate $\\phi\\to K^{+}K^{-}$ and $\\Lambda(1520)\\to pK^{-}$ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\bar{p}K^{+}\\Lambda(1520)$, $\\Lambda(1520) \\bar{\\Lambda}(1520)$, and $\\phi p\\bar{p}$ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{p} K^{+}K^{-}$ decays. These are first observations of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the $\\chi_{cJ}$ states. The experiment uses samples of $\\chi_{cJ}$ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106 million $\\psi^{\\prime}$ mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider.

BESIII Collaboration

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Calculation of the charge-carrier mobility in diamond at low temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrepancies between the quasi-elastic and inelastic approaches to the calculation of the electron and hole mobilities in diamond at low temperatures when the carrier scattering from acoustic phonons becomes significantly inelastic have been numerically estimated. The calculations showed that the mobility described by a close-to-equilibrium distribution function differs several times from that obtained within the quasi-elastic approach even at 20 K. The results obtained are important for interpreting the low-temperature electrical experiments on high-purity diamond single crystals.

Baturin, A. S.; Gorelkin, V. N.; Soloviev, V. R.; Chernousov, I. V., E-mail: ichernousov@inbox.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ca  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

elevation data for each year during the reporting period to determine the best month to map for that year. Month selection is based on the least perturbation to the natural...

245

Ca  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office Audit A-12-04 of the Savannah River Site Central Chara cterization Project (SRSCCP) processes performed to...

246

Ca  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mr. Eric J. Fygi Mr. Eric J. Fygi U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel GC-52 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 (PAA.notice@hq.doe.gov) RE: Comments Concerning the Continuation or Modification of the Provisions of the Price- Anderson Act Dear Mr. Fygi: On behalf of the Board of Lincoln County Commissioners, the Caliente City Council, and their Joint City/County Impact Alleviation Committee, I am pleased to submit the following comments concerning the continuation or modification of the provisions of the Price-Anderson Act. These comments reflect the perspectives of a county and city which are located at the end of " the funnel" through which the majority of all shipments of spent nuclear fuel, high and low-level radioactive waste will pass on their way to interim storage and/or disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since

247

SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program  

SciTech Connect

OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye, OGTs invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450?C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and verification, and first-hand knowledge of the most advanced rolling line operation in the US. This project lasted 5 years with 5 major tasks. The team successfully worked through the tasks with deliverables in detection, data analysis and process control. Technologies developed in this project were commercialized as soon as they were ready. For instance, the advanced surface defect detection algorithms were integrated into OGTs HotEye RSB systems late 2005, resulting in a more matured product serving the steel industry. In addition to the commercialization results, the SQA team delivered 7 papers and 1 patent. OGT was also recognized by two prestigious awards, including the R&D100 Award in 2006. To date, this SQA project has started to make an impact in the special bar quality industry. The resulted product, HotEye RSB systems have been accepted by quality steel mills worldwide. Over 16 installations were completed, including 1 in Argentina, 2 in Canada, 2 in China, 2 in Germany, 2 in Japan, and 7 in the U.S. Documented savings in reduced internal rejects, improved customer satisfaction and simplified processes were reported from various mills. In one case, the mill reported over 50% reduction in its scrap, reflecting a significant saving in energy and reduction in emission. There exist additional applications in the steel industry where the developed technologies can be used. OGT is working toward bringing the developed technologies to more applications. Examples are: in-line inspection and process control for continuous casting, steel rails, and seamless tube manufacturing.

Tzyy-Shuh Chang; Jianjun Shi; Shiyu Zhou

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sandia National Laboratory (CA) Former Workers, Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (CA) Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health...

249

Nonlinear Development of the Secular Bar-mode Instability in Rotating Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have modelled the nonlinear development of the secular bar-mode instability that is driven by gravitational radiation-reaction (GRR) forces in rotating neutron stars. In the absence of any competing viscous effects, an initially uniformly rotating, axisymmetric $n=1/2$ polytropic star with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy $T/|W| = 0.181$ is driven by GRR forces to a bar-like structure, as predicted by linear theory. The pattern frequency of the bar slows to nearly zero, that is, the bar becomes almost stationary as viewed from an inertial frame of reference as GRR removes energy and angular momentum from the star. In this ``Dedekind-like'' state, rotational energy is stored as motion of the fluid in highly noncircular orbits inside the bar. However, in less than 10 dynamical times after its formation, the bar loses its initially coherent structure as the ordered flow inside the bar is disrupted by what appears to be a purely hydrodynamical, short-wavelength, ``shearing'' type instability. The gravitational waveforms generated by such an event are determined, and an estimate of the detectability of these waves is presented.

Shangli Ou; Joel E. Tohline; Lee Lindblom

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is comparable to the size of a central dark-matter core, the bar may exchange angular momentum without changing its pattern speed significantly. We emphasise that this apparently simple example of secular evolution is remarkably subtle in detail and conclude that an N-body exploration of any astronomical scenario requires a deep investigation into the underlying dynamical mechanisms for that particular problem to set the necessary requirements for the simulation parameters and method (e.g. particle number and Poisson solver). Simply put, N-body simulations do not divinely reveal truth and hence their results are not infallible. They are unlikely to provide useful insight on their own, particularly for the study of even more complex secular processes such as the production of pseudo-bulges and disk heating.

Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach is based on software that generates a sequence of test signals for new and retrofit projects. Introduction The performance of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor

Diamond, Richard

252

BaBar Results on E+ E- ---> P Anti-P By Means of ISR  

SciTech Connect

BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross section from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and negative steps. Evidence for a ratio |G{sub E}/G{sub M}| > 1 has also been found as well as a sudden variation in |G{sub M}| just above the threshold.

Ferroli, Rinaldo Baldini; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /Frascati

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

CA-96062042 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

96062042 96062042 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: CA-96062042 EIS at Medicine Lake Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, Geothermal/Transmission, Fourmile Hill Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) / Environmental Impact Report (EIR) General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EIS Applicant Calpine Corporation Consultant MHA Environmental Consulting, Inc. Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, Geothermal/Transmission Techniques Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 1455 Participating Agencies Lead Agency USFS, BLM Alturas Field Office

254

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Adams, Oregon Coordinates 45.767354°, -118.5624734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

255

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

256

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

257

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Clayton, Idaho Coordinates 44.2593623°, -114.4017296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

258

Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel, with subsequent decay of the $W^+W^-$ pair into $\\ell \

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Zurita, Jos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Experimental Use as a Potential Bar to Patentability in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a number of activities that, by statute, prevent an inventor from obtaining a valid U.S. patent on an invention. Two of the most common statutory bars to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 5 Chemistry

262

Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Optimization of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of blade type X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, configuration and operation principle was analyzed to improve XBPM performance. Optimization is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission blades, Diamond Detector Blade (DDB) was analyzed as XBPM signal source. Analyses revealed, that Diamond Detector Blade XBPM would allow overcoming drawbacks of the photoemission type XBPMs.

Ilinski, Petr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nearly itinerant ferromagnetism in CaNi2 and CaNi3  

SciTech Connect

Single crystals of CaNi2 and CaNi3 are successfully grown out of excess Ca. Both compounds manifest a metallic ground state with enhanced, temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility. The relatively high Stoner factors of Z=0.79 and 0.87 found for CaNi2 and CaNi3, respectively, reveal their close vicinity to ferromagnetic instabilities. The pronounced field dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of CaNi3 at low temperatures (T<25 K) suggests strong ferromagnetic fluctuations. A corresponding contribution to the specific heat with a temperature dependence of T3lnT is also observed.

Jesche, Anton; Dennis, Kevin W.; Kreyssig, Andreas; Canfield, Paul C.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Susanville Indian Racheria proposes to establish the EPA's Portfolio Manager tool to collect key

266

AOCS Official Method Ca 12-55  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphorus AOCS Official Method Ca 12-55 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines phosphorus or the equivalent phosphatide content

267

AOCS Official Method Ca 6a-40  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsaponifiable Matter AOCS Official Method Ca 6a-40 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Unsaponifiable matter includes those substances frequently fo

268

AOCS Official Method Ca 6b-53  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsaponifiable Matter AOCS Official Method Ca 6b-53 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Unsaponifiable matter includes those substances frequently fo

269

AOCS Recommended Practice Ca 16-75  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyethylene in Fats and Oils AOCS Recommended Practice Ca 16-75 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFINITION This method determine

270

AOCS Official Method Ca 18c-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Lead by Direct Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry AOCS Official Method Ca 18c-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION ...

271

AOCS Official Method Ca 12b-92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphorus by Direct Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry AOCS Official Method Ca 12b-92 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method,

272

AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phospholipids in Vegetable Oils Nephelometric Method AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The nephelometric method measu

273

Radial Diffraction Strength and Elastic Behavior of CaF2 in Low- and High-Pressure Phases  

SciTech Connect

The radial-diffraction lattice behavior of CaF2 was analyzed in its low-pressure (fluorite) and high-pressure phase up to 11.5 GPa using radial x-ray diffraction techniques in the diamond anvil cell. Between 3.5 and 7.1 GPa, fluorite develops a radial-diffraction strength of {approx}0.8 GPa. The corresponding lattice anisotropy of the fluorite phase was measured to be equal to 0.73, in good agreement with previous Brillouin spectroscopy measurements. By 8.8 GPa, CaF2 has undergone a phase transformation to its high-pressure (orthorhombic) phase, with a corresponding volume decrease of 10.4%. By 11.5 GPa, the volume drop between the low-pressure and high-pressure phase has increased to 11.5%. In addition, the high-pressure phase is found to withstand a significantly larger differential stress than the low-pressure fluorite phase, with a large degree of lattice anisotropy. In the maximum stress direction at 8.8 GPa, we observe a time-dependent evolution of the lattice parameters of CaF2, indicating that the high-pressure structure is still undergoing deformation on time scales of hours after the phase boundary has been crossed.

Kavner,A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is the most commonly used device for obtaining static high pressures above 3 GPa. Experiments in the DAC are frequently performed at the APS, in particular at GSECARS (Sector 13), HP-CAT (Sector 16), and at XOR sectors 1 and 3. In order to have the sample in the DAC be subject to a quasi-hydrostatic pressure it is necessary to surround the

277

Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented News » Featured Articles » 2012 » Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 08.27.12 Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential Office of Science supported researchers develop new material with amazing hardness and exciting possibilities. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60 Image courtesy of Carnegie Institute of Washington Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60

278

Biodegradable Mg-Ca and Mg-1Ca-1Y alloys for Regenerative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodegradable Mg-Ca and Mg-1Ca-1Y alloys for Regenerative Medicine ... in MultiLengthScale Bone Structure An Investigation Using High-Energy X- Rays.

279

Ca-Based Liquid Metal Battery for Grid Scale Energy Storage: Ca-Mg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building upon the thermodynamic and electrochemical investigations of calcium- magnesium (Ca-Mg) and calcium-bismuth (Ca-Bi) binary electrode systems, the recent development and progress of ... Contact programming@programmaster. org.

280

Diamond as a solid state quantum computer with a linear chain of nuclear spins system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By removing a $^{12}C$ atom from the tetrahedral configuration of the diamond, replace it by a $^{13}C$ atom, and repeating this in a linear direction, it is possible to have a linear chain of nuclear spins one half and to build a solid state quantum computer. One qubit rotation and controlled-not (CNOT) quantum gates are obtained immediately from this configuration, and CNOT quantum gate is used to determined the design parameters of this quantum computer.

G. V. Lpez

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500 deg. C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950 deg. C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M. [Department of Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ariga, T. [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF GRAVEL BARS IN A RIVER CHANNEL FROM AIRBORNE LIDAR-DERIVED DTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne Laser Scanning or LiDAR data are widely used nowadays in river valleys for topography and hydro-morphology. However, the large data sets of unprocessed 3D point clouds require some challenging treatment and end-users may prefer to deal with DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) derived from LiDAR surveys. Without any complementary data (such as field survey or photographs) detecting position and shape of gravel bars in a river is a demanding task, especially if done manually. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of a river channel into distinct hydro- morphological entities: water, gravel bars, banks,... This method is based on image processing algorithms (region growing segmentation combined with morphological closing and altitude thresholding) in order to separate water from other elements present in the channel, based on the altitude information. This method is applied to a reach of the Arcen-Maurienne River, France, with alternate gravel bars. The only data source is the 0.25 m resolution DTM, derived from an airborne LiDAR survey. Results show that the developed method succeeds in automatically delimiting the main channel and in detecting gravel bars. It is then possible to get global information on the gravel bars such as location along the river or emerged surface area and topography.

Lionel Pnard; Maxime Morel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The effects of diamond injector angles on flow structures at various Mach numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of a three dimensional diamond jet interaction flowfield at various diamond injector half angles into a supersonic crossflow were presented in this thesis. The numerical study was performed to improve the understanding of the flame holding potential by extending the numerical database envelop to include different injector half angles and examine the flow at Mach 2 and Mach 5. The configuration of a diamond injector shape was found to reduce the flow separation upstream, and produce an attached shock at the initial freestream interaction and the injection fluid has an increased field penetration as compared to circular injectors. The CFD studies were also aimed at providing additional information on the uses of multiple injectors for flow control. The numerical runs were performed with diamond injectors at half angles of 10?° and 20?° at a freestream Mach number of 5. The transverse counter-rotating pair of vortices found in the 15?° does not form within the 10?° and 20?° cases at freestream Mach number 5. The 10?° case had a barrel shock that became streamlined in the lateral direction. The 20?° barrel shock had a very large spanwise expansion and became streamlined in the transverse direction. In both cases the trailing edge of their barrel shocks did not form the flat â??Vâ? shape, as found in the baseline case. At Mach 2 the 10?° and 15?° cases both formed the flat â??Vâ? shape at the trailing edge of the barrel shocks, and formed the transverse counter rotating vortex pairs. The 10?° multiple injector case successfully showed the interaction shocks forming into a larger planer shock downstream of the injectors. The swept 15?° case produced interaction shocks that were too weak to properly form a planar shock downstream. This planar shock has potential for flow control. Depending on the angle of incidence of the injector fluid with the freestream flow and the half angle of the diamond injector, the planar shocks will form further upstream or downstream of the injector.

McLellan, Justin Walter

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Search for D0 - D0bar Mixing and Rare Charm Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a dataset acquired by the BaBar experiment running on and near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance from 1999-2002, limits are set on the rate of $D^0$-- $\\kern 0.2em\\bar{\\kern -0.2em D}{}^0$ mixing using the decay mode $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^{+}$, followed by a semi-leptonic decay of the $D^0$. Results are compared to previous BaBar analysis using hadronic decays. We also report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decays $D^0 \\to e^{+} e^{-}$ ($\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$) and the lepton-flavor violation decays $D^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$.

U. Egede; for the BABAR Collaboration

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy Calibration of the BaBar EMC Using the Pi0 Invariant Mass Method  

SciTech Connect

The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter energy calibration method was compared with the local and global peak iteration procedures, of Crystal Barrel and CLEO-II. An investigation was made of the possibility of {Upsilon}(4S) background reduction which could lead to increased statistics over a shorter time interval, for efficient calibration runs. The BaBar software package was used with unreconstructed data to study the energy response of the calorimeter, by utilizing the {pi}{sup 0} mass constraint on pairs of photon clusters.

Tanner, David J.; /Manchester U.

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion U.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

3D Hopkinson bar: new experiments for dynamic testing on soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct analysis of the dynamic response of materials is possible using Split Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor mechanical properties. An original experimental arrangement called "Three-Dimensional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar" (3D SHPB) is proposed. It allows the measurement of the complete three-dimensional dynamic response of soils. Different types of confinement systems are used. The results on different loading paths are compared with other works on sand and clay. The analysis at grain-size level gives further elements on the comminution process.

Semblat, J F; Gary, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange, at which the surface street system and the free-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange signal and the ramp-metering signal. The proposed control algorithm, including an adaptive diamond inter- change control and a traffic-responsive ramp-metering control were programmed with VISSIM's vehicle

Tian, Zong Z.

293

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA CA-TRIBE-BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-BLUE CA LAKE RANCHERIA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe of California proposes to hire a technical consultant to gather additional information and make recommendations as to the best energy efficiency and conservation project or projects to utilize energy efficiency and conservation block grant funds. Following these recommendations, a decision will be made on building retrofits, and the specific retrofits will be identified and submitted for NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

294

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

295

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

296

CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010 CA Core Competency Worksheet August 2010 1 DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Key Cyber Security Role: Certification Agent (CA) (Also referred to as Security Control Assessor) Role Definition: The CA is the individual responsible for assessing the management, operational, assurance, and technical security controls implemented on an information system via security testing and evaluation (ST&E) methods. This individual must be independent of system development, operation, and deficiency mitigation. Competency Area: Data Security Functional Requirement: Design Competency Definition: Refers to the application of the principles, policies, and procedures necessary to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, availability, and privacy of data in all forms of media (i.e., electronic

297

AOCS Official Method Ca 3b-87  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hexane Residues in Fats and Oils AOCS Official Method Ca 3b-87 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The residual hexane content is the quantity of vol

298

AOCS Official Method Ca 14-56  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total, Free and Combined Glycerol Iodometric-Periodic Acid Method AOCS Official Method Ca 14-56 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method deter

299

AOCS Official Method Ca 6c-65  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons (Mineral Oil) AOCS Official Method Ca 6c-65 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The sample in solvent is passed through a chromatographi

300

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE ANYTHING BUT TEXTBOOK #12;Areas of study Bachelor of Computer Science* Algorithms Biomedical Computing Computer Game Development Computer and Internet Security Mathematics Computer Science and Mathematics Concentrations in Computing Theory and Numerical Methods

Carleton University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AOCS Official Method Ca 3c-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of a Volatile Organic Contaminant by GC-MS AOCS Official Method Ca 3c-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method describes the dete

302

AOCS Official Method Ca 18d-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Cadmium Content by Direct Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry AOCS Official Method Ca 18d-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION...

303

AOCS Official Method Ca 3a-46  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Insoluble Impurities AOCS Official Method Ca 3a-46 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines dirt, meal, and other foreign substance

304

AOCS Official Method Ca 14b-96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantification of Free Glycerin in Selected Glycerides and Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by HPLC with Laser Light-Scattering Detection AOCS Official Method Ca 14b-96 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads ...

305

AOCS Official Method Ca 9a-52  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refining Loss AOCS Official Method Ca 9a-52 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the loss of free fatty acids, oil, and impurit

306

AOCS Official Method Ca 5a-40  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Fatty Acids AOCS Official Method Ca 5a-40 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the free fatty acids existing in the sample. SC

307

AOCS Official Method Ca 18b-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Copper, Iron, and Nickel by Direct Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry AOCS Official Method Ca 18b-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFI

308

AOCS Official Method Ca 3e-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Visible Foots in Crude Fats and Oils AOCS Official Method Ca 3e-02 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION A homogenized test portion of

309

AOCS Official Method Ca 5c-87  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butyric Acid AOCS Official Method Ca 5c-87 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The butyric acid content of milkfat, butterfat, or mixtures of fats co

310

AOCS Recommended Practice Ca 5d-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Fatty Acids in Crude Vegetable Oils by Capillary Gas Chromatography AOCS Recommended Practice Ca 5d-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFI

311

AOCS Official Method Ca 15b-87  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium and Calcium by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry AOCS Official Method Ca 15b-87 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Sodium (sodium soap) and

312

AOCS Official Method Ca 15-75  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses for Chromium, Copper, Iron and Nickel in Vegetable Oils by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry AOCS Official Method Ca 15-75 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINI

313

AOCS Official Method Ca 11-55  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ash AOCS Official Method Ca 11-55 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the residue remaining after incineration under the speci

314

AOCS Official Method Ca 12a-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorimetric Determination of Phosphorus Content in Fats and Oils AOCS Official Method Ca 12a-02 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The test portion

315

AOCS Official Method Ca 3d-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Sediment in Crude Fats and OilsCentrifuge Method AOCS Official Method Ca 3d-02 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFINITION...

316

AOCS Official Method Ca 9f-57  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutral Oil and Loss AOCS Official Method Ca 9f-57 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The total neutral oil of natural fats and oils consisting esse

317

AOCS Official Method Ca 2c-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and Volatile Matter Air Oven Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2c-25 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the moisture an

318

AOCS Official Method Ca 13-56  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total Gossypol in Oils AOCS Official Method Ca 13-56 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION Total gossypol defines gossypol and gossypol derivatives, bo

319

AOCS Official Method Ca 2f-93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Moisture and Volatile Matter in Fats and Oils Modified Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2f-93 Methods Methods and Analyses Lipid Library Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method

320

AOCS Official Method Ca 4-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soluble Mineral Matter and Fatty Acids Combined as Mineral Soap AOCS Official Method Ca 4-25 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AOCS Official Method Ca 2a-45  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture Distillation Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2a-45 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the moisture by distillation wi

322

AOCS Official Method Ca 2e-84  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture Karl Fischer Reagent AOCS Official Method Ca 2e-84 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the actual water content of fa

323

AOCS Official Method Ca 2b-38  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and Volatile Matter Hot Plate Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2b-38 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the moisture a

324

AOCS Official Method Ca 2d-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and Volatile Matter Vacuum Oven Method AOCS Official Method Ca 2d-25 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the moisture

325

AOCS Official Method Ca 20-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for Phosphorus in Oil by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy AOCS Official Method Ca 20-99 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION ...

326

AOCS Official Method Ca 17-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Trace Elements (Calcium, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Nickel, Silicon, Sodium, Lead, and Cadmium) in Oil by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy AOCS Official Method Ca 17-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemi

327

AOCS Official Method Ca 18-79  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for Chromium, Copper, Iron, Nickel, and Manganese in Triglyceride Oils by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry Using a Graphite Furnace AOCS Official Method Ca 18-79 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods D

328

A diamond anvil cell with resistive heating for high pressure and high temperature x-ray diffraction and absorption studies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe a prototype of a diamond anvil cell (DAC) for high pressure/high temperature studies. This DAC combines the use of a resistive oven of 250 W power in a very small volume, associated with special conical seats for Boehler-type diamond anvils in order to have a large angular acceptance. To protect the diamond anvils from burning and to avoid the oven oxidation, the heated DAC is enclosed in a vacuum chamber. The assemblage was used to study the melting curve of germanium at high pressure (up to 20 GPa) and high temperature (up to 1200 K) using x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Pasternak, Sebastien; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Pascarelli, Sakura; Zhang Lin [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Poloni, Roberta [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona Spain (Spain); Canny, Bernard [IMPMC-CNRS UMR, 7590 Universite Paris VI, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Coulet, Marie-Vanessa [IM2NP-UMR CNRS, 6242 Universite Paul Cezanne Campus de St Jerome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electron emission and defect formation in the interaction of slow,highly charged ions with diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on electron emission and defect formation in theinteraction between slow (v~;0.3 vBohr) highly charged ions (SHCI) withinsulating (type IIa) and semiconducting (type IIb) diamonds. Electronemission induced by 31Pq+ (q=5 to 13), and 136Xeq+ (q=34 to 44) withkinetic energies of 9 kVxq increase linearly with the ion charge states,reaching over 100 electrons per ion for high xenon charge states withoutsurface passivation of the diamond with hydrogen. Yields from bothdiamond types are up to a factor of two higher then from reference metalsurfaces. Crater like defects with diameters of 25 to 40 nm are formed bythe impact of single Xe44+ ions. High secondary electron yields andsingle ion induced defects enable the formation of single dopant arrayson diamond surfaces.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Shrivastava, S.; Rebuli, D.B.; Persaud, A.; Schneider, D.H.; Schenkel, T.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Visibility of Galactic Bars and Spiral Structure At High Redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the visibility of galactic bars and spiral structure in the distant Universe by artificially redshifting 101 B-band CCD images of local spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. Our artificially redshifted images correspond to Hubble Space Telescope I-band observations of the local galaxy sample seen at z=0.7, with integration times matching those of both the very deep Northern Hubble Deep Field data, and the much shallower Flanking Field observations. The expected visibility of galactic bars is probed in two ways: (1) using traditional visual classification, and (2) by charting the changing shape of the galaxy distribution in "Hubble space", a quantitative two-parameter description of galactic structure that maps closely on to Hubble's original tuning fork. Both analyses suggest that over 2/3 of strongly barred luminous local spirals i.e. objects classified as SB in the Third Reference Catalog) would still be classified as strongly barred at z=0.7 in the Hubbl...

Van den Bergh, S; Whyte, L F; Merrifield, M R; Eskridge, P B; Frogel, J A; Pogge, R W; Bergh, Sidney van den; Abraham, Roberto G.; Whyte, Laura F.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Eskridge, Paul; Frogel, Jay A.; Pogge, Richard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press 31AE8E3D42D3E14DDBA41DE5FCD66625 AOCS Press

333

Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

Calderini, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Bar-driven fueling of galactic nuclei: a 2D view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss evidences for bar-driven gas fueling in the central regions of galaxies, focusing on scales down to about 10 pc. I thus mention the building of inner disks, and the link with resonances, as well as the corresponding kinematic signatures such as sigma-drops and counter-rotating nuclear disks as probed via integral-field spectroscopy.

Emsellem, E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improved grating and bar cell models in cortical area V1 and texture coding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents improved models of cortical neurons in V1 that act like grating and bar detectors. Both models use the same frontend, which consists of a contrast normalisation in combination with isotropic DOG filtering, followed by anisotropic ... Keywords: Computational models, Cortical cells, Diatoms, Groupings, Symmetry order, Texture analysis

J. M. H. du Buf

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

In situ XRD Study of Ca2+ Saturated Montmorillonite (STX-1) Exposed to Anhydrous and Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Reactions involving scCO2 and a calcium saturated dioctahedral smectite (Ca-STX-1) were examined by in situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction over a range of temperatures (50 to 100C) and pressures (90, 125, and 180 bar) relevant to long term geologic storage of CO2. Exposure of Ca-STX-1 containing one water of hydration (1W) to anhydrous scCO2 at 50C and 90 bar produced an immediate increase of ~0.8 in the d001 basal reflection that was sustained for the length of the experiment (~44 hours). Higher ordered basal reflections displayed similar shifts. Following depressurization, positions of basal reflections and FWHM values (d001) returned to initial values, with no measurable modification to the clay structure or water content. Similar results were obtained for tests conducted at 50C and higher pressures (125 and 180 bar). Exposure of Ca-STX-1 containing two waters of hydration (2W) to scCO2 resulted in a decrease in the d001 reflection from 14.48 to 12.52 , after pressurization, indicating a partial loss of interlayer water. In addition, the hydration state of the clay became more homogeneous during contact with anhydrous scCO2 and after depressurization. In the presence of scCO2 and water, the clay achieved a 3W hydration state, based on a d001 spacing of 18.8 . In contrast to scCO2, comparable testing with N2 gas indicated trivial changes in the d001 series regardless of hydration state (1W or 2W). In the presence of free water and N2, the basal spacing for the Ca-STX-1 expanded slightly, but remained in the 2W hydration state. These experiments indicate that scCO2 can intercalate hydrated clays, where the 1W hydrate state is stable when exposed to anhydrous scCO2 under conditions proposed for geologic storage of CO2. Consequently, clays can act as secondary CO2 traps where potential collapse or expansion of the interlayer spacing depends on the initial hydration state of the clay and scCO2.

Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Qafoku, Odeta; Martin, Paul F.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)...

339

Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico...

340

Calexico, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Calexico, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Calexico, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico...

342

Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Ogilby, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports...

343

THE TWO-PHASE FORMATION HISTORY OF SPIRAL GALAXIES TRACED BY THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE BAR FRACTION  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of galactic bars and the link with disk and spheroid formation in a sample of zoom-in cosmological simulations. Our simulation sample focuses on galaxies with present-day stellar masses in the 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} range, in field and loose group environments, with a broad variety of mass growth histories. In our models, bars are almost absent from the progenitors of present-day spirals at z > 1.5, and they remain rare and generally too weak to be observable down to z Almost-Equal-To 1. After this characteristic epoch, the fractions of observable and strong bars rise rapidly, bars being present in 80% of spiral galaxies and easily observable in two thirds of these at z {<=} 0.5. This is quantitatively consistent with the redshift evolution of the observed bar fraction, although the latter is presently known up to z Almost-Equal-To 0.8 because of band-shifting and resolution effects. Our models hence predict that the decrease in the bar fraction with increasing redshift should continue with a fraction of observable bars not larger than 10%-15% in disk galaxies at z > 1. Our models also predict later bar formation in lower-mass galaxies, in agreement with existing data. We find that the characteristic epoch of bar formation, namely redshift z Almost-Equal-To 0.8-1 in the studied mass range, corresponds to the epoch at which today's spirals acquire their disk-dominated morphology. At higher redshift, disks tend to be rapidly destroyed by mergers and gravitational instabilities and rarely develop significant bars. We hence suggest that the bar formation epoch corresponds to the transition between an early 'violent' phase of spiral galaxy formation at z {>=} 1 and a late 'secular' phase at z {<=} 0.8. In the secular phase, the presence of bars substantially contributes to the growth of the (pseudo-)bulge, but the bulge mass budget remains statistically dominated by the contribution of mergers, interactions, and disk instabilities at high redshift. Early bars at z > 1 are often short-lived, while most of the bars formed at z {<=} 1 persist down to z = 0, late cosmological gas infall being necessary to maintain some of them.

Kraljic, Katarina; Bournaud, Frederic [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Martig, Marie [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Diamond-like atomic-scale composite films: Surface properties and stability studied by STM and AFM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous ``diamond-like/quartz-like`` composites a-(C:H/Si:O) and metal containing a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) constitute a novel class of diamond-related materials with a number of unique bulk and surface properties. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the surface properties and stability of these solids we have performed a scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy investigation of both a-(C:H/Si:O) and a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) films, including the effects of ion bombardment and annealing.

Dorfman, B.; Abraizov, M. [SUNY, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Pollak, F.H. [CUNY, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Eby, R. [TopoMetrix, Bedminster, NJ (United States); Rong, Z.Y. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Strongin, M.; Yang, X.Q. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Grain size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films with a thickness of {approx}6 {micro}m and with average grain sizes ranging from 60 to 9 nm were deposited on silicon wafers using a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. These samples were then characterized with the goal to identify correlations between grain size, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The characterization reveals that our films are phase pure and exhibit a relatively smooth surface morphology. The levels of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and hydrogen impurities are low, and showed a systematic variation with the grain size. The hydrogen content increases with decreasing grain size, whereas the sp{sup 2} carbon content decreases with decreasing grain size. The material is weaker than single crystalline diamond, and both stiffness and hardness decrease with decreasing grain size. These trends suggest gradual changes of the nature of the grain boundaries, from graphitic in the case of the 60 nm grain size material to hydrogen terminated sp{sup 3} carbon for the 9 nm grain size material. The films exhibit low levels of internal stress and freestanding structures with a length of several centimeters could be fabricated without noticeable bending.

Wiora, M; Bruehne, K; Floeter, A; Gluche, P; Willey, T M; Kucheyev, S O; Van Buuren, A W; Hamza, A V; Biener, J; Fecht, H

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Single-photon emission from Ni-related color centers in CVD diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color centers in diamond are very promising candidates among the possible realizations for practical single-photon sources because of their long-time stable emission at room temperature. The popular nitrogen-vacancy center shows single-photon emission, but within a large, phonon-broadened spectrum (~100nm), which strongly limits its applicability for quantum communication. By contrast, Ni-related centers exhibit narrow emission lines at room temperature. We present investigations on single color centers consisting of Ni and Si created by ion implantation into single crystalline IIa diamond. We use systematic variations of ion doses between 10^8/cm^2 and 10^14/cm^2 and energies between 30keV and 1.8MeV. The Ni-related centers show emission in the near infrared spectral range (~770nm to 787nm) with a small line-width (~3nm FWHM). A measurement of the intensity correlation function proves single-photon emission. Saturation measurements yield a rather high saturation count rate of 77.9 kcounts/s. Polarization dependent measurements indicate the presence of two orthogonal dipoles.

David Steinmetz; Elke Neu; Christian Hepp; Roland Albrecht; Wolfgang Bolse; Jan Meijer; Detlef Rogalla; Christoph Becher

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J. [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

FEA analysis of diamond as IMCA{close_quote}s monochromator crystal  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of effort has been make in recent years in the field of undulator high heat load optics, and currently there are several tractable options [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 69}, 2792 (1994); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 266}, 517 (1988); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 239}, 555 (1993)]. Diamond crystals offer some attractive options{endash}water as the coolant, the use of established monochromator mechanisms, simpler monochromator design as compared to the use of liquid nitrogen or gallium. The use of diamond crystals as the optical elements in a double-crystal monochromator for the IMCA-CAT and MR-CAT ID beamlines has been studied. A first crystal mounting scheme using an indium-gallium eutectic as the heat transfer medium developed in collaboration with DND-CAT and M. Hart will be presented. A FEA analysis of the IMCA-CAT ID beamline arrangement using the APS undulator A as the radiaiton source will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Chrzas, J.; Cimpoes, S.; Ivanov, I.N. [CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3301 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Temperature dependence of mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond films grown by the HFCVD techinque.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of -800 C. The films have -4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, -1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Adiga, V. P.; Sumant, A. V.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Innovative Micro Tech.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Electro Circuits Inc - CA 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Electro Circuits Inc - CA 08 Electro Circuits Inc - CA 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Electro Circuits, Inc. (CA.08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 401 East Green Street , Pasadena , California CA.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CA.08-2 Site Operations: Conducted ultrasonic tests on uranium ingots in the early 1950s. CA.08-3 CA.08-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited operations at the site CA.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal CA.08-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Electro Circuits, Inc. CA.08-1 - AEC Memorandum; Parsegian to Musser; Subject: Transfer of

357

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W. BRENNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube Structures O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W precursors", Nature 364, 607. [6] Shenderova, O. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Coexistence of two carbon phases.T. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Mechanical Properties of nanotubule fibers and composites determined from

Brenner, Donald W.

358

Program plan for the development of advanced synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight companys have teamed with Sandia Labs to work on five projects as part of a cooperative effort to advance the state of the ar in synthetic-diamond drill bit design and manufacture. DBS (a Baroid Company), Dennis Tool Company, Hughes Christensen Company, Maurer Engineering, Megadiamond, Security Diamond Products, Slimdril International, and Smith International. Objective of each project is to develop advanced bit technology that results in new commercial products with longer bit life and higher penetration rates in hard formations. Each project explores a different approach to synthetic-diamond cutter and bit design and, consequently, uses different approaches to developing the technology. Each of these approaches builds or the respective companies` capabilities and current product interests. Sandia`s role is to assure integration of the individual projects into a coherent program and tc provide unique testing and analytical capabilities where needed. One additional company, Amoco Production Research, will provide synthetic-diamond drill bit research expertise and field testing services for each project in the program.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Salsbury and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning -1 -Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning - 1 - Automated Testing of HVAC Systems This paper describes an approach to the automation of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor installation, commissioning, and maintenance than by poor

360

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National and System Development Climate Data Management Tropical Cyclone Data and Information Work Communicating System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm{sup 3} regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Inoue, Toru [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Published in J. Mat. Sci. Lettr. 18 (1999) 427-430 Selective Patterned Deposition of Diamond using a New Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of centrifugation on diamond deposition. It is generally believed that atomic hydrogen at the growth surface deposition were unsuitable for experiments on a centrifuge. Thus, a new closed chemical vapor transport and removal of gas [4]. Graphite was used as a carbon source in the presence of hydrogen at low pressure

Regel, Liya L.

363

A comparative study of three different chemical vapor deposition techniques of carbon nanotube growth on diamond films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power ...

Betty T. Quinton, Paul N. Barnes, Chakrapani V. Varanasi, Jack Burke, Bang-Hung Tsao, Kevin J. Yost, Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NREL: News Feature - NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use December 7, 2009 Photo of a truck delivering materials to an office building under construction. Enlarge image Designers met NREL's aggressive energy use requirement for the Research Support Facility by taking advantage Colorado's sunny climate. Large windows for daylighting and thermally sophisticated wall systems for solar heating are crucial to the net-zero energy design. Credit: Pat Corkery Technology - from sophisticated computer modeling to advanced windows that actually open! - will help the newest building at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory be one of the world's most energy efficient offices. But making NREL's new Research Support Facility into a showcase for engineering net zero energy office design didn't begin with rooftop solar

365

Fundamental and HOM Coupler Design for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered as a deflecting system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing cavity for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. Currently the designs are optimized to achieve lower surface fields within the dimensional constraints for the above applications. A detailed analysis of the fundamental input power coupler design for the parallel-bar cavity is performed considering beam loading and the effects of microphonics. For higher beam loading the damping of the HOMs is vital to reduce beam instabilities generated due to the wake fields. An analysis of threshold impedances for each application and impedances of the modes that requires damping are presented in this paper with the design of HOM couplers.

S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Polarization Observables in $?N\\to K\\bar{K}N$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

W. Roberts

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Liverpool, New York Site Description Commercial-Restaurant Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Aisin Seiki G60 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer ECO Technical Solutions System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 240 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 46105 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2005/07/10 Monitoring Termination Date 2005/07/21

368

Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two. Therefore, there is a lack of both analysis tools and operational strategies for considering them as an integrated system. One drawback of operating the ramp-metering system and the diamond interchange system in isolation is that traffic from the ramp, particularly if it is metered, can spill back into the diamond interchange, causing both congestion and safety concerns at the diamond interchange. While flushing the ramp queues by temporarily suspending ramp metering has been the primary strategy for preventing queue spillback, it can result in freeway system breakdown, which would affect the entire system's efficiency. The aim of this research was to develop operational strategies for managing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering system (IDIRMS). Enhanced modeling methodologies were developed for an IDIRMS. A computer model named DRIVE (Diamond Interchange and Ramp Metering Integration Via Evaluation) was developed, which was characterized as a mesoscopic simulation and analysis model. DRIVE incorporated the enhanced modeling methodologies developed in this study and could be used to perform system analysis for an IDIRMS given a set of system input parameters and variables. DRIVE was validated against a VISSIM microscopic simulation model, and general agreement was found between the two models. System operational characteristics were investigated using DRIVE to gain a better understanding of the system features. Integrated control strategies (ICS) were developed based on the two commonly used diamond interchange phasing schemes, basic three-phase and TTI four-phase. The ICS were evaluated using VISSIM microscopic simulation under three general traffic demand scenarios: low, medium, and high, as characterized by the volume-to-capacity ratios at the metered ramps. The results of the evaluation indicate that the integrated operations through an adaptive signal control system were most effective under the medium traffic demand scenario by preventing or delaying the onset of ramp-metering queue flush, thereby minimizing freeway breakdown and system delays.

Tian, Zongzhong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Results on Charmonium(?like) and Bottomonium(?like) States from Belle and BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy results for Belle and BaBar are reported. A particular focus is put on new results of the X(3872) state with its radiative decays to J/?? and ??? its decay into J/?3? and the search for production in radiative Upsilon decays. Another focus is L?=?2 mesons in particlar a possible D?wave assignment to the X(3872) and the confirmation of an Upsilon D?wave state.

Jens Sren; The Belle Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear Bar, Star Formation and Gas Fueling in the Active Galaxy NGC 4303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS images are used to investigate the gas/dust and stellar structure inside the central 300 pc of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4303. The NICMOS H-band (F160W) image reveals a bright core and a nuclear elongated bar-like structure of 250 pc in diameter. The bar is centered on the bright core, and its major axis is oriented in proyection along the spin axis of the nuclear gaseous rotating disk recently detected (Colina & Arribas 1999). The V-H (F606W - F160W) image reveals a complex gas/dust distribution with a two-arm spiral structure of about 225 pc in radius. The southwestern arm is traced by young star-forming knots while the northeastern arm is detected by the presence of dust lanes. These spirals do not have a smooth structure but rather they are made of smaller flocculent spirals or filament-like structures. The magnitudes and colors of the star-forming knots are typical of clusters of young stars with masses of 0.5 to 1 x $10^5 M_{solar}, and ages of 5 to 25 million years. The overall structure of the nuclear spirals as well as the size, number and masses of the star-forming knots are explained in the context of a massive gaseous nuclear disk subject to self-gravitational instabilities and to the gravitational field created by the nuclear bar. According to the model, the gaseous disk has a mass of about 5 x 10^7 M_{solar} inside a radius of 400 pc, the bar has a radius of 150 pc and a pattern speed of about 0.5 Myr^{-1}, and the average mass accretion rate into the core (R < 8 pc) is about 0.01 M_{solar}$ yr^{-1} for about 80 Myr.

L. Colina; K. Wada

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

STAR FORMATION HISTORY IN TWO FIELDS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD BAR  

SciTech Connect

The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper, we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well-tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.

Cignoni, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cole, A. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gallagher, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A. [STScI, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grebel, E. K., E-mail: michele.cignoni@unibo.it [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio [Laboratorio MUSP-via Turotti 9, 29122 Piacenza (Italy); Strano, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano-Dipartimento di Meccanica, via La Masa 1, 20156, Milan (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

HERSCHEL SEARCH FOR O{sub 2} TOWARD THE ORION BAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the H II region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O{sub 2} N{sub J} = 3{sub 3}-1{sub 2} transition at 487 GHz and the 5{sub 4}-3{sub 4} transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3{sigma} upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O{sub 2} column density <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30 K and 250 K, or <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} if the O{sub 2} emitting region is primarily at a temperature of {approx}<100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O{sub 2} column density is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} exposed to a far-ultraviolet flux 10{sup 4} times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on A{sub V} of the Bar is less than required for O{sub 2} to reach peak abundance; (3) the O{sub 2} emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O{sub 2} reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.

Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Black, John H.; Hjalmarson, Ake; Liseau, Rene [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Encrenaz, Pierre; Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neufeld, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Snell, Ronald L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Van der Tak, Floris [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sensitivity of LHC experiments to the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state, with $H \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$, at center of mass energy of 14 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle in 2012, attention has now turned to measuring its properties, e.g., coupling to various bosonic and fermionic final states, its spin and parity, etc. In this note, we study the sensitivity of experiments at the LHC to its coupling to the top quark, by searching for the process pp $\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}H$, where the primary decay mode of the $H$ is $\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$. In this paper, the $t\\bar{t}$ system is detected in the dilepton final state. This study is performed assuming a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosities of 300 fb$^{-1}$ (with an average pileup ($\\mu$) of 50 additional collisions per bunch crossing) and 3000 fb$^{-1}$ (with $\\mu=140$). We include systematic uncertainties in production cross-sections as well as the more important experimental uncertainties. Preliminary studies indicate that we will observe the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state with a significance of 2.4 and $\\ge 5.3$ for the two luminosity scenarios, respectively; addition of other $t\\bar{t}$ final states should increase the overall significance for observing $t\\bar{t}H$.

Ricardo Goncalo; Stefan Guindon; Vivek Jain

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Category:San Francisco, CA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CA CA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "San Francisco, CA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVMidriseApartment San... 65 KB SVPrimarySchool San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVPrimarySchool San Fr... 70 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 66 KB SVSecondarySchool San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVSecondarySchool San ... 65 KB SVStandAloneRetail San Francisco CA Southern California Edison Co.png SVStandAloneRetail San...

378

16th International Conference in Quantum ChromoDynamics: Charmonium-like states at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results on charmonium-like states from the BaBar experiment located at the PEP-II asymmetric energy $e^+e^-$ collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Elisa Fioravanti

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events  

SciTech Connect

We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR; Asaadi, J.; /Texas A-M; Ashmanskas, W.; /Fermilab; Attal, A.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Aurisano, A.; /Texas A-M; Azfar, F.; /Oxford U.; Badgett, W.; /Fermilab; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Barnes, V.E.; /Purdue U.; Barnett, B.A.; /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Comenius U. /MIT /TRIUMF /INFN, Pisa /University Coll. London /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Wisconsin U., Madison /Duke U. /Fermilab /CERN /Rockefeller U. /Fermilab /INFN, Padua /University Coll. London /Argonne, HEP /Brandeis U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Duke U. /Rochester U. /Rochester U. /Purdue U. /Pittsburgh U. /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Barbara /Illinois U., Urbana /INFN, Bologna /Michigan State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR; /more authors..

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision---Making.., 2012. Download: PDF (18.47 MB) Ingle, Aaron, Mithra M. Moezzi,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

382

Theoretical tool movement required to diamond turn an off-axis paraboloid on axis  

SciTech Connect

High-quality, off-axis parabolic reflectors, required by the CTR and laser-fusion programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) and other ERDA laboratories, are currently manufactured by hand. There are several drawbacks to this method, including lead times of up to a year, costs in excess of $75,000 for a small reflector, and unsatisfactory limits to the tolerances obtainable. This situation has led to a search for cheaper and more accurate methods of manufacturing off-axis paraboloids. An alternative method, turning the workpiece about its axis on a diamond-turning machine, is presented, and the equations describing the necessary tool movement are derived. A discussion of a particular case suggests that the proposed technique is feasible. (auth)

Thompson, D.C.

1975-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Controlling the quantum dynamics of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding and mitigating decoherence is a key challenge for quantum science and technology. The main source of decoherence for solid-state spin systems is the uncontrolled spin bath environment. Here, we demonstrate quantum control of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond at room temperature that is composed of electron spins of substitutional nitrogen impurities. The resulting spin bath dynamics are probed using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre electron spin as a magnetic field sensor. We exploit the spin bath control to dynamically suppress dephasing of the NV spin by the spin bath. Furthermore, by combining spin bath control with dynamical decoupling, we directly measure the coherence and temporal correlations of different groups of bath spins. These results uncover a new arena for fundamental studies on decoherence and enable novel avenues for spin-based magnetometry and quantum information processing.

G. de Lange; T. van der Sar; M. S. Blok; Z. H. Wang; V. V. Dobrovitski; R. Hanson

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High-precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3%-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance-matching analysis, incorporating systematic uncertainties in the equation of state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2%-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations, which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments, which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar, the present measurements indicate that the mixed phase is a few percent more dense than what would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Eggert, J. H.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McWilliams, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Application of polycrystalline diamond compact bits in the Kuparuk River Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

In soft to medium-hard clays and shales, polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have proved economically successful in the Kuparuk River field, AK. Through the redesign and modification of PDC bits and rig equipment, the necessary operating parameters have been achieved, and the use of PDC bits has become routine. These bits are typically run with a bit weight of 30,000 to 40,000 lbf (133 to 178 kN), a standpipe pressure of 4,000 psi (27 MPa), a pump rate of 400 to 450 gal/min (1.5 to 1.7 m/sup 3//min), and a rotary speed of 150 to 200 rev/min. Use of these high operating parameters saves about $50,000 per PDC bit when compared with roller-cone bits.

Balkenbush, R.J.; Onisko, J.E.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

www.arts.uOttawa.ca www.programmes.uOttawa.ca 5-281  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.arts.uOttawa.ca www.programmes.uOttawa.ca 5-281 Linguistique MINEURE Le programme de mineure baccalauréat avec spécialisation approfondie avec Mineure en linguistique ­ 30 crédits mineure ou un des Sciences de la santé. LIN1710 Introduction à la linguistique I : Des mots aux énoncés

Petriu, Emil M.

389

Recipient: County of San Bernadino,CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recipient: County of San Bernadino,CA Recipient: County of San Bernadino,CA Award #: EE 000 0903 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination/ Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions and Rationale (Restrictions and Allowable Activity) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan Environmental Impact Report (EECS) A9, All None - this NEPA determination is for the report only. Solar Electric System for Rancho Cucamonga County Office Building A9, All Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause Engineering Clause **This NEPA determination is limited to a roof-mounted system only. County Heating Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) Retrofit Program B5.1 Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause Engineering clause Solar Electric System for High Desert Government Center

390

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Metropolitan Water District of S CA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District of S CA Jump to: navigation, search Name Metropolitan Water District of S CA Place California Utility Id 12397 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC...

392

Effect of couple-stress on the pure bending of a prismatic bar  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress theory to the stress analysis of graphite structures is performed by solving a pure bending problem. The differences between solutions from the couple-stress theory and from the classical theory of elasticity are compared. It is found that the differences are sufficient to account for the inconsistencies which have often been observed between the classical elasticity theory and actual behavior of graphite under bend and tensile loadings. An experimental procedure to measure the material constants in the couple-stress theory is also suggested. The linear couple-stress theory, the origins of which go back to the turn of the last century, adds linear relations between couple-stresses and rotation gradients to the classical stress-strain law. By adopting the classical assumption that the plane cross section remains plane after deformation, the pure-bending problem is reduced to a plane couple-stress problem with traction-free boundary conditions. A general solution for an isotropic elastic prismatic bar under pure bending is then obtained using the Airy stress function and another stress function wich accounts for the couple-stresss. For a cylindrical bar, it reduces to a simple series solution. The moment-curvature and stress-curvature relations derived for a cylindrical bar from the general solution are used to examine the effect of couple-stresses. Numerical compilation of relations indicates that the couple stress parameters can be practically determined by measuring the moment-curvature ratio of various diametered specimens under bending. Although there is not sufficient data for such evaluation at present, it appears that the theory is consistent with the limited bend and tensile strength data of cylindrical specimens for H-451 graphite.

Tzung, F.; Kao, B.; Ho, F.; Tang, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Secular Bar-Mode Instability in Rapidly Rotating Stars Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniformly rotating, homogeneous, incompressible Maclaurin spheroids that spin sufficiently rapidly are secularly unstable to nonaxisymmetric, bar-mode perturbations when viscosity is present. The intuitive explanation is that energy dissipation by viscosity can drive an unstable spheroid to a stable, triaxial configuration of lower energy - a Jacobi ellipsoid. But what about rapidly rotating compressible stars? Unlike incompressible stars, which contain no internal energy and therefore immediately liberate all the energy dissipated by viscosity, compressible stars have internal energy and can retain the dissipated energy as internal heat. Now compressible stars that rotate sufficiently rapidly and also manage to liberate this dissipated energy very quickly are known to be unstable to bar-mode perturbations, like their incompressible counterparts. But what is the situation for rapidly rotating compressible stars that have very long cooling timescales, so that all the energy dissipated by viscosity is retained as heat, whereby the total energy of the star remains constant on a secular (viscous) evolution timescale? Are such stars also unstable to the nonlinear growth of bar modes, or is the viscous heating sufficient to cause them to expand, drive down the ratio of rotational kinetic to gravitational potential energy T/|W| ~ 1/R, where R is the equatorial radius, and turn off the instability before it gets underway? If the instability still arises in such stars, at what rotation rate do they become unstable, and to what final state do they evolve? We provide answers to these questions in the context of the compressible ellipsoid model for rotating stars. The results should serve as useful guides for numerical simulations in 3+1 dimensions for rotating stars containing viscosity.

Stuart L. Shapiro

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ca, Li and Mg Based Lightweight Intermetallics for Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Methanol and Methane Ca, Li and Mg Based Lightweight Intermetallics for Hydrogen Storage.

395

Financial Statement: IG-FS-CA-06-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of Actions to Correct Financial Control and Reporting Weaknesses; Audit Report No: OAS-FS/CA-06-04

396

Stochastic Gravitational Wave Measurements with Bar Detectors: Dependence of Response on Detector Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a cross-correlation measurement to an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background depends on the observing geometry via the overlap reduction function. If one of the detectors being correlated is a resonant bar whose orientation can be changed, the response to stochastic gravitational waves can be modulated. I derive the general form of this modulation as a function of azimuth, both in the zero-frequency limit and at arbitrary frequencies. Comparisons are made between pairs of nearby detectors, such as LIGO Livingston-ALLEGRO, Virgo-AURIGA, Virgo-NAUTILUS, and EXPLORER-AURIGA, with which stochastic cross-correlation measurements are currently being performed, planned, or considered.

John T Whelan

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

397

Broken Bar Detection in Synchronous Machines Based Wind Energy Conversion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical machines are subject to different types of failures. Early detection of the incipient faults and fast maintenance may prevent costly consequences. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine is especially important because they are situated at extremely high towers and therefore inaccessible. For offshore plants, bad weather can prevent any repair actions for several weeks. In some of the new wind turbines synchronous generators are used and directly connected to the grid without the need of power converters. Despite intensive research efforts directed at rotor fault diagnosis in induction machines, the research work pertinent to damper winding failure of synchronous machines is very limited. This dissertation is concerned with the in-depth study of damper winding failure and its traceable symptoms in different machine signals and parameters. First, a model of a synchronous machine with damper winding based on the winding function approach is presented. Next, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed. A specially designed inside-out synchronous machine with a damper winding is employed for the experimental setup. Finally, a novel analytical method is developed to predict the behavior of the left sideband amplitude for different numbers and locations of the broken bars. This analysis is based on the magnetic field theory and the unbalanced multiphase circuits. It is found that due to the asymmetrical structure of damper winding, the left sideband component in the stator current spectrum of the synchronous machine during steady state asynchronous operation is not similar to that of the induction machine with broken bars. As a result, the motor current signature analysis (MCSA) for detection rotor failures in the induction machine is usable to detect broken damper bars in synchronous machines. However, a novel intelligent-systems based approach is developed that can identify the severity of the damper winding failure. This approach potentially can be used in a non-invasive condition monitoring system to monitor the deterioration of a synchronous motor damper winding as the number of broken bars increase over time. Some other informative features such as speed spectrum, transient time, torque-speed curve and rotor slip are also found for damper winding diagnosis.

Rahimian, Mina Mashhadi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Stauffer-Temescal Co - CA 12  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Stauffer-Temescal Co - CA 12 Stauffer-Temescal Co - CA 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAUFFER-TEMESCAL CO. (CA.12) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Stauffer Metals Company Stauffer-Temescal Co. CA.12-1 CA.12-2 CA.12-3 Location: 1201 South 47th Street , Richmond , California CA.12-1 CA.12-4 Evaluation Year: 1990 CA.12-5 CA.12-6 Site Operations: Conducted tests to determine the capabilities of electron beam melting on the purification of uranium. CA.12-1 CA.12-3 CA.12-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited operations at the site CA.12-5 CA.12-6 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CA.12-1 CA.12-3 Radiological Survey(s): Health and safety monitoring CA.12-7

402

Ca 2? permeation in cyclic nucleotide-gated channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels conduct Na ?, K ? and Ca2 ? currents under the control of cGMP and cAMP. Activation of CNG channels leads to depolarization of the membrane voltage and to a concomitant increase of the cytosolic Ca2 ? concentration. Several polypeptides were identified that constitute principal and modulatory subunits of CNG channels in both neurons and non-excitable cells, co-assembling to form a variety of heteromeric proteins with distinct biophysical properties. Since the contribution of each channel type to Ca2 ? signaling depends on its specific Ca2 ? conductance, it is necessary to analyze Ca2 ? permeation for each individual channel type. We have analyzed Ca2 ? permeation in all principal subunits of vertebrates and for a principal subunit from Drosophila melanogaster. We measured the fractional Ca2 ? current over the physiological range of Ca2 ? concentrations and found that Ca2 ? permeation is determined by subunit composition and modulated by membrane voltage and extracellular pH. Ca2 ? permeation is controlled by the Ca2?-binding affinity of the intrapore cation-binding site, which varies profoundly between members of the CNG channel family, and gives rise to a surprising diversity in the ability to generate Ca2 ? signals.

Claudia Dzeja; Volker Hagen; Stephan Frings

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

www.uwo.ca/sci Discover yourself at Western  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.uwo.ca/sci Science at Western Discover yourself at Western including the Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMSc) Program www.uwo.ca/bmscc #12;The University of Western Ontario Science at Western|2010|www.uwo.ca/sci Dear Student, Your interests and skills have guided you to seek higher education in the sciences. I am

Christensen, Dan

404

Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect

Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dynamic polarization of single nuclear spins by optical pumping of NV color centers in diamond at room temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a versatile method to efficiently polarize single nuclear spins in diamond, which is based on optical pumping of a single NV color center and mediated by a level-anti crossing in its excited state. A nuclear spin polarization higher than 98% is achieved at room temperature for the 15N nuclear spin associated to the NV center, corresponding to $\\mu$K effective nuclear spin temperature. We then show simultaneous deterministic initialization of two nuclear spins (13C and 15N) in close vicinity to a NV defect. Such robust control of nuclear spin states is a key ingredient for further scaling up of nuclear-spin based quantum registers in diamond.

V. Jacques; P. Neumann; J. Beck; M. Markham; D. Twitchen; J. Meijer; F. Kaiser; G. Balasubramanian; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X. (X-Ray Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.16 to 18-CA-c.17 - Does the Developer or...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Appeal the Decision < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search Edit 18-CA-b.16 to 18-CA-17 - Does the Developer or Public Appeal the Decision If the DTSC denies the...

409

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon GRRElements18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge Waste to Land in a Diffused Manner or Affect Groundwater Quality < GRR | Elements Jump...

410

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.10 to 18-CA-a.11 - Does the Facility Discharge...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRElements18-CA-a.10 to 18-CA-a.11 - Does the Facility Discharge Waste Water or Drilling Waste to Land < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL...

411

GRR/Elements/14-CA-c.1 to 14-CA-c.2 - Is the Waste Water Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elements14-CA-c.1 to 14-CA-c.2 - Is the Waste Water Associated Only with Geothermal Operations < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

412

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.13 to 18-CA-a.16 - Is the Waste Water Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-CA-a.13 to 18-CA-a.16 - Is the Waste Water Associated Only with Geothermal Operations < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP...

413

Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology  

SciTech Connect

The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of {le} 0.8 {micro}m absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

Pigott, Jeffrey S.; Reaman, Daniel M.; Panero, Wendy R. (OSU)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modeling of microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} for diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} in a moderate-pressure quartz bell jar reactor used for diamond deposition are studied numerically. Special attention was devoted to high-power densities which provide the most effective way for producing high-quality diamond films. First, a one-dimensional radial model describing the coupled phenomena of chemistry, energy transfer, as well as species and energy transport along the reactor's radial coordinate was developed. Species densities predicted with the model were compared with measurements with infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy, resulting in validation of the model. Second, a one-dimensional axial model was used to describe the plasma flow along the reactor axis in a region between the reactor end wall and the substrate surface. This model was particularly useful for studying the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the substrate surface, where thermal and composition gradients are large. Both the radial and axial transport models are based on the same discharge model in which the plasma is described as a thermochemically nonequilibrium flow with different energy distributions for heavy species and electrons. The chemistry was described with a model containing 28 species and 131 reactions. The electron temperature, the gas temperature, and the species concentration were determined by solving a coupled set of equations. A wide range of experimental conditions used for diamond deposition was simulated, from low microwave power density (9 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 600 W, 2500 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}2200 K) to high-power density (30 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 2 kW, 12 000 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}3200 K). The main chemical paths were identified, and the major species, transport effects, and reaction pathways that govern diamond deposition plasmas are discussed.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Stancu, G.-D.; Mechold, L.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laser Components GmbH, 82140 Olching, Werner-von-Siemens-Strasse 15 (Germany); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernndez; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Lpez, O Gonzlez; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kulkarni, N; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Luc, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martnez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Fernndez, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vzquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizn, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernndez Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzlez Lpez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; N. Kulkarni; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Luc; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martnez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernndez; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vzquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizn; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

Generalized Partitioned Quantum Cellular Automata and Quantization of Classical CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, in order to investigate natural transformations from discrete CA to QCA, we introduce a new formulation of finite cyclic QCA and generalized notion of partitioned QCA. According to the formulations, we demonstrate the condition of local transition functions, which induce a global transition of well-formed QCA. Following the results, extending a natural correspondence of classical cells and quantum cells to the correspondence of classical CA and QCA, we have the condition of classical CA such that CA generated by quantumization of its cells is well-formed QCA. Finally we report some results of computer simulations of quantumization of classical CA.

Shuichi Inokuchi; Yoshihiro Mizoguchi

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Near-threshold production of a0(980) mesons in the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective Lagrangian approach as well as the Quark-Gluon Strings Model we analyze near-threshold production of a0(980)-mesons in the reaction NN -> d K \\bar{K} as well as the background of non-resonant K\\bar{K}-pair production. We argue that the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0 at an energy release Qproduction of the a0(980)-resonance. At larger energies the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K}^0-pair production - where the kaons are produced in a relative P-wave - becomes important. Then effects of final-state interactions are evaluated in a unitarized scattering-length approach and found to be in the order of a 20% suppression close to threshold. Thus in present experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-J\\"ulich for Q<=107 MeV the a_0^+ signal can reliably be separated from the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K^0} background.

V. Yu. Grishina; L. A. Kondratyuk; M. Buescher; W. Cassing

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): IX. The decoupled bars and gas inflow in NGC 2782  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) maps of the starburst/Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 2782, obtained with the IRAM interferometer. The CO emission is aligned along the stellar nuclear bar of radius 1 kpc, configured in an elongated structure with two spiral arms at high pitch angle. At the extremity of the nuclear bar, the CO changes direction to trace two more extended spiral features at a lower pitch angle. These are the beginning of two straight dust lanes, which are aligned parallel to an oval distortion, reminiscent of a primary bar, almost perpendicular to the nuclear one. The two embedded bars appear in Spitzer IRAC near-infrared images, and HST color images, although highly obscured by dust in the latter. We compute the torques exerted by the stellar bars on the gas, and find systematically negative average torques down to the resolution limit of the images, providing evidence of gas inflow tantalizingly close to the nucleus of NGC 2782. The observations are well reproduced by numerical simulations, including gas...

Hunt, L K; Garca-Burillo, S; Schinnerer, E; Krips, M; Baker, A J; Boone, F; Eckart, A; Lon, S; Neri, R; Tacconi, L J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Dark Matter Halos and Evolution of Bars in Disk Galaxies: Varying Gas Fraction and Gas Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments by evolving gaseous/stellar disks embedded in live dark matter halos aiming at quantifying the effect of gas spatial resolution and gas content on the bar evolution. Model sequences have been constructed using different resolution, and gas fraction has been varied along each sequence within fgas=0%-50%, keeping the disk and halo properties unchanged. We find that the spatial resolution becomes important with an increase in `fgas'. For the higher resolution model sequences, we observe a bimodal behavior in the bar evolution with respect to the gas fraction, especially during the secular phase of this evolution. The switch from the gas-poor to gas-rich behavior is abrupt and depends on the resolution used. The diverging evolution has been observed in nearly all basic parameters characterizing bars, such as the bar strength, central mass concentration, vertical buckling amplitude, size, etc. We find that the presence of the gas component severely limits the bar growth and affects...

Villa-Vargas, Jorge; Heller, Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

www.arts.uOttawa.ca www.programmes.uOttawa.ca 5-279  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.arts.uOttawa.ca www.programmes.uOttawa.ca 5-279 Linguistique B.A. spécialisé avec majeure en linguistique ­ 120 crédits (4 ans) Total 1re année 2e année 3e année 4e année Total 120 crédits (40 cours) 30) LIN1710 Introduction à la linguistique I : Des mots aux énoncés LIN1720 Introduction à la linguistique

Petriu, Emil M.

425

Measurement of $e^+ e^- \\to ??^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ near 10.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data samples of 89 fb$^{-1}$, 703 fb$^{-1}$, and 121 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider at center-of-mass energies 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, we study the exclusive reactions $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ (Charge-conjugate modes are included implicitly). Significant signals of $\\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+$ are observed for the first time at these energies, and the energy dependencies of the cross sections are presented. On the other hand, no significant excesses for $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0 \\bar{K}^0$ are found, and we set limits on the cross section ratios $R_{\\rm VP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+)}>$ 4.3, 20.0, and 5.4, and $R_{\\rm TP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+)}<$ 1.1, 0.4, and 0.6, for center-of-mass energies of 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, at the 90% C.L.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; A. Sibidanov; P. Wang; K. Hayasaka; X. L. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doleal; Z. Drsal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kody; S. Korpar; P. Krian; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Rhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Measurement of the top quark mass in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using events with two leptons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using t{bar t} events with two leptons (ee, e{mu} or {mu}{mu}) in the final state in 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We analyze the kinematically underconstrained dilepton events by integrating over the neutrino rapidity distributions. We reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration using a correction obtained from t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets events. We also correct jets in simulated events to replicate the quark flavor dependence of the jet response in data. In combination with our previous analysis, we measure m{sub t} = 174.0 {+-} 2.4(stat) {+-} 1.4(syst) GeV.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Mount Wilson Ca II K index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well established that both total and spectral solar irradiance are modulated by variable magnetic activity on the solar surface. However, there is still disagreement about the contribution of individual solar features for changes in the solar output, in particular over decadal time scales. Ionized Ca II K line spectroheliograms are one of the major resources for these long-term trend studies, mainly because such measurements have been available now for more than 100 years. In this paper we introduce a new Ca II K plage and active network index time series derived from the digitization of almost 40,000 photographic solar images that were obtained at the 60-foot solar tower, between 1915 and 1985, as a part of the monitoring program of the Mount Wilson Observatory. We describe here the procedure we applied to calibrate the images and the properties of our new defined index, which is strongly correlated to the average fractional area of the visible solar disk occupied by plages and active network. We show ...

Bertello, Luca; Boyden, John E; 10.1007/s11207-010-9570-z

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Shock-Compressed Diamond: Melt, Insulator-Conductor and Polymeric-Atomic Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperatures measured on the shock-Hugoniot of diamond reveal melting between 650 ({+-} 60) GPa and 9000 ({+-} 800) K and 1090 ({+-} 50) GPa and 8400 ({+-} 800) K, with a heat of fusion of {approx} 25 {+-} 10 kJ/mole and a negative Clapeyron slope {partial_derivative}T/{partial_derivative}P|{sub melt} = -5 {+-} 3 K/GPa. Thus, the fluid is denser than the compressed solid, and optical reflectivity measurements show it to be metallic. Hugoniot-temperature measurements extending to over 4000 GPa (40 Mbar) and 115,000 K suggest de-polymerization of a dense covalently-bonded fluid to an atomic state between 10,000 and 30,000 K. These experimental results indicate that carbon present deep inside planets such as Uranus and Neptune could be solid for through-going convection, whereas stable stratification would allow for the presence of fluid metallic carbon at depth; in either case, the presence of carbon could potentially affect planetary seismic normal modes.

Eggert, J; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Bradley, D K; McWilliams, R S; Jeanloz, R; Miller, J E; Boehly, T R

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

Thermal conductivity of diamond-loaded glues for the ATLAS particle physics detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. ATLAS has been collecting data from the collisions of protons since December 2009, in order to investigate the conditions that existed during the early Universe and the origins of mass, and other topics in fundamental particle physics. The innermost layers of the ATLAS detector will be exposed to the most radiation over the first few years of operation at the LHC. In particular, the layer closest to the beam pipe, the B-layer, will degrade over time due to the added radiation. To compensate for its degradation, it will be replaced with an Insertable B-Layer (IBL) around 2016. The design of and R&D for the IBL is ongoing, as the hope is to use the most current technologies in the building of this new sub-detector layer. One topic of interest is the use of more thermally conductive glues in the construction of the IBL, in order to facilitate in the dissipation of heat from the detector. In this paper the measurement and use of highly thermally conductive glues, in particular those that are diamond-loaded, will be discussed. The modified transient plane source technique for thermal conductivity is applied in characterizing the glues across a wide temperature range.

E. A. Ouellette; A. Harris

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Andrault, D. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire des Magmas and Volcans, 5 rue Kessler 63038, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effect of gigaelectron volt Au-ion irradiation on the characteristics of ultrananocrystalline diamond films  

SciTech Connect

The effect of 2.245 GeV Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes on the electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films was investigated. Au-ion irradiation with a fluence of around 8.4x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} is required to induce a large improvement in the EFE properties of the UNCD films. Postannealing the Au-ion irradiated films at 1000 deg. C for 1 h slightly degraded the EFE properties of the films but the resulting EFE behavior was still markedly superior to that of pristine UNCD films. Transmission electron microscopy examinations revealed that the EFE properties of the UNCD films are primarily improved by Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes because of the formation of nanographites along the trajectory of the irradiating ions, which results in an interconnected path for electron transport. In contrast, the induction of grain growth process due to Au-ion irradiation in UNCD films is presumed to insignificantly degrade the EFE properties for the films as the aggregates are scarcely distributed and do not block the electron conducting path.

Chen, Huang-Chin; Teng, Kuang-Yau; Tang, Chen-Yau; Lin, I-Nan [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251 (China); Sundaravel, Balakrishnan [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Amirthapandian, Sankarakumar [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

The d-bar approach to approximate inverse scattering at fixed energy in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the d-bar approach to inverse scattering at fixed energy in dimensions $d\\ge 3$ of [Beals, Coifman 1985] and [Henkin, Novikov 1987]. As a result we propose a stable method for nonlinear approximate finding a potential $v$ from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E>0$ in dimension $d=3$. In particular, in three dimensions we stably reconstruct n-times smooth potential $v$ with sufficient decay at infinity, $n>3$, from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E$ up to $O(E^{-(n-3-\\epsilon)/2})$ in the uniform norm as $E\\to +\\infty$ for any fixed arbitrary small $\\epsilon >0$ (that is with almost the same decay rate of the error for $E\\to +\\infty$ as in the linearized case near zero potential).

Roman Novikov

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.5 to 18-CA-a.9 - Is the Hazardous Waste Discovered at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.5 to 18-CA-a.9 - Is the Hazardous Waste Discovered at GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.5 to 18-CA-a.9 - Is the Hazardous Waste Discovered at Site or will Site Produce Hazardous Waste < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 18-CA-a.5 to 18-CA-a.9 - Is the Hazardous Waste Discovered at Site or will Site Produce Hazardous Waste Delete Logic Chain No Parents \V/ GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.5 to 18-CA-a.9 - Is the Hazardous Waste Discovered at Site or will Site Produce Hazardous Waste (this page) \V/ No Dependents Under Development Add.png Add an Element Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.5_to_18-CA-a.9_-_Is_the_Hazardous_Waste_Discovered_at_Site_or_will_Site_Produce_Hazardous_Waste&oldid=487194"

437

081001 CA CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Industry Partner: Shell Oil Company Committed to reducing global CO2 emissions Extensive technical expertise in: - Geologic evaluation - Well log analysis - Porosity and permeability evaluation - Geophysics - Deep well drilling - CO2 injection A welcome industry partner 3 - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. (DOE/PIER) - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (PIER) - Sandia Technologies, LLC (DOE/PIER) - Terralog (DOE) Northern California CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow

438

Microsoft Word - Cd-CA.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Cadmium Enzyme - Carbonic Anhydrase 2 from the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii Todd W. Lane 1 , Mak A. Saito 2 , Graham N. George 3 , Ingrid J. Pickering 3 , Roger C. Prince 4 and François M.M. Morel 5 1 Biosystems Research Department, Sandia National Labs, Livermore, CA 2 Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 3 Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada 4 ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ 5 Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ Cadmium is known to be extremely toxic to mammals, and is generally viewed alongside mercury an environmental problem and toxic element that is not used by nature in any way. We have reported the characterization of a previously unknown

439

CA Mr. Wayne Klassing Klassing Hardbrake Company  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

s/L / ' s/L / ' CA _ _.- Mr. Wayne Klassing Klassing Hardbrake Company P.O. Box 860 Joliet, Illinois 60434 E- 3 --- ,"".Y.- 1 , -4 v / 1 /89 ., ._ I.. Dear Mr. Klassing: The Department of Energy (DOE) has completed its review of the preliminary radiological data from the May 1989 survey of your facility in Joliet, Illinois, which is the site of the former W. E. Pratt Manufacturing Company. We are pleased to inform you that the survey has verified that the radiological condition of your facility is in compliance with applicable DOE Guidelines and that no remedial action or further investigations are necessary. We have directed our contractor, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, to send you a copy of the final report as soon as it is published. Once the final report is published, your site

440

County, CA. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

access road maintenance access road maintenance and replacement of down guy wlfes and guy anchors on structure16/5 on the existing (Army Tap) Gila-Senator Wash 69-kV T.L. in Imperial County, CA. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes to conduct maintenance on access roads leading to structure 16/5 of the Gila-Senator Wash 69kV Transmission Line. All work will be done along existing access roads. This will consist of blading and leveling out areas of the existing access road using dozers, bucket trucks, crew trucks and pickup trucks. A backhoe will be used during replacement of the anchor guy and down guys, This work is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system. The attached map shows the project area situated within Section 5 Township 15

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond bar ca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

California Fuel Cell Partnership CaFCP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership CaFCP Partnership CaFCP Jump to: navigation, search Name California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP) Place West Sacramento, California Zip 95691 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Vehicles Product A collaboration of auto manufacturers, energy companies, fuel cell technology companies, and government agencies intended to demonstrate fuel cell vehicles under real driving conditions and to assist in the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. References California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP) is a company located in West Sacramento, California . References ↑ "California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP)"

442

3-1 Computer and Network Services (CaNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS User Resources CaNS User Resources Computer and Network Services (CaNS) The primary mission of the CaNS Group is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific research and business requirements. In supporting EMSL's growing business and research needs regarding information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the CaNS Group's efforts involves providing customer support to EMSL researchers and offsite users. For

443

CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE- SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community propose to prepare a feasibility study for

444

RECIPIENT:Dehlsen Associates STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device Funding Opportunity Announcement...

445

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. E- mail: manchoso@cs.stanford.edu. Department of Management Science and...

446

AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa-ALLOYS by K. Schlter, C. Zamponi, U. Schrmann, N. Hort, L. Kienle, K.U....

447

Beta decay of Neutron-Rich 53-56Ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Ca isotopes have been obtained. Half-life values were determined for the first time for 54Ca [86(7) ms], 55Ca [22(2) ms], and 56Ca [11(2) ms]. The half-life of 230(6) ms deduced for 53Ca is significantly longer than reported previously, where the decay chain 53K -> 53Ca -> 53Sc was considered. A delayed gamma ray with energy 247 keV as identified following beta decay of 54Ca, and is proposed to depopulate the first 1+ level in 54Sc. The beta-decay properties compare favorably with the results of shell model calculations completed in the full pf-space with the GXPF1 interaction. The half-lives of the neutron-rich Ca isotopes are also compared with gross beta-decay theory. The systematic trend of the neutron-rich Ca half-lives is consistent with the presence of a subshell gap at N=32.

P. F. Mantica; R. Broda; H. L. Crawford; A. Damaske; B. Fornal; A. A. Hecht; C. Hoffman; M. Horoi; N. Hoteling; R. V. F. Janssens; J. Pereira; J. S. Pinter; J. B. Stoker; S. L. Tabor; T. Sumikama; W. B. Walters; X. Wang; S. Zhu

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Beta decay of Neutron-Rich 53-56Ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Ca isotopes have been obtained. Half-life values were determined for the first time for 54Ca [86(7) ms], 55Ca [22(2) ms], and 56Ca [11(2) ms]. The half-life of 230(6) ms deduced for 53Ca is significantly longer than reported previously, where the decay chain 53K -> 53Ca -> 53Sc was considered. A delayed gamma ray with energy 247 keV as identified following beta decay of 54Ca, and is proposed to depopulate the first 1+ level in 54Sc. The beta-decay properties compare favorably with the results of shell model calculations completed in the full pf-space with the GXPF1 interaction. The half-lives of the neutron-rich Ca isotopes are also compared with gross beta-decay theory. The systematic trend of the neutron-rich Ca half-lives is consistent with the presence of a subshell gap at N=32.

Mantica, P F; Crawford, H L; Damaske, A; Fornal, B; Hecht, A A; Hoffman, C; Horoi, M; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Pereira, J; Pinter, J S; Stoker, J B; Tabor, S L; Sumikama, T; Walters, W B; Wang, X; Zhu, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Sandia National Laboratory (CA), Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (CA), Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered...

450

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

2274 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 9, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2013 Rotor Bar Fault Monitoring Method Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes the data analysis of the air-gap torque profile in conjunction with a Bayesian classifier, and abrupt load changes, which can produce bearing faults and rotor bar breakages. Meanwhile, electrical Monitoring Method Based on Analysis of Air-Gap Torques of Induction Motors Aderiano M. da Silva, Member, IEEE

Povinelli, Richard J.

452

Suppression of magnetism and development of superconductivity within the collapsed tetragonal phase of Ca[subscript 0.67]Sr[subscript 0.33]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and electronic characterizations of (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been performed as a function of pressure up to 12 GPa using conventional and designer diamond anvil cells. The compound (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} behaves intermediately between its end members, displaying a suppression of magnetism and the onset of superconductivity. Like other members of the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family, (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes a pressure-induced isostructural volume collapse, which we associate with the development of As-As bonding across the mirror plane of the structure. This collapsed tetragonal phase abruptly cuts off the magnetic state and supports superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 22.2 K. The maximum T{sub c} of the superconducting phase is not strongly correlated with any structural parameter, but its proximity to the abrupt suppression of magnetism as well as the volume-collapse transition suggests that magnetic interactions and structural inhomogeneity may play a role in its development.

Jeffries, J.R.; Butch, N.P.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Saha, S.R.; Samudrala, G.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K.; Paglione, J. (LLNL); (UAB); (Maryland)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

453

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge Waste to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge Waste to GRR/Elements/18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge Waste to Land in a Diffused Manner or Affect Groundwater Quality < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 18-CA-c.1 to 18-CA-c.3 - Does the Project Discharge Waste to Land in a Diffused Manner or Affect Groundwater Quality If waste is discharged to land in a diffused manner, such as that it causes soil erosion or the discharge affects groundwater, the developer must file a Report of Waste Discharge application (Form 200) and the necessary supplemental information with the appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) at least 120 days before beginning to discharge waste. Logic Chain No Parents

454

Low-energy electron scattering from Ca atoms and photodetachment of Ca{sup -}  

SciTech Connect

The B-spline R-matrix method is used to investigate electron scattering from neutral calcium and photodetachment of Ca{sup -} in the low-energy range from threshold to 4 eV. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal orbital sets is employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion includes 39 bound states of neutral calcium, covering all states from the ground state to 4s8s {sup 1}S. The present calculations yield good agreement with the few available experimental data for both elastic electron scattering and photodetachment of Ca{sup -}. The prominent resonance structure in the low-energy region is analyzed and discussed.

Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Gedeon, Sergey; Gedeon, Viktor; Lazur, Vladimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Department of Theoretical Physics, Uzhgorod State University, Uzhgorod 88000 (Ukraine)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

Nix, W.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed