National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for diamond anvil cell

  1. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preparation of...

  2. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, W.C.

    1988-10-11

    A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

  3. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westerfield, Curtis L. (Espanola, NM); Morris, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Agnew, Stephen F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  4. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  5. Laser generation and detection of longitudinal and shear acoustic waves in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chigarev, Nikolay; Zinin, Pavel; Ming Lichung; Amulele, George; Bulou, Alain; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2008-11-03

    Laser ultrasonics in a point-source-point-receiver configuration is applied for the evaluation of elastic properties of nontransparent materials in a diamond anvil cell at high pressures. Measurement of both longitudinal and shear acoustic wave velocities in an iron foil at pressures up to 23 GPa does not require any information in addition to the one obtained by all-optical pump-probe technique.

  6. Efficient graphite ring heater suitable for diamond-anvil cells to 1300 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Zhixue; Amulele, George; Lee, Kanani K. M.; Miyagi, Lowell

    2013-02-15

    In order to generate homogeneous high temperatures at high pressures, a ring-shaped graphite heater has been developed to resistively heat diamond-anvil cell (DAC) samples up to 1300 K. By putting the heater in direct contact with the diamond anvils, this graphite heater design features the following advantages: (1) efficient heating: sample can be heated to 1300 K while the DAC body temperature remains less than 800 K, eliminating the requirement of a special alloy for the DAC; (2) compact design: the sample can be analyzed with in situ measurements, e.g., x-ray, optical, and electrical probes are possible. In particular, the side access of the heater allows for radial x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in addition to traditional axial XRD.

  7. Diamond-anvil high-pressure cell with improved x-ray collimation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiferl, D.; Olinger, B.W.; Livingston, R.W.

    1984-03-30

    An adjustable x-ray collimation system for a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell of the type including a cooperable piston and cylinder and a pair of opposing diamonds located between the head of the piston and the head of the cylinder. The x-ray collimation system includes a tubular insert which contains an x-ray collimator. The insert is engageable in the bore of the piston. The collimator is mounted within the insert by means of an elastomeric o-ring at the end closest the opposed diamonds, and by means of a set of adjustable set screws at the opposite end. By adjustment of the set screws the collimator can be pivoted about the o-ring and brought into alignment with the opposed diamonds and the sample contained therein. In the preferred embodiment there is further provided a set of plugs which are insertable in the bore of the collimator. The plugs have bores of different diameters. By successively inserting plugs of progressively smaller bore diameters and adjusting the alignment of the collimator with each plug, the collimator can be quickly brought into accurate alignment with the diamonds. The collimation system allows alignment of the collimator either before or after the cell has been loaded and pressurized.

  8. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

  9. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, W.C.

    1987-02-06

    Use of double or multiple bevel culet geometry on a diamond anvil to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. 7 figs.

  10. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Dalton, D. Allen; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-11-15

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {mu}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {mu}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  11. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ tunability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palmer, Alexander; Silevitch, Daniel; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, Arnab; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2015-09-04

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with that of the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we then characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide rangemore »of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as that from insulator to metal.« less

  12. High-pressure cells for in situ multi-anvil experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinenweber, K.; Mosenfelder, J.; Diedrich, T.; Soignard, E.; Sharp, T.G.; Tyburczy, J.A.; Wang, Y.

    2008-10-14

    A new series of high-pressure cells for in situ multi-anvil experiments is described. The cells are based on the conventional COMPRES cells, but modifications are made to improve the passage of X-rays. The modifications include cutting slits in parts of the assemblies that have very high X-ray absorption, such as lanthanum chromite and rhenium, the use of low-Z thermal insulation, such as forsterite, in place of zirconia, and the partial replacement of zirconia by MgO equatorial windows combined with a mullite octahedron. Details of the designs, thermal characterizations, and examples of the application of these cells are described.

  13. High efficiency diamond solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2008-05-06

    A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

  14. X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    -Heating (upto ~900K) Protected by H2(4%)/Ar Monochromator Sagittally bent Si Laue crystals Beam energy tunable Sagittally bent Si Laue crystals PDF Scattering ADXD Setup of Mar345 Image Plate Whit b E 20 k V t 100 k V

  15. A versatile medium-resolution x-ray emission spectrometer for diamond anvil cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Lipp, M. J.; Evans, W. J.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.-M.; Boman, G.; Bowden, M. E.

    2013-08-15

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to backscattering geometry so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically bent crystal analyzer.

  16. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers'(x≤2) surface:SciTech Connect

  17. Producing diamond anvil cell gaskets for ultrahigh-pressure applications using an inex ensive electric discharge machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruger, Michael - Department of Physics, University of Missouri

    electric discharge machine H. E. Lorenzana, M. Bennahmias, and H. Radousky Lawrence Livermore National in these gaskets made of exceedingly hard metals. We describe the construction of an inexpensive electric discharge machine that can drill metals with holes as small as 25 pm in diameter. This method of drilling is easy

  18. Synthesis of new Diamond-like B-C Phases under High Pressure and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming, L. C.; Zinin, P. V.; Sharma, S. K.

    2014-04-22

    A cubic BC3 (c-BC3) phase was synthesized by direct transformation from graphitic phases at a pressure of 39 GPa and temperature of 2200 K in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). A combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction (ED), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements lead us to conclude that the obtained phase is hetero-nano-diamond, c-BC3. The EELS measurements show that the atoms inside the cubic structure are bonded by sp3 bonds.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  20. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  1. Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High Pressure High Temperature Experiments in Support of Stockpile Stewardship Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Yogesh, K.

    2009-10-28

    The role of nitrogen in the fabrication of designer diamond was systematically investigated by adding controlled amount of nitrogen in hydrogen/methane/oxygen plasma. This has led to a successful recipe for reproducible fabrication of designer diamond anvils for high-pressure high-temperature research in support of stockpile stewardship program. In the three-year support period, several designer diamonds fabricated with this new growth chemistry were utilized in high-pressure experiments at UAB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The designer diamond anvils were utilized in high-pressure studies on heavy rare earth metals, high pressure melting studies on metals, and electrical resistance measurements on iron-based layered superconductors under high pressures. The growth chemistry developed under NNSA support can be adapted for commercial production of designer diamonds.

  2. A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2011-02-22

    of anvil formation, and to provide a more realistic assessment of the radiative impact of tropical anvil on the large-scale circulation. Based on 10 years (1998-2007) of observations, anvil observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM...

  3. Anvil effect in spherical indentation testing on sheet metal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhaigude, Mayuresh Mukund

    2009-06-02

    A spherical indentation test is considered to be invalid if there is presence of a visible mark on the side of the sheet metal facing the anvil and exactly below the indentation. With the available standard loads of the conventional testers...

  4. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5,000 K. We present performance comparisons of this system with that of a state-of-the-art conventional CW system using a 458 nm excitation source. We also demonstrate that the...

  5. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  6. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  7. Electronic Structure of Diamond Surfaces Functionalized by Ru(tpy)2 Ioannis Zegkinoglou,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    in photocatalysis and photovoltaics, is compared to a hydrogen- terminated diamond surface as a reference. Bulk. The implications of using diamond films as inert electron donors in photocatalysis and dye-sensitized solar cells

  8. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  9. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  10. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Delbert D. (Los Alamos, NM); Evans, Christopher J. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  11. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  12. Electrically conductive polycrystalline diamond and particulate metal based electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg M.; Wang, Jian

    2005-04-26

    An electrically conducting and dimensionally stable diamond (12, 14) and metal particle (13) electrode produced by electrodepositing the metal on the diamond is described. The electrode is particularly useful in harsh chemical environments and at high current densities and potentials. The electrode is particularly useful for generating hydrogen, and for reducing oxygen and oxidizing methanol in reactions which are of importance in fuel cells.

  13. Amorphous diamond films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions.

  14. Quantum Engineering in Diamond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jeson

    2015-08-06

    of the NV centers yield in bulk diamond, nanodiamond (ND) size reduction, photocurrent study of the defect band-trap electronic structure in diamonds, and optimization of high-speed NV qubit control. For NV centers yield optimization, both the experimental...

  15. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  16. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD) Seal Faces | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diamond (UNCD) Seal Faces Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD) Seal Faces New Diamond Coatings Reduce Friction and Improve Performance of Mechanical Seals Mechanical seals are used...

  17. Amorphous diamond films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  18. Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

    2007-04-25

    the month-long field campaign. The morphology, evolution, and longevity of the anvil were analyzed as well as the relationship of the anvil to the rest of the precipitating system. In addition, idealized in-cloud radiative heating profiles were created based...

  19. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  20. THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND ANVIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS in the Simulation of Mesoscale Convective Systems and Anvil Clouds in the Tropical Western Pacific K. Van Weverberg1 cloud microphysics in the simulation of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropical western

  1. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Gutierrez, Humberto (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA); Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. (State College, PA); Jain, Puja (King Of Prussia, PA)

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  2. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  3. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1997-04-08

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide. 5 figs.

  4. Diamond and Polycrystalline Diamond for MEMS Applications: Simulations and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    Diamond and Polycrystalline Diamond for MEMS Applications: Simulations and Experiments Tahir C¸ a Communication Systems, El Segundo, CA 90025, U.S.A. Abstract To date most of the MEMS devices are been based both to surface chemistry and cohesive energy density of these likely MEMS bearing materials. Therefore

  5. A subpicotesla diamond magnetometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wolf; Philipp Neumann; Kazuo Nakamura; Hitoshi Sumiya; Junichi Isoya; Jörg Wrachtrup

    2014-12-19

    Diamond defect centers are promising solid state magnetometers. Single centers allow for high spatial resolution field imaging but are limited in their magnetic field sensitivity to around 10 nT/Hz^(1/2) at room-temperature. Using defect center ensembles sensitivity can be scaled as N^(1/2) when N is the number of defects. In the present work we use an ensemble of 1e11 defect centers for sensing. By carefully eliminating all noise sources like laser intensity fluctuations, microwave amplitude and phase noise we achieve a photon shot noise limited field sensitivity of 0.9 pT/Hz^(1/2) at room-temperature with an effective sensor volume of 8.5e-4 mm^3. The smallest field we measured with our device is 100 fT. While this denotes the best diamond magnetometer sensitivity so far, further improvements using decoupling sequences and material optimization could lead to fT/Hz^(1/2) sensitivity.

  6. Validation Study of Unnotched Charpy and Taylor-Anvil Impact Experiments using Kayenta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamojjala, Krishna; Lacy, Jeffrey; Chu, Henry S.; Brannon, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Validation of a single computational model with multiple available strain-to-failure fracture theories is presented through experimental tests and numerical simulations of the standardized unnotched Charpy and Taylor-anvil impact tests, both run using the same material model (Kayenta). Unnotched Charpy tests are performed on rolled homogeneous armor steel. The fracture patterns using Kayenta’s various failure options that include aleatory uncertainty and scale effects are compared against the experiments. Other quantities of interest include the average value of the absorbed energy and bend angle of the specimen. Taylor-anvil impact tests are performed on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. The impact speeds of the specimen are 321 m/s and 393 m/s. The goal of the numerical work is to reproduce the damage patterns observed in the laboratory. For the numerical study, the Johnson-Cook failure model is used as the ductile fracture criterion, and aleatory uncertainty is applied to rate-dependence parameters to explore its effect on the fracture patterns.

  7. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  8. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  10. Gas-loading apparatus for large-volume high-pressure cell 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bocian, Artur

    2012-06-25

    The Paris-Edinburgh cell (PEC) is a widely used opposed-anvil device for neutron scattering. Since its development, it has been used to study a number of samples loaded as solids or liquids. However, studying gases at ...

  11. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  12. The 74-year water level record for Anvil Lake, a northern Wis-consin seepage lake, demonstrates pronounced, recurring highs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    The 74-year water level record for Anvil Lake, a northern Wis- consin seepage lake, demonstrates impacts on Wisconsin's water resources Carolyn Rumery Betz1 , Tim Asplund2 , and jim Hurley1 1 University Impacts, a copy of the full Water Resources Working Group report, and a PDF of this poster, go to wicci

  13. Method of Forming Diamonds from Carbonaceous Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, Tyrone; Lewis, Roy; Rehn, Lynn; Kirk, Marquis

    1999-11-30

    A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

  14. Method for forming diamonds from carbonaceous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daulton, Tyrone (Slidell, LA); Lewis, Roy (Evanston, IL); Rehn, Lynn (LaGrange, IL); Kirk, Marquis (Hinsdale, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

  15. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  16. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  17. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casstevens, John M. (Greenville, TX)

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  18. A Five-dimensional Visualization of the Pressure-induced Phase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by changing the external pressure which can be well controlled using high-pressure vessels such as diamond anvil cells. Numerous studies on BiNiO3 have been carried out using...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    treatment for more than 20more years. less October 2007 Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high...

  20. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Abramson

    2009-06-26

    Viscosities of water, nitrogen and carbon dioxide have been measured at elevated pressures and temperatures in the diamond-anvil cell. A strong correlation between viscosity and entropy has been confirmed.

  1. Deformation T-Cup: A new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Simon A. McCormack, Richard J.; Bailey, Edward; Dobson, David P.; Weidner, Donald J.; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T.

    2014-08-15

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1–2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C.

  2. EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA April 1, 2011 EA-1795: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Diamond...

  3. Diamonds are a Sun's Best Friend: Examining the Photoconductive Properties of Diamond to Improve TEC Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamonds are a Sun's Best Friend: Examining the Photoconductive Properties of Diamond to Improve source in TEC devices by using the sun makes the device more efficient. This research has shown that diamond films are enhanced by photoconductivity. If the sun was used to drive a TEC device that uses

  4. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  5. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  6. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  7. Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    novel diamond nanocomposites are anticipated to yield significant energy, carbon and cost savings from improved productivity (i.e., reduced total drilling time). Applications...

  8. Electromagnetic Radiation Hardness of Diamond Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Behnke; M. Doucet; N. Ghodbane; A. Imhof; C. Martinez; W. Zeuner

    2001-08-22

    The behavior of artificially grown CVD diamond films under intense electromagnetic radiation has been studied. The properties of irradiated diamond samples have been investigated using the method of thermally stimulated current and by studying their charge collection properties. Diamonds have been found to remain unaffected after doses of 6.8 MGy of 10 keV photons and 10 MGy of MeV-range photons. This observation makes diamond an attractive detector material for a calorimeter in the very forward region of the proposed TESLA detector.

  9. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lon?ar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310?nm and 632?nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300?pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  10. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  11. Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    Energy Harvesting Diamond Channel with Energy Cooperation Berk Gurakan Sennur Ulukus Department@umd.edu Abstract--We consider the energy harvesting diamond channel, where the source and two relays harvest energy the option of wirelessly transferring some of its energy to the relays via energy cooperation. We find

  12. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2012-09-04

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  13. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  14. Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pern, Fu-Jann (Golden, CO); Touryan, Kenell J. (Indian Hills, CO); Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos (Yerevan, AM); Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich (Moscow, RU)

    2008-12-02

    Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

  15. First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2013-12-14

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0??{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33?meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

  16. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

  17. Multifrequency spin resonance in diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, Lilian; McIntyre, Jean

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance techniques provide a powerful tool for controlling spin systems, with applications ranging from quantum information processing to medical imaging. Nevertheless, the behavior of a spin system under strong excitation remains a rich dynamical problem. In this paper, we examine spin resonance of the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond under conditions outside the regime where the usual rotating-wave approximation applies, focusing on effects of multifrequency excitation and excitation with orientation parallel to the spin quantization axis. Strong-field phenomena such as multiphoton transitions and coherent destruction of tunneling are observed in the spectra and analyzed via numerical and analytic theory. In addition to illustrating the response of a spin system to strong multifrequency excitation, these observations may inform techniques for manipulating electron-nuclear spin quantum registers.

  18. Effective placement of detectors at diamond interchanges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhakar, Dayakar

    1994-01-01

    Most signalized interchanges in Texas are tight urban diamond interchanges of freeways having one-way frontage roads. At these interchanges, traffic actuated control with improper location of detectors may result in inefficient traffic operations...

  19. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  20. In Situ Tribo-Electrochemical Characterization of Diamond-Containing Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Huaping

    2014-07-31

    and the diamond surface. In the present research, the wear mechanism of diamond-reinforced composite has been demonstrated. The amorphization-wear process of diamond can be real-timely monitored using electrochemical approach. The frication force between diamond...

  1. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, X.

    1997-04-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 10 figs.

  2. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  3. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

    1997-06-03

    A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

  4. n-Type diamond and method for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

  5. Sparkling Diamonds – Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, J.

    2007-01-01

    De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under...

  6. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Erik M.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    As a successful completion of this award, my group has demonstrated world-leading electron gain from diamond for use in a diamond-amplified photocathode. Also, using high-resolution photoemission measurements we were able to uncover exciting new physics of the electron emission mechanisms from hydrogen terminated diamond. Our work, through the continued support of HEP, has resulted in a greater understanding of the diamond material science, including current limits, charge transport modeling, and spatial uniformity.

  7. ORC Seminar Series Presents: "Diamond adds brilliance: Power scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    ORC Seminar Series Presents: "Diamond adds brilliance: Power scaling diamond Raman lasers: Building 46, Rm 4050 (ORC Boardroom) Abstract: In this presentation I will review my work to date on power formatting for high-brightness laser diode arrays and most recently power scaling diamond Raman lasers. http://www.orc

  8. Vacancy induced structural changes in diamond.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, A.; Sternberg, M.; Univ. of Melbourne

    2008-01-01

    Although optically active defects in nanodiamond are being considered as candidates for optical labeling in biomedical applications, development in this area is being hindered the fact that suitable defects are rarely seen in diamond nanoparticles in the size regime required. These defects usually form as a complex with an impurity and a neutral of charged vacancy, so a measurable concentration of vacancy point defects is also necessary. Presented here are results of density functional tight binding computer simulations investigating the stability of vacancies in diamond nanoparticles with different surface structures. The results indicate that both neutral and charged vacancies alter the structure of as-grown diamond nanoparticles and are likely to diffuse out of the particle during synthesis or irradiation. We also find that suitable passivation of the particle may alleviate this problem, and hence facilitate the formation of defect complexes.

  9. Hydrogen-doped cubic diamond and the crystal structure of n-diamond Bin Wen a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Hydrogen-doped cubic diamond and the crystal structure of n-diamond Bin Wen a,b, , Roderick Melnik. In particular, hydrogen concen- tration dependent elastic constants and lattice parameters for the H-doped diamond have been analyzed. Our results indicate that when the hydrogen concentration is less than 19 at

  10. Wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology

    2002-01-01

    Detailed tribological studies on diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have confirmed that these films are inherently self-lubricating and resistant to abrasive, adhesive and corrosive wear. Because of their high chemical inertness, they are also resistant to corrosion and oxidation (even at elevated temperatures). The combination of such exceptional qualities in these films makes them ideal for a wide range of demanding tribological applications (such as microelectromechanical systems, cutting tools, mechanical seals, magnetic hard disks, etc.). These films, available for more than three decades, have been used extensively for tooling and magnetic hard disk applications. Their potential in other application areas is currently being explored around the world. With the development of new and more robust deposition methods in recent years, it is envisioned that the production of high quality diamond and DLC films will become very cost effective and highly reliable for large-scale applications in the transportation and manufacturing sectors. In this paper, sliding wear mechanisms of diamond and DLC films will be presented. Specifically, it will be shown that, in general the wear of these films is extremely low (mainly because of their exceptional hardness and low friction characteristics). Specific test conditions established during each sliding test, however, may dramatically affect the wear performance of certain diamond and DLC films. One of the dominant wear mechanismsrelates to a phase transformation that is primarily the result of very high mechanical and thermal loadings of sliding contact interfaces. The transformation products (such as disordered graphite) trapped at the sliding interface may transfer to themating surface and significantly affect friction and wear. This paper describes, in terms of structural and fundamental tribological knowledge, the ideal film microstructures and chemistry, as well as operational conditions under which diamond and DLC films perform the best and provide superlow friction and wear properties in sliding tribological applications.

  11. STATUS OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMISSION ENHANCED PHOTOCATHODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; SMEDLEY, J.; TODD, R.; WARREN, J.; WU, Q.

    2007-05-25

    The diamond secondary emission enhanced photocathode (SEEP) provides an attractive alternative for simple photo cathodes in high average current electron injectors. It reduces the laser power required to drive the cathode, simultaneously isolating the cathode and the FW cavity from each other, thereby protecting them from contamination and increasing their life time. In this paper, we present the latest results on the secondary electron yield using pulsed thermionic and photo cathodes as primary electron sources, shaping the diamond using laser ablation and reactive ion etching as well as the theoretical underpinning of secondary electron generation and preliminary results of modeling.

  12. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downer Grove, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

  13. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1999-05-11

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties is disclosed. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display. 3 figs.

  14. On-Chip Diamond Raman Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latawiec, Pawel; Burek, Michael J; Hausmann, Birgit J M; Bulu, Irfan; Loncar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic single-crystal diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for Raman lasers at exotic wavelengths due to its giant Raman shift, large transparency window and excellent thermal properties yielding a greatly enhanced figure-of-merit compared to conventional materials. To date, diamond Raman lasers have been realized using bulk plates placed inside macroscopic cavities, requiring careful alignment and resulting in high threshold powers (~W-kW). Here we demonstrate an on-chip Raman laser based on fully-integrated, high quality-factor, diamond racetrack micro-resonators embedded in silica. Pumping at telecom wavelengths, we show Stokes output discretely tunable over a ~100nm bandwidth around 2-{\\mu}m with output powers >250 {\\mu}W, extending the functionality of diamond Raman lasers to an interesting wavelength range at the edge of the mid-infrared spectrum. Continuous-wave operation with only ~85 mW pump threshold power in the feeding waveguide is demonstrated along with continuous, mode-hop-fr...

  15. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

  16. Method to fabricate micro and nano diamond devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M; Anderson, Richard J; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Skinner, Jack L; Rye, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    A method including forming a diamond material on the surface of a substrate; forming a first contact and a separate second contact; and patterning the diamond material to form a nanowire between the first contact and the second contact. An apparatus including a first contact and a separate second contact on a substrate; and a nanowire including a single crystalline or polycrystalline diamond material on the substrate and connected to each of the first contact and the second contact.

  17. Methane storage capabilities of diamond analogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haranczyk, M; Lin, LC; Lee, K; Martin, RL; Neaton, JB; Smit, B

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be an alternative fuel for vehicular usage provided that new porous materials are developed for its efficient adsorption-based storage. Herein, we search for materials for this application within the family of diamond analogues. We used density functional theory to investigate structures in which tetrahedral C atoms of diamond are separated by-CC-or-BN-groups, as well as ones involving substitution of tetrahedral C atoms with Si and Ge atoms. The adsorptive and diffusive properties of methane are studied using classical molecular simulations. Our results suggest that the all-carbon structure has the highest volumetric methane uptake of 280 VSTP/V at p = 35 bar and T = 298 K. However, it suffers from limited methane diffusion. Alternatively, the considered Si and Ge-containing analogies have fast diffusive properties but their adsorption is lower, ca. 172-179 VSTP/V, at the same conditions.

  18. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  19. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  20. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemley, Russell J. (Washington, DC); Mao, Ho-kwang (Washington, DC); Yan, Chih-shiue (Washington, DC)

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  1. Robust Diamond-Based RF Switch Yields Enhanced Communication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diamond (UNCD) as a dielectric. A specialized radio frequency (RF) micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) switch that promises enhanced capabilities for next-generation...

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    nanocrystalline diamond aerogel Peter J. Pauzauskie a,1,2 ,Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Aerogel materials have myriadcreating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an

  3. Substitutional Boron in Nanodiamond, Bucky-Diamond, and Nanocrystalline Diamond Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2006-10-05

    Although boron has been known for many years to be a successful dopant in bulk diamond, efficient doping of nanocrystalline diamond with boron is still being developed. In general, the location, configuration, and bonding structure of boron in nanodiamond is still unknown, including the fundamental question of whether it is located within grains or grain boundaries of thin films and whether it is within the core or at the surface of nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional boron in various types of nanocrystalline diamond. The results predict that boron is likely to be positioned at the surface of isolated particles and at the grain boundary of thin-film samples.

  4. Proposal of room-temperature diamond maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang Jin; Matthias Pfänder; Nabeel Aslam; Sen Yang; Jörg Wrachtrup; Ren-Bao Liu

    2015-09-25

    Lasers have revolutionized optical science and technology, but their microwave counterpart, maser, has not realized its great potential due to its demanding work conditions (high-vacuum for gas maser and liquid-helium temperature for solid-state maser). Room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but under such conditions the lifetimes of emitters (usually electron spins) are usually too short (~ns) for population inversion. The only room-temperature solid-state maser is based on a pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal, which has long spin lifetime (~0.1 ms). This maser, however, operates only in the pulse mode and the material is unstable. Here we propose room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond, which feature long spin lifetimes at room temperature (~10 ms), high optical pump efficiency, and material stability. We demonstrate that under readily accessible conditions, room-temperature diamond maser is feasible. Room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  5. A Diamond Nanowire Single Photon Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Babinec; Birgit J. M. Hausmann; Mughees Khan; Yinan Zhang; Jero Maze; Philip R. Hemmer; Marko Loncar

    2009-10-28

    The development of a robust light source that emits one photon at a time is an outstanding challenge in quantum science and technology. Here, at the transition from many to single photon optical communication systems, fully quantum mechanical effects may be utilized to achieve new capabilities, most notably perfectly secure communication via quantum cryptography. Practical implementations place stringent requirements on the device properties, including stable photon generation, room temperature operation, and efficient extraction of many photons. Single photon light emitting devices based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots, and carbon nanotube material systems have all been explored, but none have simultaneously demonstrated all criteria. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a bright source of single photons consisting of an individual Nitrogen-vacancy color center (NV center) in a diamond nanowire operating in ambient conditions. The nanowire plays a positive role in increasing the number of single photons collected from the NV center by an order of magnitude over devices based on bulk diamond crystals, and allows operation at an order of magnitude lower power levels. This result enables a new class of nanostructured diamond devices for room temperature photonic and quantum information processing applications, and will also impact fields as diverse as biological and chemical sensing, opto-mechanics, and scanning-probe microscopy.

  6. Patterning of nanocrystalline diamond films for diamond microstructures useful in MEMS and other devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Busmann, Hans-Gerd (Bremen, DE); Meyer, Eva-Maria (Bremen, DE); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (late of Naperville, IL); Krauss, Julie R. (Naperville, IL)

    2004-11-02

    MEMS structure and a method of fabricating them from ultrananocrystalline diamond films having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm and feature resolution of less than about one micron . The MEMS structures are made by contacting carbon dimer species with an oxide substrate forming a carbide layer on the surface onto which ultrananocrystalline diamond having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm is deposited. Thereafter, microfabrication process are used to form a structure of predetermined shape having a feature resolution of less than about one micron.

  7. Diamond/diamond-like thin film growth in a butane plasma on unetched, unheated, N-type Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, E.S.; Richardson, J.S. Jr.; Anderson, D.; Starkey, K.

    1995-06-01

    Deposition of diamond/diamond-like thin films on unetched, unheated, n-type Si(100) substrates in a butane plasma is reported. An interconnection between values of index of refraction, hydrogen flow rate, butane flow rate and Rf power was determined. The H{sub 2} and C{sub 4}H{sub 10} molecules are disassociated by Rf energy to create a plasma. Carbon from the butane forms a thin diamond/diamond-like film on a suitable substrate, which in the current investigation, is n-type Si(100).

  8. EIS-0070: Mining, Construction and Operation for a Full-size Module at the Anvil Points Oil Shale Facility, Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposal to mine 11 million tons of oil shale from the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) at Anvil Points, Colorado; to construct an experimental full-size shale retort module on a 365-acre lease tract having a 4700 bbl/day production capacity; and to consider extension, modification or new leasing of the facility. This project was cancelled after the DEIS was issued.

  9. CVD diamond: a new technology for the Paul W. May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    , and as an insert and/or wear- resistant coating for cutting tools. Ob- viously, given its many unique properties polycrystalhne diamond films, or coatings, by a wide variety of chemical vapour Paul W. May, B.Sc., Ph.D. After and heat sinks, while the possibility of coating large surface areas with a continuous film of diamond

  10. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  11. Diamond and Related Materials 9 (2000) 12221227 www.elsevier.com/locate/diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    2000-01-01

    have been deposited on Si substrates using CH 4 -based RF plasmas with addition of 0­21% PH 3; Diamond-like carbon; Field emission; Phosphorus doping 1. Introduction produced by a filtered cathodic arc and compatibility coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma deposition has been used to produce P-doped DLC films [9

  12. Method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parsells, Robert; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Perry, Erik; Rule, Keith

    2005-04-19

    A method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures, such as nuclear reactor vessels, is provided. A diamond wire saw having a plurality of diamond beads with beveled or chamfered edges is provided for sawing into the walls of the metal structure. The diamond wire is guided by a plurality of support structures allowing for a multitude of different cuts. The diamond wire is cleaned and cooled by CO.sub.2 during the cutting process to prevent breakage of the wire and provide efficient cutting. Concrete can be provided within the metal structure to enhance cutting efficiency and reduce airborne contaminants. The invention can be remotely controlled to reduce exposure of workers to radioactivity and other hazards.

  13. Observing bulk diamond spin coherence in high-purity nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helena S. Knowles; Dhiren M. Kara; Mete Atature

    2013-10-03

    Nitrogen-vacancy centres (NVs) in diamond are attractive for research straddling quantum information science and nanoscale magnetometry and thermometry. While ultrapure bulk diamond NVs sustain the longest spin coherence times among optically accessible spins, nanodiamond NVs display persistently poor spin coherence. Here we introduce high-purity nanodiamonds accommodating record-long NV coherence times, >60 us, observed via universal dynamical decoupling. We show that the main contribution to decoherence comes from nearby nitrogen impurities rather than surface states. We protect the NV spin free precession, essential to DC magnetometry, by driving solely these impurities into the motional narrowing regime. This extends the NV free induction decay time from 440 ns, longer than that in type Ib bulk diamond, to 1.27 us, which is comparable to that in type IIa (impurity-free) diamond. These properties allow the simultaneous exploitation of both high sensitivity and nanometre resolution in diamond-based emergent quantum technologies.

  14. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 31 (1996) 2801 2805 Laser ablation of diamond fibres and a diamond fibre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    1996-01-01

    ] and are also being considered for cutting tools [4]. A recent development has been the manufacture of diamond damage using conventional tools. The cutting and machining operations have therefore become a critical Research Agency Farnborough, GU14 6TD, UK Continuous chemical vapour-deposited diamond-coated fibres

  15. Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1993-05-24

    With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

  16. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  17. Diamond, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump to:SouthBar, California:WalnutDiamond,

  18. Bruce Diamond | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C | NationalBenefitsDiamond | National

  19. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  20. DIAMONDS: A new Bayesian nested sampling tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsaro, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In the context of high-quality asteroseismic data provided by the NASA Kepler mission, we developed a new code, termed Diamonds (high-DImensional And multi-MOdal NesteD Sampling), for fast Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the Nested Sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional problems (like the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations) and multi-modal problems (i.e. problems that show multiple solutions). We applied the code to the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations observed in a challenging F-type star. By means of Diamonds one is able to detect the different backgrounds in the power spectrum of the star (e.g. stellar granulation and faculae activity) and to understand whether one or two oscillation peaks can be identified or not. In addition, we demonstrate a novel approach to peak bagging based on multimodality, which is able to reduce significantly the number of free parameters involved in th...

  1. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  2. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  3. Printable, flexible and stretchable diamond for thermal management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Dae Hyeong; Meitl, Matthew; Menard, Etienne; Carlisle, John

    2013-06-25

    Various heat-sinked components and methods of making heat-sinked components are disclosed where diamond in thermal contact with one or more heat-generating components are capable of dissipating heat, thereby providing thermally-regulated components. Thermally conductive diamond is provided in patterns capable of providing efficient and maximum heat transfer away from components that may be susceptible to damage by elevated temperatures. The devices and methods are used to cool flexible electronics, integrated circuits and other complex electronics that tend to generate significant heat. Also provided are methods of making printable diamond patterns that can be used in a range of devices and device components.

  4. Modeling electron emission and surface effects from diamond cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-02-05

    We developed modeling capabilities, within the Vorpal particle-in-cell code, for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of surface effects and electron emission from semiconductor photocathodes. They include calculation of emission probabilities using general, piece-wise continuous, space-time dependent surface potentials, effective mass and band bending field effects. We applied these models, in combination with previously implemented capabilities for modeling charge generation and transport in diamond, to investigate the emission dependence on applied electric field in the range from approximately 2 MV/m to 17 MV/m along the [100] direction. The simulation results were compared to experimental data. For the considered parameter regime, conservation of transversemore »electron momentum (in the plane of the emission surface) allows direct emission from only two (parallel to [100]) of the six equivalent lowest conduction band valleys. When the electron affinity ? is the only parameter varied in the simulations, the value ? = 0.31 eV leads to overall qualitative agreement with the probability of emission deduced from experiments. Including band bending in the simulations improves the agreement with the experimental data, particularly at low applied fields, but not significantly. In this study, using surface potentials with different profiles further allows us to investigate the emission as a function of potential barrier height, width, and vacuum level position. However, adding surface patches with different levels of hydrogenation, modeled with position-dependent electron affinity, leads to the closest agreement with the experimental data.« less

  5. Modeling electron emission and surface effects from diamond cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dimitrov, D. A. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smithe, D. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Cary, J. R. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smedley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-02-07

    We developed modeling capabilities, within the Vorpal particle-in-cell code, for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of surface effects and electron emission from semiconductor photocathodes. They include calculation of emission probabilities using general, piece-wise continuous, space-time dependent surface potentials, effective mass and band bending field effects. We applied these models, in combination with previously implemented capabilities for modeling charge generation and transport in diamond, to investigate the emission dependence on applied electric field in the range from approximately 2 MV/m to 17 MV/m along the [100] direction. The simulation results were compared to experimental data. For the considered parameter regime, conservation of transverse electron momentum (in the plane of the emission surface) allows direct emission from only two (parallel to [100]) of the six equivalent lowest conduction band valleys. When the electron affinity ? is the only parameter varied in the simulations, the value ? = 0.31 eV leads to overall qualitative agreement with the probability of emission deduced from experiments. Including band bending in the simulations improves the agreement with the experimental data, particularly at low applied fields, but not significantly. Using surface potentials with different profiles further allows us to investigate the emission as a function of potential barrier height, width, and vacuum level position. However, adding surface patches with different levels of hydrogenation, modeled with position-dependent electron affinity, leads to the closest agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Substitutional Nitrogen in Nanodiamond and Bucky-Diamond Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2005-09-15

    The inclusion of dopants (such as nitrogen) in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Although most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain a small fraction of nitrogen, it is still unclear whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticle. Presented here are density functional tight binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional nitrogen in nanodiamond and bucky-diamond particles. The results predict that nitrogen is likely to be positioned at the surface of both hydrogenated nanodiamond and (dehydrogenated) bucky-diamond, and that the coordination of the dopants within the particles is dependent upon the surface structure.

  7. Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

    1996-01-01

    A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

  8. Pathogenesis of the Erythroid Failure in Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sieff, Colin A.

    Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a severe congenital failure of erythropoiesis. Despite mutations in one of several ribosome protein genes, including RPS19, the cause of the erythroid specificity is still a mystery. We ...

  9. Ramp Compression of Diamond to 5 TPa: Experiments Taking Carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Diamond to 5 TPa: Experiments Taking Carbon to the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac Regime Authors: Smith, R F ; Eggert, J H ; Jeanloz, R ; Duffy, T S ; Braun, D G ; Patterson, J R ; Rudd, R E...

  10. Yield Optimization of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jeson

    2012-10-19

    used in this work is Dynamitron electron beam particle accelerator (IBA Industrial, formerly Radiation Dynamics) capable of implantation energy from 300keV to 50MeV at Ruhr University at Bochum. Before ion implantation, diamonds...

  11. Robust Decoupling Techniques to Extend Quantum Coherence in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Colm A.

    We experimentally demonstrate over 2 orders of magnitude increase in the room-temperature coherence time of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by implementing decoupling techniques. We show that equal pulse spacing ...

  12. Diamonds are an Electronic Device’s Best Friend

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at Argonne National Lab recently devised a way to use diamonds to brighten the performance of electronic devices, which could put a bit more sparkle in everyone’s day.

  13. Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination By Jared Sagoff * May 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National...

  14. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  15. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  16. Method for the preparation of nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.

    1998-06-30

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate such as field emission tips. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrocarbon and possibly hydrogen, and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous vapor and deposition of a diamond film on the field emission tip. 40 figs.

  17. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  18. Diagnostic of fusion neutrons on JET tokamak using diamond detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemtsev, G.; Amosov, V.; Marchenko, N.; Meshchaninov, S.; Rodionov, R.; Popovichev, S.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Conbributors

    2014-08-21

    In 2011-2012, an experimental campaign with a significant yield of fusion neutrons was carried out on the JET tokamak. During this campaign the facility was equipped with two diamond detectors based on natural and artificial CVD diamond. These detectors were designed and manufactured in State Research Center of Russian Federation TRINITI. The detectors measure the flux of fast neutrons with energies above 0.2 MeV. They have been installed in the torus hall and the distance from the center of plasma was about 3 m. For some of the JET pulses in this experiment, the neutron flux density corresponded to the operational conditions in collimator channels of ITER Vertical Neutron Camera. The main objective of diamond monitors was the measurement of total fast neutron flux at the detector location and the estimation of the JET total neutron yield. The detectors operate as threshold counters. Additionally a spectrometric measurement channel has been configured that allowed us to distinguish various energy components of the neutron spectrum. In this paper we describe the neutron signal measuring and calibration procedure of the diamond detector. Fluxes of DD and DT neutrons at the detector location were measured. It is shown that the signals of total neutron yield measured by the diamond detector correlate with signals measured by the main JET neutron diagnostic based on fission chambers with high accuracy. This experiment can be considered as a successful test of diamond detectors in ITER-like conditions.

  19. Structural behaviour of niobium oxynitride under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Bharat Bhooshan Poswal, H. K. Pandey, K. K. Sharma, Surinder M.; Yakhmi, J. V.; Ohashi, Y.; Kikkawa, S.

    2014-04-24

    High pressure investigation of niobium oxynitrides (NbN{sub 0.98}O{sub 0.02}) employing synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments was carried out in very fine pressure steps using membrane driven diamond anvil cell. Ambient cubic phase was found to be stable up to ?18 GPa. At further high pressure cubic phase showed rhombohedral distortion.

  20. Zircon solubility and zirconium complexation in H2ONa2OSiO27Al2O3 fluids at high pressure and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Letters Zircon solubility and zirconium complexation in H2OþNa2OþSiO27Al2O3 fluids at high pressure-ray fluorescence analysis using hydrothermal diamond- anvil cells. Zirconium complexation in fluids in equilibrium

  1. Spin crossover equation of state and sound velocities of (Mg0.65Fe0.35)O ferropericlase to 140 GPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    Spin crossover equation of state and sound velocities of (Mg0.65Fe0.35)O ferropericlase to 140 GPa.65Fe0.35)O ("FP35"), a composition representative of deep mantle "pyrolite" or chondrite in diamond-anvil cells at 300 K. Combining with in situ XRD measurements, the Debye sound velocity of FP35

  2. Investigation of the Implementation of Ramp Reversal at a Diamond Interchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bo

    2013-06-25

    Diamond interchange design has been commonly utilized in United States to facilitate traffic exchange between freeway and frontage roads. Another less common interchange design is X-ramp interchange, which is the reversed version of diamond...

  3. The effects of diamond injector angles on flow structures at various Mach numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLellan, Justin Walter

    2006-10-30

    Numerical simulations of a three dimensional diamond jet interaction flowfield at various diamond injector half angles into a supersonic crossflow were presented in this thesis. The numerical study was performed to improve the understanding...

  4. Two- and three-dimensional ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) structures for a high resolution diamond-based MEMS technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.; Tucek, J.; Sumant, A.; Jayatissa, A.; Moldovan, N.; Mancini, D. C.; Gardos, M. N.

    2000-01-17

    Silicon is currently the most commonly used material for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, silicon-based MEMS will not be suitable for long-endurance devices involving components rotating at high speed, where friction and wear need to be minimized, components such as 2-D cantilevers that may be subjected to very large flexural displacements, where stiction is a problem, or components that will be exposed to corrosive environments. The mechanical, thermal, chemical, and tribological properties of diamond make it an ideal material for the fabrication of long-endurance MEMS components. Cost-effective fabrication of these components could in principle be achieved by coating Si with diamond films and using conventional lithographic patterning methods in conjunction with e. g. sacrificial Ti or SiO{sub 2} layers. However, diamond coatings grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods exhibit a coarse-grained structure that prevents high-resolution patterning, or a fine-grained microstructure with a significant amount of intergranular non-diamond carbon. The authors demonstrate here the fabrication of 2-D and 3-D phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) MEMS components by coating Si with UNCD films, coupled with lithographic patterning methods involving sacrificial release layers. UNCD films are grown by microwave plasma CVD using C{sub 60}-Ar or CH{sub 4}-Ar gas mixtures, which result in films that have 3--5 nm grain size, are 10--20 times smoother than conventionally grown diamond films, are extremely resistant to corrosive environments, and are predicted to have a brittle fracture strength similar to that of single crystal diamond.

  5. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  6. Thermally stimulated exoelectronic emission of CVD diamond lms D. Brianda,*, P. Iacconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Thermally stimulated exoelectronic emission of CVD diamond ®lms D. Brianda,*, P. Iacconia , M of several CVD diamond ®lms (undoped or doped with nitrogen) are studied by the thermally stimulated) ®lms, diamond is an attractive material in the ®eld of high temperature electronic applications [2

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tushar K Ghosh

    2008-10-13

    The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

  8. Electronic, Magnetic and Thermal Properties of Graphene-Diamond Hybrid S. Konabe,2, 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    of the graphene-diamond hybrid system. Energies are mea- sured from that of the Fermi level. Blue and redElectronic, Magnetic and Thermal Properties of Graphene-Diamond Hybrid Structure T. Shiga,1 S, it is demonstrated that the heat generated in the graphene nanoribbon can efficiently dissipate to the diamond region

  9. Field emission properties of phosphorus doped microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition diamond films by ion implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    to the conclusion that phosphorus ions and defects in the Si­diamond interface play an important role. INTRODUCTION A new mold type diamond field emission array FEA has been fabricated on indium tin oxide ITO defects induce the split energy bands within the wide band gap of diamond and help electrons to jump

  10. Subtractive 3D Printing of Optically Active Diamond Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Aiden A; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Diamond has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising platform for quantum technologies, photonics and high resolution sensing applications. Here we demonstrate a chemical approach that enables the fabrication of functional diamond structures using gas-mediated electron induced etching. The method achieves chemical etching at room temperature through the dissociation of surface-adsorbed H2O molecules by electron irradiation in a water vapor environment. High throughput, parallel processing is possible by electron flood exposure and the use of an etch mask, while single step, mask-free three dimensional fabrication and iterative editing are achieved using a variable pressure scanning electron microscope. The electron induced chemical etching paves the way to a transformative technology for nanofabrication of diamond and other wide band-gap semiconductors.

  11. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang (Los Alamos, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  12. Fabrication of Diamond Nanowires for Quantum Information Processing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgit Hausmann; Mughees Khan; Tom Babinec; Yinan Zhang; Katie Martinick; Murray McCutcheon; Phil Hemmer; Marko Loncar

    2010-02-23

    We present a design and a top-down fabrication method for realizing diamond nanowires in both bulk single crystal and polycrystalline diamond. Numerical modeling was used to study coupling between a Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) color center and optical modes of a nanowire, and to find an optimal range of nanowire diameters that allows for large collection efficiency of emitted photons. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching (RIE) with oxygen is used to fabricate the nanowires. Drop-casted nanoparticles (including $\\mathrm{Au}$, $\\mathrm{SiO_{2}}$ and $\\mathrm{Al_2O_3}$) as well as electron beam lithography defined spin-on glass and evaporated $\\mathrm{Au}$ have been used as an etch mask. We found $\\mathrm{Al_2O_3}$ nanoparticles to be the most etch resistant. At the same time FOx e-beam resist (spin-on glass) proved to be a suitable etch mask for fabrication of ordered arrays of diamond nanowires. We were able to obtain nanowires with near vertical sidewalls in both polycrystalline and single crystal diamond. The heights and diameters of the polycrystalline nanowires presented in this paper are $\\unit[\\approx1]{\\mu m}$ and $\\unit[120-340]{nm}$, respectively, having a $\\unit[200]{nm/min}$ etch rate. In the case of single crystal diamond (types Ib and IIa) nanowires the height and diameter for different diamonds and masks shown in this paper were $\\unit[1-2.4]{\\mu m}$ and $\\unit[120-490]{nm}$ with etch rates between $\\unit[190-240]{nm/min}$.

  13. Classical and Quantum Chaos in the Diamond Shaped Billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, R; Jaramillo, D; González, D L

    2012-01-01

    We analyse the classical and quantum behaviour of a particle trapped in a diamond shaped billiard. We defined this billiard as a half stadium connected with a triangular billiard. A parameter $\\xi$ which gradually change the shape of the billiard from a regular equilateral triangle ($\\xi=1$) to a diamond ($\\xi=0$) was used to control the transition between the regular and chaotic regimes. The classical behaviour is regular when the control parameter $\\xi$ is one; in contrast, the system is chaotic when $\\xi \

  14. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  15. Field emission properties of the polycrystalline diamond film prepared by microwave-assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    transparency. These properties allow diamond to be used in a few commercial products such as cutting tools, a patterned diamond nuclei is applied. For this, the substrate was coated with diamond photoresist DPR which is the normal photoresist containing 0.1 m diamond powders.7 Spin coated DPR can be patterned by using

  16. Quantum optics with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yiwen Chu; Mikhail D. Lukin

    2015-04-22

    We review the electronic level structure of the nitrogen-vacancy in diamond and some common experimental techniques to study its optical properties at low temperatures. We then summarize several recent experiments and advances in using nitrogen-vacancy centers for quantum optics.

  17. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  18. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  19. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films via block copolymer lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.

    2010-07-01

    Nanopatterning of diamond surfaces is critical for the development of diamond-based microelectromechanical system/nanoelectromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS), such as resonators or switches. Micro-/nanopatterning of diamond materials is typically done using photolithography or electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching (RIE). In this work, we demonstrate a simple process, block copolymer (BCP) lithography, for nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films to produce nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of NEMS based on UNCD. In BCP lithography, nanoscale self-assembled polymeric domains serve as an etch mask for pattern transfer. The authors used thin films of a cylinder-forming organic-inorganic BCP, poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane), PS-b-PFS, as an etch mask on the surface of UNCD films. Orientational control of the etch masking cylindrical PFS blocks is achieved by manipulating the polymer film thickness in concert with the annealing treatment. We have observed that the surface roughness of UNCD layers plays an important role in transferring the pattern. Oxygen RIE was used to etch the exposed areas of the UNCD film underneath the BCP. Arrays of both UNCD posts and wirelike structures have been created using the same starting polymeric materials as the etch mask.

  20. WATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improved drilling rates can provide a significant benefit, justifying the costs and effort required both of drilling and completions of the wells can account for 25 ­ 50% of the cost of the electricity whichWATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK Santi, P, Bell, S

  1. Diamond origin and genesis: A C and N stable isotope study on diamonds from a single eclogitic xenolith (Kaalvallei, South Africa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartigny, Pierre

    aggregation state of 35 diamonds in a single eclogite xenolith from the Kaalvallei kimberlite in South Africa, and are positively correlated with nitrogen aggregation states which vary from 11.5% to 43.7% of IaB defects with diamond formation from recycled (crustal) material which is enriched in 15 N (i.e. positive 15 N

  2. Diamond Wire Saw for Precision Machining of Laser Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bono, M J; Bennett, D W

    2005-08-08

    The fabrication of precision laser targets requires a wide variety of specialized mesoscale manufacturing techniques. The diamond wire saw developed in this study provides the capability to precisely section meso-scale workpieces mounted on the assembly stations used by the Target Fabrication Group. This new capability greatly simplifies the fabrication of many types of targets and reduces the time and cost required to build the targets. A variety of materials are used to fabricate targets, including metals, plastics with custom designed chemical formulas, and aerogels of various densities. The materials are usually provided in the form of small pieces or cast rods that must be machined to the required shape. Many of these materials, such as metals and some plastics, can be trimmed using a parting tool on a diamond turning machine. However, other materials, such as aerogels and brittle materials, cannot be adequately cut with a parting tool. In addition, the geometry of the parts often requires that the workpieces be held in a special assembly station, which excludes the use of a parting tool. In the past, these materials were sectioned using a small, handheld coping saw that used a diamond-impregnated wire as a blade. This miniature coping saw was effective, but it required several hours to cut through certain materials. Furthermore, the saw was guided by hand and often caused significant damage to fragile aerogels. To solve these problems, the diamond wire saw shown in Figure 1 was developed. The diamond wire saw is designed to machine through materials that are mounted in the Target Fabrication Group's benchtop assembly stations. These assembly stations are the primary means of aligning and assembling target components, and there is often a need to machine materials while they are mounted in the assembly stations. Unfortunately, commercially available saws are designed for very different applications and are far too large to be used with the assembly stations. Therefore, a custom diamond wire saw was designed and constructed. The diamond wire saw cuts through workpieces using a continuous loop of diamond-impregnated wire of length 840 mm. The wire loop runs around several idler pulleys and is driven by a simple geared DC motor that rotates at 17 rpm. The linear speed of the wire is 107 inches/minute. The saw is oriented at an angle of 20{sup o} from horizontal, so the operator can view the wire through the cutout at the front end of the saw. When looking through a microscope or camera with a horizontal line of sight, the operator can clearly see the wire as it cuts through the workpiece, as shown in the right side of Figure 1. The saw is mounted on a two-axis stage that allows the operator to align the wire with the workpiece. To cut through the workpiece, the operator drives the wire through the workpiece by turning the feed micrometer. An image of the interior of the diamond wire saw appears in Figure 2. This picture was taken after removing the protective cover plate from the saw.

  3. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kwan, Simon W. (Geneva, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  4. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  5. Superconducting single photon detectors integrated with diamond nanophotonic circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rath, Patrik; Ferrari, Simone; Sproll, Fabian; Lewes-Malandrakis, Georgia; Brink, Dietmar; Ilin, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael; Nebel, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Photonic quantum technologies promise to repeat the success of integrated nanophotonic circuits in non-classical applications. Using linear optical elements, quantum optical computations can be performed with integrated optical circuits and thus allow for overcoming existing limitations in terms of scalability. Besides passive optical devices for realizing photonic quantum gates, active elements such as single photon sources and single photon detectors are essential ingredients for future optical quantum circuits. Material systems which allow for the monolithic integration of all components are particularly attractive, including III-V semiconductors, silicon and also diamond. Here we demonstrate nanophotonic integrated circuits made from high quality polycrystalline diamond thin films in combination with on-chip single photon detectors. Using superconducting nanowires coupled evanescently to travelling waves we achieve high detection efficiencies up to 66 % combined with low dark count rates and timing resolu...

  6. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon <100>substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  7. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D. [Institution PROJECT CENTER ITER, 1, Akademik Kurchatov Sq., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  8. Zr/oxidized diamond interface for high power Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traoré, A., E-mail: aboulaye.traore@neel.cnrs.fr; Muret, P.; Fiori, A.; Eon, D.; Gheeraert, E. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Pernot, J., E-mail: julien.pernot@neel.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Boulevard Saint-Michel, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-02-03

    High forward current density of 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} (at 6 V) and a breakdown field larger than 7.7 MV/cm for diamond diodes with a pseudo-vertical architecture, are demonstrated. The power figure of merit is above 244 MW/cm{sup 2} and the relative standard deviation of the reverse current density over 83 diodes is 10% with a mean value of 10{sup ?9} A/cm{sup 2}. These results are obtained with zirconium as Schottky contacts on the oxygenated (100) oriented surface of a stack comprising an optimized lightly boron doped diamond layer on a heavily boron doped one, epitaxially grown on a Ib substrate. The origin of such performances are discussed.

  9. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  10. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2009-01-01

    diamond-like structures (nanodiamond) observed using Ramandefect centres 21 in a nanodiamond matrix. II. Experimentallike structures (nanodiamond). Here the surface treatment

  11. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-08

    The objective of this project was to determine why diamond-based films are unusually efficient electron emitters (field emission cathodes) at room temperature. Efficient cathodes based on diamond are being developed by SI Diamond Technology (SIDT) as components for bright, sunlight-readable, flat panel displays. When the project started, it was known that only a small fraction (<1%) of the cathode area is active in electron emission and that the emission sites themselves are sub-micron in size. The critical challenge of this project was to develop new microcharacterization methods capable of examining known emission sites. The research team used a combination of cathode emission imaging (developed at SIDT), micro-Raman spectroscopy (LBNL), and electron microscopy and spectroscopy (National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBNL) to examine the properties of known emission sites. The most significant accomplishment of the project was the development at LBNL of a very high resolution scanning probe that, for the first time, measured simultaneously the topography and electrical characteristics of single emission sites. The increased understanding of the emission mechanism helped SIDT to develop a new cathode material,''nano-diamond,'' which they have incorporated into their Field Emission Picture Element (FEPix) product. SIDT is developing large-format flat panel displays based on these picture elements that will be brighter and more efficient than existing outdoor displays such as Jumbotrons. The energy saving that will be realized if field emission displays are introduced commercially is in line with the energy conservation mission of DOE. The unique characterization tools developed in this project (particularly the new scanning microscopy method) are being used in ongoing BES-funded basic research.

  12. Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon wafers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Tayfun

    Plasma-activated direct bonding of diamond-on-insulator wafers to thermal oxide grown silicon microscopy, profilometer and wafer bow measurements. Plasma-activated direct bonding of DOI wafers to thermal September 2010 Keywords: Diamond-on-insulator Plasma activation Ultrananocrystalline diamond Direct bonding

  13. University of Alberta opens new diamond lab Updated: November 27, 2013 | 7:58 pm | By Ryan Tumilty Metro Edmonton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    University of Alberta opens new diamond lab Updated: November 27, 2013 | 7:58 pm | By Ryan Tumilty Siemens) If diamonds truly are a girl's best friend than a new lab at the University of Alberta could." Source: http://metronews.ca/news/edmonton/868068/university-of-alberta-opens-new-diamond-lab/ #12;

  14. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  15. Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Robert F.

    include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasmaAtmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b, , Ronald D Available online xxxx Keywords: Atmospheric pressure plasma Diamond-like carbon deposition DLC PECVD

  16. Thermal conductivity changes upon neutron transmutation of {sup 10}B doped diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K., E-mail: jag-kasichainula@ncsu.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Verghese, K. [Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Butler, J. E. [Code 6174, Naval research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    {sup 10}B doped p-type diamond samples were subjected to neutron transmutation reaction using thermal neutron flux of 0.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} and fast neutron flux of 0.09 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1}. Another sample of epilayer grown on type IIa (110) single crystal diamond substrate was subjected to equal thermal and fast neutron flux of 10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1}. The defects in the diamond samples were previously characterized by different methods. In the present work, thermal conductivity of these diamond samples was determined at room temperature by transient thermoreflectance method. The thermal conductivity change in the samples as a function of neutron fluence is explained by the phonon scattering from the point defects and disordered regions. The thermal conductivity of the diamond samples decreased more rapidly initially and less rapidly for larger neutron fluence. In addition, the thermal conductivity in type IIb diamond decreased less rapidly with thermal neutron fluence compared to the decrease in type IIa diamond subjected to fast neutron fluence. It is concluded that the rate of production of defects during transmutation reaction is slower when thermal neutrons are used. The thermal conductivity of epilayer of diamond subjected to high thermal and fast neutron fluence is associated with the covalent carbon network in the composite structure consisting of disordered carbon and sp{sup 2} bonded nanocrystalline regions.

  17. Fabrication of adherent porous diamond films on sintered WC-13 wt.%Co

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    biocompatibility, make it a very attractive material for a wide spectrum of applications in the fields of cutting tools, optical and electronic devices, etc. [1, 2]. Porous diamond (PD) films have received much recent substrates that had themselves been pre- coated with a thin WC-Co interlayer [13, 14]. Successful diamond

  18. Standards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global Standards Officer, EMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global was President of the IEEE Computer Society. Steve is General Manager of the Industry Standards Office at EMC Standards Officer, EMC Corporation, Office of the CTO Steve Diamond has 30 years of management, marketing

  19. Vacuum encapsulated hermetically sealed diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, John; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2014-12-30

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first cold-weld ring disposed between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and a second cold-weld ring disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the diamond window element. The cathode capsule is formed by a vacuum cold-weld process such that the first cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and the second cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the diamond window element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  20. Vacuum encapsulated, high temperature diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, John; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-29

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first high-temperature solder weld disposed between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and a second high-temperature solder weld disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the cathode element. The cathode capsule is formed by a high temperature weld process under vacuum such that the first solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and the second solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the cathode element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  1. Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-08-20

    We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

  2. Alignment of the diamond nitrogen vacancy center by strain engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karin, Todd [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dunham, Scott [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Fu, Kai-Mei [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a sensitive probe of magnetic field and a promising qubit candidate for quantum information processing. The performance of many NV-based devices improves by aligning the NV(s) parallel to a single crystallographic direction. Using ab initio theoretical techniques, we show that NV orientation can be controlled by high-temperature annealing in the presence of strain under currently accessible experimental conditions. We find that (89?±?7)% of NVs align along the [111] crystallographic direction under 2% compressive biaxial strain (perpendicular to [111]) and an annealing temperature of 970?°C.

  3. Charging characteritiscs of ultrananocrystalline diamond in RF MEMS capacitive switches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Goldsmith, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J.; Zheng, H.; Hwang, J. C. M.; Palego, C.; Wang, W.; Carpick, R.; Adiga, V.; Datta, A.; Gudeman, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.

    2010-05-01

    Modifications to a standard capacitive MEMS switch process have been made to allow the incorporation of ultra-nano-crystalline diamond as the switch dielectric. The impact on electromechanical performance is minimal. However, these devices exhibit uniquely different charging characteristics, with charging and discharging time constants 5-6 orders of magnitude quicker than conventional materials. This operation opens the possibility of devices which have no adverse effects of dielectric charging and can be operated near-continuously in the actuated state without significant degradation in reliability.

  4. Blue Diamond, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility JumpIICalifornia: EnergyC LtdDiamond,

  5. Sandia Energy - Diamond Plates Create Nanostructures through Pressure,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjectsCyberNot Chemistry Diamond Plates Create

  6. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS, 14 (1995) 1448-1450 A technique for the manufacture of long hollow diamond fibres by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    1995-01-01

    substrates, which has limited CVD diamond applications to optical or wear resistant coatings and cutting tools [4]. Recently, continuous CVD diamond fibres have been produced by coating CVD diamond onto wires diamond coated shape obtained depends on the dimensions of the coil (Fig. 2a). A continuous solid fibre

  7. Nanofabrication of sharp diamond tips by e-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Zeng, H.; Carlisle, J. A.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

    2009-12-07

    Ultrasharp diamond tips make excellent atomic force microscopy probes, field emitters, and abrasive articles due to diamond's outstanding physical properties, i.e., hardness, low friction coefficient, low work function, and toughness. Sharp diamond tips are currently fabricated as individual tips or arrays by three principal methods: (1) focused ion beam milling and gluing onto a cantilever of individual diamond tips, (2) coating silicon tips with diamond films, or (3) molding diamond into grooves etched in a sacrificial substrate, bonding the sacrificial substrate to another substrate or electrodepositing of a handling chip, followed by dissolution of the sacrificial substrate. The first method is tedious and serial in nature but does produce very sharp tips, the second method results in tips whose radius is limited by the thickness of the diamond coating, while the third method involves a costly bonding and release process and difficulties in thoroughly filling the high aspect ratio apex of molding grooves with diamond at the nanoscale. To overcome the difficulties with these existing methods, this article reports on the feasibility of the fabrication of sharp diamond tips by direct etching of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{reg_sign}) as a starting and structural material. The UNCD is reactive ion etched using a cap-precursor-mask scheme. An optimized etching recipe demonstrates the formation of ultrasharp diamond tips ({approx} 10 nm tip radius) with etch rates of 650 nm/min.

  8. Ultrananocrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond thin films for NEMS/MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Srinivasan, S.; Butler, J. E. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); ( PSC-USR)

    2010-04-01

    There has been a tireless quest by the designers of micro- and nanoelectro mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) to find a suitable material alternative to conventional silicon. This is needed to develop robust, reliable, and long-endurance MEMS/NEMS with capabilities for working under demanding conditions, including harsh environments, high stresses, or with contacting and sliding surfaces. Diamond is one of the most promising candidates for this because of its superior physical, chemical, and tribomechanical properties. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films, the two most studied forms of diamond films in the last decade, have distinct growth processes and nanostructures but complementary properties. This article reviews the fundamental and applied science performed to understand key aspects of UNCD and NCD films, including the nucleation and growth, tribomechanical properties, electronic properties, and applied studies on integration with piezoelectric materials and CMOS technology. Several emerging diamond-based MEMS/NEMS applications, including high-frequency resonators, radio frequency MEMS and photonic switches, and the first commercial diamond MEMS product - monolithic diamond atomic force microscopy probes - are discussed.

  9. Diamondization of Graphene and Graphene-BN Bilayers: Chemical Functionalization and Electronic Structure Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Long; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, Jian Guo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, based on first-principles calculations, we systematically study functionalization induced diamonization of graphene bilayer and graphene-BN hybrid bilayer. With single-side functionalization, the diamondized structures are magnetic semiconductor. Interestingly, if both sides of the bilayer are functionalized, diamondization becomes spontaneous without a barrier. On the other hand, when the bottom layer of the bilayer graphene is replaced by a single hexagonal BN layer, the diamondized structure becomes nonmagnetic metal. The tunable electronic and magnetic properties pave new avenues to construct graphene-based electronics and spintronics devices.

  10. Adhesion of diamond coatings synthesized by oxygen-acetylene flame CVD on tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, S.; Stankovic, S.; Dekanski, A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a study concerned with chemical vapor deposition of diamond on tungsten carbide cutting tools using an oxygen-acetylene flame in a normal ambient environment are presented. Effects of preparation conditions on the adhesion of the coating have been investigated, including different surface treatment, different position of the flame with respect to the coated surface, effect of an intermediate poorly crystalline diamond layer, etc. In particular, effect of polishing and ultrasonic lapping with diamond powder was compared with that of a corresponding treatment with SiC powder.

  11. Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu,Q.

    2008-10-01

    The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent experiments were carried out to determine the transport of the electrons within the diamond and their emission at the surface. In transmission mode measurements, the diamond amplifier was coated with metal on both sides, so results simply depend only on the electron transport within the diamond. The SEY for this mode provides one secondary electron per 20eV energy, which gives the gain of more than 200 for 4.7keV (effective energy) primary electrons under 2MV/m. Laser detrapping can help the signal maintain the gain with lops pulse and duty cycle of 1.67 x 10{sup -7}. In emission mode measurements, in which the diamond is prepared as in the actual application, the SEY is {approx}20 for 700eV (effective energy) primary electrons under 1.21MV/m. The electric field applied and the primary electron energy is limited by the experiment setup, but the results show good trend toward large gain under high field. Thermal emittance of the diamond secondary emission is critical for the beam application. A careful design is setup to measure with very fine precision and accuracy of 0.01eV.

  12. Radiation-induced decomposition of PETN and TATB under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Yang, Wenge

    2008-10-02

    We have investigated decomposition of PETN and TATB induced by white synchrotron X-ray radiation in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature and two pressures, nearly ambient and about 6 GPa. The decomposition rate of TATB decreases significantly when it is pressurized to 5.9 GPa. The measurements were highly reproducible and allowed us to obtain decomposition rates and the order parameters of the reactions.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nitrides of iridium and palladiums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sadigh, B.; Zaug, J.M.; Aberg, D.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (LLNL); (CIW); (UC)

    2008-08-14

    We describe the synthesis of nitrides of iridium and palladium using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We have used the in situ techniques of x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering to characterize these compounds and have compared our experimental findings where possible to the results of first-principles theoretical calculations. We suggest that palladium nitride is isostructural with pyrite, while iridium nitride has a monoclinic symmetry and is isostructural with baddeleyite.

  14. Study of narrowband single photon emitters in polycrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, Russell G.; Shimoni, Olga; Martin, Aiden A.; Aharonovich, Igor, E-mail: igor.aharonovich@uts.edu.au [School of Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology, Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum information processing and integrated nanophotonics require robust generation of single photon emitters on demand. In this work, we demonstrate that diamond films grown on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition can host bright, narrowband single photon emitters in the visible—near infra-red spectral range. The emitters possess fast lifetime (?several ns), absolute photostability, and exhibit full polarization at excitation and emission. Pulsed and continuous laser excitations confirm their quantum behaviour at room temperature, while low temperature spectroscopy is performed to investigate inhomogeneous broadening. Our results advance the knowledge of solid state single photon sources and open pathways for their practical implementation in quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  15. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  16. Persistence of Single Spin Coherence above 600K in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toyli, D M; Alkauskas, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2012-01-01

    We study the spin and orbital dynamics of single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond between room temperature and 700 K. We find that the ability to optically address and coherently control single spins above room temperature is limited by nonradiative processes that quench the NV center's fluorescence-based spin readout between 550 K and 700 K. Combined with electronic structure calculations, our measurements indicate that the energy difference between the 3E and 1A1 electronic states is approximately 0.8 eV. We also find that the inhomogeneous spin lifetime (T2*) is independent of temperature up to at least 625 K, suggesting that single NV centers could be applied as nanoscale thermometers over a broad temperature range.

  17. Polycrystalline diamond MEMS resonator technology for sensor applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John P.; Aslam, Dean (Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI); Sepulveda-Alancastro, Nelson (Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI)

    2005-07-01

    Due to material limitations of poly-Si resonators, polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been explored as a new MEMS resonator material. The poly-C resonators are designed, fabricated and tested using electrostatic (Michigan State University) and piezoelectric (Sandia National Laboratories) actuation methods, and the results are compared. For comparable resonator structures, although the resonance frequencies are similar, the measured Q values in the ranges of 1000-2000 and 10,000-15,000 are obtained for electrostatic and piezoelectric actuation methods, respectively. The difference in Q for the two methods is related to different pressures used during the measurement and not to the method of measurement. For the poly-C cantilever beam resonators, the highest value of their quality factor (Q) is reported for the first time (15,263).

  18. Sensitive Magnetic Control of Ensemble Nuclear Spin Hyperpolarisation in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Avalos, Claudia E; Seltzer, Scott J; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation, which transfers the spin polarisation of electrons to nuclei, is routinely applied to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance; it is also critical in spintronics, particularly when spin hyperpolarisation can be produced and controlled optically or electrically. Here we show the complete polarisation of nuclei located near the optically-polarised nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond. When approaching the ground-state level anti-crossing condition of the NV electron spins, 13C nuclei in the first-shell are polarised in a pattern that depends sensitively and sharply upon the magnetic field. Based on the anisotropy of the hyperfine coupling and of the optical polarisation mechanism, we predict and observe a complete reversal of the nuclear spin polarisation with a few-mT change in the magnetic field. The demonstrated sensitive magnetic control of nuclear polarisation at room temperature will be useful for sensitivity-enhanced NMR, nuclear-based spintronics, and quant...

  19. Examination of the Material Removal Rate in Lapping Polycrystalline Diamond Compacts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowers, Jason Michael

    2012-10-19

    This study examines the lapping machining process used during the manufacturing of polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDCs). More specifically, it is aimed at improving the productivity of the process by developing a better understanding...

  20. FURTHER NOTES ON THE NATURAL HISTORY AND ARTIFICIAL PROPAGATION OF THE DIAMOND-BACK TERRAPIN.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the artificial propagation of the diamond-back terrapin, Malaclemmys cenirata, at the United States Fisheries been directed since its beginning by several investigators. Originally Dr. R. E. Coker gave his

  1. The semi-empirical tight-binding model for carbon allotropes “between diamond and graphite”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lytovchenko, V.; Kurchak, A.; Strikha, M.

    2014-06-28

    The new carbon allotropes “between diamond and graphite” have come under intensive examination during the last decade due to their numerous technical applications. The modification of energy gap in thin films of these allotropes was studied experimentally using optical methods. The proposed simple model of carbon clusters with variable lengths of chemical bonds allows us to imitate the transfer from diamond and diamond-like to graphite-like structures, as well as the corresponding modification of hybridization sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} for diamond-like and sp{sub z} for graphite-like phases. This enables us to estimate various allotropes parameters, like the gap E{sub g}, energies of valence E{sub v}, and conduction E{sub c} band edges, and the value of electronic affinity, i.e., optical work function X, which are all of practical importance. The obtained estimations correspond to the experimental data.

  2. Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The diamond amplified photocathode may improve the performance of laser-photocathode RF guns by providing a robust, high quantum-efficiency, low thermal-emittance cathode. In the...

  3. Electrochemically grafted polypyrrole changes photoluminescence of electronic states inside nanocrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galá?, P. Malý, P.; ?ermák, J.; Kromka, A.; Rezek, B.

    2014-12-14

    Hybrid diamond-organic interfaces are considered attractive for diverse applications ranging from electronics and energy conversion to medicine. Here we use time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence spectroscopy in visible spectral range (380–700?nm) to study electronic processes in H-terminated nanocrystalline diamond films (NCD) with 150?nm thin, electrochemically deposited polypyrrole (PPy) layer. We observe changes in dynamics of NCD photoluminescence as well as in its time-integrated spectra after polymer deposition. The effect is reversible. We propose a model where the PPy layer on the NCD surface promotes spatial separation of photo-generated charge carriers both in non-diamond carbon phase and in bulk diamond. By comparing different NCD thicknesses we show that the effect goes as much as 200?nm deep inside the NCD film.

  4. Model of the competitive growth of amorphous carbon and diamond films I. J. Forda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Ian

    be deposited on a silicon wafer mounted on a rotating platform, which was exposed sequen- tially to fluxes carbon films could be deposited (for an increase in the car- bon flux) or diamond films were produced (by

  5. Evaluation of TexSIM for modeling traffic behavior at diamond interchanges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadors, Allison Christine Cherry

    1995-01-01

    Poor operation of diamond interchanges along a freeway corridor can decrease the mobility of the corridor and increase time and energy costs associated with delay at signalized interchanges. Computer simulation provides a safe and efficient means...

  6. Nucleation of nanocrystalline diamond by fragmentation of fullerene precursors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1998-05-04

    Growth of diamond films from C{sub 60}/Ar microwave discharges results in a nanocrystalline microstructure with crystallite sizes in the range 3-10 nm. Heterogeneous nucleation rates of 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} sec are required to account for the results. The nucleation mechanism presented here fulfills this requirement and is based on the insertion of carbon dimer, C{sub 2}, molecules, produced by fragmentation of C{sub 60}, into the n-bonded dimer rows of the reconstructed (100) surface of diamond. Density functional theory is used to calculate the energetic of C{sub 2} insertion into carbon clusters that model the (100) surface. The reaction of singlet C{sub 2} with the double bond of the C{sub 9}H{sub 12} cluster leads to either carbene structures or a cyclobutynelike structure. At the HF/6-31G* level, the carbene product has a C{sub 2v} structure, while at the B3LYP/6-31G* levels of theory, it has a C{sub s} structure with the inserted C{sub 2} tilted. No barrier for insertion into the C=C double bond of the C{sub 9}H{sub 12} cluster was found at the HF/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G* levels of theory. Thus, calculations including correlation energy and geometry optimization indicate that insertion of C{sub 2} into a C=C double bond leads to a large energy lowering, {approximately}120 kcal/mol for a C{sub 9}H{sub 12} cluster, and there is no barrier for insertion.

  7. Influence of diamond turning and surface cleaning processes on the degradation of KDP crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlowski, M.R.; Thomas, I.; Edwards, G.; Stanion, K.; Fuchs, B.

    1991-06-24

    One factor influencing the efficiency of KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) frequency conversion arrays on the Nova laser system at LLNL has been environmental degradation, or fogging'', of the crystal surfaces. Decreases in array transmission by as much as 20% have been attributed to crystal fogging. The surfaces of the 27-cm square Nova array crystals are prepared by a wet diamond-turning process. The rate of surface fogging has been associated with several parameters of the diamond turning and subsequent cleaning processes. High humidity during diamond turning, storage, and use on the laser tends to accelerate the fogging. We suspect that some of the additives present in the diamond turning oil increase the fogging rate and have found a machining oil which minimizes this surface degradation. Efficient removal of the machining oils from the crystal surface also minimizes the fogging problem. Care must be taken to use cleaning solvents which do not cause additional surface degradation. The fogging rate is sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the material as well as to surface roughness related to the diamond turning process. Accelerated fogging at diamond turning artifacts may increase crystal surface roughness causing increased beam modulation and scattering losses. 5 refs. 5 figs.

  8. Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High-Pressure-High Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Yogesh, K.

    2003-08-27

    OAK B127 Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High-Pressure-High Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship

  9. Status review of the science and technology of Ultrananoscrystalline Diamond (UNCD (sup {trademark}) films and application to multifunctional devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.

    2010-07-01

    This review focuses on a status report on the science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films developed and patented at Argonne National Laboratory. The UNCD material has been developed in thin film form and exhibit multifunctionalities applicable to a broad range of macro to nanoscale multifunctional devices. UNCD thin films are grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) or hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using new patented Ar-rich/CH4 or H2/CH4 plasma chemistries. UNCD films exhibit a unique nanostructure with 2-5 nm grain size (thus the trade name UNCD) and grain boundaries of 0.4-0.6 nm for plain films, and grain sizes of 7-10 nm and grain boundaries of 2-4 nm when grown with nitrogen introduced in the Ar-rich/CH4 chemistry, to produce UNCD films incorporated with nitrogen, which exhibit electrical conductivity up to semi-metallic level. This review provides a status report on the synthesis of UNCD films via MPCVD and integration with dissimilar materials like oxides for piezoactuated MEMS/NEMS, metal films for contacts, and biological matter for a new generation of biomedical devices and biosensors. A broad range of applications from macro to nanoscale multifunctional devices is reviewed, such as coatings for mechanical pumps seals, field-emission cold cathodes, RF MEMS/NEMS resonators and switches for wireless communications and radar systems, NEMS devices, biomedical devices, biosensors, and UNCD as a platform for developmental biology, involving biological cells growth on the surface. Comparisons with nanocrystalline diamond films and technology are made when appropriate.

  10. Response of diamond detector sandwich to 14 MeV neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; G. Ricco; B. Caiffi; F. Pompili; M. Pillon; G. Verona-Rinati; R. Cardarelli

    2015-10-27

    In this paper we present the measurement of the response of 50 $\\mu$m thin diamond detectors to 14 MeV neutrons. Such neutrons are produced in fusion reactors and are of particular interest for ITER neutron diagnostics. Among semiconductor detectors diamond has properties most appropriate for harsh radiation and temperature conditions of a fusion reactor. However, 300-500 $\\mu$m thick diamond detectors suffer significant radiation damage already at neutron fluences of the order of $10^{14}$ n/cm$^2$. It is expected that a 50 $\\mu$m thick diamond will withstand a fluence of $>10^{16}$ n/cm$^2$. We tested two 50 $\\mu$m thick single crystal CVD diamonds, stacked to form a "sandwich" detector for coincidence measurements. The detector measured the conversion of 14 MeV neutrons, impinging on one diamond, into $\\alpha$ particles which were detected in the second diamond in coincidence with nuclear recoil. For $^{12}C(n,\\alpha)^{9}Be$ reaction the total energy deposited in the detector gives access to the initial neutron energy value. The measured 14 MeV neutron detection sensitivity through this reaction by a detector of effective area 3$\\times$3 mm$^2$ was $5\\times 10^{-7}$ counts cm$^2$/n. This value is in good agreement with Geant4 simulations. The intrinsic energy resolution of the detector was found to be 240 keV FWHM which adds only 10 % to ITER's 14 MeV neutron energy spread.

  11. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Molodvan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busman, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-08-24

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors. However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAs) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure nanocrystalline diamond with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. The authors have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making nanocrystalline diamond a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  12. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-23

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A {approx}5 {mu}m ({sigma}) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  13. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  14. Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2014-02-21

    Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamond’s extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

  15. Fabrication of layered self-standing diamond film by dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. C.; Dai, F. W.; Li, B.; Lan, H.; Askari, J.; Tang, W. Z.; Lu, F. X.

    2007-01-15

    Layered self-standing diamond films, consisting of an upper layer, buffer layer, and a lower layer, were fabricated by fluctuating the ratio of methane to hydrogen in high power dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition. There were micrometer-sized columnar diamond crystalline grains in both upper layer and lower layer. The size of the columnar diamond crystalline grains was bigger in the upper layer than that in the lower layer. The orientation of the upper layer was (110), while it was (111) for the lower layer. Raman results showed that no sp{sup 3} peak shift was found in the upper layer, but it was found and blueshifted in the lower layer. This indicated that the internal stress within the film body could be tailored by this layered structure. The buffer layer with nanometer-sized diamond grains formed by secondary nucleation was necessary in order to form the layered film. Growth rate was over 10 {mu}m/h in layered self-standing diamond film fabrication.

  16. Study of TFTR D-T neutron spectra using natural diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roquemore, A.L.; Krasilnikov, A.V., Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1996-12-31

    Three Natural Diamond Detector (NDD) based spectrometers have been used for neutron spectra measurement during Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments using high power Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and Ton Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in 1996. A 2-3 % energy resolution coupled with the high radiation resistance of NDDs (5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}) makes them ideal for measuring the D-T neutron spectra in the high radiation environment of TFTR tritium experiments. The compact size of the NDD made it possible to insert one of the detectors into one of the center channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator to provide a vertical view perpendicular to the vessel midplane, Two other detectors were placed inside shields in TFTR test cell and provide measurements of the neutrons having angles of emission of 110- 180{degrees} and 60-12-{degrees} with respect to the direction of the plasma current. By using a 0.25 {mu}s shaping time of the Ortec 673 spectroscopy amplifier we were able to accumulate useful spectrometry data at count rates up to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} counts/sec. To model the D- T neutron spectra measured by each of three NDD`s the Neutron Source post TRANSP (NST) code and semi-analytical model were developed. A set of D-T and D-D plasmas is analyzed for the dynamics of D-T neutron spectral broadening for each of three NDD cones of view. The application of three NDD based D-T neutron -spectrometer array demonstrated the anisotropy of the ion distribution function. and provided a mature of the dynamics of the effective ion temperatures for each detector view, and determined the tangential velocity of resonant tritons during ICRH.

  17. A Ni/surface-modified Diamond Composite Electroplating Coating on Superelastic NiTi Alloy as Potential Dental Bur Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    A Ni/surface-modified Diamond Composite Electroplating Coating on Superelastic NiTi Alloy: Composite Electroplating; Surface-modified Diamond Particles; Interfacial Adhesion; NiTi alloy; Dental Bur into nickel coating, and its shank made of stainless steel. There are strong demands from the dentist

  18. Seasonal steroid hormone levels and their relation to reproduction in the Western Diamond-backed Rattlesnake, Crotalus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Emily

    Seasonal steroid hormone levels and their relation to reproduction in the Western Diamond-backed levels in blood samples from free-ranging Western Diamond-backed Rattle- snakes (Crotalus atrox physiology, from under- standing basic mechanisms to designing treatments for reproductive dysfunction

  19. Inkjet printing of nanodiamond suspensions in ethylene glycol for CVD growth of patterned diamond structures and practical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    Inkjet printing of nanodiamond suspensions in ethylene glycol for CVD growth of patterned diamond Available online 26 October 2008 Keywords: Inkjet Printing Diamond Nanodiamond Patterns Fabrication on a rigid or flexible substrate. In this work, nanodiamond suspensions in ethylene glycol were used as inks

  20. AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings Adhesion Ti/Ti-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC composite coatings were deposited on the properties of these composite coatings was investigated through microstructure and mechanical properties

  1. High-temperature electron emission from diamond films Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    High-temperature electron emission from diamond films S. H. Shin Department of Mechanical This work examines electron field-emission characteristics of polycrystalline diamond films at elevated-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. To investigate the effect of increased temperatures on field emission, current

  2. Optical properties of polycrystalline diamond films in the far-infrared A. J. Gatesman, R. H. Giles, J. Waldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    spurred interest in the growth and production of high quality diamond films for a variety of electrical and optical applications. Potential uses for vapor grown diamond include optical coatings and windows, heatTorr Deposition Pressure 50 Torr Substrate Temperature 875 - 950 C Hydrogen Flow 250 - 500 sccm Methane Flow 2 - 5

  3. Effects of thickness and cycle parameters on fretting wear behavior of CVD diamond coatings on steel substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    , mechanical seals, cutting tools, and gears. Well-adhered diamond films deposited on steel surfaces can leadEffects of thickness and cycle parameters on fretting wear behavior of CVD diamond coatings) methods. A Co-containing tungsten-carbide coating prepared by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying was used

  4. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  5. Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg M. Swain, PI

    2009-03-10

    The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

  6. Ultraviolet photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- and nano-crystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Frank; Makarov, Vladimir; Hidalgo, Arturo; Weiner, Brad; Morell, Gerardo

    2011-06-06

    The room-temperature photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- (MCD), submicro- (SMCD) and nano- (NCD) crystalline diamond films synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition was studied. The structure and composition of these diamond materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The UV sensitivity and response time were studied for the three types of diamond materials using a steady state broad UV excitation source and two pulsed UV laser radiations. It was found that they have high sensitivity in the UV region, as high as 109 sec-1mV-1 range, linear response in a broad spectral range below 320 nm, photocurrents around ~10-5 A, and short response time better than 100 ns, which is independent of fluency intensity. A phenomenological model was applied to help understand the role of defects and dopant concentration on the materials’ photosensitivity.

  7. Ultraviolet photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- and nano-crystalline diamond

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mendoza, Frank; Makarov, Vladimir; Hidalgo, Arturo; Weiner, Brad; Morell, Gerardo

    2011-06-06

    The room-temperature photosensitivity of sulfur-doped micro- (MCD), submicro- (SMCD) and nano- (NCD) crystalline diamond films synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition was studied. The structure and composition of these diamond materials were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The UV sensitivity and response time were studied for the three types of diamond materials using a steady state broad UV excitation source and two pulsed UV laser radiations. It was found that they have high sensitivity in the UV region, as high as 109 sec-1mV-1 range, linear response in a broad spectral range below 320 nm, photocurrentsmore »around ~10-5 A, and short response time better than 100 ns, which is independent of fluency intensity. A phenomenological model was applied to help understand the role of defects and dopant concentration on the materials’ photosensitivity.« less

  8. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

    2009-03-31

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  9. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  10. Numerical Modeling on Thermal Loading of Diamond Crystal in X-ray FEL Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Meiqi; Guo, Yuhang; Li, Kai; Deng, Haixiao

    2015-01-01

    Due to high reflectivity and high resolution to X-ray pulse, diamond is one of the most popular Bragg crystals serving as the reflecting mirror and mono-chromator in the next generation free electrons lasers (FELs). The energy deposition of X-rays will result in thermal heating, and thus lattice expanding of diamond crystal, which may degrade the performance of X-ray FELs. In this paper, the thermal loading effect of diamond crystal for X-ray FEL oscillator has been systematically studied by the combined simulation of Geant4 and ANSYS, and its dependence on the environment temperature, crystal size, X-ray pulse repetition rate and pulse energy are presented.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica"Rocasolano"C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L'Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

    2007-12-28

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

  13. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Gruen, D. M.; Krauss, A. R.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Moldovan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-11-15

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors, However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAS) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. We have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making UNCD a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  14. The Nanoscience Beamline at Diamond, Optical Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reininger, Ruben; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-19

    The main requirement of the Nanoscience Beamline at Diamond is to deliver the highest possible flux at the sample position of a PEEM with a resolving power of about 5000 in the energy range 80-2000 eV. The source of the beamline is a couple of APPLE II helical undulators in tandem that can also be used separately to allow for faster switching of the circular polarization. Based on its versatility, a collimated plane grating monochromator using sagittally focusing elements was chosen to cover the required energy range with three gratings. The operation of this monochromator requires a collimated beam incident on the grating along the dispersion direction. This can be achieved either with a toroid, focusing with its major radius along the non-dispersive direction at the exit slit, or with a sagittal cylinder. The former option uses a sagittal cylinder after the grating to focus the collimated beam at the exit slit. In the latter case, a toroid after the grating is used to focus in both directions at the exit slit. The advantage of the toroid downstream the grating is the higher horizontal demagnification. This configuration fulfills the Nanoscience Beamline's required resolving power but cannot be used to achieve very high resolution due to the astigmatic coma aberration of the toroidal mirror. The focusing at the sample position is performed with a KB pair of plane elliptical mirrors. Assuming achievable values for the errors on all the optical surfaces, the expected spots FWHW in the horizontal and vertical directions are 10 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m, respectively. The calculated photon flux at this spot at 5000 resolving power is >1012 photons/sec between 80 and 1600 eV for linearly polarized light and between 106 and 1200 eV for circularly polarized light. The beamline is expected to be operational in January 2007.

  15. Design of flexible ultrahigh-Q microcavities in diamond-based photonic crystal slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snjezana Tomljenovic-Hanic; Andrew D. Greentree; C. Martijn de Sterke; Steven Prawer

    2008-12-10

    We design extremely flexible ultrahigh-Q diamond-based double-heterostructure photonic crystal slab cavities by modifying the refractive index of the diamond. The refractive index changes needed for ultrahigh-Q cavities with $Q ~ 10^7$, are well within what can be achieved ($\\Delta n \\sim 0.02$). The cavity modes have relatively small volumes $Vdesign is flexible because the range of parameters, cavity length and the index changes, that enables an ultrahigh-Q is quite broad. Furthermore as the index modification is post-processed, an efficient technique to generate cavities around defect centres is achievable, improving prospects for defect-tolerant quantum architectures.

  16. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-07-24

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  17. Field emission from bias-grown diamond thin films in a microwave plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Ding, Ming Q. (Beijing, CN); Auciello, Orlando (Bolinbrook, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing diamond or diamond like films in which a negative bias is established on a substrate with an electrically conductive surface in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The atmosphere that is subjected to microwave energy includes a source of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The negative bias is maintained on the substrate through both the nucleation and growth phase of the film until the film is continuous. Biases between -100V and -200 are preferred. Carbon sources may be one or more of CH.sub.4, C.sub.2 H.sub.2 other hydrocarbons and fullerenes.

  18. Longitudinal spin-relaxation in nitrogen-vacancy centers in electron irradiated diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jarmola; A. Berzins; J. Smits; K. Smits; J. Prikulis; F. Gahbauer; R. Ferber; D. Erts; M. Auzinsh; D. Budker

    2015-11-19

    We present systematic measurements of longitudinal relaxation rates ($1/T_1$) of spin polarization in the ground state of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV$^-$) color center in synthetic diamond as a function of NV$^-$ concentration and magnetic field $B$. NV$^-$ centers were created by irradiating a Type 1b single-crystal diamond along the [100] axis with 200 keV electrons from a transmission electron microscope with varying doses to achieve spots of different NV$^-$ center concentrations. Values of ($1/T_1$) were measured for each spot as a function of $B$.

  19. Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop and produce in quantity novel superhard and ultratough thermally stable polycrystalline (TSP) diamond/SiC nanocomposites reinforced with SiC/C nanofibers for drill-bit applications and multiple industrial functions.

  20. Multiple scales of diamond mining in Akwatia, Ghana: addressing environmental and human development impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    impact on environmental degradation, health, and the livelihood of artisanal miners. We concludeMultiple scales of diamond mining in Akwatia, Ghana: addressing environmental and human development impact Kaakpema Yelpaalaa,b , Saleem H. Alic,d, * a Yale University, School of Epidemiology and Public

  1. Chapter 2.20 Msink20 Diamond Seeding & Lift-off (General Solvent Sink)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    Chapter 2.20 Msink20 Diamond Seeding & Lift-off (General Solvent Sink) (msink20) (582A) 1/eyewash station at the east side of Rm. 582A (polisher/wet lab area); to activate the shower pull down Operation 8.1 Two ultrasonic baths- plus user-owned setups- are stationed on the deck of this sink. The left

  2. Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamondsilicananotube composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    Chemically vapor deposited diamond-tipped one-dimensional nanostructures and nanodiamond vapor deposition Composite thin films of nanodiamond and silica nanotubes were synthesized by means with nanodiamond particles. SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and EDX were used to analyze the composite. Wet chemical

  3. Slide diamond burnishing of tool steels with adhesive coatings and diffusion layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Slide diamond burnishing of tool steels with adhesive coatings and diffusion layers W. Brostow*1 modification of selected tool steels. The steels were covered with adhesive coatings of the hard chrome type was determined by a profilometer before and after burnishing. Adhesion of coatings to steel was determined

  4. Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    carrying out a proof of operation. In large modern buildings, the energy management and control system monitoring period following each change in setpoint, characterize system performance. These indicesAutomated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley

  5. WM00 Conference, February 27-March 2, 2000 DEMONSTRATING DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TFTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    task for dismantling. Plasma arc cutting is the current baseline technology for the dismantlement plasma arc cutting. This paper will provide detailed results of the diamond wire cutting demonstration: The baseline planning for dismantling the vacuum vessel utilizes plasma arc torch cutting. This involves

  6. Propagation and absorption of high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation in diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kononenko, V V; Konov, V I; Gololobov, V M; Zavedeev, E V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    Femtosecond interferometry has been used to experimentally study the photoexcitation of the electron subsystem of diamond exposed to femtosecond laser pulses of intensity 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. The carrier concentration has been determined as a function of incident intensity for three harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser (800, 400 and 266 nm). The results demonstrate that, in a wide range of laser fluences (up to those resulting in surface and bulk graphitisation), a well-defined multiphoton absorption prevails. We have estimated nonlinear absorption coefficients for pulsed radiation at ? = 800 nm (four-photon transition) and at 400 and 266 nm (indirect and direct two-photon transitions, respectively). It has also been shown that, at any considerable path length of a femtosecond pulse in diamond (tens of microns or longer), the laser beam experiences a severe nonlinear transformation, determining the amount of energy absorbed by the lattice, which is important for the development of technology for diamond photostructuring by ultrashort pulses. The competition between wave packet self-focusing and the plasma defocusing effect is examined as a major mechanism governing the propagation of intense laser pulses in diamond. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  7. Eclogitic Diamond Formation at Jwaneng: No Room for a Recycled Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartigny, Pierre

    and chemistry and the volatiles of the Earth's mantle (1, 2). Two main diamond types are identified on the basis (but chemically distinct) to either oli- vine-bearing peridotites or eclogites and are commonly. On the basis of the mea- sured 13 C values (12), we selected 31 sili- cate-bearing and 9 sulfide-bearing dia

  8. High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes H packed forests of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). The DLC:VACNT composite film and high corrosion resistance [13,14]. Other type of dopants, including nickel and boron, also result

  9. Method to grow pure nanocrystalline diamond films at low temperatures and high deposition rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlisle, John A. (Plainfield, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL); Xiao, Xingcheng (Woodridge, IL)

    2009-07-07

    A method of depositing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate at a rate of not less than about 0.2 microns/hour at a substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. The method includes seeding the substrate surface with nanocrystalline diamond powder to an areal density of not less than about 10.sup.10sites/cm.sup.2, and contacting the seeded substrate surface with a gas of about 99% by volume of an inert gas other than helium and about 1% by volume of methane or hydrogen and one or more of acetylene, fullerene and anthracene in the presence of a microwave induced plasma while maintaining the substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. to deposit nanocrystalline diamond on the seeded substrate surface at a rate not less than about 0.2 microns/hour. Coatings of nanocrystalline diamond with average particle diameters of less than about 20 nanometers can be deposited with thermal budgets of 500.degree. C.-4 hours or less onto a variety of substrates such as MEMS devices.

  10. High quality factor nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators limited by thermoelastic damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najar, Hadi; Chan, Mei-Lin; Yang, Hsueh-An; Lin, Liwei; Cahill, David G.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-04-14

    We demonstrate high quality factor thin-film nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators with quality factors limited by thermoelastic damping. Cantilevers, single-anchored and double-anchored double-ended tuning forks, were fabricated from 2.5??m thick in-situ boron doped nanocrystalline diamond films deposited using hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Thermal conductivity measured by time-domain thermoreflectance resulted in 24?±?3?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for heat transport through the thickness of the diamond film. The resonant frequencies of the fabricated resonators were 46?kHz–8?MHz and showed a maximum measured Q???86?000 at f{sub n}?=?46.849?kHz. The measured Q-factors are shown to be in good agreement with the limit imposed by thermoelastic dissipation calculated using the measured thermal conductivity. The mechanical properties extracted from resonant frequency measurements indicate a Young's elastic modulus of ?788?GPa, close to that of microcrystalline diamond.

  11. Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2 -on-sp3 Technology Laboratory, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field

  12. Atomistic modeling of the fracture of polycrystalline diamond O. A. Shenderova and D. W. Brenner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Atomistic modeling of the fracture of polycrystalline diamond O. A. Shenderova and D. W. Brenner for fracture, maximum stresses and strains, and toughness as a function of GB type are evaluated. Results With strength values ranging between 180 and 5190 MPa, and fracture toughness between 5.3 and 8 MN m 3/2 ,1

  13. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  14. Growth of diamond nanocrystals by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in liquid , P.W. May a,, L. Yin b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Diamond; Pulsed laser ablation; Nanoparticles; Nanodiamond 1 materials to be created [4,5]. The conditions inside the bubbles are similar to the cavitation bubbles

  15. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald; Tu, Chia-Hao; Chang Chi; Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Li; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zongzhong

    2004-09-30

    Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

    2003-01-01

    The microwave processing of materials is a new emerging technology with many attractive advantages over the conventional methods. The advantages of microwave technology for various ceramic systems has already been demonstrated and proven. The recent developments at Penn State have succeeded in applying the microwave technology for the commercialization of WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools, effectively sintering of metallic materials, and fabrication of transparent ceramics for advanced applications. In recent years, the Microwave Processing and Engineering Center at Penn State University in collaboration with our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. has succeeded in commercializing the developed microwave technology partially funded by DOE for WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools for gas and oil exploration operations. In this program we have further developed this technology to make diamond-carbide composites and metal-carbide-diamond functionally graded materials. Several actual product of diamond-carbide composites have been processed in microwave with better performance than the conventional product. The functionally graded composites with diamond as one of the components has been for the first time successfully developed. These are the highlights of the project.

  18. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-08-08

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  19. Low-temperature electrical transport in B-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lin; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhaosheng; Quan, Baogang; Li, Junjie Gu, Changzhi

    2014-05-05

    B-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films are grown using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition method, and their electrical transport properties varying with temperature are investigated. When the B-doped concentration of UNCD film is low, a step-like increase feature of the resistance is observed with decreasing temperature, reflecting at least three temperature-modified electronic state densities at the Fermi level according to three-dimensional Mott's variable range hopping transport mechanism, which is very different from that of reported B-doped nanodiamond. With increasing B-doped concentration, a superconductive transformation occurs in the UNCD film and the highest transformation temperature of 5.3?K is observed, which is higher than that reported for superconducting nanodiamond films. In addition, the superconducting coherence length is about 0.63?nm, which breaks a reported theoretical and experimental prediction about ultra-nanoscale diamond's superconductivity.

  20. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Diling, E-mail: dlzhu@slac.stanford.edu; Feng, Yiping; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J. M.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Robert, Aymeric [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D. [Technological Institute of Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, Tsentralnaya str. 7a, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Driel, Tim B. van [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Center for Molecular Movies, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-06-15

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ?100 ?m to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 ?m thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  1. Design and manufacture of micro-optical arrays using 3D diamond machining techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Schmoll; David J. Robertson; David A. Ryder

    2006-06-07

    We describe our work towards the manufacture of micro-optical arrays using freeform diamond machining techniques. Simulations have been done to show the feasibility of manufacturing micro-lens arrays using the slow-tool servo method. Using this technique, master shapes can be produced for replication of micro-lens arrays of either epoxy-on-glass or monolthic glass types. A machine tool path programme has been developed on the machine software platform DIFFSYS, allowing the production of spherical, aspherical and toric arrays. In addition, in theory spatially varying lenslets, sparse arrays and dithered lenslet arrays (for high contrast applications) are possible to produce. In practice, due to the diamond tool limitations not all formats are feasible. Investigations into solving this problem have been carried out and a solution is presented here.

  2. Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cerv; P. Sarin; H. Pernegger; P. Vageesvaran; E. Griesmayer

    2014-11-15

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  3. The Ramsey number of diamond-matchings and loose cycles in hypergraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkozy, Gabor

    The Ramsey number of diamond-matchings and loose cycles in hypergraphs Andr´as Gy´arf´as Computer Abstract The 2-color Ramsey number R(C3 n, C3 n) of a 3-uniform loose cycle Cn is asymp- totic to 5n/4 extend their result to the r-uniform case by show- ing that the corresponding Ramsey number is asymptotic

  4. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  5. Test of a prototype neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors in a fast reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; F. Pompili; M. Ripani; M. Pillon; G. Ricco; B. Caiffi; R. Cardarelli; G. Verona-Rinati; S. Argiro

    2015-05-23

    A prototype of neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors has been developed. This prototype consists of a $^6$Li neutron converter sandwiched between two CVD diamond crystals. The radiation hardness of the diamond crystals makes it suitable for applications in low power research reactors, while a low sensitivity to gamma rays and low leakage current of the detector permit to reach good energy resolution. A fast coincidence between two crystals is used to reject background. The detector was read out using two different electronic chains connected to it by a few meters of cable. The first chain was based on conventional charge-sensitive amplifiers, the other used a custom fast charge amplifier developed for this purpose. The prototype has been tested at various neutron sources and showed its practicability. In particular, the detector was calibrated in a TRIGA thermal reactor (LENA laboratory, University of Pavia) with neutron fluxes of $10^8$ n/cm$^2$s and at the 3 MeV D-D monochromatic neutron source named FNG (ENEA, Rome) with neutron fluxes of $10^6$ n/cm$^2$s. The neutron spectrum measurement was performed at the TAPIRO fast research reactor (ENEA, Casaccia) with fluxes of 10$^9$ n/cm$^2$s. The obtained spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations, modeling detector response with MCNP and Geant4.

  6. Proton recoil telescope based on diamond detectors for measurement of fusion neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Caiffi; M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; M. Pillon; M. Taiuti

    2015-05-23

    Diamonds are very promising candidates for the neutron diagnostics in harsh environments such as fusion reactor. In the first place this is because of their radiation hardness, exceeding that of Silicon by an order of magnitude. Also, in comparison to the standard on-line neutron diagnostics (fission chambers, silicon based detectors, scintillators), diamonds are less sensitive to $\\gamma$ rays, which represent a huge background in fusion devices. Finally, their low leakage current at high temperature suppresses the detector intrinsic noise. In this talk a CVD diamond based detector has been proposed for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutrons from D-T fusion reaction. The detector was arranged in a proton recoil telescope configuration, featuring a plastic converter in front of the sensitive volume in order to induce the (n,p) reaction. The segmentation of the sensitive volume, achieved by using two crystals, allowed to perform measurements in coincidence, which suppressed the neutron elastic scattering background. A preliminary prototype was assembled and tested at FNG (Frascati Neutron Generator, ENEA), showing promising results regarding efficiency and energy resolution.

  7. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in NV-centered diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo A. Alvarez; Christian O. Bretschneider; Ran Fischer; Paz London; Hisao Kanda; Shinobu Onoda; Junichi Isoya; David Gershoni; Lucio Frydman

    2014-12-30

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk, usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room-temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers could alleviate this need, but hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron->13C spin alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron-nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs, throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond NV centers in NMR, and in quantum information processing.

  8. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has beenmore »unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.« less

  9. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?°C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  10. Design of microcavities in diamond-based photonic crystals by Fourier- and real-space analysis of cavity fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janine Riedrich-Möller; Elke Neu; Christoph Becher

    2010-01-04

    We present the design of two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities in thin diamond membranes well suited for coupling of color centers in diamond. By comparing simulated and ideal field distributions in Fourier and real space and by according modification of air hole positions and size, we optimize the cavity structure yielding high quality factors up to Q = 320000 with a modal volume of V = 0.35 (lambda/n)^3. Using the very same approach we also improve previous designs of a small modal volume microcavity in silicon, gaining a factor of 3 in cavity Q. In view of practical realization of photonic crystals in synthetic diamond films, it is necessary to investigate the influence of material absorption on the quality factor. We show that this influence can be predicted by a simple model, replacing time consuming simulations.

  11. Determination of the internalization pathway of photoluminescent nanodiamonds in mammalian cells for biological labeling and optimization of the ?uorescent yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faklaris, Orestis; Irinopoulou, Theano; Tauc, Patrick; Girard, Hugues; Gesset, Celine; Senour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Treussart, François

    2009-01-01

    Diamond nanoparticles have been recently used as new ?uorescent labels in cells. Their emission relies on color centers embedded in the diamond matrix. In this work we compare the photoluminescence of a single color center embedded in a 30 nm diameter nanodiamond to that to a single dye molecule and demonstrate the perfect photostability of the color centers. We also compare the photoluminescence properties of nanodiamonds prepared under different conditions in order to ?nd the optimal parameters to achieve a high ?uorescence yield. We use these photoluminescent nanodiamonds for HeLa cell labeling and investigate their uptake mechanism. On the one hand by immunostaining the endocytotic vesicles and on the other by transmission electron microscopy observations we study the localization of nanodiamonds in cells. Moreover, by blocking selectively different endocytotic mechanisms we unravel their internalization pathway. We ?nd that nanodiamonds enter the cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The results of thi...

  12. Nanoimplantation and Purcell enhancement of single NV centers in photonic crystal cavities in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janine Riedrich-Möller; Sébastien Pezzagna; Jan Meijer; Christoph Pauly; Frank Mücklich; Matthew Markham; Andrew M. Edmonds; Christoph Becher

    2015-03-19

    We present the controlled creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers via ion implantation at the center of a photonic crystal cavity which is fabricated in an ultrapure, single crystal diamond membrane. High-resolution placement of NV centers is achieved using collimation of a 5keV-nitrogen ion beam through a pierced tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate coupling of the implanted NV centers' broad band fluorescence to a cavity mode and observe Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission. The results are in good agreement with a master equation model for the cavity coupling.

  13. Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Z.; Brewer, M.; Brown, I.; Komvopoulos, K.

    1994-05-03

    A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment. 6 figures.

  14. Fabrication of triangular nanobeam waveguide networks in bulk diamond using single-crystal silicon hard masks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayn, I.; Mouradian, S.; Li, L.; Goldstein, J. A.; Schröder, T.; Zheng, J.; Chen, E. H.; Gaathon, O.; Englund, Dirk; Lu, M.; Stein, A.; Ruggiero, C. A.; Salzman, J.; Kalish, R.

    2014-11-24

    A scalable approach for integrated photonic networks in single-crystal diamond using triangular etching of bulk samples is presented. We describe designs of high quality factor (Q?=?2.51?×?10{sup 6}) photonic crystal cavities with low mode volume (V{sub m}?=?1.062?×?(?/n){sup 3}), which are connected via waveguides supported by suspension structures with predicted transmission loss of only 0.05?dB. We demonstrate the fabrication of these structures using transferred single-crystal silicon hard masks and angular dry etching, yielding photonic crystal cavities in the visible spectrum with measured quality factors in excess of Q?=?3?×?10{sup 3}.

  15. Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

    2010-07-02

    We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

  16. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  17. Addressing a single spin in diamond with a macroscopic dielectric microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Tobar, M. E.; Bradac, C.; Nand, N.; Volz, T.; Castelletto, S.

    2014-09-29

    We present a technique for addressing single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond over macroscopic distances using a tunable dielectric microwave cavity. We demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for a single negatively charged NV center (NV{sup –}) in a nanodiamond (ND) located directly under the macroscopic microwave cavity. By moving the cavity relative to the ND, we record the ODMR signal as a function of position, mapping out the distribution of the cavity magnetic field along one axis. In addition, we argue that our system could be used to determine the orientation of the NV{sup –} major axis in a straightforward manner.

  18. Cleaning of diamond nanoindentation probes with oxygen plasma and carbon dioxide snow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Dylan J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8520, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8520 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Diamond nanoindentation probes may perform thousands of indentations over years of service life. There is a broad agreement that the probes need frequent cleaning, but techniques for doing so are mostly anecdotes shared between experimentalists. In preparation for the measurement of the shape of a nanoindentation probe by a scanning probe microscope, cleaning by carbon dioxide snow jets and oxygen plasma was investigated. Repeated indentation on a thumbprint-contaminated surface formed a compound that was very resistant to removal by solvents, CO{sub 2} snow, and plasma. CO{sub 2} snow cleaning is found to be a generally effective cleaning procedure.

  19. Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

  20. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  1. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  2. High stability electron field emitters made of nanocrystalline diamond coated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Srinivasu, K.; Leou, K. C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-16

    We report enhanced life-time stability for the electron field emitters prepared by coating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Upon overcoming the problem of poor stability in CNTs, the NCD-CNTs exhibit excellent life-time stability of 250 min tested at different applied voltages of 600 and 900?V. In contrast, the life-time stability of CNTs is only 33 min even at relatively low voltage of 360?V and starts arcing at 400?V. Hence, the NCD-CNTs with improved life-time stability have great potential for the applications as cathodes in flat panel displays and microplasma display devices.

  3. Storage and retrieval of ultrafast single photons using a room-temperature diamond quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan G. England; Kent A. G. Fisher; Jean-Philippe W. MacLean; Philip J. Bustard; Rune Lausten; Kevin J. Resch; Benjamin J. Sussman

    2014-09-11

    We report the storage and retrieval of single photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded photons are generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is $g^{(2)}(0) = 0.65 \\pm 0.07$, demonstrating preservation of non-classical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low-noise, high-speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.

  4. One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with a diamond quantum sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Boss; K. Chang; J. Armijo; K. Cujia; T. Rosskopf; J. R. Maze; C. L. Degen

    2015-12-10

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with high precision (here 5 digits). The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. The technique will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  5. Recursive polarization of nuclear spins in diamond at arbitrary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pagliero, Daniela; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Henshaw, Jacob D.; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2014-12-15

    We introduce an alternate route to dynamically polarize the nuclear spin host of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Our approach articulates optical, microwave, and radio-frequency pulses to recursively transfer spin polarization from the NV electronic spin. Using two complementary variants of the same underlying principle, we demonstrate nitrogen nuclear spin initialization approaching 80% at room temperature both in ensemble and single NV centers. Unlike existing schemes, our approach does not rely on level anti-crossings and is thus applicable at arbitrary magnetic fields. This versatility should prove useful in applications ranging from nanoscale metrology to sensitivity-enhanced NMR.

  6. Analysis of the spectroscopy of a hybrid system composed of a superconducting flux qubit and diamond NV centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Cai; Y. Matsuzaki; K. Kakuyanagi; H. Toida; X. Zhu; N. Mizuochi; K. Nemoto; K. Semba; W. J. Munro; S. Saito; H. Yamaguchi

    2015-05-28

    A hybrid system that combines the advantages of a superconducting flux qubit and an electron spin ensemble in diamond is one of the promising devices to realize quantum information processing. Exploring the properties of the superconductor diamond system is essential for the efficient use of this device. When we perform spectroscopy of this system, significant power broadening is observed. However, previous models to describe this system are known to be applicable only when the power broadening is negligible. Here, we construct a new approach to analyze this system with strong driving, and succeed to reproduce the spectrum with the power broadening. Our results provide an efficient way to analyze this hybrid system.

  7. An ultra-thin diamond membrane as a transmission particle detector and vacuum window for external microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakši?, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Iwamoto, N.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2013-12-09

    Several applications of external microbeam techniques demand a very accurate and controlled dose delivery. To satisfy these requirements when post-sample ion detection is not feasible, we constructed a transmission single-ion detector based on an ultra-thin diamond membrane. The negligible intrinsic noise provides an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and enables a hit-detection efficiency of close to 100%, even for energetic protons, while the small thickness of the membrane limits beam spreading. Moreover, because of the superb mechanical stiffness of diamond, this membrane can simultaneously serve as a vacuum window and allow the extraction of an ion microbeam into the atmosphere.

  8. Size dependence of cubic to trigonal structural distortion in silver micro- and nanocrystals under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixum [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zin, Zhijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhongwu [CORNELL UNIV; Skrabalak, Sara E [INDIANA UNIV; Xia, Younan [WASHINGTON UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Silver micro- and nanocrystals with sizes of {approx}2--3.5 {mu}m and {approx}50--100 nm were uniaxially compressed under nonhydrostatic pressures (strong deviatoric stress) up to {approx}30 GPa at room temperature in a symmetric diamond-anvil cell and studied in situ using angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A cubic to trigonal structural distortion along a 3-fold rotational axis was discovered by careful and comprehensive analysis of the apparent lattice parameter and full width at half-maximum, which are strongly dependent upon the Miller index and crystal size.

  9. Cubic to Tetragonal Phase Transformation in Cold-Compressed Pd Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Q.X.; Zhao, Y.S.; Mao, W.L.; Wang, Z.W.; Xiong, Y.J.; Xia, Y.N.; /Los Alamos /SLAC /Cornell U., LNS /Washington U., Seattle

    2009-06-09

    Pd nanocubes with an average side length of {approx}10 nm were compressed up to 24.8 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC). In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to monitor structural changes, and a face-centered cubic (fcc) to face-centered tetragonal (fct) distortion was observed for the first time. This novel discovery not only provides new insights into the pressure-induced behavior of faceted nanocrystals of palladium and other noble metals but also gives guidance for finding new phases in close-packed metals.

  10. Studying single nanocrystals under high pressure using an x-ray nanoprobe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Lin; Ding Yang; Yang Wenge; Patel, Umesh; Xiao Zhili; Cai Zhonghou; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao Hokwang

    2011-04-15

    In this report, we demonstrate the feasibility of applying a 250-nm focused x-ray beam to study a single crystalline NbSe{sub 3} nanobelt under high-pressure conditions in a diamond anvil cell. With such a small probe, we not only resolved the distribution and morphology of each individual nanobelt in the x-ray fluorescence maps but also obtained the diffraction patterns from individual crystalline nanobelts with thicknesses of less than 50 nm. Single crystalline diffraction measurements on NbSe{sub 3} nanobelts were performed at pressures up to 20 GPa.

  11. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, a finding in stark contrast to DAC data.

  12. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazzaniga, C., E-mail: carlo.cazzaniga@mib.infn.it; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L. [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M. [CNR-ISM, Research Area Roma 1, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015-Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) (Italy); Griesmayer, E. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, ?){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  13. Optimizing a dynamical decoupling protocol for solid-state electronic spin ensembles in diamond

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Farfurnik, D.; Jarmola, A.; Pham, L. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Walsworth, R. L.; Budker, D.; Bar-Gill, N.

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrate significant improvements of the spin coherence time of a dense ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond through optimized dynamical decoupling (DD). Cooling the sample down to 77 K suppresses longitudinal spin relaxation T1 effects and DD microwave pulses are used to increase the transverse coherence time T2 from ~0.7ms up to ~30ms. Furthermore, we extend previous work of single-axis (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) DD towards the preservation of arbitrary spin states. Following a theoretical and experimental characterization of pulse and detuning errors, we compare the performance of various DD protocols. We also identify that the optimal control scheme for preservingmore »an arbitrary spin state is a recursive protocol, the concatenated version of the XY8 pulse sequence. The improved spin coherence might have an immediate impact on improvements of the sensitivities of ac magnetometry. Moreover, the protocol can be used on denser diamond samples to increase coherence times up to NV-NV interaction time scales, a major step towards the creation of quantum collective NV spin states.« less

  14. Stokes--anti-Stokes Correlations in Raman Scattering from Diamond Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasperczyk, Mark; Neu, Elke; Maletinsky, Patrick; Novotny, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the arrival statistics of Stokes (S) and anti-Stokes (aS) Raman photons generated in diamond membranes. Strong quantum correlations between the S and aS signals are observed, which implies that the two processes share the same phonon, that is, the phonon excited by the S process is consumed in the aS process. We show that the intensity cross-correlation $g_{\\rm S,aS}^{(2)}(0)$, which describes the simultaneous detection of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, decreases steadily with laser power as $1/{\\rm P_L}$. Contrary to many other material systems, diamond exhibits a maximum $g_{\\rm S,aS}^{(2)}(0)$ at very low pump powers, implying that the Stokes-induced aS photons outnumber the thermally generated aS photons. On the other hand, the coincidence rate shows a quadratic plus cubic power dependence, which indicates a departure from the Stokes-induced anti-Stokes process.

  15. Grain size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiora, M; Bruehne, K; Floeter, A; Gluche, P; Willey, T M; Kucheyev, S O; Van Buuren, A W; Hamza, A V; Biener, J; Fecht, H

    2008-08-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films with a thickness of {approx}6 {micro}m and with average grain sizes ranging from 60 to 9 nm were deposited on silicon wafers using a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. These samples were then characterized with the goal to identify correlations between grain size, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The characterization reveals that our films are phase pure and exhibit a relatively smooth surface morphology. The levels of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and hydrogen impurities are low, and showed a systematic variation with the grain size. The hydrogen content increases with decreasing grain size, whereas the sp{sup 2} carbon content decreases with decreasing grain size. The material is weaker than single crystalline diamond, and both stiffness and hardness decrease with decreasing grain size. These trends suggest gradual changes of the nature of the grain boundaries, from graphitic in the case of the 60 nm grain size material to hydrogen terminated sp{sup 3} carbon for the 9 nm grain size material. The films exhibit low levels of internal stress and freestanding structures with a length of several centimeters could be fabricated without noticeable bending.

  16. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Simpson; Jean-Philippe Tetienne; Julia McCoey; Kumaravelu Ganesan; Liam T. Hall; Steven Petrou; Robert E. Scholten; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-08-10

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE), x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. In this work, we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100x100 {\\mu}m^2 with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 440 nm at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate a novel all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-{\\mu}T sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals.

  17. On Monic Gr\\"obner Bases in Free Algebras over Rings Stemming from Bergman's Diamond Lemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Huishi

    2009-01-01

    Let $R$ be an arbitrary commutative ring and $R =R$ the free algebra of $n$ generators over $R$. Note that Bergman's diamond lemma characterizes the resolvability of ambiguities of monic relations of the form $W_{\\sigma}-f_{\\sigma}$ with $f_{\\sigma}$ a linear combination of monomials $\\prec W_{\\sigma}$, where $\\prec$ is a semigroup partial ordering on $$; and that in the algorithmic language of Gr\\"obner basis theory over a ground field $K$, the diamond lemma had been translated into the implementable termination theorem. Here we bring the termination theorem over $R$ into play so that monic Gr\\"obner Bases in $R$ may be verified in an effective way, though it does not necessarily yield a noncommutative analogue of Buchberger Algorithm in such a setting. This enables us to recognize that many important algebras over rings may have Gr\\"obner defining relations, and thereby enables us to study such algebras via their $\\mathbb{N}$-leading homogeneous algebra and ${\\cal B}_R$-leading homogeneous algebra.

  18. Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Tel : +1 System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

  19. Z .Diamond and Related Materials 10 2001 1947 1951 Synthesis of high-density carbon nanotube films by microwave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    and vertical growth rate of nanotubes. The growth rate on an iron-coated substrate is higher than on a nickel. Nanotubes in the present study are fabricated by MPCVD using iron Z . Z .Fe or nickel Ni as transition metalZ .Diamond and Related Materials 10 2001 1947 1951 Synthesis of high-density carbon nanotube films

  20. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  1. Experimental Evaluation of Beam to Diamond Box Column Connection with Through Plate in Moment Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keshavarzi, Farhad; Torabian, Shahabeddin; Imanpour, Ali; Mirghaderi, Rasoul

    2008-07-08

    Moment resisting frames with built up section have very enhanced features due to high bending stiffness and strength characteristics in two principal axes and access to column faces for beam to column easy connections. But due to proper transfer of beam stresses to column faces there were always some specific controvertibly issues that how to make the load transfer through and in plane manner in order to mobilize the forces in column faces. Using diamond column instead of box column provide possibility to mobilize the load transfer mechanism in column faces. This section as a column has considerable benefit such as high plastic to elastic section modulus ratio which is an effective factor for force controlled components. Typical connection has no chance to be applied with diamond column.This paper elucidates the seismic behavior of through-plates moment connections to diamond box columns for use in steel moment resisting frames. This connection has a lot of economical benefits such as no need to horizontal continuity plates and satisfying the weak beam--strong column criteria in the connection region. They might serve as panel zone plates as well. According to high shear demand in panel zone of beam to column joint one should use the doublers plates in order to decrease the shear strength demand in this sensitive part of structure but these plates have no possibility to mobilize the load transfer mechanism in column web and transfer them to column flanges. In this type of connection, column faces have effective role in order to decrease the demands on through plate and they are impressive factors for improving the performance of the connection.Experimental analysis was conducted to elucidate the seismic behavior of this connection. The results of Experimental analysis established the effectiveness of the through plate in mitigating local stress concentrations and forming the plastic hinge zone in the beam away from the beam to column interface. The moment-rotation graphs form sub-assemblage show a desirable seismic performance of this connection.

  2. Photonic architecture for scalable quantum information processing in NV-diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kae Nemoto; Michael Trupke; Simon J. Devitt; Ashley M. Stephens; Kathrin Buczak; Tobias Nobauer; Mark S. Everitt; Jorg Schmiedmayer; William J. Munro

    2013-09-17

    Physics and information are intimately connected, and the ultimate information processing devices will be those that harness the principles of quantum mechanics. Many physical systems have been identified as candidates for quantum information processing, but none of them are immune from errors. The challenge remains to find a path from the experiments of today to a reliable and scalable quantum computer. Here, we develop an architecture based on a simple module comprising an optical cavity containing a single negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Modules are connected by photons propagating in a fiber-optical network and collectively used to generate a topological cluster state, a robust substrate for quantum information processing. In principle, all processes in the architecture can be deterministic, but current limitations lead to processes that are probabilistic but heralded. We find that the architecture enables large-scale quantum information processing with existing technology.

  3. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; et al

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnifiedmore »x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.« less

  4. A superconducting cavity bus for single Nitrogen Vacancy defect centres in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Twamley; S. D. Barrett

    2009-12-18

    Circuit-QED has demonstrated very strong coupling between individual microwave photons trapped in a superconducting coplanar resonator and nearby superconducting qubits. In this work we show how, by designing a novel interconnect, one can strongly connect the superconducting resonator, via a magnetic interaction, to a small number (perhaps single), of electronic spins. By choosing the electronic spin to be within a Nitrogen Vacancy centre in diamond one can perform optical readout, polarization and control of this electron spin using microwave and radio frequency irradiation. More importantly, by utilising Nitrogen Vacancy centres with nearby 13C nuclei, using this interconnect, one has the potential build a quantum device where the nuclear spin qubits are connected over centimeter distances via the Nitrogen Vacancy electronic spins interacting through the superconducting bus.

  5. Polarization dependent asymmetric magneto-resistance features in nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath, E-mail: Somnath.Bhattacharyya@wits.ac.za [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg, South Africa and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Churochkin, Dmitry [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-08-18

    Polar angle-dependence of magneto-resistance (AMR) in heavily nitrogen-incorporated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films is recorded by applying high magnetic fields, which shows strong anisotropic features at low temperatures. The temperature-dependence of MR and AMR can reveal transport in the weak-localization regime, which is explained by using a superlattice model for arbitrary values of disorder and angles. While a propagative Fermi surface model explains the negative MR features for low degree of disorder the azimuthal angle-dependent MR shows field dependent anisotropy due to the aligned conducting channels on the layers normal to film growth direction. The analysis of MR and AMR can extract the temperature dependence of dephasing time with respect to the elastic scattering time which not only establishes quasi-two dimensional features in this system but also suggests a potential application in monitoring the performance of UNCD based quantum devices.

  6. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Fei-Hao [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu, E-mail: xypan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Long, Gui-Lu [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  7. Coherent spin control of a nanocavity-enhanced qubit in diamond

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Luozhou; Lu, Ming; Schroder, Tim; Chen, Edward H.; Walsh, Michael; Bayn, Igal; Goldstein, Jordan; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Mower, Jacob; et al

    2015-01-28

    A central aim of quantum information processing is the efficient entanglement of multiple stationary quantum memories via photons. Among solid-state systems, the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond has emerged as an excellent optically addressable memory with second-scale electron spin coherence times. Recently, quantum entanglement and teleportation have been shown between two nitrogen-vacancy memories, but scaling to larger networks requires more efficient spin-photon interfaces such as optical resonators. Here we report such nitrogen-vacancy nanocavity systems in strong Purcell regime with optical quality factors approaching 10,000 and electron spin coherence times exceeding 200 µs using a silicon hard-mask fabrication process. This spin-photon interfacemore »is integrated with on-chip microwave striplines for coherent spin control, providing an efficient quantum memory for quantum networks.« less

  8. Broadband, noise-free optical quantum memory with neutral nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Poem; C. Weinzetl; J. Klatzow; K. T. Kaczmarek; J. H. D. Munns; T. F. M. Champion; D. J. Saunders; J. Nunn; I. A. Walmsley

    2015-04-23

    It is proposed that the ground-state manifold of the neutral nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond could be used as a quantum two-level system in a solid-state-based implementation of a broadband, noise-free quantum optical memory. The proposal is based on the same-spin $\\Lambda$-type three-level system created between the two E orbital ground states and the A$_1$ orbital excited state of the center, and the cross-linear polarization selection rules obtained with the application of transverse electric field or uniaxial stress. Possible decay and decoherence mechanisms of this system are discussed, and it is shown that high-efficiency, noise-free storage of photons as short as a few tens of picoseconds for at least a few nanoseconds could be possible at low temperature.

  9. Resolving single molecule structures with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Kost; Jianming Cai; Martin B. Plenio

    2014-07-23

    We present two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy protocols based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond as efficient quantum sensors of protein structure. Continuous microwave driving fields are used to achieve Hartmann-Hahn resonances between NV spin sensor and proximate nuclei for selective control of nuclear spins and measurement of their polarization. Our protocols take advantage of the strong coupling between the NV sensor and the nuclei, thus facilitating coherence control of nuclear spins and relax the requirement of nuclear spin polarization. We dramatically reduce the experimental effort by employing a singular value thresholding matrix completion algorithm from signal processing to regain the resolution of protein structure based on sub-sampled data from NV based single molecule nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As an illustration, we demonstrate the power of this approach by identifying the nitrogen-Hydrogen interaction peak in an Alanine spectrum based on merely 5% of the sample data.

  10. Creation of ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by neutron and electron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Nöbauer; Kathrin Buczak; Andreas Angerer; Stefan Putz; Georg Steinhauser; Johanna Akbarzadeh; Herwig Peterlik; Johannes Majer; Jörg Schmiedmayer; Michael Trupke

    2013-09-02

    We created dense ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers in diamond by neutron and electron irradiation for applications in hybrid quantum systems and magnetometry. We characterize fluorescence intensity, optical and coherence properties of the resulting defects by confocal microscopy, UV/Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, optically detected magnetic resonance and small angle X-ray scattering. We find the highest densities of NV- at neutron fluences on the order of 10^17 cm^-2 and electron doses of 10^18 cm^-2, with spin resonance linewidths of 6 MHz. Lower electron energies increase the ratio of centers in the desired negative charge state to those in the neutral one. Annealing at 900 {\\deg}C during the irradiation reduces the spin resonance linewidth. Electron irradiation furthermore results in substantially higher optical transparency compared to neutron irradiation.

  11. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-05-15

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {l_brace}100{r_brace} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was {approx}530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/{mu}m) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  12. A neutral oxygen-vacancy center in diamond: A plausible qubit candidate and its spintronic and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. G.; Tang, Z. Zhao, X. G.; Cheng, G. D.; Tu, Y.; Cong, W. T.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Peng, W.

    2014-08-04

    Spintronic and electronic properties of a neutral oxygen-vacancy (O-V) center, an isoelectronic defect similar to the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, were studied by combining first-principles calculations and a mean-field theory for spin hyperfine interaction. It is elucidated that the neutral O-V center is stable in the p-type diamond and possesses an S?=?1 triplet ground state and four spin-conserved excited states with the spin coherence times in an order of second at T?=?0?K. The results indicate that the neutral O-V center is another promising candidate for spin coherent manipulation and qubit operation.

  13. Levitation and collection of diamond fine particles in the rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, S.; Shimizu, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Jacob, W.

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate the levitation of diamond fine particles in a H{sub 2} rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament and heated electrodes. The levitation conditions should be carefully chosen to compensate the strong thermophoretic forces caused by the filament and the electrodes. This levitation technique with the existence of a hot filament can be applied, e.g., for the efficient growth of diamond layers on seed particles injected and levitated in an rf plasma with reactive gases, e.g., CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}. Additionally, the method for direct capture of levitated particles on a planar substrate was established, which is useful if it is necessary to analyze the particles after the levitation.

  14. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Kalpataru E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17?V/?m with high EFE current density of 5.08?mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0?V/?m. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  15. Direct first-principles simulation of a high-performance electron emitter: Lithium-oxide-coated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshi-miyamoto@aist.go.jp; Miyazaki, Takehide [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); JST, ALCA, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    We examined the field emission properties of lithium(Li)/oxygen(O)-co-terminated diamond (001) surface [C(001)-LiO] through real-time electron dynamics simulation under an applied field. The current emitted from this surface was found to be more than four-fold that emitted by an H-terminated (001) surface, the latter being a typical negative electron affinity system. This high performance is attributed to the Li layer, which bends the potential wall of O-induced electron pockets down in the direction of vacuum, thus facilitating electron emission. Detailed analysis of the emitted electrons and the profile of the self-consistent potential elucidated that the role of O atoms changes from an electron barrier on OH-terminated diamond surfaces to an outlet for electron emission on C(001)-LiO.

  16. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, Gaurav; Jensen, David S.; Wiest, Landon A.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Lee, Milton L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2010-06-01

    We report the formation of core-shell diamond particles for solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) made by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. Their synthesis begins with the amine functionalization of microdiamond by its immersion in an aqueous solution of a primary amine-containing polymer (polyallylamine (PAAm)). The amine-terminated microdiamond is then immersed in an aqueous suspension of nanodiamond, which leads to adsorption of the nanodiamond. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing polymer and the suspension of nanodiamond are continued until the desired number of nanodiamond layers is formed around the microdiamond. Finally, the core-shell particles are cross-linked with 1,2,5,6-diepoxycyclooctane or reacted with 1,2-epoxyoctadecane. Layer-by-layer deposition of PAAm and nanodiamond is also studied on planar Si/SiO2 surfaces, which were characterized by SEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Core-shell particles are characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area and pore size measurements. Larger (ca. 50 ?m) core-shell diamond particles have much higher surface areas, and analyte loading capacities in SPE than nonporous solid diamond particles. Smaller (ca. 3 ?m), normal and reversed phase, core-shell diamond particles have been used for HPLC, with 36,300 plates per meter for mesitylene in a separation of benzene and alkyl benzenes on a C18 adsorbent, and 54,800 plates per meter for diazinon in a similar separation of two pesticides.

  17. High-pressure effect on dislocation density in nanosize diamond crystals C. Panteaa,*, J. Gubiczab,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    materials are different from the coarse-grained materials. Diamond nanosize crystals attracted a lot manufacturing, high-pressure and high-tempera- ture treatment may affect structure and properties of crystalsD2 (3 GPa), nD3 (5.5 GPa), and nD4 (8.0 GPa) and the raw powder nD0. In the case of experiments

  18. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Choi, B. K. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Jarvis, J. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, New York 11763 (United States); Prieto, P.; Reid, J. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ?10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15?mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  19. The effect of substrate temperature and growth rate on the doping efficiency of single crystal boron doped diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demlow, SN; Rechenberg, R; Grotjohn, T

    2014-10-01

    The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in single crystal, boron doped diamond (BDD) deposition is investigated. Single crystal diamond (SCD) is grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) type Ib substrates. Samples are grown at substrate temperatures of 850-950 degrees C for each of five doping concentration levels, to determine the effect of the growth temperature on the doping efficiency and defect morphology. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron concentration in the gas phase to the flux of carbon incorporated into the solid diamond phase is shown to be a more predictive measure of the resulting boron concentration than the gas phase boron to carbon ratio that is more commonly reported. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Carpick, R. W.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.

    2007-12-15

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2{+-}2 vs 826{+-}186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2{+-}0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals' interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a direct link between the surface chemistry and nanoscale friction. The proposed mechanism, supported by the detailed surface spectroscopic analysis, is the elimination of reactive (e.g., C*-), polar (e.g., C=O), and {pi}-bonded (C=C) surface groups, which are replaced by fully saturated, hydrogen-terminated surface bonds to produce an inert surface that interacts minimally with the contacting counterface.

  1. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2007-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2 {+-} 2 vs 826 {+-} 186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2 {+-} 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a direct link between the surface chemistry and nanoscale friction. The proposed mechanism, supported by the detailed surface spectroscopic analysis, is the elimination of reactive (e.g., C*-), polar (e.g., C-O), and {pi}-bonded (C-C) surface groups, which are replaced by fully saturated, hydrogen-terminated surface bonds to produce an inert surface that interacts minimally with the contacting counterface.

  2. Timing performances of diamond detectors with Charge Sensitive Ampli?er readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berretti, M; Minafra, N

    2015-01-01

    Research on particle detector based on synthetic diamonds has always been limited by the cost, quality and availability of the sensitive material. Moreover, the read-out electronics requires particular care due to the small number of electron/hole pairs generated by the passage of a minimum ionizing particle. However, high radiation hardness, low leakage currents and high mobility of the electron/hole pairs make them an attractive solution for the time of flight measurements and the beam monitoring of new high energy physics experiments where the severe radiation environment is a limitation for most of the technologies commonly used in particle detection. In this work we report the results on the timing performance of a 4.5x4.5 mm$^{2}$ scCVD sensor read-out using a charge sensitive amplifier. Both sensors and amplifiers have been purchased from CIVIDEC Instrumentation. The measurement have been performed on minimum ionizing pions in two beam tests at the PSI and CERN-PS facilities with two different detec...

  3. Bandgap properties of diamond structure photonic crystal heterostructures with inclined and curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Haitao; Li, Yong; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-06-14

    The 3D (dimensional) diamond structure photonic crystal heterostructures with different lattice constants were prepared using rapid prototyping and gel casting with alumina. In this paper, heterostructures with inclined and curved interfaces were designed and its bandgap properties were studied. The normalized resonant intensity of electromagnetic wave in heterostructure with inclined and curved interface is stronger than that in the ordinary heterostructure without modified interface. The influence of curved interface on transmission properties of electromagnetic wave was investigated with the radius of curvature ranging from 17?mm to 37?mm at 5?mm interval. The results show that two resonant modes appear in the photonic band gap, being similar to the band gap characteristics of the photonic crystals with two defects inside. With the increasing of the radius of curvature, the resonant mode shift to higher frequency. In the structure with a radius of curvature of 32?mm, a guiding band appears in the photonic band gap. Further increase in the radius of curvature, the guiding band will split into two resonant modes again and the two resonant modes shift to lower frequencies.

  4. Planar ultrananocrystalline diamond field emitter in accelerator radio frequency electron injector: Performance metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshev, Sergey V. Antipov, Sergey; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shao, Jiahang; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Pérez Quintero, Kenneth J.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kanareykin, Alexei D.

    2014-11-17

    A case performance study of a planar field emission cathode (FEC) based on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond, (N)UNCD, was carried out in an RF 1.3?GHz electron gun. The FEC was a 100?nm (N)UNCD film grown on a 20?mm diameter stainless steel disk with a Mo buffer layer. At surface gradients 45–65?MV/m, peak currents of 1–80?mA (equivalent to 0.3–25?mA/cm{sup 2}) were achieved. Imaging with two YAG screens confirmed emission from the (N)UNCD surface with (1) the beam emittance of 1.5?mm?×?mrad/mm-rms and (2) longitudinal FWHM and rms widths of non-Gaussian energy spread of 0.7% and 11% at an electron energy of 2?MeV. Current stability was tested over the course of 36?×?10{sup 3} RF pulses (equivalent to 288?×?10{sup 6?}GHz oscillations)

  5. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  6. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  7. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H. [Institute of Nanoengineering and Microsystems (NEMS), National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30043 (China); Bhattacharyya, T. K. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Patel, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Barik, T. K. [School of Applied Sciences, Haldia Institute of Technology, Haldia 721657, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-06-15

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of C-C, C-H, Si-C, and Si-H bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio I{sub D}/I{sub G}. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  8. Stability of 3C-SiC surfaces under diamond growth conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnault, J. C.; Delclos, S.; Saada, S.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, Ph. [CEA DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); CEA DRT-LIST-DETECS, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-01-01

    The present study deals with the interaction of C-terminated c(2x2) and Si-rich 3x2 3C-SiC (100) reconstructed surfaces with a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition used for diamond growth. Pure hydrogen and hydrogen/methane exposures have been carried out. Their effects on the atomic ordering and the stoichiometry within the first planes have been studied in situ using low energy electron diffraction and electron spectroscopies: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray Auger electron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. 5 min plasma exposures result in a lost of the initial reconstructions, a postplasma oxygen contamination, and strong modifications of the stoichiometry within the first planes. Indeed, the stability of well defined 3C-SiC surfaces depends strongly on their termination: C-terminated surface exhibits a high inertia while the Si-rich surface undergoes partial etching. The three first silicon atomic planes involved in the 3x2 reconstruction are removed upon pure hydrogen plasma while a monolayer is preserved after hydrogen/methane exposure.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave plasma and fast growth rate of diamond single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derkaoui, N.; Rond, C. Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A.

    2014-06-21

    One of the best ways to increase the diamond growth rate is to couple high microwave power to the plasma. Indeed, increasing the power density leads to increase gas temperature the atomic hydrogen density in the plasma bulk, and to produce more hydrogen and methyl at the diamond surface. Experimental and numerical approaches were used to study the microwave plasma under high power densities conditions. Gas temperature was measured by optical emission spectroscopy and H-atom density using actinometry. CH{sub 3}-radical density was obtained using a 1D model that describes temperatures and plasma composition from the substrate to the top of the reactor. The results show that gas temperature in the plasma bulk, atomic hydrogen, and methyl densities at the diamond surface highly increase with the power density. As a consequence, measurements have shown that diamond growth rate also increases. At very high power density, we measured a growth rate of 40??m/h with an H-atom density of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup ?3} which corresponds to a H{sub 2} dissociation rate higher than 50%. Finally, we have shown that the growth rate can be framed between a lower and an upper limit as a function depending only on the maximum of H-atom density measured or calculated in the plasma bulk. The results also demonstrated that increasing fresh CH{sub 4} by an appropriate injection into the boundary layer is a potential way to increase the diamond growth rates.

  10. Model-Based Diagnostics for Air-Handling Units Salsbury and Diamond 1 ModelModel--Based Diagnostics for Air Handling UnitsBased Diagnostics for Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Based Diagnostics for Air-Handling Units ­ Salsbury and Diamond 1 ModelModel--Based Diagnostics for Air Handling UnitsBased Diagnostics for Air Handling Units Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Introduction In most large air-conditioned buildings, air-handling units

  11. Using deep-probing EM studies as an aid to area selection of diamond provinces Alan G. Jones*, Continental Geoscience Division, Geological Survey of Canada, 615 Booth St., Ottawa, On-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    , they can contribute to knowledge about a re- gion's tectonic history, and they can identify whether Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons. North America's first commercial diamond mine, BHP Billiton Diamonds' Ekati mine, was opened in 1999 in the center of the Slave craton of northern Canada, and provides 5

  12. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 16 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 20 APRIL 1998 Microscopic Mechanism for Mechanical Polishing of Diamond (110) Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijmegen, University of

    for Mechanical Polishing of Diamond (110) Surfaces M. R. Jarvis,1 Ruben Pérez,2 F. M. van Bouwelen,3 and M. C. Payne1 1 Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road of diamond, as occurs during polishing, is studied using total- energy pseudopotential calculations

  13. A nitrogen doped low-dislocation density free-standing single crystal diamond plate fabricated by a lift-off process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokuno, Yoshiaki Kato, Yukako; Tsubouchi, Nobuteru; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Hideaki; Shikata, Shinichi

    2014-06-23

    A nitrogen-doped single crystal diamond plate with a low dislocation density is fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a high pressure high temperature synthetic type IIa seed substrate by ion implantation and lift-off processes. To avoid sub-surface damage, the seed surface was subjected to deep ion beam etching. In addition, we introduced a nitrogen flow during the CVD step to grow low-strain diamond at a relatively high growth rate. This resulted in a plate with low birefringence and a dislocation density as low as 400?cm{sup ?2}, which is the lowest reported value for a lift-off plate. Reproducing this lift-off process may allow mass-production of single crystal CVD diamond plates with low dislocation density and consistent quality.

  14. Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2005-09-30

    This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

  15. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  16. Pulsed-Laser Deposited Amorphous Diamond and Related Materials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Field Emission Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor, L.R.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1999-01-23

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp{sup 3} content were produced by ArF (193nm) pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C{sup +} ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15{degree} angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near-optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only {approximately} 1 {angstrom} over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of {approximately}50 V/{micro}m was required to draw current of {approximately}1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  17. Relationship between the structure and electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takabayashi, Susumu Otsuji, Taiichi; Yang, Meng; Ogawa, Shuichi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ješko, Radek; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2014-09-07

    To elucidate the relationship between the structure and the electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, DLC films were synthesized in a well-controlled glow discharge with the aid of photoelectrons in an argon/methane atmosphere. The dielectric constant and breakdown strength of the films exhibited opposite behaviors, depending on the total pressure during the synthesis. The product of these two values decreased monotonically as the pressure increased. The Raman spectra were analyzed with a Voigt-type formula. Based on the results, the authors propose the “sp{sup 2} cluster model” for the DLC structure. This model consists of conductive clusters of sp{sup 2} carbons surrounded by a dielectric matrix sea of sp{sup 2} carbon, sp{sup 3} carbon, and hydrogen, and indicates that the dielectric constant of the whole DLC film is determined by the balance between the dielectric constant of the matrix and the total size of the clusters, while the breakdown strength is determined by the reciprocal of the cluster size. The model suggests that a high-? DLC film can be synthesized at a middle pressure and consists of well-grown sp{sup 2} clusters and a dense matrix. A low-? DLC film can be synthesized both at low and high pressures. The sp{sup 2} cluster model explains that a low-? DLC film synthesized at low pressure consists of a dense matrix and a low density of sp{sup 2} clusters, and exhibits a high breakdown strength. On the other hand, a low-? film synthesized at high pressure consists of a coarse matrix and a high density of clusters and exhibits a low breakdown strength.

  18. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazzaniga, C., E-mail: carlo.cazzaniga@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M. [Department of Physics “G. Occhialini,” University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy) [Department of Physics “G. Occhialini,” University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy)] [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M. [Department of Physics “G. Occhialini,” University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Physics “G. Occhialini,” University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Griesmayer, E. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)] [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Kaveney, G.; Syme, B. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham OX143DB (United Kingdom)] [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham OX143DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  19. High-frequency and high-field optically detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Stepanov; Franklin H. Cho; Chathuranga Abeywardana; Susumu Takahashi

    2015-02-11

    We present the development of an optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) system, which enables us to perform the ODMR measurements of a single defect in solids at high frequencies and high magnetic fields. Using the high-frequency and high-field ODMR system, we demonstrate 115 GHz continuous-wave and pulsed ODMR measurements of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a diamond crystal at the magnetic field of 4.2 Tesla as well as investigation of field dependence ($0-8$ Tesla) of the longitudinal relaxation time ($T_1$) of NV centers in nanodiamonds.

  20. Energy levels and decoherence properties of single electron and nuclear spins in a defect center in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Popa; T. Gaebel; M. Domhan; C. Wittmann; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

    2004-09-12

    The coherent behavior of the single electron and single nuclear spins of a defect center in diamond and a 13C nucleus in its vicinity, respectively, are investigated. The energy levels associated with the hyperfine coupling of the electron spin of the defect center to the 13C nuclear spin are analyzed. Methods of magnetic resonance together with optical readout of single defect centers have been applied in order to observe the coherent dynamics of the electron and nuclear spins. Long coherence times, in the order of microseconds for electron spins and tens of microseconds for nuclear spins, recommend the studied system as a good experimental approach for implementing a 2-qubit gate.

  1. The role of carbon in extrasolar planetary geodynamics and habitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterborn, Cayman T.; Kabbes, Jason E.; Pigott, Jeffrey S.; Panero, Wendy R. [School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 South Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Reaman, Daniel M., E-mail: unterborn.1@buckeyemail.osu.edu [US Army Research Laboratory, RDRL-WML-B (Bldg. 390), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The proportions of oxygen, carbon, and major rock-forming elements (e.g., Mg, Fe, Si) determine a planet's dominant mineralogy. Variation in a planet's mineralogy subsequently affects planetary mantle dynamics as well as any deep water or carbon cycle. Through thermodynamic models and high pressure diamond anvil cell experiments, we demonstrate that the oxidation potential of C is above that of Fe at all pressures and temperatures, indicative of 0.1-2 Earth-mass planets. This means that for a planet with (Mg+2Si+Fe+2C)/O > 1, excess C in the mantle will be in the form of diamond. We find that an increase in C, and thus diamond, concentration slows convection relative to a silicate-dominated planet, due to diamond's ?3 order of magnitude increase in both viscosity and thermal conductivity. We assert then that in the C-(Mg+2Si+Fe)-O system, there is a compositional range in which a planet can be habitable. Planets outside of this range will be dynamically sluggish or stagnant, thus having limited carbon or water cycles leading to surface conditions inhospitable to life as we know it.

  2. Elastic properties, sp³ fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Burgess, Katherine; Jia, Ruth; Sharma, Shiv; Ming, Li-Chung; Liu, Yongsheng; Ciston, Jim; Hong, Shiming

    2014-10-07

    Dense BC{sub x} phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BC{sub x} (dl-BC{sub x}) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BC{sub x} phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BC{sub x} phases depend on the carbon sp²versus sp³ content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BC{sub x} after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp³ fraction, the shear modulus ? of dl-BC?, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, and dl-B?C?, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, were found to be ? = 19.3 GPa and ? = 170 GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp³ bonds during the deposition processes.

  3. Investigation of free charge carrier dynamics in single-crystalline CVD diamond by two-photon absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivakin, E V; Kisialiou, I G [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P; Ashkinazi, E E [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sharonov, G V [A.N. Sevchenko Research Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-11-30

    By using the methods of transient gratings (TGs) and induced absorption, we have studied the kinetics of plasma of free charge carriers (FCCs) created by the action of a picosecond laser pulse in two high-purity diamond single crystals synthesised from the gas phase. The gratings with different spatial periods have been excited at the wavelengths of 266 or 213 nm (above and below the fundamental absorption edge in diamond) and probed with continuous-wave radiation in the visible region. At the moderate FCC concentrations (?7 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}), the coefficient of ambipolar diffusion and the carrier recombination time of two crystals are 20.3 and 18.9 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and 30 and 190 ns, respectively. The increase in the carrier concentration up to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} reduces the TG lifetime. We have determined the conditions under which the relaxation of the grating of carriers leads to the formation of a thermal grating, with the amplitude sufficient for its experimental observation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  4. Fundamentals and technology for monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches with ultra-nanocrystaline diamond dielectric/CMOS devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Sumant, A.; Goldsmith, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.; Gudeman, C; Wang, W.; Hwang, J.; Swonger, J.; Carlisle, J.; Balachandran, S.; MEMtronics Corp.; Innovative Micro Technology; Lehigh Univ.; Peregrine Semiconductor; Advanced Diamond Technologies

    2010-01-01

    Most current capacitive RF-MEMS switch technology is based on conventional dielectric materials such as SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. However, they suffer not only from charging problems but also stiction problems leading to premature failure of an RF-MEMS switch. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{sup (R)}) (2-5 nm grains) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) (10-100 nm grains) films exhibit one of the highest Young's modulus ({approx} 980-1100 GPa) and demonstrated MEMS resonators with the highest quality factor (Q {ge} 10,000 in air for NCD) today, they also exhibit the lowest force of adhesion among MEMS/NEMS materials ({approx}10 mJ/m{sup 2}-close to van der Waals attractive force for UNCD) demonstrated today. Finally, UNCD exhibits dielectric properties (fast discharge) superior to those of Si and SiO{sub 2}, as shown in this paper. Thus, UNCD and NCD films provide promising platform materials beyond Si for a new generation of important classes of high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices.

  5. Fundamentals and application of materials integration for low-power piezoelectrically actuated ultra-nanocrystalline diamond MEMS/NEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O.; Srinivasan, S.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD)

    2009-01-01

    Most current micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) are based on silicon. However, silicon exhibits relatively poor mechanical/tribological properties, compromising applications to several projected MEMS/NEMS devices, particularly those that require materials with high Young's modulus for MEMS resonators or low surface adhesion forces for MEMS/NEMS working in conditions with extensive surface contact. Diamond films with superior mechanical/tribological properties provide an excellent alternative platform material. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{cflx W}) in film form with 2-5 nm grains exhibits excellent properties for high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices. Concurrently, piezoelectric Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x})O{sub 3} (PZT) films provide high sensitivity/low electrical noise for sensing/high-force actuation at relatively low voltages. Therefore, integration of PZT and UNCD films provides a high-performance platform for advanced MEMS/NEMS devices. This paper describes the bases of such integration and demonstration of low voltage piezoactuated hybrid PZT/UNCD cantilevers.

  6. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of nanocrystalline diamond: An ab initio approach J. Filik, J. N. Harvey, N. L. Allan, and P. W. May*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    crystals is controversial; the origins of peaks at 1150 cm-1 in chemical vapor deposition nanodiamond films and 500 cm-1 in nanodiamond particles, which have both been suggested as evidence for nanophase material to C84H64, an octahedral 1 nm-sized diamond crystallite. For comparison with nanodiamond thin films

  8. Diamond and Related Materials 12 (2003) 18581861 0925-9635/03/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    2003-01-01

    polished single crystal high-pressure high-temperature diamond substrates using microwave plasma chemical pressure arc w3x, laser ablation w4x and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) w5­7x have been developed end with a carbon dome. Similarly, carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been prepared by microwave plasma

  9. Diamond and Related Materials 13 (2004) 561568 0925-9635/04/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    2004-01-01

    spectroscopy 1. Introduction DC arc jet plasmas operating with CH yH yAr gas4 2 mixtures enable chemical vapour number density2 distributions in a DC arc jet used for diamond chemical vapour deposition C.J. Rennick Institute, Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow, Russiab Abstract Modelling studies of the plasma

  10. Highly c-axis oriented GaN films grown on free-standing diamond substrates for high-power devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, J.M., E-mail: jmbian@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin, F.W.; Wang, J.; Pan, L. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, J.M. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Y.; Bai, Y.Z. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Du, G.T. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} GaN films are deposited on diamond substrates by ECR-PEMOCVD. {yields} Influence of deposition temperature on the properties of samples is investigated. {yields} Properties of GaN films are dependent on the deposition temperature. -- Abstract: GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are deposited on free-standing thick diamond films by low temperature electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PEMOCVD). The TMGa and N{sub 2} are applied as precursors of Ga and N, respectively. The quality of as-grown GaN films are systematically investigated as a function of deposition temperature by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Hall Effect measurement (HL), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the dense and uniformed GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are successfully achieved on free-standing diamond substrates under optimized deposition temperature of 400 {sup o}C, and the room temperature PL spectra of the optimized GaN film show a intense ultraviolet near band edge emission and a weak yellow luminescence. The obtained GaN/diamond structure has great potential for the development of high-power semiconductor devices due to its excellent heat dissipation nature.

  11. Cell Stem Cell Stem Cell States, Fates,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Carsten

    Cell Stem Cell Review Stem Cell States, Fates, and the Rules of Attraction Tariq Enver,1 Martin Pera,2 Carsten Peterson,3,4 and Peter W. Andrews5,* 1The Molecular Haematology Unit, The Weatherall and their relationship to commitment to differ- entiate and lineage selection can be elucidated in terms of a landscape

  12. Radiative sensitivities of tropical anvils to small ice crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles S.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    that the saturation vapor pressure drops relative to planarkm, S,- ~ 65%. The vapor pressure gradient from the crystal

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The evolution of anvil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds, Aerosols,Comparisonatvariability:Best-Estimatemicrophysics

  14. Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts[TRI-PARTYInnovationHeterogeneousWesternIN

  15. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer-Nolte, E.; Wrachtrup, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany) [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); 3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Reinhard, F. [3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Ternes, M., E-mail: m.ternes@fkf.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, K. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany) [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matière Condenseé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  16. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  17. Nanodiamond as a vector for siRNA delivery to Ewing sarcoma cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhaddad, Anna; Botsoa, Jacques; Dantelle, Géraldine; Perruchas, Sandrine; Gacoin, Thierry; Mansuy, Christelle; Lavielle, Solange; Malvy, Claude; Treussart, François; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the ability of diamond nanoparticles (nanodiamonds, NDs) to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) in Ewing sarcoma cells, in the perspective of in vivo anti-cancer nucleic acid drug delivery. siRNA was adsorbed onto NDs previously coated with cationic polymer. Cell uptake of NDs has been demonstrated by taking advantage of NDs intrinsic fluorescence coming from embedded color center defects. Cell toxicity of these coated NDs was shown to be low. Consistent with the internalization efficacy, we have shown a specific inhibition of EWS/Fli-1 gene expression at the mRNA and protein level by the ND vectorized siRNA in a serum containing medium.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01

    The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

  19. Simulation of ultraviolet- and soft X-ray-pulse generation as a result of cooperative recombination of excitons in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukushkin, V. A., E-mail: vakuk@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Using numerical simulation, it is shown that the recombination of free excitons photoexcited in diamond nanocrystals embedded in a polymer film can occur in the cooperative mode. It is found that this mode can be implemented despite the fact that diamond is an 'indirect' semiconductor. It is shown that the power of the generated radiation at the pulse peak during the cooperative recombination of free excitons can exceed that of the incoherent spontaneous emission of the same initial number of free excitons by more than an order of magnitude. Finally, it is shown that the process under consideration can be used to generate picosecond pulses of ultraviolet and soft X-ray electromagnetic field at a wavelength of 235 nm.

  20. Method and article of manufacture corresponding to a composite comprised of ultra nonacrystalline diamond, metal, and other nanocarbons useful for thermoelectric and other applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2010-05-18

    One provides (101) disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered crystallites that are each sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then reacts (102) these crystallites with a metallic component. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also substantially preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material. The reaction process can comprise combining (201) the crystallites with one or more metal salts in an aqueous solution and then heating (203) that aqueous solution to remove the water. This heating can occur in a reducing atmosphere (comprising, for example, hydrogen and/or methane) to also reduce the salt to metal.

  1. Fabrication and testing of diamond-machined gratings in ZnSe, GaP, and bismuth germanate for the near infrared and visible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2008-06-22

    High quality immersion gratings for infrared applications have been demonstrated in silicon and germanium. To extend this technology to shorter wavelengths other materials must be investigated. We selected three materials, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide and bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}), based on high refractive index, good visible transmission and commercial availability in useful sizes. Crystal samples were diamond turned on an ultra-precision lathe to identify preferred cutting directions. Using this information we diamond-flycut test gratings over a range of feed rates to determine the optimal cutting conditions. For both ZnSe and GaP good surface quality was achieved at feed rates up to 1.0 cm/minute using a special compound angle diamond tool with negative rake angles on both cutting surfaces. The surface roughness of the groove facets was about 4 nm. A Zygo interferometer measured grating wavefront errors in reflection. For the ZnSe the RMS error was < {lambda}/20 at 633nm. More extensive testing was performed with a HeNe laser source and a cooled CCD camera. These measurements demonstrated high relative diffraction efficiency (> 80%), low random groove error (2.0 nm rms), and Rowland ghost intensities at < 0.1%. Preliminary tests on bismuth germanate show high tool wear.

  2. CELL TYPES, DIFFERENTIAL CELL COUNTS, AND BLOOD CELL MEASUREMENTS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    examined under oil immersion at 800 and 1200 power. Cells were measured at 800 power. Cell classificationCELL TYPES, DIFFERENTIAL CELL COUNTS, AND BLOOD CELL MEASUREMENTS OF A PORTUGUESE SHARK describe the cell types, differential cell counts, and measurements of both the erythrocytes and leukocytes

  3. Pressure dependence on the reaction propagation rate of PETN at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, M.F.

    1993-04-01

    The reaction propagation rate (RPR) of the sensitive high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was measured in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) over the pressure range of 2--20 GPa. The experimental technique used is the same as that previously reported. The RPR data shows that it burns one to two orders of magnitude faster in the DAC than 1,3,5,-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) respectively. The PETN RPR curve did not show sample pressure-dependent behavior like that of nitromethane, but instead varied abruptly like the RPR curve of TATB. In order to interpret these changes, static-pressure DAC mid-IR FTIR spectra were taken of micro-pellets of PETN embedded in KBr. The relationship between changes in the spectra, the RPR curve, and published single crystal PETN wedge test data are discussed.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l'Energie Atomique,; F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

  5. Transport signatures of quantum critically in Cr at high pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaramillo, R.; Feng, Y.; Wang, J.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-08-03

    The elemental antiferromagnet Cr at high pressure presents a new type of naked quantum critical point that is free of disorder and symmetry-breaking fields. Here we measure magnetotransport in fine detail around the critical pressure, P{sub c} {approx} 10 GPa, in a diamond anvil cell and reveal the role of quantum critical fluctuations at the phase transition. As the magnetism disappears and T {yields} 0, the magntotransport scaling converges to a non-mean-field form that illustrates the reconstruction of the magnetic Fermi surface, and is distinct from the critical scaling measured in chemically disordered Cr:V under pressure. The breakdown of itinerant antiferromagnetism only comes clearly into view in the clean limit, establishing disorder as a relevant variable at a quantum phase transition.

  6. Structural transition and amorphization in compressed ? - Sb 2 O 3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Zhao; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Shibing; Hirai, Shigeto; Zeng, Zhidan; Mao, Wendy L.

    2015-05-27

    Sb?O?-based materials are of broad interest in materials science and industry. High-pressure study using diamond anvil cells shows promise in obtaining new crystal and electronic structures different from their pristine states. Here, we conducted in situ angle dispersive synchrotron x-ray-diffraction and Raman spectroscopy experiments on ?-Sb?O? up to 50 GPa with neon as the pressure transmitting medium. A first-order structural transition was observed in between 15 and 20 GPa, where the cubic phase I gradually transformed into a layered tetragonal phase II through structural distortion and symmetry breaking. To explain the dramatic changes in sample color and transparency, we performedmore »first-principles calculations to track the evolution of its density of states and electronic structure under pressure. At higher pressure, a sluggish amorphization was observed. Our results highlight the structural connections among the sesquioxides, where the lone electron pair plays an important role in determining the local structures.« less

  7. Static and dynamic high pressure experiments on cerium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Velisavljevic, Nenad [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cherne, Frank J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Gerald [NST, STL; Tschauner, Oliver [UNIV OF NEVADA

    2011-01-25

    There is a scientific need to obtain dynamic data to develop and validate multi phase equation-of-state (EOS) models for metals. Experiments are needed to examine the relevant pure phases, to locate phase boundaries and the associated transition kinetics, and other material properties such as strength. Cerium is an ideal material for such work because it exhibits a complex multiphase diagram at relatively moderate pressures readily accessible using standard shock wave methods. In the current work, shock wave (dynamic) and diamond anvil cell (static) experiments were performed to examine the high pressure, low temperature region of the phase diagram to obtain EOS data and to search for the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} boundary. Past work examining the shock-melt transition and the low-pressure {gamma}-{alpha} transition will be presented in brief followed by details of recent results obtained from DAC and double-shock experiments.

  8. Prediction of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns in arbitrarily strained samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; McGonegle, David, E-mail: d.mcgonegle1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07

    The prediction of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from strained samples is typically conducted in the small strain limit. Although valid for small deviations from the hydrostat (such as the conditions of finite strength typically observed in diamond anvil cells) this assertion is likely to fail for the large strain anisotropies (often of order 10% in normal strain) found in uniaxially loaded dynamic compression experiments. In this paper, we derive a general form for the (?{sub B},?) dependence of the diffraction for an arbitrarily deformed polycrystalline sample in any geometry, and of any crystal symmetry. We show that this formula is consistent with ray traced diffraction for highly strained computationally generated polycrystals, and that the formula shows deviations from the widely used small strain solutions previously reported.

  9. The Frenkel Line: a direct experimental evidence for the new thermodynamic boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zav'yalov, D; Tkachev, S N; Cunsolo, A; Cai, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluids play a significant role in elucidating fundamental aspects of liquid matter under extreme conditions. They have been extensively studied at pressures and temperatures relevant to various industrial applications. However, much less is known about the structural behaviour of supercritical fluids and no structural crossovers have been observed in static compression experiments in any temperature and pressure ranges beyond the critical point. The structure of supercritical state is currently perceived to be uniform everywhere on the phase diagram, and to change only in a monotonic way while moving along any pressure and temperature path beyond the critical point and its neighborhood. Conversely, we observe structural crossovers in a deeply supercritical sample through diffraction measurements in a diamond anvil cell and discover a new thermodynamic boundary on the pressure-temperature diagram. We explain the existence of these crossovers in the framework of the phonon theory of liquids using ...

  10. Evidence for photo-induced monoclinic metallic VO{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David A.; Andrea Artioli, Gianluca; Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-13

    We combine ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy with a diamond-anvil cell to decouple the insulator-metal electronic transition from the lattice symmetry changing structural transition in the archetypal strongly correlated material vanadium dioxide. Coherent phonon spectroscopy enables tracking of the photo-excited phonon vibrational frequencies of the low temperature, monoclinic (M{sub 1})-insulating phase that transforms into the metallic, tetragonal rutile structured phase at high temperature or via non-thermal photo-excitations. We find that in contrast with ambient pressure experiments where strong photo-excitation promptly induces the electronic transition along with changes in the lattice symmetry, at high pressure, the coherent phonons of the monoclinic (M{sub 1}) phase are still clearly observed upon the photo-driven phase transition to a metallic state. These results demonstrate the possibility of synthesizing and studying transient phases under extreme conditions.

  11. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, amore »finding in stark contrast to DAC data.« less

  12. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  13. Directivity patterns and pulse profiles of ultrasound emitted by laser action on interface between transparent and opaque solids: Analytical theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikitin, Sergey M. E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Tournat, Vincent; Chigarev, Nikolay; Castagnede, Bernard; Gusev, Vitalyi E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Bulou, Alain; Zerr, Andreas

    2014-01-28

    The analytical theory for the directivity patterns of ultrasounds emitted from laser-irradiated interface between two isotropic solids is developed. It is valid for arbitrary combinations of transparent and opaque materials. The directivity patterns are derived both in two-dimensional and in three-dimensional geometries, by accounting for the specific features of the sound generation by the photo-induced mechanical stresses distributed in the volume, essential in the laser ultrasonics. In particular, the theory accounts for the contribution to the emitted propagating acoustic fields from the converted by the interface evanescent photo-generated compression-dilatation waves. The precise analytical solutions for the profiles of longitudinal and shear acoustic pulses emitted in different directions are proposed. The developed theory can be applied for dimensional scaling, optimization, and interpretation of the high-pressure laser ultrasonics experiments in diamond anvil cell.

  14. Bent Diamond Crystals and Multilayer Based Optics at the new 5-Station Protein Crystallography Beamline 'Cassiopeia' at MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammen, Christian B.; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Ursby, Thomas; Thunnissen, Marjolein

    2004-05-12

    A new 5-station beamline for protein crystallography is being commissioned at the Swedish synchrotron light source MAX-II at Lund University. Of the 2K/{gamma} = 14 mrad horizontal wiggler fan, the central 2 mrad are used and split in three parts. The central 1 mrad will be used for a station optimized for MAD experiments and on each side of the central fan, from 0.5 mrad to 1 mrad, there are two fixed energy stations using different energies of the same part of the beam. These, in total five stations, can be used simultaneously and independently for diffraction data collection. The two upstream monochromators for the side stations are meridionally bent asymmetric diamond(111) crystals in Laue transmission geometry. The monochromators for the downstream side stations are bent Ge(111) crystals in asymmetric Bragg reflection geometry. Curved multilayer mirrors inserted in the monochromatic beams provide focusing in the vertical plane. The first side station is under commissioning, and a preliminary test protein data set has been collected.

  15. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakins, D. E. Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  16. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  17. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-02-01

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

  18. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  19. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  20. Load cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  1. Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance--Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2003-10-01

    This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2002 through September 2002. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit--fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. Accomplishments to date include the following: 4Q 2002--Project started; Industry Team was assembled; Kick-off meeting was held at DOE Morgantown; 1Q 2003--Engineering meeting was held at Hughes Christensen, The Woodlands Texas to prepare preliminary plans for development and testing and review equipment needs; Operators started sending information regarding their needs for deep drilling challenges and priorities for large-scale testing experimental matrix; Aramco joined the Industry Team as DEA 148 objectives paralleled the DOE project; 2Q 2003--Engineering and planning for high pressure drilling at TerraTek commenced; 3Q 2003--Continuation of engineering and design work for high pressure drilling at TerraTek; Baker Hughes INTEQ drilling Fluids and Hughes Christensen commence planning for Phase 1 testing--recommendations for bits and fluids.

  2. Fast growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films by bias-enhanced nucleation and growth process in CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Dong, C. L. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-05

    This letter describes the fast growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films by bias-enhanced nucleation and growth process in CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma. The UNCD grains were formed at the beginning of the film's growth without the necessity of forming the amorphous carbon interlayer, reaching a thickness of ?380?nm in 10?min. Transmission electron microscopic investigations revealed that the application of bias voltage induced the formation of graphitic phase both in the interior and at the interface regions of UNCD films that formed interconnected paths, facilitating the transport of electrons and resulting in enhanced electron field emission properties.

  3. Rabi Waves and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-03-06

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves - has been experimentally identified for the first time. Raman spectra in perfect quasi-1D carbon nanotubes are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D carbon nanotubes of larger diameter. They characterized by vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice and its revival part in frequency representation, which is the consequence of Rabi wave packet formation.

  4. Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Fuel Cells TM Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power A Fuel Cell System Developer-17, 2002 Phoenix, Arizona #12;Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power Outline (1 Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

  5. Cell Stem Cell The Systematic Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Cell Stem Cell Review The Systematic Production of Cells for Cell Therapies Daniel C. Kirouac1 to guide the development of next-generation technologies capable of producing cell-based products in a safe will enhance cell therapy product quality and safety, expediting clinical development. Breakthroughs

  6. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

  7. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  8. An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek

    2007-06-30

    A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

  9. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, George W. (2328 Ashwood, Norman, OK 73069)

    1983-01-01

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

  10. Photoelectrodialytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, G.W.

    1983-09-13

    A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment. 3 figs.

  11. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    research on organic photovoltaic cells since small molecule10 years prior (4). Photovoltaic cells with an active layerof the associated photovoltaic cells. 2.4 Charge transport

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Reforming for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells," Berichte derVan Dijkum, "The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Programme in thealkaline, molten carbonate, and solid oxide. (Fuel cells

  13. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensionalinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  14. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    nanocrystal-polymer solar cells The full potential of hybridto reach the full potential of polymer blend solar cells.solar cells described here offer several potential

  15. Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  16. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell...

  17. Electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-12-23

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell having a metal anode wherein the metal is selected from zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal bromide having the same metal as the metal of the anode. The improvement described here comprises: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte, the complexing agent consisting solely of a quaternary ammonium salt of an N-organo substituted alpha amino acid, ester, or betaine.

  18. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  19. Diamond Pixel Luminosity Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2014-12-23

    In this document, Halyo summaries her key contributions to CMS at the LHC and provide an explanation of their importance and her role in each project. At the end Halyo describes her recent research interest that includes GPU/MIC Acceleration of the High Level Trigger (HLT) to Extend the Physics Research at the LHC. A descriptionof her work the recent promising results that she accomplished and the deliverable are also elaborated. These contribution were only possible thanks to DOE support of junior faculty research and their clear goal to promote research and innovations. #3;Princeton University i

  20. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-10

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

  1. Charge exchange neutral particle measurements with natural diamond detector under the deuterium-deuterium neutron field on JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kusama, Y.; Takechi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A.; Kaschuck, Yu. A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-0193 (Japan); Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gihu 509-5292 (Japan); Troitsk Institute of Innovating and Fusion Research (TRINITI) Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092 (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-01

    A natural diamond detector (NDD) has been installed on the JT-60U tokamak to measure the flux and the energy distribution of charge exchange (CX) fast neutral particles. A NDD has many important advantages to be used as a CX neutral particle analyzer, for example very compact size, high energy resolution, and high radiation hardness etc., while the neutrons and {gamma} rays are a large noise source in the deuterium plasma. The shield was set up around the NDD to reduce those noises. Time-resolved energy distribution of CX neutral particles corresponding to injected beam energy have been successfully obtained under high intensity neutron yield Y{sub n}>10{sup 15} n/s. Further enhanced neutral particle fluxes during sawtooth oscillation and Alfven eigenmodes were observed with the NDD. The performance of the NDD as CX neutral particle spectrometer under high intensity neutron yield was demonstrated for the first time on JT-60U in this work.

  2. Electron Spin Resonance Shift and Linewidth Broadening of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond as a Function of Electron Irradiation Dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwin Kim; Victor M. Acosta; Erik Bauch; Dmitry Budker; Philip R. Hemmer

    2012-08-09

    A high-nitrogen-concentration diamond sample was subject to 200-keV electron irradiation using a transmission electron microscope. The optical and spin-resonance properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers were investigated as a function of the irradiation dose up to 6.4\\times1021 e-/cm2. The microwave transition frequency of the NV- center was found to shift by up to 0.6% (17.1 MHz) and the linewidth broadened with increasing electron-irradiation dose. Unexpectedly, the measured magnetic sensitivity is best at the lowest irradiation dose, even though the NV concentration increases monotonically with increasing dose. This is in large part due to a sharp reduction in optically-detected spin contrast at higher doses.

  3. Cell Stem Cell Sic Transit Gloria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Ben

    Cell Stem Cell Review Sic Transit Gloria: Farewell to the Epidermal Transit Amplifying Cell? Philip H. Jones,1,* Benjamin D. Simons,2 and Fiona M. Watt3,4 1MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research basement membrane (Figures 1D and 1F). On commitment to terminal differen- tiation, basal keratinocytes

  4. The influence of surface interactions on the reversibility of ferri/ferrocyanide at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granger, M.C.; Swain, G.M.

    1999-12-01

    The electrochemistry of four redox analytes [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup +2/+3}, IrCl{sub 6}{sup {minus}2/{minus}3}, and methyl viologen, MV{sup +2/+/0}] was investigated at polycrystalline, boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes before and after anodic polarization and hydrogen plasma treatment. The as-deposited diamond surface is predominantly hydrogen treatment, and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammograms ({Delta}E{sub p} of 60--80 mV) were observed for all of these couples at 0.1 V/s. After anodic polarization in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the surface atomic O/C ratio, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, increased from 0.02 to ca. 0.20. Concomitant with the increase in surface oxygen, the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} increased to over 200 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other redox systems remained relatively unchanged. After acid washing and rehydrogenating the surface in hydrogen plasma (i.e., atomic hydrogen), the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} returned to ca. 80 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other three redox analytes remained close to the original values. The results demonstrate the electron transfer for ferri/ferrocyanide is very sensitive to the presence of surface carbon-oxygen functionalities and that the electron transfer involves a site associated with the hydrogen-terminated surface. The results also unequivocally rule out the influence of adventitious nondiamond phases as the sole sites for the electron transfer.

  5. (Fuel Cells)(Fuel Cells) William Grove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang-Yuan

    Fuel Cell #12; H2 O2 Power CH4 H2 Toyota H2 H2 #12; H2 ~253 #12; 2. 3. : 1. #12; #12;Fuel Cell #12; (Fuel Cells)(Fuel Cells) 1839 William Grove A H2O2 H2O2 2H; Fuel Cell #12;!! PEMFC DMFC SOFC (60~200) (60~100) (600~1000) #12; Proton

  6. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  7. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55?GPa at 300?K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0}?=?174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, ?{sub G}{sup TO?}=?1.26 and ?{sub G}{sup LO?}=?1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which ?{sub G}{sup TO?}>??{sub G}{sup LO?}??1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant ? is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???0.25 at 0.1?MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???2.5 at 45?GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  8. Adult Stem Cells & Homeostasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    · Tissue models for studying adult stem cells · Experimental assays · Adult stem cell & Cancer · Adult stem in many organs/tissues · Adult stem cells self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis #12;Stem Cell & Progenitor ·long-term self-renewal ·generate all differentiated cells of an organ

  9. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Overview of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office...

  10. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  11. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    cell. The solar cell’s power conversion efficiency, ? is theEfficiency ..5 Thermal Managements of SolarTemperature on Efficiency Photons incident on a solar cell

  12. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    D. Mills, "Cooling of photovoltaic cells under concentratedelectric performance of a photovoltaic cells by cooling andof Photovoltaic Solar Cell A photovoltaic cell is a

  13. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    basic bilayer CdTe/CdSe solar cells described above. Figurecomplete CdTe/CdSe nanocrystal solar cell (B). gap variationlength for CdSe-P3HT hybrid solar cells. (b) Current-voltage

  14. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    of organic based solar cells and distinguish them from theirNov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensionalinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recent

  15. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish themThe organic donor-acceptor solar cell relies on a type II

  16. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    of organic based solar cells and distinguish them from theirinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentNov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional

  17. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  18. Cell Stem Cell Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a promising source of patient-specific cells for disease modeling self-renewal and multili- neage potential in vitro and maintained primitive CD34+ CD38Ã? cells., 2013), and others. These lines have the potential to become powerful models to gain insight

  19. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    will enable optimal solar cell efficiencies in multiple bandlow cost, high efficiency hybrid solar cells. 4.6 Conclusioncosts and improving efficiencies of solar photovoltaic

  20. Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Argonne National Laboratory Thursday, August 11, 2011 Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC) Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project: * Joe Bonadies - Delphi * Rick...

  1. STEM CELLS A CLOSER DIFFERENT KINDS OF STEM CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    STEM CELLS ­ A CLOSER LOOK John Sun Bio 118Q #12;DIFFERENT KINDS OF STEM CELLS Embryonic Stem Cells Adult Stem Cells From Bone Marrow: Mesenchymal stem cells Haematopoietic stem cells Endothelial stem cells Induced Pluripotent Cells Mammary, Testicular, Neural, Dental, Umbilical cord, etc

  2. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS: The Gas Diffusion Layer Johannah Itescu Princeton University PRISM REU #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information I. What do fuel cells do? Generate electricity through chemical reaction #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information -+ + eHH 442 2 0244 22 He

  3. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  5. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-10-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp{sup 3} bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp{sup 3} bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  6. Complete characterization by Raman spectroscopy of the structural properties of thin hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films exposed to rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Franck Wang, Na; Smith, Robert; Xiao, Qi-Fan; Dai, Qing; Marchon, Bruno; Inaba, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Toru; Saito, Yoko; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Mangolini, Filippo; Carpick, Robert W.

    2014-09-28

    We have demonstrated that multi-wavelength Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies are sufficient to completely characterize the structural properties of ultra-thin hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC:H) films subjected to rapid thermal annealing (RTA, 1 s up to 659 °C) and to resolve the structural differences between films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, facing target sputtering and filtered cathodic vacuum arc with minute variations in values of mass density, hydrogen content, and sp³ fraction. In order to distinguish unequivocally between films prepared with different density, thickness, and RTA treatment, a new method for analysis of Raman spectra was invented. This newly developed analysis method consisted of plotting the position of the Raman G band of carbon versus its full width at half maximum. Moreover, we studied the passivation of non-radiative recombination centers during RTA by performing measurements of the increase in photoluminescence in conjunction with the analysis of DLC:H networks simulated by molecular dynamics. The results show that dangling bond passivation is primarily a consequence of thermally-induced sp² clustering rather than hydrogen diffusion in the film.

  7. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    voltage . The cell output power is given by:solar cell. The solar cell’s power conversion efficiency, ?ratio of the solar cell output power to the incident light

  8. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the cost of automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 14012 More Documents & Publications DOE Fuel Cell...

  9. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition on October 19, 2010. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011...

  10. Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Pete Devlin Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy Federal Utility Partnership...

  11. Fuel Cells for Supermarkets: Cleaner Energy with Fuel Cell Combined...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Supermarkets: Cleaner Energy with Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Systems Fuel Cells for Supermarkets: Cleaner Energy with Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Systems Presented...

  12. Photovoltaic Cell Performance Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount of electricity produced depends on the quality of the light available and the performance of the PV cell.

  13. Interfacing devices with cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    To detect electrical properties of cells, we have developed a method called iso-dielectric separation (IDS), where cells are placed in a spatially varying electric field and a spatially varying conductivity gradient that ...

  14. Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

  15. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Experience with the German Hydrogen Fuel Project," HydrogenHydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  16. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryTiO 2 solar cells: transport, recombination and photovoltaic

  17. cytotoxic T cells kill infected cells directly by inducing them to undergo apoptosis helper T cells help activate B cells, macrophages and cytotoxic T cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    cytotoxic T cells kill infected cells directly by inducing them to undergo apoptosis helper T cells help activate B cells, macrophages and cytotoxic T cells. Both classes of T cells express cell-surface, antibodylike receptors, encoded by genes that are assembled from multiple gene segments during T cell

  18. Electroluminescence in photovoltaic cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petraglia, Antonio; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/5/F01

    2011-01-01

    Here we propose two methods to get electroluminescence images from photovoltaic cells in a school or home lab.

  19. Webinar: Fuel Cell Buses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Fuel Cell Buses, originally presented on September 12, 2013.

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    California, June (1986). General Electric, Direct Energy Conversion Programs, Feasibility Study ofSPE Fuel Cell Power Plants

  1. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  2. Polyhedral Voronoi Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ina Voigt; Stephan Weis

    2010-03-22

    Voronoi cells of a discrete set in Euclidean space are known as generalized polyhedra. We identify polyhedral cells of a discrete set through a direction cone. For an arbitrary set we distinguish polyhedral from non-polyhedral cells using inversion at a sphere and a theorem of semi-infinite linear programming.

  3. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  4. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1998-08-18

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  5. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, ? cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hrvatin, Sinisa

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic ? cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in ...

  6. a bStomach Lung cell zone Clara cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    a bStomach Lung Chief-cell zone Stem-cell zone Mucus- cell zone Clara cell Tracheal airway Basal independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act and the other by Stange et al.2 published in Cell, find that followingdepletionofstemcellsinthestomach or lung

  7. Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting, originally presented on November 13, 2012.

  8. Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in Argentina DANIEL ROSENFELD The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel WILLIAM L. WOODLEY Woodley, Argentina, with a cloud-physics jet aircraft penetrating the major feeder clouds from cloud base to the 45°C. Introduction The province of Mendoza in western Argentina (32°S, 68°W), which is known worldwide for its wine

  9. Homogeneous Ice Nucleation in Subtropical and Tropical Convection and Its Influence on Cirrus Anvil Microphysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and large aggregates. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that the air sampled in the updraft core was mixed- erogeneously or secondarily produced, or recycled). 1. Introduction The poorly understood processes of ice

  10. Validation of Model Simulations of Anvil Cirrus Properties During TWP-ICE: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipser, Edward J. [University of Utah] [University of Utah

    2013-05-20

    This 3-year grant, with two extensions, resulted in a successful 5-year effort, led by Ph.D. student Adam Varble, to compare cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations with the excellent database obtained during the TWP-ICE field campaign. The objective, largely achieved, is to undertake these comparisons comprehensively and quantitatively, informing the community in ways that goes beyond pointing out errors in the models, but points out ways to improve both cloud dynamics and microphysics parameterizations in future modeling efforts. Under DOE support, Adam Varble, with considerable assistance from Dr. Ann Fridlind and others, entrained scientists who ran some 10 different CRMs and 4 different limited area models (LAMs) using a variety of microphysics parameterizations, to ensure that the conclusions of the study will have considerable generality.

  11. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  12. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  13. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  14. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  15. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  16. Hydrogen Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    The fuel cell — an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen — is the key to making it happen.

  17. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  18. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  19. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  20. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  1. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Membrane Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers," Journal of PowerAdvanced Alkaline Electrolyzer for Solar Operation,"requirements are for electrolyzer feedwater. T h e high-

  2. Opportunities with Fuel Cells

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The concept for fuel cells was discovered in the nineteenth century. Today, units incorporating this technology are becoming commercially available for cogeneration applications.

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EERE

    2012-03-16

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office receives appropriations from Energy and Water Development. The offices's major activities and budget are outlined in this Web page.

  4. Microcomposite Fuel Cell Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of microcomposite fuel cell membrane work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003

  5. CELL CLINICS FOR BLOELECTRONIC INTERFACE WITH SINGLE CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    CELL CLINICS FOR BLOELECTRONIC INTERFACE WITH SINGLE CELLS P. Abshiret, J.-M Lauensteid Y.L i d E for capture and characterization of large numbers of individual cells. Each of these "cell clinics" consists of a cell-sized cavity and a lid that can be opened and closed by hinges constructed from polypyrrole

  6. Equation of state of bcc-Mo by static volume compression to 410?GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akahama, Yuichi; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Singh, Anil K.

    2014-12-14

    Unit cell volumes of Mo and Pt have been measured simultaneously to ?400?GPa by x-ray powder diffraction using a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation source. The body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of Mo was found to be stable up to 410 GPa. The equation of state (EOS) of bcc-Mo was determined on the basis of Pt pressure scale. A fit of Vinet EOS to the volume compression data gave K{sub 0}?=?262.3(4.6) GPa, K{sub 0}??=?4.55(16) with one atmosphere atomic volume V{sub 0}?=?31.155(24) A{sup 3}. The EOS was in good agreement with the previous ultrasonic data within pressure difference of 2.5%–3.3% in the multimegabar range, though the EOS of Mo proposed from a shock compression experiment gave lower pressure by 7.2%–11.3% than the present EOS. The agreement would suggest that the Pt pressure scale provides an accurate pressure value in an ultra-high pressure range.

  7. Molecular Cell Short Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahav, Galit

    these pathways depends on cell-cycle phase; however the continuous effect of cell cycle on the balance between pathways are functional. The shift from NHEJ to HR is gradual, with the highest proportion of breaks repaired by HR in mid S, where the amount of DNA replication is highest. Higher proportions of HR also

  8. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  9. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    freezing and about a hundred freeze-thaw cycles, there is no change in fuel cellfuel cell is operating, it generates more than enough heat to prevent water and moisture from freezingfuel cell system, because in the present design the flow fields and manifolds would be damaged by the freezing-

  10. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1993-11-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

    1993-11-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

  13. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  14. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Physics of adherent cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich S. Schwarz; Samuel S. Safran

    2013-09-09

    One of the most unique physical features of cell adhesion to external surfaces is the active generation of mechanical force at the cell-material interface. This includes pulling forces generated by contractile polymer bundles and networks, and pushing forces generated by the polymerization of polymer networks. These forces are transmitted to the substrate mainly by focal adhesions, which are large, yet highly dynamic adhesion clusters. Tissue cells use these forces to sense the physical properties of their environment and to communicate with each other. The effect of forces is intricately linked to the material properties of cells and their physical environment. Here a review is given of recent progress in our understanding of the role of forces in cell adhesion from the viewpoint of theoretical soft matter physics and in close relation to the relevant experiments.

  16. Mechanical forces such as cell traction control cell growth, differ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaita, Khalid

    Mechanical forces such as cell traction control cell growth, differ entiation, motility, which bind integrins (transmembrane receptors that relay mechanical signals from the extracellular the contribution of mechanical forces to cell behaviour and function. Eytan Zlotorynski TECHNIQUE DNA hairpins

  17. Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramhall, Naomi F

    2012-01-01

    Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

  18. Single-cell technologies for monitoring interactions between immune cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Yvonne J. (Yvonne Joy)

    2014-01-01

    Immune cells participate in dynamic cellular interactions that play a critical role in the defense against pathogens and the destruction of malignant cells. The vast heterogeneity of immune cells motivates the study of ...

  19. tem cells are undifferentiated or "blank slate" cells from which other types of cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S tem cells are undifferentiated or "blank slate" cells from which other types of cells can arise. The defining characteristic of human stem cells is their ability to self-renew (provide an exact copy of themselves) while maintaining the potential to develop into other types of cells, such as blood, brain

  20. MODELING CELL HETEROGENEITY: FROM SINGLE-CELL VARIATIONS TO MIXED CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Ben J.

    MODELING CELL HETEROGENEITY: FROM SINGLE-CELL VARIATIONS TO MIXED CELLS ERIC BATCHELOR Center of Health Bethesda, MD 20894, USA Email: wojtowda@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Emerging technologies such as single cell gene expression analysis and single cell genome sequencing provide an unprecedented opportunity

  1. Fuel Cell Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Systems Fuel Cell Systems The design of fuel cell systems is complex, and can vary significantly depending upon fuel cell type and application. However, several basic...

  2. Fuel Cells Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen fuel cell technology. Fuel Cells More Documents & Publications Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

  3. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (version 38).Grätzel. A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Solar Cell Based on Dyeand E.D. Dunlop. Solar Cell efficiency tables (version 38).

  4. RECHARGEABLE MOLTEN-SALT CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2013-01-01

    KC! /FeS 2 cell lithium-silicon magnesium oxide molten-saltmolten-salt cells Na/Na glass/Na:z.Sn-S cell Na/NazO•xA!Symposium on Molten Salts, Physical Electrochemistry

  5. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 86, pp. 451-in crystalline silicon solar cells," Renewable Energy, vol.

  6. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 93(10): 1728-1723,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 92(8) 39. Sima, C.Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (

  7. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,in crystalline silicon solar cells," Renewable Energy, vol.

  8. Measuring single-cell density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, William H.

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of ...

  9. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    glass contact Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 93(10):cells. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 92(8) 39.potential of these materials for solar energy conversion,

  10. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 86, pp. 451-Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,

  11. Power from the Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.

    2000-01-01

    Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars,” Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productPower from the Fuel Cell BY TIMOTHY E. LIPMAN A U T O M O B

  12. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2 nanocrystal/R. J. ; Nozik, A. J. Schottky Solar Cells Based on Colloidal

  13. Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracio, Filipe

    Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient ...

  14. DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    t t 1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U S D f E Overview U.S....

  15. Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and the environment PT Loma WWTP, Biogas to Fuel Cell Power BioFuels Energy Biogas to BioMethane to 4.5 MW Fuel Cell Power 3 FCE Fuel Cells 2 via directed...

  16. Cell Patterning with Mucin Biopolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouzier, T.

    The precise spatial control of cell adhesion to surfaces is an endeavor that has enabled discoveries in cell biology and new possibilities in tissue engineering. The generation of cell-repellent surfaces currently requires ...

  17. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    there is a great deal of interest in thin-film solar cells.Thin-film solar cells are made from a variety oflimitation in all thin-film solar cell technologies is that

  18. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01

    the harvesting potential of our solar cell and suggests thedye sensitized solar cell and the potential they can serveSchottky solar cells has demonstrated the potential of these

  19. Fuel Cells Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel CellFuel Fuel CellsCells Fuel

  20. Molecular Cell Hydroxyurea Induces Hydroxyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    Molecular Cell Article Hydroxyurea Induces Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Cell Death in Escherichia coli superoxide production, together with the increased iron uptake, fuels the formation of hydroxyl radicals