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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

Experimental Design for Laser Produced Shocks in Diamond Anvil Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on pre-compressed samples. A diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been used to statically compress water to 1 GPa and then strong shocked with an energetic laser. The use of intense laser irradiation can drive shocks in targets making it possible to study the equation of state (EOS) of samples well into the hundreds of GPQ regime. Generally, such experiments employ a sample initially at normal density and standard pressure. Therefore providing data on the principal Hugoniot. In this experiment the initial state of the sample was varied to provide data off the principal Hugoniot. We report the work that was done on the Vulcan laser and describe a method to achieve off principal Hugoniot data.

Moon, S J; Cauble, R; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M; Hicks, D; Da Silva, L B; Mackinon, A; Wallace, R; Hammel, B; Hsing, W; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K M; Benedetti, L R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi, A; Huser, G; Henry, E; Batani, D; Willi, O; Pasley, J; Henning, G; Loubeyre, P; Neely, D; Notley, M; Danson, C

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

First tests of THz transmission through a Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

The THz source generated by the accelerator driver for the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser is unique in the world in its ability to deliver a high average power beam of ultrashort (<500 fs FWHM) broadband THz pulses. The spectrum of this source presents an ideal probe for many low energy phenomena, and the time structure enables measurement of dynamic processes with sub-ps resolution. An outline of the range of potential applications for this THz source as a probe of sub-ps dynamics in materials under extreme conditions will be presented. To demonstrate the capabilities of this source for just such experiments, the first set of tests to characterize the transmission of the THz beam through a diamond anvil cell (DAC) have been performed. These preliminary results will be presented along with a description of the optical design used to deliver the THz beam into and out of the DAC. The current design will be compared with other possible techniques and the plans for the next set of measurements will also be given.

John Klopf

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

Moss, W.C.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is the most commonly used device for obtaining static high pressures above 3 GPa. Experiments in the DAC are frequently performed at the APS, in particular at GSECARS (Sector 13), HP-CAT (Sector 16), and at XOR sectors 1 and 3. In order to have the sample in the DAC be subject to a quasi-hydrostatic pressure it is necessary to surround the

7

A diamond anvil cell with resistive heating for high pressure and high temperature x-ray diffraction and absorption studies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe a prototype of a diamond anvil cell (DAC) for high pressure/high temperature studies. This DAC combines the use of a resistive oven of 250 W power in a very small volume, associated with special conical seats for Boehler-type diamond anvils in order to have a large angular acceptance. To protect the diamond anvils from burning and to avoid the oven oxidation, the heated DAC is enclosed in a vacuum chamber. The assemblage was used to study the melting curve of germanium at high pressure (up to 20 GPa) and high temperature (up to 1200 K) using x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Pasternak, Sebastien; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Pascarelli, Sakura; Zhang Lin [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Poloni, Roberta [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona Spain (Spain); Canny, Bernard [IMPMC-CNRS UMR, 7590 Universite Paris VI, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Coulet, Marie-Vanessa [IM2NP-UMR CNRS, 6242 Universite Paul Cezanne Campus de St Jerome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect

A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microfabrication of controlled-geometry samples for the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell using focused ion beam technology  

SciTech Connect

The pioneering of x-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating in the diamond-anvil cell has revolutionized the field of high-pressure mineral physics, expanding the ability to determine high-pressure, high-temperature phase boundaries and equations of state. Accurate determination of high-pressure, high-temperature phases and densities in the diamond-anvil cell rely upon collinearity of the x-ray beam with the center of the laser-heated spot. We present the development of microfabricated samples that, by nature of their design, will have the sample of interest in the hottest portion of the sample. We report initial successes with a simplified design using a Pt sample with dimensions smaller than the synchrotron-based x-ray spot such that it is the only part of the sample that absorbs the heating laser ensuring that the x-rayed volume is at the peak hotspot temperature. Microfabricated samples, synthesized using methods developed at The Ohio State University's Mineral Physics Laboratory and Campus Electron Optics Facility, were tested at high P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at beamline 16 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Pt layer thicknesses of {le} 0.8 {micro}m absorb the laser and produce accurate measurements on the relative equations of state of Pt and PtC. These methods combined with high-purity nanofabrication techniques will allow for extension by the diamond-anvil cell community to multiple materials for high-precision high-pressure, high-temperature phase relations, equations of state, melting curves, and transport properties.

Pigott, Jeffrey S.; Reaman, Daniel M.; Panero, Wendy R. (OSU)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Andrault, D. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire des Magmas and Volcans, 5 rue Kessler 63038, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

A simple external resistance heating diamond anvil cell and its application for synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect

A simple external heating assemblage allowing diamond anvil cell experiments at pressures up to 34 GPa and temperatures up to 653 K was constructed. This cell can be connected to the synchrotron radiation conveniently. The design and construction of this cell are fully described, as well as its applications for x-ray diffraction. Heating is carried out by using an external-heating system, which is made of NiCr resistance wire, and the temperature was measured by a NiCr-NiSi or PtRh-Pt thermocouple. We showed the performance of the new system by introducing the phase transition study of cinnabar ({alpha}-HgS) and thermal equation of state study of almandine at high pressure and temperature with this cell.

Fan Dawei; Zhou Wenge; Liu Yonggang; Xie Hongsen [Institute of Geochemistry of Earth's Deep Interior Materials and Fluid Interaction, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Wei Shuyi [Institute of Geochemistry of Earth's Deep Interior Materials and Fluid Interaction, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma Maining [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L. (China University of Geosciences)

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Development of Designer Diamond Anvils for High Pressure-High-Temperature Experiments in Support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is to develop the next generation of designer diamond anvils that can perform simultaneous joule heating and temperature profile measurements in a diamond anvil cell. A series of tungsten-rhenium thermocouples will be fabricated onto to the anvil and encapsulated by a chemical vapor deposited diamond layer to allow for a complete temperature profile measurement across the anvil. The tip of the diamond anvil will be engineered to reduce the thermal conductivity so that the tungsten-heating coils can be deposited on top of this layer. Several different approaches will be investigated to engineer the tip of the diamond anvil for reduction in thermal conductivity (a) isotopic mixture of 12C and 13C in the diamond layer, (b) doping of diamond with impurities (nitrogen and/or boron), and (c) growing diamond in a higher concentration of methane in hydrogen plasma. Under this academic alliance with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), PI and his graduate students will use the lithographic and diamond polishing facility at LLNL. This proposed next generation of designer diamond anvils will allow multi-tasking capability with the ability to measure electrical, magnetic, structural and thermal data on actinide materials with unparallel sensitivity in support of the stockpile stewardship program.

Yogesh K. Vohra

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Raman Shift of Stressed Diamond Anvils: Pressure Calibration and Culet Geometry Dependence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pressure dependence of the Raman shift of diamond for highly stressed anvils at the diamond-anvil sample interface has been measured for different culet shapes up to 180 GPa at ambient temperature. By using hydrogen samples, which constitute both a quasi-hydrostatic medium and a sensitive pressure sensor, some of the effects of culet and tip size have been determined. We propose that the divergent results in the literature can be partly ascribed to different anvil geometries. Experiments show increasing second order dependence of the diamond Raman shift with pressure for decreasing tip size. This is an important consideration when using the diamond anvils as a pressure sensor.

Baer, B J; Chang, M E; Evans, W J

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of Eu/HNO{sub 3} aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to {approx}900 deg. C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly.

Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, St. Francis Xavier University, P.O. Box 5000, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); MS 954, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K. (LLNL); (UAB)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Shocking Results from Diamond Anvil Cell Experiments  

Shocked behavior in microscopic samples can consist of the behavior of shocked explosives before chemistry begins or the high density, ...

19

Melting temperature of iron in the core diamond cell experiments Guoyin Shen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1998. 3. Boehler, R., High pressure experiments and the phase diagram of lower mantle and core. Manghnani and Y. Syono (Terra Scientific Publishing Company/American Geophysical Union, Tokyo, Washington DC materials, Rev. Geophysics, 38, 221-245, 2000. Diamond cell technique Diamond as anvil and window Diamond

Shen, Guoyin

20

High efficiency diamond solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Heating Rates in Tropical Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of infrared and solar radiation with tropical cirrus anvils is addressed. Optical properties of the anvils are inferred from satellite observations and from high-altitude aircraft measurements. An infrared multiple-scattering ...

Thomas P. Ackerman; Kuo-Nan Liou; Francisco P. J. Valero; Leonhard Pfister

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Deep Convection and ôFirst Echoesö within Anvil Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of convective cells within anvil precipitation, in a region of moderate convective activity that might be called a small mesoscale convective system, is described and discussed. The presence of precipitation-sized hydrometeors in ...

Charles A. Knight; L. Jay Miller; William D. Hall

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

SciTech Connect

Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evolution of a Florida Cirrus Anvil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed study of a single thunderstorm anvil cirrus cloud measured on 21 July 2002 near southern Florida during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus LayersľFlorida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). ...

T. J. Garrett; B. C. Navarro; C. H. Twohy; E. J. Jensen; D. G. Baumgardner; P. T. Bui; H. Gerber; R. L. Herman; A. J. Heymsfield; P. Lawson; P. Minnis; L. Nguyen; M. Poellot; S. K. Pope; F. P. J. Valero; E. M. Weinstock

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A new diamond biosensor with integrated graphitic microchannels for detecting quantal exocytic events from chromaffin cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantal release of catecholamines from neuroendocrine cells is a key mechanism which has been investigated with a broad range of materials and devices, among which carbon-based materials such as carbon fibers, diamond-like carbon, carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline diamond. In the present work we demonstrate that a MeV-ion-microbeam lithographic technique can be successfully employed for the fabrication of an all-carbon miniaturized cellular bio-sensor based on graphitic micro-channels embedded in a single-crystal diamond matrix. The device was functionally characterized for the in vitro recording of quantal exocytic events from single chromaffin cells, with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, opening promising perspectives for the realization of monolithic all-carbon cellular biosensors.

Picollo, Federico; Vittone, Ettore; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

Swain; Greg M.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nowcasting Thunderstorm Anvil Clouds over Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrified thunderstorm anvil clouds extend the threat of natural and triggered lightning to space launch and landing operations far beyond the immediate vicinity of thunderstorm cells. The deep convective updrafts of thunderstorms transport ...

David A. Short; James E. Sardonia; Winifred C. Lambert; Mark M. Wheeler

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Argonne scientists squeeze more out of metal-organic framework...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a diamond anvil cell next to collaborating scientists Peter Chupas and Gregory Halder. Argonne scientist Karena Chapman holds a diamond anvil cell next to collaborating scientists...

29

Radiosonde Penetration of an Undilute Cumulonimbus Anvil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An example is presented of the serendipitous radiosonde penetration through the western edge of a rapidly growing undilute cumulonimbus anvil above 200 mb by an operationally released radiosonde balloon. The sounding is supportive of deep ...

Lance F. Bosart; John W. Nielsen

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Test of the Fixed Anvil Temperature Hypothesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis is examined based on the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based cloud-top temperature (CTT) in conjunction with the tropical atmospheric profiles and sea surface temperature (...

Yue Li; Ping Yang; Gerald R. North; Andrew Dessler

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDF (1.02 MB) 2011 Diamond, Richard C.. "The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency." In The California Statewide Strategic Plan for Energy Efficiency....

32

Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Modeling The tropical anvil cirrus formation...

33

ANVIL-5000 1. 1. 1 NC programming update  

SciTech Connect

ANVIL-5000 is used effectively by the staff in Sandia's Materials Process Engineering and Fabrication Directorate to develop training materials, solve mathematics problems, prepare documentation, and program machines. The computational graphics resources are reviewed, the techniques for training the craftworker staff to use ANVIL are described, and a variety of current ANVIL applications are documented. Complex ANVIL projects involving a propeller blade mold and a water cooled head are described to illustrate the utility of CAD/CAM techniques being used by the NC Engineering staff. 30 figs.

Plomp, P.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Leading and Trailing Anvil Clouds of West African Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anvil clouds of tropical squall-line systems over West Africa have been examined using cloud radar data and divided into those that appear ahead of the leading convective line and those on the trailing side of the system. The leading anvils ...

Jasmine Cetrone; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Storing Hydrogen, by Enhancing Diamond Powder Properties under Hydrogen Plasma with CaF2 and KF for Use in Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell is like a battery that instead of using electricity to recharge itself, it uses hydrogen. In the fuel cell industry, one of the main problems is storing hydrogen in a safe way and extracting it economically. Gaseous hydrogen requires high pressures which could be very dangerous in case of a collision. The success of hydrogen use depends largely on the development of an efficient storage and release method. In an effort to develop a better hydrogen storage system for fuel cells technology this research investigates the use of 99% pure diamond powder for storing hydrogen. Mixing this powder with a calcium fluoride and potassium fluoride compound in its solid form and treating the surface of the powder with hydrogen plasma, modifies the surface of the diamond. After some filtration through distilled water and drying, the modified diamond is treated with hydrogen. We expect hydrogen to be attracted to the diamond powder surface in higher quantities due to the CaF2 and KF treatment. Due to the large surface area of diamond nanopowder and the electronegative terminal bonds of the fluorine particles on the structure's surface, to the method shows promise in storing high densities of hydrogen.

Ochoa, Franklyn E. Colmenares [Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The evolution of anvil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The evolution of anvil microphysics observed during CRYSTAL-FACE The evolution of anvil microphysics observed during CRYSTAL-FACE Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mather, James Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Deep convective cloud systems produce extensive cirrus anvils that play an important role in humidifying the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and strongly affect the radiative balance in the atmosphere, particularly in the tropics. Current general circulation models (GCMs) have difficulty predicting observed cloudiness in the tropics, which is attributed to the representation of cloud formation and feedback to the water and radiative budgets in the atmosphere. Understanding the evolution and dissipation of convective anvils and their relationship to the convective source will

38

Observations of Low-Level Baroclinity Generated by Anvil Shadows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-level cooling beneath the cirrus anvil canopies of supercell thunderstorms is documented in two Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment cases and in the 17 May 1981 Arcadia, Oklahoma, supercell. Surface temperature ...

Paul M. Markowski; Erik N. Rasmussen; Jerry M. Straka; David C. Dowell

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

LIRAD Observations of Tropical Cirrus Clouds in MCTEX. Part II: Optical Properties and Base Cooling in Dissipating Storm Anvil Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX), several decaying storm anvils were observed. The anvil clouds exhibited typical patterns of fallout and decay over a number of hours of observation. The anvil bases were initially ...

C. M. R. Platt; R. T. Austin; S. A. Young; A. J. Heymsfield

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil ...

Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Anil Kumar; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Remote Sounding of High Clouds. V: Infrared Properties and Structures of Tropical Thunderstorm Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrared properties and structures of some anvils emanating from local thunderstorms were studied by lidar and infrared radiometry at Darwin, tropical Northern Australia. The anvils were typically from 1 to 2 km deep, at altitudes from 7 to ...

C. M. R. Platt; A. C. Dilley; J. C. Scott; I. J. Barton; G. L. Stephens

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-...

Jian Yuan; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Electrically conductive diamond electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation uses multiple tools to investigate tropical anvil, i.e., thick, non-precipitating cloud associated with deep convection with the main objectives to provide a climatology of tropics-wide anvil properties and a better understanding of anvil formation, and to provide a more realistic assessment of the radiative impact of tropical anvil on the large-scale circulation. Based on 10 years (1998-2007) of observations, anvil observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation (PR) shows significant geographical variations, which can be linked to variations in the parent convection. Strong upper level wind shear appears to assist the generation of anvil and may further explain the different anvil statistics over land and ocean. Variations in the large-scale environment appear to play a more important role in anvil production in regions where convection regularly attains heights greater than 7 km. For regions where convection is less deep, variations in the depth of the convection and the large-scale environment likely contribute more equally to anvil generation. Anvil radiative heating profiles are estimated by extrapolating millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) radiative properties from Manus to the 10-year TRMM PR record. When the unconditional anvil areal coverage is taken into account, the anvil radiative heating becomes quite weak, increasing the PR latent heating profile by less than 1 percent at mid and upper levels. Stratiform rain and cirrus radiative heating contributions increase the upper level latent heating by 12 percent. This tropical radiative heating only slightly enhances the latent heating driven model response throughout the tropics, but more significantly over the East Pacific. These modest circulation changes suggest that previous studies may have overemphasized the importance of radiative heating in terms of Walker and Hadley circulation variations. Further, the relationship of cloud radiative heating to latent heating needs to be taken into account for more realistic studies of cloud radiative forcing on the large-scale circulation.

Li, Wei

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Delbert D. (Los Alamos, NM); Evans, Christopher J. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Testing the Fixed Anvil Temperature Hypothesis in a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using cloud-resolving simulations of tropical radiativeľconvective equilibrium, it is shown that the anvil temperature changes by less than 0.5 K with a 2-K change in SST, lending support to the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis. The ...

Zhiming Kuang; Dennis L. Hartmann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Diamond nucleation using polyethene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

50

Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tropical Pacific Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) took place in Darwin, Australia in early 2006. C-band radar data from this experiment were used to characterize tropical anvil areal coverage, height, and thickness during the month-long field campaign. The morphology, evolution, and longevity of the anvil were analyzed as well as the relationship of the anvil to the rest of the precipitating system. In addition, idealized in-cloud radiative heating profiles were created based on the anvil observations. The anvil was separated into mixed (i.e., echo base below 6 km) and ice only categories. The experiment areal average coverage for both types of anvil was between 4-5% of the radar grid. Ice anvil thickness averaged 2.8 km and mixed anvil thickness averaged 6.7 km. No consistent diurnal signal was seen in the anvil, implying that the life cycle of the parent convection was of first order importance in determining the anvil height, thickness, and area. Areal peaks show that mixed anvil typically formed out of the stratiform region. Peak production in ice anvil usually followed the mixed anvil peak by 1-3 hr. Anvil typically lasted 4-10 hr after the initial convective rain area peak. The TWP-ICE experienced three distinct regimes: the active monsoon, dry monsoon, and break periods. During the entire experiment (except the active monsoon period) there was a strong negative correlation between ice anvil thickness and ice anvil height, a strong positive correlation between ice anvil area and thickness, and a greater variance in ice anvil bottom than ice anvil top. Anvil produced during the active regime had the most dramatic in-cloud radiative response with a maximum cooling of 0.45├?┬░ K day-1 at 12 km, a maximum heating of 3├?┬░ K day-1 at 9 km, and a secondary maximum heating of 1.2├?┬░ K day-1 at 5 km.

Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Numerical Simulations of Radiative Cooling beneath the Anvils of Supercell Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms that include parameterized radiative transfer and surface fluxes are performed using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) to investigate the effects of anvil shadows on the near-storm ...

Jeffrey Frame; Paul Markowski

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Numerical Simulation Study of the Effects of Anvil Shading on Quasi-Linear Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to investigate how the attenuation of solar radiation by the intervening cumulonimbus cloud, particularly its large anvil, affects the structure, intensity, and evolution of quasi-linear convective systems and the ...

Andrew J. Oberthaler; Paul M. Markowski

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ice Particle Evolution in the Anvil of a Severe Thunderstorm during CCOPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Sabreliner aircraft are combined with a multiple Doppler radar synthesis of the wind field to investigate particle growth processes in the anvil region of a severe thunderstorm. The ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Relationships for Deriving Thunderstorm Anvil Ice Mass for CCOPE Storm Water Budget Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between radar reflectivity and ice water content are derived from pendmtions into thundemonn anvils in Montana on seven days during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE), using aircraft data and radar ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Alice G. Palmer

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Observed Enhancement of Reflectivity and the Electric Field in Long-Lived Florida Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of two long-lived Florida anvils showed that reflectivity >20 dBZ increased in area, thickness, and sometimes magnitude at the midlevel well downstream of the convective cores. In these same regions electric fields maintained strengths >...

James E. Dye; John C. Willett

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Microphysical Characteristics of Three Anvils Sampled during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ microphysical measurements of three anvils were made 17 March, 1 April, and 4 April 1993 during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment for several constant altitude penetrations, in the same direction or opposite the ambient wind, from ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Andrew J. Heymsfield

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

Dugdale, R.A.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Diamond Schottky barrier diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With superior physical and electrical properties, diamond became a potential competitor to SiC soon after Element Six reported in 2002 the successful synthesis of single crystal plasma deposited diamond with high catTier mobility. This thesis discusses... the fabrication of silicon thyristors able to block more than 5000V and to conduct 2000A when forward-biased. However, due to their bipolar conduction mechanism, these devices suffered from serious limitations in terms of high frequency operation [2...

Brezeanu, Mihai

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

installation of X-ray powder diffractometer with imaging plate detector and diamond anvil cell, calibration and test experiments. Purpose of Work: Our goal is a better...

60

Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions - DOE Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provided by mechanochemistry, including dynamic shearingcompression via mechanical milling and static high-pressure chemistry in a diamond anvil cell. Materials are currently...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

Lueking, Angela (State College, PA); Gutierrez, Humberto (State College, PA); Narayanan, Deepa (Redmond, WA); Burgess Clifford, Caroline E. (State College, PA); Jain, Puja (King Of Prussia, PA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Black Diamond Internal network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

├?├? ├? ├?├?├É ├? ├? ├? ├?├? ├?├?├?├?├?├É ┬┤├? ┬Á ├É ├? ├É ├?├? ├? ├? ├?├? #12;Black Diamond Internet 123456 789101112 A B 12x 6x

Imperial College, London

64

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Conversion of fullerenes to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

Gruen, Dieter M. (1324 59th St., Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Diamond Wire Technology LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wire Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Wire Technology LLC Place Colorado Springs, Colorado Zip 80916 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of diamond...

67

The cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei effects on tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer  

SciTech Connect

Cloud anvils from deep convective clouds are of great importance to the radiative energy budget and the aerosol impact on them is the least understood. Few studies examined the effects of both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) on anvil properties and water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved cloud microphysics, we focus on the CCN and IN effects on cloud anvil properties and WVC in the TTL. We find that cloud microphysical changes induced by CCN/IN play a very important role in determining cloud anvil area and WVC in the TTL, whether convection is enhanced or suppressed. Also, CCN effects on anvil microphysical properties, anvil size and lifetime are much more evident relative to IN. IN has little effect on convection, but can increase ice number and mass concentrations significantly under humid conditions. CCN in the PBL is found to have greater effects on convective strength and mid-tropospheric CCN has negligible effects on convection and cloud properties. Convective transport may only moisten the main convective outflow region but the cloud anvil size determines the WVC in the TTL domain. This study shows an important role of CCN in the lower-troposphere in modifying convection, the upper-level cloud properties. It also shows the effects of IN and the PBL CCN on the upper-level clouds depends on the humidity, resolving some contradictory results in past studies. 2

Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Anvil Characteristics as Seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Pacific Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) took place in Darwin, Australia, in early 2006. C-band radar data were used to characterize tropical anvil (i.e., thick, nonprecipitating cloud associated with deep ...

Kaycee Frederick; Courtney Schumacher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Bitraker Anvil: Binary instrumentation for rapid creation of simulation and workload analysis tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide range of ARM developers from architects, to compiler writers, to software developers, need tools to understand, analyze, and simulate program behavior. For developers to achieve high levels of system and program correctness, performance, reliability, and power efficiency these tools must be fast and customizable to the problems at hand. BitRaker Anvil is a tool building framework allowing developers to rapidly build tools to achieve these goals. BitRaker Anvil uses binary instrumentation to modify ARM binaries for the purpose of analyzing program behavior. BitRaker Anvil equips the developer with an easy to use API that allows the user to specify the particular program characteristics to analyze. Using this API, the developer can create custom tools to perform simulation or workload analysis several orders of magnitude faster than using a cycle level simulator. Prior binary instrumentation technology requires that analysis code be merged into the same binary as the code to be analyzed. A key new feature of our binary instrumentation framework is ReHost analysis, which allows an instrumented ARM binary to make calls to analysis code that is written in the native format of the desktop machine. Using this for cross-platform ARM development results in analysis that runs orders of magnitude faster while simultaneously reducing the size of the ARM binary images. 1

Brad Calder; Todd Austin; Don Yang; Timothy Sherwood; Suleyman Sair; David Newquist; Tim Cusac

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Influence of Blank-Width Ratio on Stress Field during Heavy Axial Forgings Manufacturing with Horizontal V-Shaped Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forging method with horizontal V-shaped anvils (HVA) is effective in the control of inner stress states, metal tissue, etc. FEM numerical simulation is conducted for the HVA forging method, given the blank-width ratio 0.5, 1.0 and 1.2, respectively, ... Keywords: horizontal V-shaped anvil, anvil-width ratio, blank-width ratio, axial forging, stress field

Li Li; Wang Qian; Yu Suoqing; Ni Liyong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method for forming diamonds from carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone (Slidell, LA); Lewis, Roy (Evanston, IL); Rehn, Lynn (LaGrange, IL); Kirk, Marquis (Hinsdale, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of Forming Diamonds from Carbonaceous Material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing diamonds is provided comprising exposing carbonaceous material to ion irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure.

Daulton, Tyrone; Lewis, Roy; Rehn, Lynn; Kirk, Marquis

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Summary of the oil shale fragmentation program at Anvil Points Mine, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

During 1981 and 1982, an extensive oil shale fragmentation research program was conducted at the Anvil Points Mine near Rifle, Colorado. The primary goals were to investigate factors involved for adequate fragmentation of oil shale and to evaluate the feasibility of using the modified in situ retort (MIS) method for recovery of oil from oil shale. The test program included single-deck, single-borehole tests to obtain basic fragmentation data; multiple-borehole, multiple-deck explosive tests to evaluate practical aspects for developing an in situ retort; and the development of a variety of instrumentation techniques to diagnose the blasting event. This paper will present an outline of the field program, the type of instrumentation used, some typical results from the instrumentation, and a discussion of explosive engineering problems encountered over the course of the program. 4 references, 21 figures, 1 table.

Dick, R.D.; Young, C.; Fourney, W.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

78

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tropical Anvil Characteristics and Water Vapor of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL): Impact of Homogeneous Freezing Parameterizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Freezing Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Freezing Parameterizations on Tropical Anvil Characteristics and Water Vapor Content of the TTL Jiwen Fan Climate Physics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contributed by: Jennifer Comstock, Mikhail Ovtchinnikov, Sally McFarlane, and Greg McFarquhar OBJECTIVES Look into the effects of the commonly used heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing parameterizations on anvil properties and water vapor content in the TTL for the deep convective clouds developed in the contrasting environments. Examine the impact of the immersion-freezing on homogeneous freezing process. Homogeneous freezing parameterizations (HFPs) 1) Koop et al. (2000): J r depends on the water activity of the solution and is independent of the nature of solute.

80

Explosive engineering problems from fragmentation tests in oil shale at the Anvil Points Mine, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

During 1981 and 1982, an extensive oil shale fragmentation research program was conducted at the Anvil Points Mine near Rifle, Colorado. The primary goals were to investigate factors involved for adequate fragmentation of oil shale and to evaluate the feasibility of using the modified in situ retort (MIS) method for recovery of oil from oil shale. The field test program included single-deck, single-borehole experiments to obtain basic fragmentation data; multiple-deck, multiple-borehole experiments to evaluate some practical aspects for developing an in situ retort; and the development of a variety of instrumentation technique to diagnose the blast event. This paper discusses some explosive engineering problems encountered, such as electric cap performance in complex blasting patterns, explosive and stem performance in a variety of configurations from the simple to the complex, and the difficulties experienced when reversing the direction of throw of the oil shale in a subscale retort configuration. These problems need solutions before an adequate MIS retort can be created in a single-blast event and even before an experimental mini-retort can be formed. 6 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

Dick, R.D.; Fourney, W.L.; Young, C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays  

SciTech Connect

To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect

One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

Gruen, Dieter M.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode  

SciTech Connect

Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrogen chemisorption on diamond surfaces. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we demonstrated the ability to measure submonolayer quantities of surface hydrogen on insulating glasses. The present study builds on this by examining hydrogen coverages on another insulating material: the technologically important diamond (100) surface. The information to be obtained in the present study will allow us to deduce the correct structures for the diamond (100)-(1X1) and -(2X1) surface phases and provide information on the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the (100) surface. Such experiments are essential for a complete understanding of hydrogen surface chemistry during the chemical vapor deposition of thin diamond films. This report summarizes progress made in FY93 for measuring surface hydrogen concentrations on the diamond (100) surface. Although the available LDRD resources were insufficient to finish this study in FY93, completion of the study is planned using other resources and this detailed report as a reference.

Daley, R.; Musket, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Free energy and shock compression of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new approach has been developed to calculate the free energy in quasiharmonic approximation for homogeneous condensed matter. Common result has been demonstrated on an example of solid and liquid diamond at high pressures and temperatures of shock compression.

A. M. Molodets; M. A. Molodets; S. S. Nabatov

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Diamond growth at low substrate temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diamond films are deposited on silicon wafers at a temperature of less than 600{degree}C by a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process using methane in hydrogen as a source of carbon. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Hsu, W.L.; Tung, D.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

Pern, Fu-Jann (Golden, CO); Touryan, Kenell J. (Indian Hills, CO); Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos (Yerevan, AM); Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich (Moscow, RU)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

93

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Superhard Diamond-Denting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pressed between the flattened tips of two opposing diamonds. Scientists can shine lasers or X-rays through the transparent diamonds to observe and identify any atomic-scale...

94

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond Channel with Partially Separated Relays Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus Department of Electrical Theory, 27(1):122┬ş125, January 1981. [8] R. Tandon and S. Ulukus. Diamond channels with partially

Ulukus, Sennur

95

n-Type diamond and method for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Diamond-like Coating Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Feature Archive Diamond-like Coating Improves Electron Microscope Images By Mike Ross November 26, 2012 Coating the surface of a material with a single layer of diamond-like...

97

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Energy Pty Ltd Place Melbourne, Australia Zip 3124 Product Victoria based clean energy project developer. Coordinates -37.817532┬░, 144.967148┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.817532,"lon":144.967148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Shock Compressing Diamond to a Conducting Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser generated shock reflectance data show that diamond undergoes a continuous transition from optically absorbing to reflecting between Hugoniot pressures 600diamond having a thermal population of carriers at P{sub H}{approx}600 GPa, undergoing band overlap metallization at P{sub H}{approx}1000 GPa and melting at 800

Bradley, D K; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Moon, S J; Cauble, R C; Collins, G W

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downer Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend Diamonds are an Electronic Device's Best Friend April 17, 2012 - 11:43am Addthis Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Ultrananocrystalline diamond has a diverse range of applications from the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays to coatings for mechanical pump seals and tools. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science How does it work? As computer performance has improved, engineers have had a hard time dissipating the heat produced. Diamond film may be the answer, as it's much better at absorbing and

102

Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walnut Biomass Facility Walnut Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Walnut Biomass Facility Facility Diamond Walnut Sector Biomass Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935┬░, -121.1710389┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

Diamond Willow Extension | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extension Extension Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Extension Facility Diamond Willow Extension Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.281621┬░, -104.271355┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.281621,"lon":-104.271355,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

Comparison of Fast Amplifiers for Diamond Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors requests for novel signal amplifiers, capable to match the superb signal-to-noise ratio and timing response of these detectors. Existing amplifiers are still far away from this goal and are the dominant contributors to the overall system noise and the main source of degradation of the energy and timing resolution. We tested a number of commercial amplifiers designed for diamond detector readout to identify the best solution for a particular application. This application required a deposited energy threshold below 100 keV and timing resolution of the order of 200 ps at 200 keV. None of tested amplifiers satisfies these requirements. The best solution to such application found to be the Cividec C6 amplifier, which allows 100 keV minimal threshold, but its coincidence timing resolution at 200 keV is as large as 1.2 ns.

M. Osipenko; S. Minutoli; P. Musico; M. Ripani; B. Caiffi; A. Balbi; G. Ottonello; S. Argir˛; S. BeolŔ; N. Amapane; M. Masera; G. Mila

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

106

Boron-doped Diamond Synthesis Using Mode-conversion Type ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DC Arc Plasma Jet Growth of Large Area High Quality Freestanding Diamond Films and ... Hybrid Nanoporous Metal/Oxide Films for Energy Storage.

107

Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Brian Smith, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Skylar Cox Indoor Environment...

108

Argonne CNM News: Medical applications of diamond particles and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical applications of diamond particles and surfaces TEM image of nanodiamond particles TEM image of nanodiamond particles Scientists in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group...

109

Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

110

Alloy Development for Copper Diamond Composites for Thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One approach to meeting the challenges is to add diamond particles to a copper matrix to improve thermal conductivity and lower CTE simultaneously.

111

Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocrystalline diamond aerogel Peter J. Pauzauskie a,1,2 ,Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Aerogel materials have myriadcreating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an

Pauzauskie, Peter J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thin Sheet of Diamond Has Worlds of Uses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new technique from Argonne National Laboratory creates thin diamond films that are helping industry save energy and could even be used in heart and eye implants.

Sagoff, Jared

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Black Diamond Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Diamond Power Co Black Diamond Power Co Place West Virginia Utility Id 1764 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.0685/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Black Diamond Power Co (West Virginia). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

114

NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

Robert Radtke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Diamond and Related Materials 6 ( 1997) 1759-I771 Simulation of morphological instabilities during diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and hydrogen are activated with energetic sources such as microwaves to generate plasmas, direct current (DC include the hot filament [2] and many types of microwave plasma [3], which typically have *Corresponding is expected to be negligible since the diamond phase of carbon is very stable and gasification of dia- mond

Dandy, David

117

Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

Chin, R.P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-diamonds in the Universe A.C. Andersen,1 H. Mutschke,2 L. Binette3 , S. H├Âfner4 1 NORDITA, SE-75120 Uppsala Sweden The first direct evidence for nano-diamonds in space came from meteorites. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues from primitive meteorites have shown that nano- diamonds

Andersen, Anja C.

119

Diamond Detectors for Heavy Ion Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1999, the accelerator facility at GSI is scheduled to deliver beam intensities of about 10 10 particles/spill for all available ions up to 238 U. This necessitates the development of a new generation of radiation-resistant and ultra-fast detectors, in conjunction with new high-speed and low-noise electronics. Preliminary results confirm the suitability of CVD-diamond detectors for both, beam diagnostics, and heavy-ion experiments with projectiles in the energy region from 50 MeV/amu to 2 GeV/amu. Various test measurements

E. Berdermann; K. Blasche; P. Moritz; H. Stelzer; F. Zeytouni

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions  

SciTech Connect

With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

True, W.R.

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Manufacturing of diamond windows for synchrotron radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diamond window construction is presented and explicit manufacturing details are given. This window will increase the power dissipation by about a factor of 4 over present day state of the art windows to absorb 600 W of power. This power will be generated by in-vacuum undulators with the storage ring ALBA operating at a design current of 400 mA. Extensive finite element (FE) calculations are included to predict the windows behavior accompanied by explanations for the chosen boundary conditions. A simple linear model was used to cross-check the FE calculations.

Schildkamp, W.; Nikitina, L. [Synchrotron ALBA, CELLS, Carretera BP 1413, km 3.3, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines R.C. Blasdell, L. A. Assoufid, and D. M. Mills TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................1 2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DIAMONDS ..................................................5 2.1 Varieties of Diamonds ....................................................................5 2.2 The Lattice Parameter .....................................................................5 2.3 Bulk Thermal and Mechanical Properties ...............................................6 2.4 Typical Surface and Lattice Plane Morphology ......................................8 2.5 The Liquid-GaIn/Diamond Interface ...................................................10 3. DIFFRACTION PROPERTIES OF DIAMOND

123

Printable, flexible and stretchable diamond for thermal management  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various heat-sinked components and methods of making heat-sinked components are disclosed where diamond in thermal contact with one or more heat-generating components are capable of dissipating heat, thereby providing thermally-regulated components. Thermally conductive diamond is provided in patterns capable of providing efficient and maximum heat transfer away from components that may be susceptible to damage by elevated temperatures. The devices and methods are used to cool flexible electronics, integrated circuits and other complex electronics that tend to generate significant heat. Also provided are methods of making printable diamond patterns that can be used in a range of devices and device components.

Rogers, John A; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Dae Hyeong; Meitl, Matthew; Menard, Etienne; Carlisle, John

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

Epitaxial synthesis of diamond layers on a monocrystalline diamond substrate in a torch microwave plasmatron  

SciTech Connect

The epitaxial growth of a diamond single-crystal film in a torch microwave discharge excited by a magnetron of a domestic microwave oven with the power of {<=}1 kW in an argon-hydrogen-methane mixture with a high concentration of methane (up to 25% with respect to hydrogen) at atmospheric pressure on a sub-strate of a synthetic diamond single crystal (HPHP) with the orientation (100) and 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 mm in size is obtained. A discharge with the torch diameter of {approx}2 mm and the concentration of the microwave power absorbed in the torch volume of >10{sup 3} W/cm{sup 3} is shown to be effective for epitaxial enlargement of a single crystal of synthetic diamond. The structure of the deposited film with the thickness up to 10 {mu}m with high-quality morphology is investigated with an optical microscope as well as using the methods of the Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy.

Sergeichev, K. F., E-mail: kserg@fpl.gpi.ru; Lukina, N. A. [Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400┬░C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

126

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

127

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-Loaded Accelerating Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE S. Antipov, C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, P. Schoessow Euclid TechLabs LLC, Solon, OH, 44139 USA M. Conde, W. Gai, S....

128

Wakefield Breakdown Test of a Diamond-loaded Accelerating Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAKEFIELD BREAKDOWN TEST OF A DIAMOND-LOADED ACCELERATING STRUCTURE AT THE AWA S. Antipov, C. Jing, P. Schoessow, J. E. Butler, S. Zuo and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC,...

129

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Diamond: a storage architecture for early discard in interactive search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the concept of early discard for interactive search of unindexed data. Processing data inside storage devices using downloaded searchlet code enables Diamond to perform efficient, applicationspecific filtering of large data collections. ...

Larry Huston; Rahul Sukthankar; Rajiv Wickremesinghe; M. Satyanarayanan; Gregory R. Ganger; Erik Riedel; Anastassia Ailamaki

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

Tushar K Ghosh

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Crystal-Face Science Posters - Post-mission Science Posters from the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) took place in the summer of 2002 over Key West, Florida. It was a measurement campaign that investigated the physical properties and formation processes of tropical cirrus clouds. Six aircraft with various instruments flew missions, gathering data that were compared with ground-based instrument data and that would be used in the modeling of the Earth's climate. DOE was only one of several federal agencies involved, along with various universities and science institutes. The Crystal-Face numeric data sets are available in DOE's ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/armlogin/login.jsp and in NASA's ARCS archive at http://espoarchive.nasa.gov/archive/arcs/crystalf/images/npol_1/. Various sets of data are also available at some of the participating universities. The official home page for Crystal-Face is http://www.espo.nasa.gov/crystalface/index.html.

134

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

135

Is Graphite a Diamonds Best Friend? New Information on Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 18th, 2003 November 18th, 2003 Is Graphite a Diamond's Best Friend? New Information on Material Transformation Science has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turning lead into gold. But a group of re-searchers using the GeoSoilEn-viroCARS (GSECARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to turn ordinary soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the

136

Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

Devlin, David James (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Archuleta, Thomas Arthur (Espanola, NM); Barbero, Robert Steven (Santa Cruz, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Designed Diamond Ground State via Optimized Isotropic Monotonic Pair Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply inverse statistical-mechanical methods to find a simple family of optimized isotropic, monotonic pair potentials, under certain constraints, whose ground states for a wide range of pressures is the diamond crystal. These constraints include desirable phonon spectra and the widest possible pressure range for stability. We also ascertain the ground-state phase diagram for a specific optimized potential to show that other crystal structures arise for other pressures. Cooling disordered configurations interacting with our optimized potential to absolute zero frequently leads to the desired diamond crystal ground state, revealing that the capture basin for the global energy minimum is large and broad relative to the local energy minima basins.

Etienne Marcotte; Frank H. Stillinger; Salvatore Torquato

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

E. Ampem-Lassen; D. A. Simpson; B. C. Gibson; S. Trpkovski; F. M. Hossain; S. T. Huntington; K. Ganesan; L. C. L. Hollenberg; S. Prawer

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

Ampem-Lassen, E; Gibson, B C; Trpkovski, S; Hossain, F M; Huntington, S T; Ganesan, K; Hollenberg, L C L; Prawer, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Nanostructure diamond cathodes can operate at relatively moderate vacuum pressures due to the inert surface/vacuum interface. September 27, 2013 A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode Researchers at LANL have developed a novel, ultra-high-quality, robust electron source, which uses nanostructured polycrystalline diamond in a matrix with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email A Photo-Stimulated Low Electron Temperature High Current Diamond Film Field Emission Cathode

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Abstract Moving average algorithms for diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped window operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents fast moving window algorithms for calculating local statistics in a diamond, hexagon, and general polygonal shaped windows of an image which is important for real-time applications. The algorithms for a diamond shaped window requires only seven or eight additions and subtractions per pixel. A fast sparse algorithm only needs four additions and subtractions for a sparse diamond shaped window. A number of other shapes of diamond windows such as skewed or parallelogram shaped diamond, long diamond, and lozenged diamond shaped, are also investigated. Similar algorithms are also developed for hexagon shaped windows. The computation for a hexagon window only needs eight additions and subtractions for each pixel. Fast algorithms for general polygonal shaped windows are also developed. The computation cost of all these algorithms is independent of the window size. A variety of synthetic and real images have been tested.

Changming Sun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Diamond Beamline Controls and Data Acquisition Software Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The software for the Diamond Light Source beamlines[1] is based on two complementary software frameworks: low level control is provided by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) framework[2][3] and the high level user interface is provided by the Java based Generic Data Acquisition or GDA[4][5]. EPICS provides a widely used

N. Rees; Diamond Controls Group; Diamond Data Acquisition Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fabrication of Aluminum Alloy-Based Diamond Grinding Wheel by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moreover, ability of CFRP drilling of the aluminum alloy-based diamond grinding wheel ... Accelerated Post-Weld Natural Ageing in Ultrasonic Welding Aluminium ..... Powder Metallurgy of High Strength Al84Gd6Ni7Co3 Gas-atomized Powder.

144

Science and technology review, March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication contains two feature articles and one research highlight. The first feature article is on the safe disposal of nuclear wastes. The second article is about using the Lab`s diamond anvil cell to probe the behavior of nuclear weapons related materials. The research highlight is on using hydrogen fuel for hybrid vehicles.

Failor, B.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Diamond Wire Saw for Precision Machining of Laser Target Components  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of precision laser targets requires a wide variety of specialized mesoscale manufacturing techniques. The diamond wire saw developed in this study provides the capability to precisely section meso-scale workpieces mounted on the assembly stations used by the Target Fabrication Group. This new capability greatly simplifies the fabrication of many types of targets and reduces the time and cost required to build the targets. A variety of materials are used to fabricate targets, including metals, plastics with custom designed chemical formulas, and aerogels of various densities. The materials are usually provided in the form of small pieces or cast rods that must be machined to the required shape. Many of these materials, such as metals and some plastics, can be trimmed using a parting tool on a diamond turning machine. However, other materials, such as aerogels and brittle materials, cannot be adequately cut with a parting tool. In addition, the geometry of the parts often requires that the workpieces be held in a special assembly station, which excludes the use of a parting tool. In the past, these materials were sectioned using a small, handheld coping saw that used a diamond-impregnated wire as a blade. This miniature coping saw was effective, but it required several hours to cut through certain materials. Furthermore, the saw was guided by hand and often caused significant damage to fragile aerogels. To solve these problems, the diamond wire saw shown in Figure 1 was developed. The diamond wire saw is designed to machine through materials that are mounted in the Target Fabrication Group's benchtop assembly stations. These assembly stations are the primary means of aligning and assembling target components, and there is often a need to machine materials while they are mounted in the assembly stations. Unfortunately, commercially available saws are designed for very different applications and are far too large to be used with the assembly stations. Therefore, a custom diamond wire saw was designed and constructed. The diamond wire saw cuts through workpieces using a continuous loop of diamond-impregnated wire of length 840 mm. The wire loop runs around several idler pulleys and is driven by a simple geared DC motor that rotates at 17 rpm. The linear speed of the wire is 107 inches/minute. The saw is oriented at an angle of 20{sup o} from horizontal, so the operator can view the wire through the cutout at the front end of the saw. When looking through a microscope or camera with a horizontal line of sight, the operator can clearly see the wire as it cuts through the workpiece, as shown in the right side of Figure 1. The saw is mounted on a two-axis stage that allows the operator to align the wire with the workpiece. To cut through the workpiece, the operator drives the wire through the workpiece by turning the feed micrometer. An image of the interior of the diamond wire saw appears in Figure 2. This picture was taken after removing the protective cover plate from the saw.

Bono, M J; Bennett, D W

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Crystal-Face Archive of Images: Images from the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) took place in the summer of 2002 over Key West, Florida. It was a measurement campaign that investigated the physical properties and formation processes of tropical cirrus clouds. Six aircraft with various instruments flew missions, gathering data that were compared with ground-based instrument data and that would be used in the modeling of the EarthĂs climate. DOE was only one of several federal agencies involved, along with various universities and science institutes. The Crystal-Face numeric data sets are available in DOEĂs ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/armlogin/login.jsp and in NASAĂs ARCS archive at http://espoarchive.nasa.gov/archive/arcs/crystalf/images/npol_1/. Various sets of data are also available at some of the participating universities. The official home page for Crystal-Face is http://www.espo.nasa.gov/crystalface/index.html. See the 52 science posters at http://www.espo.nasa.gov/crystalface/posters.html

147

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550.degree. C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

149

Black Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Diamond, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.3087121┬░, -122.0031691┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.3087121,"lon":-122.0031691,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Corrosion Resistance of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Lined Pipe to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Peter F. Ellis, Brian Chambers, Bill Boardman. On-Site Speaker ( Planned), Peter F. Ellis. Abstract Scope, Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings appliedá...

151

I17: Surface Modification of Boron-doped Diamond with H2O Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the other hand, the wettability of diamond film surfaces can be altered by plasma exposure treatments. Investigation was carried on the surface modificationá...

152

Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

Mark A. Prelas

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Particle? and photoinduced conductivity in type?IIa diamonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single?crystal natural type?IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle?induced conductivity and time?resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle?induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility ? and lifetime ? throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the materialsurface. For each technique

L. S. Pan; S. Han; D. R. Kania; S. Zhao; K. K. Gan; H. Kagan; R. Kass; R. Malchow; F. Morrow; W. F. Palmer; C. White; S. K. Kim; F. Sannes; S. Schnetzer; R. Stone; G. B. Thomson; Y. Sugimoto; A. Fry; S. Kanda; S. Olsen; M. Franklin; J. W. Ager III; P. Pianetta

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Study of bound hydrogen in powders of diamond nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to access feasibility of increasing albedo of very cold neutrons from powder of diamond nanoparticles, we studied hydrogen bound to surface of diamond nanoparticles, which causes unwanted losses of neutrons. We showed that one could decrease a fraction of hydrogen atoms from a ratio C{sub 7.4{+-}0.15}H to a ratio C{sub 12.4{+-}0.2}H by means of thermal treatment and outgasing of powder. Measurements of atomic excitation spectra of these samples, using a method of inelastic incoherent neutron scattering, indicate that residual hydrogen is chemically bound to carbon, while a removed fraction was composed of adsorbed water. The total cross section of scattering of neutrons with a wavelength of 4.4 Angstrom-Sign on residual hydrogen atoms equals 108 {+-} 2 b; it weakly changes with temperature. Thus preliminary cleaning of powder from hydrogen and its moderate cooling do not improve considerably neutron albedo from powder of nano-diamonds. An alternative approach is isotopic replacement of hydrogen by deuterium.

Krylov, A. R.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzychka, A. Yu. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Nesvizhevsky, V. V., E-mail: nesvizhevsky@ill.eu [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation); Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A. S. [Institut Laue-Langevin (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Annealing dependence of diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights probed by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. The platinum contacts on oxygen-terminated diamond was found to provide a higher Schottky barrier and therefore a better blocking contact than that of the silver contact in diamond-based electronic devices.

Gaowei, M.; Muller, E. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Rumaiz, A. K. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Weiland, C.; Cockayne, E.; Woicik, J. C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, J. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Smedley, J. [Instrumentation Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Growth of diamond films using an enclosed methyl-acetylene and propadiene combustion flame K Abstract Diamond growth in low pressure combustion flames was studied using a safer, more economical and chemical kinetic time scales in the combustion reactor. 1 Present Address: 3M Corporation, Bldg. 60-1N-01

Dandy, David

157

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds Shohei Chiashi diameter attract attention. Here, we perform CVD growth by using nano-diamond particles as the catalyst [1] and investigate the CVD condition dependence of SWNT tube diameter. The average diameter of the as-received nano

Maruyama, Shigeo

158

Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design and Application of CVD Diamond Windows for X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Yifei [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg 401, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cookson, David [University of Chicago, CARS, APS Sector 15, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Bldg. 434D, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Design and application of CVD diamond windows for x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

Jaski, Y.; Cookson, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Chicago

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

Charging characteritiscs of ultrananocrystalline diamond in RF MEMS capacitive switches.  

SciTech Connect

Modifications to a standard capacitive MEMS switch process have been made to allow the incorporation of ultra-nano-crystalline diamond as the switch dielectric. The impact on electromechanical performance is minimal. However, these devices exhibit uniquely different charging characteristics, with charging and discharging time constants 5-6 orders of magnitude quicker than conventional materials. This operation opens the possibility of devices which have no adverse effects of dielectric charging and can be operated near-continuously in the actuated state without significant degradation in reliability.

Sumant, A. V.; Goldsmith, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J.; Zheng, H.; Hwang, J. C. M.; Palego, C.; Wang, W.; Carpick, R.; Adiga, V.; Datta, A.; Gudeman, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind (07) Wind Farm Wind (07) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.274903┬░, -104.183013┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.274903,"lon":-104.183013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm Facility Diamond Willow Wind (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Montana-Dakota Utilities Developer Montana-Dakota Utilities Energy Purchaser Montana-Dakota Utilities Location Near Baker MT Coordinates 46.268046┬░, -104.201742┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.268046,"lon":-104.201742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

Sparkling Diamonds ľ Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under construction. The focus on a construction site tends to be on keeping the project on schedule, and not on energy matters although the two can, and need to, complement each other. There were two motivating factors in completing an energy review during the construction phase: cost and environmental responsibilities. De Beers Canada is working to identify a long term strategy to manage their business in a sustainable manner while mitigating the energy costs of their on-site power usage. The paper will highlight the: Ľ Approach De Beers took; Ľ Challenges of conducting an energy assessment at a construction site; Ľ Energy issues exposed by a sub-arctic climate Ľ Results achieved; Ľ Next steps to achieve a sustainable energy management program. The paper will also discuss how De Beers Canada is incorporating the learning and the systems development benefits from the energy review. The organization is building these aspects into their overall Carbon Emissions and Energy Management System that will be implemented at their three new sites across Canada.

Feldman, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond micro-resonators.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of {approx}800 C. The films have {approx}4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, {approx}1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Sumant, A. V.; Adiga, V. P.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlis, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.  

SciTech Connect

Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar diamond accelerating structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have directly measured THz wakefields induced by a subpicosecond, intense relativistic electron bunch in a diamond loaded accelerating structure via the wakefield acceleration method. We present here the beam test results from the diamond based structure. Diamond has been chosen for its high breakdown threshold and unique thermoconductive properties. Fields produced by a leading (drive) beam were used to accelerate a trailing (witness) electron bunch, which followed the drive bunch at a variable distance. The energy gain of a witness bunch as a function of its separation from the drive bunch describes the time structure of the generated wakefield.

Antipov, S.; Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kanareykin, A.; Butler, J. E. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gai, W. [Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent experiments were carried out to determine the transport of the electrons within the diamond and their emission at the surface. In transmission mode measurements, the diamond amplifier was coated with metal on both sides, so results simply depend only on the electron transport within the diamond. The SEY for this mode provides one secondary electron per 20eV energy, which gives the gain of more than 200 for 4.7keV (effective energy) primary electrons under 2MV/m. Laser detrapping can help the signal maintain the gain with lops pulse and duty cycle of 1.67 x 10{sup -7}. In emission mode measurements, in which the diamond is prepared as in the actual application, the SEY is {approx}20 for 700eV (effective energy) primary electrons under 1.21MV/m. The electric field applied and the primary electron energy is limited by the experiment setup, but the results show good trend toward large gain under high field. Thermal emittance of the diamond secondary emission is critical for the beam application. A careful design is setup to measure with very fine precision and accuracy of 0.01eV.

Wu,Q.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Minerals, Metals and Materials under Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New diamond-anvil, shock-loading and computational techniques ... Probing the Role of Temperature on Texture Evolution in Tantalum during Dynamic-Tensile-á...

175

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information ┬╗ Spinoff Archives Diamond Amplified Photocathode at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Diamond amplified photocathode Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York Developed in: 2004-2007 Result of NP research:

176

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond`s performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Phillips, W. [Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information August 2012 New Superhard Form of Carbon Dents Diamond Squeezing creates new class of...

179

Diamond-turning HP-21 beryllium to achieve an optical surface  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of diamond turning on beryllium was made in anticipation of obtaining an optical finish. Although results of past experiences were poor, it was decided to continue diamond turning on beryllium beyond initial failures. By changing speed and using coolant, partial success was achieved. Tool wear was the major problem. Tests were made to establish and plot wear as a function of cutting speed and time. Slower speeds did cause lower wear rates, but at no time did wear reach an acceptable level. The machine, tools, and procedure used were chosen based on the results of preliminary attempts and on previous experience. It was unnecessary to use an air-bearing spindle because tool failure governed the best finish that could be expected. All tools of diamond composition, whether single crystal or polycrystalline, wore at unacceptable rates. Based on present technology, it must be concluded that beryllium cannot be feasibly diamond turned to achieve an optical finish. (22 fig.) (auth)

Allen, D.K.; Hauschildt, H.W.; Bryan, J.B.

1975-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Growth and electrical characterisation of {delta}-doped boron layers on (111) diamond surfaces  

SciTech Connect

A plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition protocol for the growth of {delta}-doping of boron in diamond is presented, using the (111) diamond plane as a substrate for diamond growth. AC Hall effect measurements have been performed on oxygen terminated {delta}-layers and desirable sheet carrier densities ({approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) for field-effect transistor application are reported with mobilities in excess of what would expected for equivalent but thicker heavily boron-doped diamond films. Temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that the grown layers have metallic-like electrical properties with high cut-off frequencies and low thermal impedance activation energies with estimated boron concentrations of approximately 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}.

Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Sato, Syunsuke; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Kawarada, Hiroshi [Department of Electronic and Photonic Systems, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Morris, Richard [Advanced SIMS Projects, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ANL/APS/TB-24 Diamond Monochromators for APS Undulator-A Beamlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Cutoff Energies, and Tuning Range .......................27 3.3 Absorption .............................................................36 4.2 Direct Cooling of Diamonds ............................................................39 4.3 Operation at Cryogenic Temperatures .................................................39 4.4 Cooling through

Kemner, Ken

182

Microsoft Word - DiamondB_Easement_CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2011 16, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to purchase the Diamond B conservation easement. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-800-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there will be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 28N, Range 20W, Sections 28 and 33 in Flathead County, MT

183

Creation of multiple identical single photon emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single photon emitters are also required. However typical solid-state single photon sources are dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here, we present controllable growth of bright silicon-vacancy (SiV-) centres in bulk diamond which intrinsically show almost identical emission (spectral overlap of up to 83%) and near transform-limited excitation linewidths. We measure the photo-physical properties of defects at room and cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate incorporation into a solid immersion lens (SIL). Our results have impact upon the application of single photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography, and the production of next generation fluorophores for bio-imaging.

Lachlan J. Rogers; Kay D. Jahnke; Luca Marseglia; Christoph. MŘller; Boris Naydenov; Hardy Schauffert; C. Kranz; T. Teraji; Junichi Isoya; Liam P. McGuinness; Fedor Jelezko

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ultrafast QND measurements based on diamond-shape artificial atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a Quantum Non Demolition (QND) read-out scheme for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a resonator in a circuit QED architecture, for which we estimate a very high measurement fidelity without Purcell effect limitations. The device consists of two transmons coupled by a large inductance, giving rise to a diamond-shape artificial atom with a logical qubit and an ancilla qubit interacting through a cross-Kerr like term. The ancilla is strongly coupled to a transmission line resonator. Depending on the qubit state, the ancilla is resonantly or dispersively coupled to the resonator, leading to a large contrast in the transmitted microwave signal amplitude. This original method can be implemented with state of the art Josephson parametric amplifier, leading to QND measurements in a few tens of nanoseconds with fidelity as large as 99.9 %.

I. Diniz; E. Dumur; O. Buisson; A. AuffŔves

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Orbital ice: An exact Coulomb phase on the diamond lattice  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the existence of an orbital Coulomb phase as the exact ground state of a p-orbital exchange Hamiltonian on the diamond lattice. The Coulomb phase is an emergent state characterized by algebraic dipolar correlations and a gauge structure resulting from local constraints (ice rules) of the underlying lattice models. For most ice models on the pyrochlore lattice, these local constraints are a direct consequence of minimizing the energy of each individual tetrahedron. On the contrary, the orbital ice rules are emergent phenomena resulting from the quantum orbital dynamics. We show that the orbital ice model exhibits an emergent geometrical frustration by mapping the degenerate quantum orbital ground states to the spin-ice states obeying the 2-in-2-out constraints on the pyrochlore lattice. We also discuss possible realization of the orbital ice model in optical lattices with p-band fermionic cold atoms.

Chern Giawei [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wu Congjun [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Self-assembling hybrid diamond-biological quantum devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realization of scalable arrangements of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond remains a key challenge on the way towards efficient quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum sensing applications. Although technologies based on implanting NV-center in bulk diamond crystals or hybrid device approaches have been developed, they are limited in the achievable spatial resolution and by the intricate technological complexities involved in achieving scalability. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach for creating an arrangement of NV-centers, based on the self-assembling capabilities of biological systems and its beneficial nanometer spatial resolution. Here, a self-assembled protein structure serves as a structural scaffold for surface functionalized nanodiamonds, in this way allowing for the controlled creation of NV-structures on the nanoscale and providing a new avenue towards bridging the bio-nano interface. One-, two- as well as three-dimensional structures are within the scope of biological structural assembling techniques. We realized experimentally the formation of regular structures by interconnecting nanodiamonds using biological protein scaffolds. Based on the achievable NV-center distances of 11nm, we evaluate the expected dipolar coupling interaction with neighboring NV-center as well as the expected decoherence time. Moreover, by exploiting these couplings, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis on the viability of multiqubit quantum operations, suggest the possibility of individual addressing based on the random distribution of the NV intrinsic symmetry axes and address the challenges posed by decoherence and imperfect couplings. We then demonstrate in the last part that our scheme allows for the high-fidelity creation of entanglement, cluster states and quantum simulation applications.

Andreas Albrecht; Guy Koplovitz; Alex Retzker; Fedor Jelezko; Shira Yochelis; Danny Porath; Yuval Nevo; Oded Shoseyov; Yossi Paltiel; Martin B. Plenio

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characterization and Qualification of a Precision Diamond Saw  

SciTech Connect

A precision diamond saw was characterized and qualified for production using the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network. This characterization was performed in three steps. First the equipment was evaluated and characterized, and then a process was developed and characterized to saw cofire networks. Finally, the characterized process was qualified for production using the MET network. During the development of the low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) processes needed to build the MCCS Encryption Translator (MET) network, a problem was uncovered. The laser process planned for scribing and separating was found to weaken the LTCC material by about 30%. A replacement process was needed, and precision diamond sawing was chosen. During the equipment evaluation and characterization, several parameters were investigated. These were cut depth, feed rate, spindle speed, and saw blade thickness. Once these were understood the process was then developed. Initially 24 variables were identified for the process, and eventually 12 of these variables were found to be critical. These variables were then adjusted until a process envelope was found that produced acceptable product. Finally parameters were chosen from the middle of the process envelope for production. With the production process set, the next step was to qualify it for production. Two criteria had to be met: visual acceptability and bending strength. The parts were examined under a microscope and found to be visually acceptable. Parts were then put through a four-point bend test, and the strengths recorded were equivalent to those measured in the past. With the completion of this work and the acceptable results, this process was qualified for production use.

Morgenstern, H.A.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond: electronic properties and hyperfine parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond have been studied using first principles calculations. We computed the symmetry, formation and transition energies, and hyperfine parameters of cobalt impurities in isolated configurations and in complexes involving vacancies and nitrogen atoms. We found that the Co impurity in a divacant site is energetically favorable and segregates nitrogen atoms in its neighborhood. Our results were discussed in the context of the recently observed Co-related electrically active centers in synthetic diamond.

Larico, R; Machado, W V M; Justo, J F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pulsed ion beam methods for in situ characterization of diamond film deposition processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) have properties which in principle make them ideally suited to a wide variety of thin-film applications. Their widespread use as thin films, however, has been limited for a number of reasons related largely to the lack of understanding and control of the nucleation and growth processes. Real-time, in situ studies of the surface of the growing diamond film are experimentally difficult because these films are normally grown under a relatively high pressure of hydrogen, and conventional surface analytical methods require an ultrahigh vacuum environment. It is believed, however, that the presence of hydrogen during growth is necessary to stabilize the corrugated diamond surface structure and thereby prevent the formation of the graphitic phase. Pulsed ion beam-based analytical methods with differentially pumped ion sources and particle detectors are able to characterize the uppermost atomic layer of a film during, growth at ambient pressures 5-7 orders of magnitude higher than other surface-specific analytical methods. We describe here a system which has been developed for the purpose of determining the hydrogen concentration and bonding sites on diamond surfaces as a function of sample temperature and ambient hydrogen pressure under hot filament CVD growth conditions. It is demonstrated that as the hydrogen partial pressure increases, the saturation hydrogen coverage of the surface of a CVD diamond film increases, but that the saturation level depends on the atomic hydrogen concentration and substrate temperature.

Krauss, A.R.; Smentkowski, V.S.; Zuiker, C.D.; Gruen, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Im, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Schultz, J.A.; Waters, K. [Ionwerks Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Chang, R.P.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Optical measurements on hydrogen at ultrahigh static pressures. Summary report for NRIP W233  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a two-year New Research Initiatives Program (NRIP) aimed at developing apparatus and techniques for studying hydrogen and other gases under ultrahigh static pressure in diamond--anvil cells are summarized. The following goals were achieved: A facility was established in which precision optical measurements can be made; special diamond cells for use at low temperatures were built; procedures were devised for loading cells with gases at high density; preliminary visual, x-ray, and spectral studies on various gases at pressures up to 50 kbar were conducted; and having demonstrated the feasibility of NRIP, other sponsorship on a continuing basis was obtained.

Mills, R.L.; Liebenberg, D.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the techno logy was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. 10 complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D activity.

Rule, Keith; Perry, Erik; Parsells, Robert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

Ladwig, Angela

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Particle- and photoinduced conductivity in type-IIa diamonds  

SciTech Connect

Electrical characteristics associated with radiation detection were measured on single-crystal natural type-IIa diamond using two techniques: charged particle-induced conductivity and time-resolved transient photoinduced conductivity. The two techniques complement each other: The charged particle-induced conductivity technique measures the product of the carrier mobility [mu] and lifetime [tau] throughout the bulk of the material while the transient photoconductivity technique measures the carrier mobility and lifetime independently at the first few micrometers of the material surface. For each technique, the [mu][tau] product was determined by integration of the respective signals. The collection distance that a free carrier drifts in an electric field was extracted by each technique. As a result, a direct comparison of bulk and surface electrical properties was performed. The data from these two techniques are in agreement, indicating no difference in the electrical properties between the bulk and the surface of the material. The collection distance continues to increase with field up to 25 kV/cm without saturation. Using the transient photoconductivity technique the carrier mobility was measured separately and compared with a simple electron-phonon scattering model. The general characteristics of carrier mobility, lifetime, and collection distance at low electric field appear to be adequately described by the model.

Pan, L.S.; Han, S.; Kania, D.R. (Laser Division, L-476, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Zhao, S.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Palmer, W.F.; White, C. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)); Kim, S.K.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Thomson, G.B. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)); Sugimoto, Y. (KEK Laboratory, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305 (Japan)); Fry, A. (Physics Division, SSC Laboratory, Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States)); Kanda, S.; Olsen, S. (Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)); Franklin, M. (Department of Physics, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)); Ager, J.W. III (Center for Advanced Materials, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Pianetta, P

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Recent developments in polycrystalline diamond-drill-bit design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of design criteria for polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits for use in severe environments (hard or fractured formations, hot and/or deep wells) is continuing. This effort consists of both analytical and experimental analyses. The experimental program includes single point tests of cutters, laboratory tests of full scale bits, and field tests of these designs. The results of laboratory tests at simulated downhole conditions utilizing new and worn bits are presented. Drilling at simulated downhole pressures was conducted in Mancos Shale and Carthage Marble. Comparisons are made between PDC bits and roller cone bits in drilling with borehole pressures up to 5000 psi (34.5 PMa) with oil and water based muds. The PDC bits drilled at rates up to 5 times as fast as roller bits in the shale. In the first field test, drilling rates approximately twice those achieved with conventional bits were achieved with a PDC bit. A second test demonstrated the value of these bits in correcting deviation and reaming.

Huff, C.F.; Varnado, S.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science A Breakthrough in Interface Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots MARCH 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share Research and Design Magazine "The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has been kept busy of late." That's the first sentence of R&D Magazine's recent overview of research results from the APS. The article highlights "a new ultrafast synchrotron x-ray full-field phase contrast imaging technique and used it to reveal

198

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core The chemical composition of the Earth's core is surprisingly complicated, according to high-temperature, high-pressure experiments conducted by University of Chicago scientists using the William M. Keck High Pressure Laboratory at the GSECARS facility, APS sector 13. This research has produced experimental evidence suggesting that the Earth's inner core largely consists of two exotic forms of iron (rather than one as previously thought) that appear to be alloyed with silicon. Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.) Above: Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.)

199

Laser Controlled Area Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

79 79 01 Effective: Page 1 of 17 05/13/11 Subject: X17B3 Laser Safety Program Documentation 1 AUTHORIZATION | Princeton University BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines the safety management program for the laser system listed below. All American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Hazard Class 3B and 4 laser systems must be documented, reviewed, and approved through use of this form. Each system must be reviewed annually. System description: A laser heating system for diamond anvil cell experiments has been installed at X17B3. A class 4 ytterbium fiber laser (IPG model YLR-100-SM-CS) is used to perform high-pressure laser heating of samples contained in diamond anvil cells. Included within this laser is a guide laser

200

Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison); (INTEL)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hugoniot Data for Helium in the Ionization Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hugoniot data were obtained for fluid He in the 100 GPa pressure range by shock compression of samples statically precompressed in diamond-anvil cells. The initial (precompressed) He density ({rho}{sub 1}) for each experiment was tuned to a value between {rho}{sub 0L}=}3{rho}{sub 0L} (i.e., {rho}/{rho}{sub 0L}{>=}12). Data show an increase in compressibility at the onset of ionization, similar to theoretical predictions.

Eggert, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brygoo, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Departement de Physique, Theorique et Applications, CEA, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Loubeyre, P. [Departement de Physique, Theorique et Applications, CEA, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); McWilliams, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California (United States)

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond's performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows.

Khounsary, A.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Phillips, W. (Crystallume, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nano-fabricated solid immersion lenses registered to single emitters in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a technique for fabricating micro- and nano-structures incorporating fluorescent defects in diamond with a positional accuracy in the hundreds of nanometers. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) etching we first locate a suitable defect with respect to registration marks on the diamond surface and then etch a structure using these coordinates. We demonstrate the technique here by etching an 8 micron diameter hemisphere positioned such that a single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect lies at its origin. This type of structure increases the photon collection efficiency by removing refraction and aberration losses at the diamond-air interface. We make a direct comparison of the fluorescence photon count rate before and after fabrication and observe an 8-fold increase due to the presence of the hemisphere.

L. Marseglia; J. P. Hadden; A. C. Stanley-Clarke; J. P. Harrison; B. Patton; Y. -L. D. Ho; B. Naydenov; F. Jelezko; J. Meijer; P. R. Dolan; J. M. Smith; J. G. Rarity; J. L. O'Brien

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

Rainer Wallny

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

Greg M. Swain, PI

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

208

Phlogopite and Quartz Lamellae in Diamond-bearing Diopside from Marbles of the Kokchetav Massif Kazakhstan: Exsolution or Replacement Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exsolution lamellae of pyroxene in garnet (grt), coesite in titanite and omphacite from UHPM terranes are widely accepted as products of decompression. However, interpretation of oriented lamellae of phyllosilicates, framework silicates and oxides as a product of decompression of pyroxene is very often under debate. Results are presented here of FIB-TEM, FEG-EMP and synchrotron-assisted infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of phlogopite (Phlog) and phlogopite + quartz (Qtz) lamellae in diamond-bearing clinopyroxene (Cpx) from ultra-high pressure (UHP) marble. These techniques allowed collection of three-dimensional information from the grain boundaries of both the single (phlogopite), two-phase lamellae (phlogopite + quartz), and fluid inclusions inside of diamond included in K-rich Cpx and understanding their relationships and mechanisms of formation. The Cpx grains contain in their cores lamellae-I, which are represented by topotactically oriented extremely thin lamellae of phlogopite (that generally are two units cell wide but locally can be seen to be somewhat broader) and microdiamond. The core composition is: (Ca{sub 0.94}K{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.06}Fe{sub 0.08}Mg{sub 0.88})(Si{sub 1.98}Al{sub 0.02})O{sub 6.00}. Fluid inclusions rich in K and Si are recognized in the core of the Cpx, having no visible connections to the lamellae-I. Lamellar-II inclusions consist of micron-size single laths of phlogopite and lens-like quartz or slightly elongated phlogopite + quartz intergrowths; all are situated in the rim zone of the Cpx. The composition of the rim is (Ca{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.03}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 0.05}Mg{sub 0.90})Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and the rim contains more Ca, Mg than the core, with no K there. Such chemical tests support our microstructural observations and conclusion that the phlogopite lamellae-I are exsolved from the K-rich Cpx-precursor during decompression. It is assumed that Cpx-precursor was also enriched in H{sub 2}O, because diamond included in the core of this Cpx contains fluid inclusions. The synchrotron IR spectra of such diamond record the presence of OH{sup -} stretching and H{sub 2}O bending motion regions. Lamellar-II inclusions are interpreted as forming partly because of modification of the lamellae-i in the presence of fluid enriched in K, Fe and Si during deformation of the host diopside; the latter is probably related to the shallower stage of exhumation of the UHP marble. This study emphasizes that in each case to understand the mechanism of lamellar inclusion formation more detailed studies are needed combining both compositional, structural and three-dimensional textural features of lamellar inclusions and their host.

L Dobrzhinetskaya; R Wirth; D Rhede; Z Liu; H Green

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

Shurter; Roger Philips (Los Alamos, NM), Devlin; David James (Santa Fe, NM), Moody; Nathan Andrew (Los Alamos, NM), Taccetti; Jose Martin (Santa Fe, NM), Russell; Steven John (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

Calculation of the charge-carrier mobility in diamond at low temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrepancies between the quasi-elastic and inelastic approaches to the calculation of the electron and hole mobilities in diamond at low temperatures when the carrier scattering from acoustic phonons becomes significantly inelastic have been numerically estimated. The calculations showed that the mobility described by a close-to-equilibrium distribution function differs several times from that obtained within the quasi-elastic approach even at 20 K. The results obtained are important for interpreting the low-temperature electrical experiments on high-purity diamond single crystals.

Baturin, A. S.; Gorelkin, V. N.; Soloviev, V. R.; Chernousov, I. V., E-mail: ichernousov@inbox.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments  

SciTech Connect

A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica" Rocasolano" C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L' Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach is based on software that generates a sequence of test signals for new and retrofit projects. Introduction The performance of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor

Diamond, Richard

213

Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Optimization of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of blade type X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, configuration and operation principle was analyzed to improve XBPM performance. Optimization is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission blades, Diamond Detector Blade (DDB) was analyzed as XBPM signal source. Analyses revealed, that Diamond Detector Blade XBPM would allow overcoming drawbacks of the photoemission type XBPMs.

Ilinski, Petr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

McClintock, Carlee [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News ┬╗ Featured Articles ┬╗ 2012 ┬╗ Dented News ┬╗ Featured Articles ┬╗ 2012 ┬╗ Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 08.27.12 Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages and Exceptional Potential Office of Science supported researchers develop new material with amazing hardness and exciting possibilities. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60 Image courtesy of Carnegie Institute of Washington Simulated structures showing the starting material of carbon-60

217

Diamond as a solid state quantum computer with a linear chain of nuclear spins system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By removing a $^{12}C$ atom from the tetrahedral configuration of the diamond, replace it by a $^{13}C$ atom, and repeating this in a linear direction, it is possible to have a linear chain of nuclear spins one half and to build a solid state quantum computer. One qubit rotation and controlled-not (CNOT) quantum gates are obtained immediately from this configuration, and CNOT quantum gate is used to determined the design parameters of this quantum computer.

G. V. Lˇpez

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500 deg. C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950 deg. C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M. [Department of Design and Manufacture, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ariga, T. [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

The effects of diamond injector angles on flow structures at various Mach numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of a three dimensional diamond jet interaction flowfield at various diamond injector half angles into a supersonic crossflow were presented in this thesis. The numerical study was performed to improve the understanding of the flame holding potential by extending the numerical database envelop to include different injector half angles and examine the flow at Mach 2 and Mach 5. The configuration of a diamond injector shape was found to reduce the flow separation upstream, and produce an attached shock at the initial freestream interaction and the injection fluid has an increased field penetration as compared to circular injectors. The CFD studies were also aimed at providing additional information on the uses of multiple injectors for flow control. The numerical runs were performed with diamond injectors at half angles of 10├?┬░ and 20├?┬░ at a freestream Mach number of 5. The transverse counter-rotating pair of vortices found in the 15├?┬░ does not form within the 10├?┬░ and 20├?┬░ cases at freestream Mach number 5. The 10├?┬░ case had a barrel shock that became streamlined in the lateral direction. The 20├?┬░ barrel shock had a very large spanwise expansion and became streamlined in the transverse direction. In both cases the trailing edge of their barrel shocks did not form the flat ├ó┬?┬?V├ó┬?┬Ł shape, as found in the baseline case. At Mach 2 the 10├?┬░ and 15├?┬░ cases both formed the flat ├ó┬?┬?V├ó┬?┬Ł shape at the trailing edge of the barrel shocks, and formed the transverse counter rotating vortex pairs. The 10├?┬░ multiple injector case successfully showed the interaction shocks forming into a larger planer shock downstream of the injectors. The swept 15├?┬░ case produced interaction shocks that were too weak to properly form a planar shock downstream. This planar shock has potential for flow control. Depending on the angle of incidence of the injector fluid with the freestream flow and the half angle of the diamond injector, the planar shocks will form further upstream or downstream of the injector.

McLellan, Justin Walter

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange, at which the surface street system and the free-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freeway ramp metering often exists in the vicinity of a signal-controlled diamond interchange signal and the ramp-metering signal. The proposed control algorithm, including an adaptive diamond inter- change control and a traffic-responsive ramp-metering control were programmed with VISSIM's vehicle

Tian, Zong Z.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lightning in the Anvils of Supercell Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA), the National Lightning Detection Network, and the Norman, Oklahoma (KOUN), prototype Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar to examine the evolution and ...

Stephanie A. Weiss; Donald R. MacGorman; Kristin M. Calhoun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electron emission and defect formation in the interaction of slow,highly charged ions with diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on electron emission and defect formation in theinteraction between slow (v~;0.3 vBohr) highly charged ions (SHCI) withinsulating (type IIa) and semiconducting (type IIb) diamonds. Electronemission induced by 31Pq+ (q=5 to 13), and 136Xeq+ (q=34 to 44) withkinetic energies of 9 kVxq increase linearly with the ion charge states,reaching over 100 electrons per ion for high xenon charge states withoutsurface passivation of the diamond with hydrogen. Yields from bothdiamond types are up to a factor of two higher then from reference metalsurfaces. Crater like defects with diameters of 25 to 40 nm are formed bythe impact of single Xe44+ ions. High secondary electron yields andsingle ion induced defects enable the formation of single dopant arrayson diamond surfaces.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Shrivastava, S.; Rebuli, D.B.; Persaud, A.; Schneider, D.H.; Schenkel, T.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length scales. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements facilitate depth profiling of the implanted nitrogen to provide three-dimensional characterization of the NV center spatial distribution. Measurements of NV center coherence with on-chip coplanar waveguides suggest a pathway for incorporating this scalable nanofabrication technique in future quantum applications.

Toyli, David M.; Weis, Christoph D.; Fuchs, D.; Schenkel, Thomas; Awschalom, David D.

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

Feng, Zhu (Albany, CA); Brewer, Marilee (Goleta, CA); Brown, Ian (Berkeley, CA); Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Diamond-like atomic-scale composite films: Surface properties and stability studied by STM and AFM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous ``diamond-like/quartz-like`` composites a-(C:H/Si:O) and metal containing a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) constitute a novel class of diamond-related materials with a number of unique bulk and surface properties. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the surface properties and stability of these solids we have performed a scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy investigation of both a-(C:H/Si:O) and a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) films, including the effects of ion bombardment and annealing.

Dorfman, B.; Abraizov, M. [SUNY, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Pollak, F.H. [CUNY, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Eby, R. [TopoMetrix, Bedminster, NJ (United States); Rong, Z.Y. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Strongin, M.; Yang, X.Q. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Beamlines Directory | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Directory Beamlines Directory Filter by: L bracket Discipline: All Atomic Physics Chemistry Environmental Science GeoScience Life Sciences Materials Science Physics Polymer Science Technique: All Anomalous and resonant scattering (hard x-ray) Anomalous and resonant scattering (soft x-ray) Biohazards at the BSL2/3 level Coherent x-ray scattering Diffraction anomalous fine structure Diffuse x-ray scattering Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction Fiber diffraction Fluorescence spectroscopy General diffraction Grazing incidence diffraction Grazing incidence small-angle scattering High-energy x-ray diffraction High-pressure diamond anvil cell High-pressure multi-anvil press Inelastic x-ray scattering Inelastic x-ray scattering (1 eV resolution) Intensity fluctuation spectroscopy Large unit cell crystallography Laue

231

Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Grain size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films with a thickness of {approx}6 {micro}m and with average grain sizes ranging from 60 to 9 nm were deposited on silicon wafers using a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. These samples were then characterized with the goal to identify correlations between grain size, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The characterization reveals that our films are phase pure and exhibit a relatively smooth surface morphology. The levels of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and hydrogen impurities are low, and showed a systematic variation with the grain size. The hydrogen content increases with decreasing grain size, whereas the sp{sup 2} carbon content decreases with decreasing grain size. The material is weaker than single crystalline diamond, and both stiffness and hardness decrease with decreasing grain size. These trends suggest gradual changes of the nature of the grain boundaries, from graphitic in the case of the 60 nm grain size material to hydrogen terminated sp{sup 3} carbon for the 9 nm grain size material. The films exhibit low levels of internal stress and freestanding structures with a length of several centimeters could be fabricated without noticeable bending.

Wiora, M; Bruehne, K; Floeter, A; Gluche, P; Willey, T M; Kucheyev, S O; Van Buuren, A W; Hamza, A V; Biener, J; Fecht, H

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Single-photon emission from Ni-related color centers in CVD diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color centers in diamond are very promising candidates among the possible realizations for practical single-photon sources because of their long-time stable emission at room temperature. The popular nitrogen-vacancy center shows single-photon emission, but within a large, phonon-broadened spectrum (~100nm), which strongly limits its applicability for quantum communication. By contrast, Ni-related centers exhibit narrow emission lines at room temperature. We present investigations on single color centers consisting of Ni and Si created by ion implantation into single crystalline IIa diamond. We use systematic variations of ion doses between 10^8/cm^2 and 10^14/cm^2 and energies between 30keV and 1.8MeV. The Ni-related centers show emission in the near infrared spectral range (~770nm to 787nm) with a small line-width (~3nm FWHM). A measurement of the intensity correlation function proves single-photon emission. Saturation measurements yield a rather high saturation count rate of 77.9 kcounts/s. Polarization dependent measurements indicate the presence of two orthogonal dipoles.

David Steinmetz; Elke Neu; Christian Hepp; Roland Albrecht; Wolfgang Bolse; Jan Meijer; Detlef Rogalla; Christoph Becher

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J. [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstr, 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

FEA analysis of diamond as IMCA{close_quote}s monochromator crystal  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of effort has been make in recent years in the field of undulator high heat load optics, and currently there are several tractable options [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 69}, 2792 (1994); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 266}, 517 (1988); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 239}, 555 (1993)]. Diamond crystals offer some attractive options{endash}water as the coolant, the use of established monochromator mechanisms, simpler monochromator design as compared to the use of liquid nitrogen or gallium. The use of diamond crystals as the optical elements in a double-crystal monochromator for the IMCA-CAT and MR-CAT ID beamlines has been studied. A first crystal mounting scheme using an indium-gallium eutectic as the heat transfer medium developed in collaboration with DND-CAT and M. Hart will be presented. A FEA analysis of the IMCA-CAT ID beamline arrangement using the APS undulator A as the radiaiton source will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Chrzas, J.; Cimpoes, S.; Ivanov, I.N. [CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3301 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Temperature dependence of mechanical stiffness and dissipation in ultrananocrystalline diamond films grown by the HFCVD techinque.  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized mechanical properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films grown using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique at 680 C, significantly lower than the conventional growth temperature of -800 C. The films have -4.3% sp{sup 2} content in the near-surface region as revealed by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The films, -1 {micro}m thick, exhibit a net residual compressive stress of 370 {+-} 1 MPa averaged over the entire 150 mm wafer. UNCD microcantilever resonator structures and overhanging ledges were fabricated using lithography, dry etching, and wet release techniques. Overhanging ledges of the films released from the substrate exhibited periodic undulations due to stress relaxation. This was used to determine a biaxial modulus of 838 {+-} 2 GPa. Resonant excitation and ring-down measurements in the kHz frequency range of the microcantilevers were conducted under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in a customized UHV atomic force microscope system to determine Young's modulus as well as mechanical dissipation of cantilever structures at room temperature. Young's modulus is found to be 790 {+-} 30 GPa. Based on these measurements, Poisson's ratio is estimated to be 0.057 {+-} 0.038. The quality factors (Q) of these resonators ranged from 5000 to 16000. These Q values are lower than theoretically expected from the intrinsic properties of diamond. The results indicate that surface and bulk defects are the main contributors to the observed dissipation in UNCD resonators.

Adiga, V. P.; Sumant, A. V.; Suresh, S.; Gudeman, C.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Pennsylvania; Innovative Micro Tech.; Advanced Diamond Tech.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Salsbury and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning -1 -Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diamond: Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning - 1 - Automated Testing of HVAC Systems This paper describes an approach to the automation of the commissioning of HVAC systems. The approach of many HVAC systems is limited more by poor installation, commissioning, and maintenance than by poor

238

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W. BRENNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Diamond/Nanotube Structures O.A. SHENDEROVA*, D. ARESHKIN and D.W precursors", Nature 364, 607. [6] Shenderova, O. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Coexistence of two carbon phases.T. and Brenner, D.W. (1997) "Mechanical Properties of nanotubule fibers and composites determined from

Brenner, Donald W.

239

A comparative study of three different chemical vapor deposition techniques of carbon nanotube growth on diamond films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power ...

Betty T. Quinton, Paul N. Barnes, Chakrapani V. Varanasi, Jack Burke, Bang-Hung Tsao, Kevin J. Yost, Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Program plan for the development of advanced synthetic-diamond drill bits for hard-rock drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight companys have teamed with Sandia Labs to work on five projects as part of a cooperative effort to advance the state of the ar in synthetic-diamond drill bit design and manufacture. DBS (a Baroid Company), Dennis Tool Company, Hughes Christensen Company, Maurer Engineering, Megadiamond, Security Diamond Products, Slimdril International, and Smith International. Objective of each project is to develop advanced bit technology that results in new commercial products with longer bit life and higher penetration rates in hard formations. Each project explores a different approach to synthetic-diamond cutter and bit design and, consequently, uses different approaches to developing the technology. Each of these approaches builds or the respective companies` capabilities and current product interests. Sandia`s role is to assure integration of the individual projects into a coherent program and tc provide unique testing and analytical capabilities where needed. One additional company, Amoco Production Research, will provide synthetic-diamond drill bit research expertise and field testing services for each project in the program.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm{sup 3} regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Inoue, Toru [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National and System Development Climate Data Management Tropical Cyclone Data and Information Work Communicating System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

243

Published in J. Mat. Sci. Lettr. 18 (1999) 427-430 Selective Patterned Deposition of Diamond using a New Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of centrifugation on diamond deposition. It is generally believed that atomic hydrogen at the growth surface deposition were unsuitable for experiments on a centrifuge. Thus, a new closed chemical vapor transport and removal of gas [4]. Graphite was used as a carbon source in the presence of hydrogen at low pressure

Regel, Liya L.

244

Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two. Therefore, there is a lack of both analysis tools and operational strategies for considering them as an integrated system. One drawback of operating the ramp-metering system and the diamond interchange system in isolation is that traffic from the ramp, particularly if it is metered, can spill back into the diamond interchange, causing both congestion and safety concerns at the diamond interchange. While flushing the ramp queues by temporarily suspending ramp metering has been the primary strategy for preventing queue spillback, it can result in freeway system breakdown, which would affect the entire system's efficiency. The aim of this research was to develop operational strategies for managing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering system (IDIRMS). Enhanced modeling methodologies were developed for an IDIRMS. A computer model named DRIVE (Diamond Interchange and Ramp Metering Integration Via Evaluation) was developed, which was characterized as a mesoscopic simulation and analysis model. DRIVE incorporated the enhanced modeling methodologies developed in this study and could be used to perform system analysis for an IDIRMS given a set of system input parameters and variables. DRIVE was validated against a VISSIM microscopic simulation model, and general agreement was found between the two models. System operational characteristics were investigated using DRIVE to gain a better understanding of the system features. Integrated control strategies (ICS) were developed based on the two commonly used diamond interchange phasing schemes, basic three-phase and TTI four-phase. The ICS were evaluated using VISSIM microscopic simulation under three general traffic demand scenarios: low, medium, and high, as characterized by the volume-to-capacity ratios at the metered ramps. The results of the evaluation indicate that the integrated operations through an adaptive signal control system were most effective under the medium traffic demand scenario by preventing or delaying the onset of ramp-metering queue flush, thereby minimizing freeway breakdown and system delays.

Tian, Zongzhong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Strain-Dependent Photoluminescence Behavior of CdSe/CdS Nanocrystals with Spherical, Linear, and Branched Topologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission peak maxima for CdSe/CdS rods of different lengthsfluorescence spectra of bare zb-CdSe dots in a diamond anvilPhotoluminescence Behavior of CdSe/CdS Nanocrystals with

Choi, Charina L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Using Laser-driven Shocks to Study the Phase Diagrams Of Low-Z Materials at Mbar Pressures and eV Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate phase diagrams for simple molecular fluids and solids (H2, He, H2O, SiO2, and C) and their constituent elements at eV temperatures and pressures up to tens of Mbar are integral to planetary models of the gas giant planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), and the rocky planets. Laboratory experiments at high pressure have, until recently, been limited to around 1 Mbar. These pressures are usually achieved dynamically with explosives and two-stage light-gas guns, or statically with diamond anvil cells. Current and future high energy laser and pulsed power facilities will be able to produce tens of Mbar pressures in these light element materials. This presentation will describe the capabilities available at current high energy laser facilities to achieve these extreme conditions, and focus on several examples including water, silica, diamond-phase-carbon, helium and hydrogen. Under strong shock compression all of these materials become electronic conductors, and are transformed eventually to dense plasmas. The experiments reveal some details of the nature of this transition. To obtain high pressure data closer to planetary isentropes advanced compression techniques are required. We are developing a promising technique to achieve higher density states: precompression of samples in a static diamond anvil cell followed by laser driven shock compression. This technique and results from the first experiments with it will be described. Details about this topic can be found in some of our previous publications.

Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W. [Larence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R.; Miller, J. E. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Brygoo, S. [Larence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Departement de Physique Theorique et Applications, CEA, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Loubeyre, P. [Departement de Physique Theorique et Applications, CEA, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); McWilliams, R. S.; Jeanloz, R. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Theoretical tool movement required to diamond turn an off-axis paraboloid on axis  

SciTech Connect

High-quality, off-axis parabolic reflectors, required by the CTR and laser-fusion programs at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) and other ERDA laboratories, are currently manufactured by hand. There are several drawbacks to this method, including lead times of up to a year, costs in excess of $75,000 for a small reflector, and unsatisfactory limits to the tolerances obtainable. This situation has led to a search for cheaper and more accurate methods of manufacturing off-axis paraboloids. An alternative method, turning the workpiece about its axis on a diamond-turning machine, is presented, and the equations describing the necessary tool movement are derived. A discussion of a particular case suggests that the proposed technique is feasible. (auth)

Thompson, D.C.

1975-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Application of polycrystalline diamond compact bits in the Kuparuk River Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

In soft to medium-hard clays and shales, polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have proved economically successful in the Kuparuk River field, AK. Through the redesign and modification of PDC bits and rig equipment, the necessary operating parameters have been achieved, and the use of PDC bits has become routine. These bits are typically run with a bit weight of 30,000 to 40,000 lbf (133 to 178 kN), a standpipe pressure of 4,000 psi (27 MPa), a pump rate of 400 to 450 gal/min (1.5 to 1.7 m/sup 3//min), and a rotary speed of 150 to 200 rev/min. Use of these high operating parameters saves about $50,000 per PDC bit when compared with roller-cone bits.

Balkenbush, R.J.; Onisko, J.E.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

High-precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3%-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance-matching analysis, incorporating systematic uncertainties in the equation of state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2%-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations, which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments, which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar, the present measurements indicate that the mixed phase is a few percent more dense than what would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Eggert, J. H.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McWilliams, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Controlling the quantum dynamics of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding and mitigating decoherence is a key challenge for quantum science and technology. The main source of decoherence for solid-state spin systems is the uncontrolled spin bath environment. Here, we demonstrate quantum control of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond at room temperature that is composed of electron spins of substitutional nitrogen impurities. The resulting spin bath dynamics are probed using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre electron spin as a magnetic field sensor. We exploit the spin bath control to dynamically suppress dephasing of the NV spin by the spin bath. Furthermore, by combining spin bath control with dynamical decoupling, we directly measure the coherence and temporal correlations of different groups of bath spins. These results uncover a new arena for fundamental studies on decoherence and enable novel avenues for spin-based magnetometry and quantum information processing.

G. de Lange; T. van der Sar; M. S. Blok; Z. H. Wang; V. V. Dobrovitski; R. Hanson

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Richard Diamond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision---Making.., 2012. Download: PDF (18.47 MB) Ingle, Aaron, Mithra M. Moezzi,...

254

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Behavior of the Diamond Difference and Low-Order Nodal Numerical Transport Methods in the Thick Diffusion Limit for Slab Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to investigate the thick diffusion limit of various spatial discretizations of the one-dimensional, steady-state, monoenergetic, discrete ordinates neutron transport equation. This work specifically addresses the two lowest order nodal methods, AHOT-N0 and AHOT-N1, as well as reconsiders the asymptotic limit of the Diamond Difference method. The asymptotic analyses of the AHOT-N0 and AHOT-N1 nodal methods show that AHOT-N0 does not possess the thick diffusion limit for cell edge or cell average fluxes except under very limiting conditions, which is to be expected considering the AHOT-N0 method limits to the Step method in the thick diffusion limit. The AHOT-N1 method, which uses a linear in-cell representation of the flux, was shown to possess the thick diffusion limit for both cell average and cell edge fluxes. The thick diffusion limit of the DD method, including the boundary conditions, was derived entirely in terms of cell average scalar fluxes. It was shown that, for vacuum boundaries, only when {sigma}{sub t}, h, and Q are constant and {sigma}{sub a} = 0 is the asymptotic limit of the DD method close to the finite-differenced diffusion equation in the system interior, and that the boundary conditions between the systems will only agree in the absence of an external source. For a homogeneous medium an effective diffusion coefficient was shown to be present, which was responsible for causing numeric diffusion in certain cases. A technique was presented to correct the numeric diffusion in the interior by altering certain problem parameters. Numerical errors introduced by the boundary conditions and material interfaces were also explored for a two-region problem using the Diamond Difference method. A discrete diffusion solution which exactly solves the one-dimensional diffusion equation in a homogeneous region with constant cross sections and a uniform external source was also developed and shown to be equal to the finite-differenced diffusion discretization for c = 1 in the system interior, where again the boundary conditions again only agree in the absence of an external source. It was also shown that for c < 1 the exact discrete diffusion solution is written in terms of hyperbolic functions, with expressions which limit to the exact solution for the c = 1 case as c {yields} 1. Finally, a transport discretization is developed which reproduces the exact S2 solution for the case of a purely scattering homogeneous region with vacuum boundary conditions, and an extension to the discretization for the case of c < 1 is found by considering a Taylor series expansion of the exact answer centered at c = 0.

Gill DF

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 * May 2012 1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in Non-hydrostatic Behavior in the Diamond Anvil Cell 8 Emission of Shocked Inhomogeneous Materials 9 2012 NNSA Stewardship Science Academic

257

Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations  

SciTech Connect

Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs.

Skelton, E.F.; Elam, W.T.; Qadri, S.B.; Webb, A.W.; Schiferl, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Insulator-to-Conducting Transition in Dense Fluid Helium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By combining diamond-anvil-cell and laser-driven shock wave techniques, we produced dense He samples up to 1.5 g/cm{sup 3} at temperatures reaching 60 kK. Optical measurements of reflectivity and temperature show that electronic conduction in He at these conditions is temperature-activated (semiconducting). A fit to the data suggests that the mobility gap closes with increasing density, and that hot dense He becomes metallic above {approx}1.9 g/cm{sup 3}. These data provide a benchmark to test models that describe He ionization at conditions found in astrophysical objects, such as cold white dwarf atmospheres.

Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Post Office Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Loubeyre, P.; Brygoo, S. [CEA/DAM/DIF, 91297 Arpajon. France (France); McWilliams, R. S. [Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

XAFS at the Canadian Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canadian Light Source Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis Beamline (HXMA, 06ID-1) is a hard X-ray spectroscopy beamline currently under commissioning. The source of the beamline is a superconducting wiggler covering 5 to 40 keV. The primary optics include a cryogenically cooled double crystal monochromator (Si 111 and 220), white beam vertical collimating and toroidal focusing mirrors. End station experimental capabilities include XAFS (Ge solid state detectors), microprobe (Kirkpatrick-Baez murors, Ge solid state detector and image plate area detector), and diffraction (Huber psi-8 and powder diffraction setups, with diamond anvil cell high pressure sample environment). Commissioning status for the XAFS capabilities is described.

Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Zhang, L.; Malgorzata, K. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wright, G.; Igarashi, R.; Beauregard, D.; Kirkham, M.; McKibben, M. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Isotropic Thermal Expansivity and Anisotropic Compressibility of ReB2  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally investigated some of the mechanical properties of ReB{sub 2} under high temperature/pressure (T/P) conditions. High-T experiments (up to 600 C at 1 atm) were carried out in a high-T oven attached to a conventional X-ray diffractometer whereas high-P experiments (up to about 42 GPa at 25 C) were conducted in a diamond-anvil cell using synchrotron X-ray radiation. High-T data suggest a highly isotopic thermal expansivity whereas high-P data suggest a highly anisotropic compressibility for ReB{sub 2}.

X Liu; W Liu; Q He; L Deng; H Wang; D He; B Li

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Mineralogy under extreme conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

Shu, Jinfu (CIW)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effect of pressure on arsenic diffusion in germanium  

SciTech Connect

We report preliminary results of a study of the activation volume for diffusion of arsenic in germanium. High-temperature high-pressure anneals were performed in a liquid argon pressure medium in a diamond anvil cell capable of reaching 5 GPa and 750 C,l which is externally heated for uniform and repeatable temperature profiles. Broadening of an ion-implanted arsenic profile was measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Hydrostatic pressure retards the diffusivity at 575 C, characterized by an activation volume that is +15% of the atomic volume of Ge. Implications for diffusion mechanisms are discussed.

Mitha, S.; Theiss, S.D.; Aziz, M.J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Schiferl, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Poker, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dynamic polarization of single nuclear spins by optical pumping of NV color centers in diamond at room temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a versatile method to efficiently polarize single nuclear spins in diamond, which is based on optical pumping of a single NV color center and mediated by a level-anti crossing in its excited state. A nuclear spin polarization higher than 98% is achieved at room temperature for the 15N nuclear spin associated to the NV center, corresponding to $\\mu$K effective nuclear spin temperature. We then show simultaneous deterministic initialization of two nuclear spins (13C and 15N) in close vicinity to a NV defect. Such robust control of nuclear spin states is a key ingredient for further scaling up of nuclear-spin based quantum registers in diamond.

V. Jacques; P. Neumann; J. Beck; M. Markham; D. Twitchen; J. Meijer; F. Kaiser; G. Balasubramanian; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect

Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X. (X-Ray Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling of microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} for diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave discharges of H{sub 2} admixed with CH{sub 4} in a moderate-pressure quartz bell jar reactor used for diamond deposition are studied numerically. Special attention was devoted to high-power densities which provide the most effective way for producing high-quality diamond films. First, a one-dimensional radial model describing the coupled phenomena of chemistry, energy transfer, as well as species and energy transport along the reactor's radial coordinate was developed. Species densities predicted with the model were compared with measurements with infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy, resulting in validation of the model. Second, a one-dimensional axial model was used to describe the plasma flow along the reactor axis in a region between the reactor end wall and the substrate surface. This model was particularly useful for studying the plasma behavior in the vicinity of the substrate surface, where thermal and composition gradients are large. Both the radial and axial transport models are based on the same discharge model in which the plasma is described as a thermochemically nonequilibrium flow with different energy distributions for heavy species and electrons. The chemistry was described with a model containing 28 species and 131 reactions. The electron temperature, the gas temperature, and the species concentration were determined by solving a coupled set of equations. A wide range of experimental conditions used for diamond deposition was simulated, from low microwave power density (9 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 600 W, 2500 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}2200 K) to high-power density (30 W cm{sup -3}, i.e., 2 kW, 12 000 Pa, and T{sub g}{approx}3200 K). The main chemical paths were identified, and the major species, transport effects, and reaction pathways that govern diamond deposition plasmas are discussed.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Stancu, G.-D.; Mechold, L.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laser Components GmbH, 82140 Olching, Werner-von-Siemens-Strasse 15 (Germany); INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13-99, av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Shock-Compressed Diamond: Melt, Insulator-Conductor and Polymeric-Atomic Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperatures measured on the shock-Hugoniot of diamond reveal melting between 650 ({+-} 60) GPa and 9000 ({+-} 800) K and 1090 ({+-} 50) GPa and 8400 ({+-} 800) K, with a heat of fusion of {approx} 25 {+-} 10 kJ/mole and a negative Clapeyron slope {partial_derivative}T/{partial_derivative}P|{sub melt} = -5 {+-} 3 K/GPa. Thus, the fluid is denser than the compressed solid, and optical reflectivity measurements show it to be metallic. Hugoniot-temperature measurements extending to over 4000 GPa (40 Mbar) and 115,000 K suggest de-polymerization of a dense covalently-bonded fluid to an atomic state between 10,000 and 30,000 K. These experimental results indicate that carbon present deep inside planets such as Uranus and Neptune could be solid for through-going convection, whereas stable stratification would allow for the presence of fluid metallic carbon at depth; in either case, the presence of carbon could potentially affect planetary seismic normal modes.

Eggert, J; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Bradley, D K; McWilliams, R S; Jeanloz, R; Miller, J E; Boehly, T R

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Effect of gigaelectron volt Au-ion irradiation on the characteristics of ultrananocrystalline diamond films  

SciTech Connect

The effect of 2.245 GeV Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes on the electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films was investigated. Au-ion irradiation with a fluence of around 8.4x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} is required to induce a large improvement in the EFE properties of the UNCD films. Postannealing the Au-ion irradiated films at 1000 deg. C for 1 h slightly degraded the EFE properties of the films but the resulting EFE behavior was still markedly superior to that of pristine UNCD films. Transmission electron microscopy examinations revealed that the EFE properties of the UNCD films are primarily improved by Au-ion irradiation/postannealing processes because of the formation of nanographites along the trajectory of the irradiating ions, which results in an interconnected path for electron transport. In contrast, the induction of grain growth process due to Au-ion irradiation in UNCD films is presumed to insignificantly degrade the EFE properties for the films as the aggregates are scarcely distributed and do not block the electron conducting path.

Chen, Huang-Chin; Teng, Kuang-Yau; Tang, Chen-Yau; Lin, I-Nan [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251 (China); Sundaravel, Balakrishnan [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Amirthapandian, Sankarakumar [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal conductivity of diamond-loaded glues for the ATLAS particle physics detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. ATLAS has been collecting data from the collisions of protons since December 2009, in order to investigate the conditions that existed during the early Universe and the origins of mass, and other topics in fundamental particle physics. The innermost layers of the ATLAS detector will be exposed to the most radiation over the first few years of operation at the LHC. In particular, the layer closest to the beam pipe, the B-layer, will degrade over time due to the added radiation. To compensate for its degradation, it will be replaced with an Insertable B-Layer (IBL) around 2016. The design of and R&D for the IBL is ongoing, as the hope is to use the most current technologies in the building of this new sub-detector layer. One topic of interest is the use of more thermally conductive glues in the construction of the IBL, in order to facilitate in the dissipation of heat from the detector. In this paper the measurement and use of highly thermally conductive glues, in particular those that are diamond-loaded, will be discussed. The modified transient plane source technique for thermal conductivity is applied in characterizing the glues across a wide temperature range.

E. A. Ouellette; A. Harris

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus Structure of the "Swine Flu" Virus The Package Matters Disarming Deadly South American Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Pull-Chain "Polymer" Solves Puzzle of Complex Molecular Packing Discovering New Talents for Diamond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Metallic Glass Yields Secrets under Pressure MARCH 29, 2010 Bookmark and Share Diamond anvil cell used for high-pressure experiments Metallic glasses are emerging as potentially useful materials at the frontier of materials science research. They combine the advantages-and avoid many of the problems of-normal metals and glasses, two classes of materials with a very wide range of applications. For example, metallic

275

Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

Nix, W.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy levels and decoherence properties of single electron and nuclear spins in a defect center in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coherent behavior of the single electron and single nuclear spins of a defect center in diamond and a 13C nucleus in its vicinity, respectively, are investigated. The energy levels associated with the hyperfine coupling of the electron spin of the defect center to the 13C nuclear spin are analyzed. Methods of magnetic resonance together with optical readout of single defect centers have been applied in order to observe the coherent dynamics of the electron and nuclear spins. Long coherence times, in the order of microseconds for electron spins and tens of microseconds for nuclear spins, recommend the studied system as a good experimental approach for implementing a 2-qubit gate.

I. Popa; T. Gaebel; M. Domhan; C. Wittmann; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mn-Stabilized Zirconia: From Imitation Diamonds to a New Potential High-T{sub C} Ferromagnetic Spintronics Material  

SciTech Connect

From the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations which include the effects of thermally excited magnetic fluctuations, we predict Mn-stabilized cubic zirconia to be ferromagnetic above 500 K. We find this material, which is well known both as an imitation diamond and as a catalyst, to be half-metallic with the majority and minority spin Mn impurity states lying in zirconia's wide gap. The Mn concentration can exceed 40%. The high-T{sub C} ferromagnetism is robust to oxygen vacancy defects and to how the Mn impurities are distributed on the Zr fcc sublattice. We propose this ceramic as a promising future spintronics material.

Ostanin, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Ernst, A.; Sandratskii, L. M.; Bruno, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Daene, M.; Hergert, W.; Mertig, I. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Fachbereich Physik, D-06099 Halle (Germany); Hughes, I. D.; Staunton, J. B. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kudrnovsky, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Robust control of entanglement in a Nitrogen-vacancy centre coupled to a Carbon-13 nuclear spin in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address a problem of generating a robust entangling gate between electronic and nuclear spins in the system of a single nitrogen-vacany centre coupled to a nearest Carbon-13 atom in diamond against certain types of systematic errors such as pulse-length and off-resonance errors. We analyse the robustness of various control schemes: sequential pulses, composite pulses and numerically-optimised pulses. We find that numerically-optimised pulses, produced by the gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm (GRAPE), are more robust than the composite pulses and the sequential pulses. The optimised pulses can also be implemented in a faster time than the composite pulses.

R. S. Said; J. Twamley

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Conformational flexibility and molecular interactions of an archaeal homologue of the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK and 7Current address: ArchitÚcture et Fonction des MacromolÚcules Biologiques UMR 9068, Case 932, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 9, France Email: C Leong Ng - clng@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk; David G Waterman - david... .waterman@diamond.ac.uk; Eugene V Koonin - koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Alison D Walters - adw501@york.ac.uk; James PJ Chong - jpjc1@york.ac.uk; Michail N Isupov - M.Isupov@exeter.ac.uk; Andrey A Lebedev - lebedev@ysbl.york.ac.uk; David HJ Bunka - bmbdhjb@bmb.leeds.ac.uk; Peter G...

Ng, C Leong; Waterman, David G; Koonin, Eugene V; Walters, Alison D; Chong, James P J; Isupov, Michail N; Lebedev, Andrey A; Bunka, David H J; Stockley, Peter G; Ortiz-Lombardia, Miguel; Antson, Alfred A

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Structure and Energy of the 90 degree sign Partial Dislocation in Diamond: A Combined Ab Initio and Elasticity Theory Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core structure and stability of the 90 degree sign partial dislocation in diamond is studied within isotropic elasticity theory and ab initio total energy calculations. The double-period reconstruction is found to be more stable than the single-period reconstruction for a broad range of stress states. The analysis of the ab initio results shows further that elasticity theory is valid for dislocation spacings as small as 10-20 Angstrom, thus allowing ab initio calculations to provide reliable parameters for continuum theory analysis. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Blase, X. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Departement de Physique des Materiaux, U.M.R. No. 5586, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, (France); Lin, Karin [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Canning, A. [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Louie, S. G. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chrzan, D. C. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The SiC problem: astronomical and meteoritic evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-solar grains of silicon carbide found in meteorites and interpreted as having had an origin around carbon stars from their isotopic composition, have all been found to be of the beta-SiC polytype. Yet to date fits to the 11.3 microns SiC emission band of carbon stars had been obtained only for alpha-SiC grains. We present thin film infrared (IR) absorption spectra measured in a diamond anvil cell for both the alpha- and beta- polymorphs of synthetic SiC and compare the results with previously published spectra taken using the KBr matrix method. We find that our thin film spectra have positions nearly identical to those obtained previously from finely ground samples in KBr. Hence, we show that this discrepancy has arisen from inappropriate `KBr corrections' having been made to laboratory spectra of SiC particles dispersed in KBr matrices. We re-fit a sample of carbon star mid-IR spectra, using laboratory data with no KBr correction applied, and show that beta-SiC grains fit the observations, while alpha-SiC grains do not. The discrepancy between meteoritic and astronomical identifications of the SiC-type is therefore removed. This work shows that the diamond anvil cell thin film method can be used to produce mineral spectra applicable to cosmic environments without further manipulation.

A. K. Speck; A. M. Hofmeister; M. J. Barlow

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Creating the Core Conditions of Extra-solar and Solar Giant Planets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials can be experimentally characterized at high pressures and densities by sending a laser-induced shock wave through a sample that is pre-compressed inside a diamond-anvil cell. This combination of static- and dynamic-compression methods has been experimentally demonstrated, and ultimately provides access to the 10-100 TPa (0.1-1 Gbar) pressure range that is relevant to planetary science. We report on dynamical measurements of the high pressure compressibility of helium, hydrogen and helium/hydrogen mixtures up to 230 GPa by combining laser shocks and static compression in diamond anvil cells. The initial density of samples in these precompressed targets has been varied by a factor of 3. The measurements on the principal He Hugoniot, i.e with the initial density of cryo-helium, is extended above 100 GPa and a maximum of compression ratio of greater than 5-fold of the initial density is observed. Also, a strong decrease in compressibility is observed by increasing the initial density. A similar data set has been produced for precompressed H{sub 2} and a mixture of He and H{sub 2}.

Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Collins, G; Brygoo, S; Jeanloz, R; McWilliams, R; Loubeyre, P; Boehly, T; Miller, J

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

An X-ray diffraction study of pressure-induced phase transitions in Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron based X-ray diffraction through a diamond anvil cell was used to determine the equations of state and pressure-induced phase transitions in Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}. It was observed that Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} undergoes a phase transformation at {approx}6.8 GPa. The high-pressure phase can be indexed to the orthorhombic structure and the transition is reversible on decompression from {approx}47 GPa. The bulk moduli of the low and high-pressure phases were calculated, while holding K Prime =4, to be: K=51{+-}1 GPa and K=141.5 {+-}0.1 GPa, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The material Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} was placed inside a diamond anvil cell and then studied under high pressure at beamline X17C of the National Synchrotron Light source. X-ray diffraction data was analyzed using the Rietveld method. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high-pressure study of bismuth molybdate was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressure-induced phase transitions were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The low pressure phase bulk modulus was calculated to be K=51{+-}1 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high pressure phase bulk modulus was calculated to be B=141.5{+-}0.1 GPa.

Scott, Paul R., E-mail: prscott933@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, MO 64110 (United States); Crow, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, MO 64110 (United States); Maczka, M. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw 2 (Poland)] [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw 2 (Poland); Kruger, M.B. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, MO 64110 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fundamentals and technology for monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches with ultra-nanocrystaline diamond dielectric/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

Most current capacitive RF-MEMS switch technology is based on conventional dielectric materials such as SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. However, they suffer not only from charging problems but also stiction problems leading to premature failure of an RF-MEMS switch. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{sup (R)}) (2-5 nm grains) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) (10-100 nm grains) films exhibit one of the highest Young's modulus ({approx} 980-1100 GPa) and demonstrated MEMS resonators with the highest quality factor (Q {ge} 10,000 in air for NCD) today, they also exhibit the lowest force of adhesion among MEMS/NEMS materials ({approx}10 mJ/m{sup 2}-close to van der Waals attractive force for UNCD) demonstrated today. Finally, UNCD exhibits dielectric properties (fast discharge) superior to those of Si and SiO{sub 2}, as shown in this paper. Thus, UNCD and NCD films provide promising platform materials beyond Si for a new generation of important classes of high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A.; Goldsmith, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.; Gudeman, C; Wang, W.; Hwang, J.; Swonger, J.; Carlisle, J.; Balachandran, S.; MEMtronics Corp.; Innovative Micro Technology; Lehigh Univ.; Peregrine Semiconductor; Advanced Diamond Technologies

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of a Beam Condition Monitor System for the Experimental Areas of the LHC Using CVD Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, each bunch consisting of 10^11 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damages not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond has been studied for use as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with a Sr-90 source and high intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. The results from these investigations are p...

Fernßndez-Hernando, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Diamond Particle Detector Properties during High Fluence Material Damage Tests and their Future Applications for Machine Protection in the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience with LHC machine protection (MP) during the last three years of operation shows that the MP systems sufficiently protect the LHC against damage in case of failures leading to beam losses with a time constant exceeding 1ms. An unexpected fast beam loss mechanism, called UFOs [1], was observed, which could potentially quench superconducting magnets. For such fast losses, but also for better understanding of slower losses, an improved understanding of the loss distribution within a bunch train is required [2]. Diamond particle detectors with bunch-by-bunch resolution and high dynamic range have been developed and successfully tested in the LHC and in experiments to quantify the damage limits of LHC components. This paper will focus on experience gained in use of diamond detectors. The properties of these detectors were measured during high-fluence material damage tests in CERNĺs Hi-RadMat facility. The results will be discussed and compared to the cross-calibration with FLUKA simulations. Future app...

Burkart, F; Borburgh, J; Dehning, B; Di Castro, M; Griesmayer, E; Lechner, A; Lendaro, J; Loprete, F; Losito, R; Montesano, S; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coupling of a single diamond nanocrystal to a whispering-gallery microcavity: Photon transport benefitting from Rayleigh scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the Rayleigh scattering induced by a diamond nanocrystal in a whispering-gallery-microcavity-waveguide coupling system and find that it plays a significant role in the photon transportation. On the one hand, this study provides insight into future solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics aimed at understanding strong-coupling physics. On the other hand, benefitting from this Rayleigh scattering, effects such as dipole-induced transparency and strong photon antibunching can occur simultaneously. As a potential application, this system can function as a high-efficiency photon turnstile. In contrast to B. Dayan et al. [Science 319, 1062 (2008)], the photon turnstiles proposed here are almost immune to the nanocrystal's azimuthal position.

Liu Yongchun; Xiao Yunfeng; Li Beibei; Jiang Xuefeng; Li Yan; Gong Qihuang [State Key Lab for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The induction of a graphite-like phase on diamond films by a Fe-coating/post-annealing process to improve their electron field emission properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron field emission (EFE) process for diamond films was tremendously enhanced by Fe-coating and post-annealing processes. Microstructural analysis indicates that the mechanism for the improvement in the EFE process is the formation of nanographites with good crystallinity that surround the Fe (or Fe{sub 3}C) nanoclusters. Presumably the nanographites were formed via the reaction of Fe clusters with diamond films, viz. by the dissolution of carbons into Fe (or Fe{sub 3}C) clusters and the reprecipitation of carbon species to the surface of the clusters, a process similar to the growth of carbon nanotubes via Fe clusters as catalyst. Not only is a sufficiently high post-annealing temperature (900 deg. C) required but also a highly active reducing atmosphere (NH{sub 3}) is needed to give a proper microstructure for enhancing the EFE process. The best EFE properties are obtained by post-annealing the Fe-coated diamond films at 900 deg. C in an NH{sub 3} environment for 5 min. The EFE behavior of the films can be turned on at E{sub 0} = 1.9 V/{mu}m, attaining a large EFE current density of 315 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 8.8 V/{mu}m (extrapolation using the Fowler-Nordheim model leads to J{sub e} = 40.7 mA/cm{sup 2} at a 20 V/{mu}m applied field).

Huang, Pin-Chang; Shih, Wen-Ching [Graduate Institute in Electro-Optical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I-Nan [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Surface damages in diamond by Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and their effect on the electrical and electrochemical characteristics of boron-doped layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epitaxial single crystal and boron-doped diamond layers were exposed to reactive ion etching in Ar/O{sub 2} plasma (rf power of 25 W and self-bias of 100 V); and the electrical, structural, and electrochemical characteristics of the exposed surface were investigated. Angle-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed a nonuniform layer of amorphous carbon at the exposed surface with an average thickness of approximately 4 nm, as confirmed also by atomic force microscopy profiling of selectively etched areas. On highly boron-doped diamond, the plasma-induced damages resulted also in a nonconductive surface layer. This damaged and insulating surface layer remained resistant to graphite-etching chemicals and to rf oxygen plasma but it was removed completely in microwave hydrogen plasma at 700 deg. C. The surface characteristics after the H-plasma process followed by wet chemical oxidation were restored back to the initial state, as confirmed by XPS. Such ''recovery'' treatment had been applied to an all-diamond submicrometer electrode array initially patterned by an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma etching. The electrochemical characteristics of this electrode array were improved by more than two orders of magnitude, approaching theoretical limit for the given geometrical configuration.

Denisenko, A.; Pietzka, C.; Scharpf, J.; Kohn, E. [Institute of Electron Devices and Circuits, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Romanyuk, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamical Influences of Anvil Shading on Simulated Supercell Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms including parameterized radiative transfer and surface fluxes are performed using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model to investigate how low-level air temperature deficits within ...

Jeffrey Frame; Paul Markowski

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Retained Nanostructures in Monoliths by Multi-anvil High Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Aerogel/Nanorod Functional Materials for Energy and Sensing ... Processing and Characterization of Inorganic, High Temperature Nanomaterial Filter.

295

Superhard behaviour, low residual stress, and unique structure in diamond-like carbon films by simple bilayer approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple bilayer approach is proposed for synthesizing hard and superhard diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings with reduced residual stress. For this, M/DLC bilayer (M = Ti and Cu) structures are grown using hybrid system involving radio frequency (RF)-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Ti/DLC bilayer deposited at negative self bias of 100 V shows superhard behaviour with hardness (H) as 49 GPa. Cu/DLC bilayer grown at self bias of 100 V exhibits hard behaviour with H as 22.8 GPa. The hardness of Ti/DLC (Cu/DLC) bilayer gets changed from superhard (hard) to hard (moderate hard) regime, when the self bias is raised to 300 V. Residual stress in Ti/DLC (Cu/DLC) bilayer is found to be significantly low that varies in the range of 1 GPa-1.65 GPa (0.8 GPa-1.6 GPa). The microstructure and morphology are studied by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM and AFM pictures reveal the creation of nanostructured features in the deposited bilayers. Raman, SEM, and AFM analyses are correlated with the nano-mechanical properties. Owing to excellent nano-mechanical properties, these bilayers can find their direct industrial applications as hard and protective coatings.

Dwivedi, Neeraj [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), KS Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India); Kumar, Sushil [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), KS Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Malik, Hitendra K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hydrogen effect on the morphology and structure of 3D porous titanium in the HFCVD-diamond growth environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titanium hydride was obtained from hydrogenation process on pure titanium (Ti) using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. The Ti samples were produced from powder metallurgy technique and present three-dimensional porosity. The experimental parameters of the hydrogenation process were controlled in a similar way as those for diamond growth. The pressure inside the reactor was kept at 6.6 kPa for a H{sub 2} flow rate of 100 sccm and hydrogenation time of 1 hour. The distance from the filaments to the Ti surface was kept at 5 mm. Hydrogenation processes were carried out at different temperatures of 773, 873, 973 and 1073 K. The morphology of the titanium hydrides was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The images showed an increase in the roughness titanium surface as well as the formation of cracks due to the hydride titanium precipitation. The structure of these titanium hydrides was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, performed through {theta}-2{theta} scans from 1 to 15{sup o} grazing incident angle. The results revealed that the temperature enhanced the titanium hydride concentration in the samples with a predominant precipitation of TiH phase for the four temperatures studied. - Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen quickly spread out in the Ti matrix reacting and generating TiH phases. {yields} The higher the hydrogenation temperature the higher the amount of TiH formation. {yields} The volume increasing associated with the TiH formation caused tensions in the Ti metallic matrix. {yields} The TiH increases the Ti surface roughness influencing the grain size reduction.

Braga, N.A., E-mail: neilabraga@ufam.edu.br [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, UFAM, 69077-000, Manaus, Am (Brazil); Ferreira, N.G., E-mail: neidenei@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, INPE, 12245-970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Baldan, M.R., E-mail: baldan@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, INPE, 12245-970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

TerraTek

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Novel Catalyst Support Materials for PEM Fuel Cells: Current Status and Future Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalyst supports exhibit great influence on the cost, performance, and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. This review paper is to summarize several important kinds of novel support materials for PEM fuel cells (including direct methanol fuel cell, DMFC): nanostructured carbon materials (carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers, mesoporous carbon), conductive doped diamonds and nanodiamonds, conductive oxides (tin oxide/indium tin oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide) and carbides (tungsten carbides). The advantages and disadvantages, the acting mechanism to promote electrocatalysis, and the strategies to improve present catalyst support materials and to search for new ones are discussed. This is expected to throw light on future development of catalyst support for PEM fuel cells.

Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Laser Controlled Area Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 4 6 4 Effective: Page 1 of 18 09/16/2011 Subject: Laser Safety Program Documentation: U2A The only official copy of this file is the one on-line in the PS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the PS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) U2A Laser Systems This document defines the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Hazard Class 3B and 4 laser systems must be documented, reviewed, and approved through use of this form. Each system must be reviewed annually. System description: There are 4 lasers installed at beamline U2A for diamond anvil cell experiments:

300

A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaken but Not Stirred Shaken but Not Stirred 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award The 2008 3-Way Meeting In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed A Marriage of Hardware and Hard Work MAY 5, 2008 Bookmark and Share The first assembled production girder for the LCLS sits atop the coordinate measuring machine. From "SLAC Today," http://today.slac.stanford.edu/ The first undulator support girder assembly for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) made its way from the Collider Hall, where technicians are piecing them together, to the

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301

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Sample Preparation Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Monika Hartl | hartl@lanl.gov | 505.665.2375 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: Leilani Conradson | leilani@lanl.gov | 505.665.9505 Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond anvils Rotating anode generators (reflectometry, residual stress, powder diffraction) Zeiss microscope (with fluorescence abilities) Tube and box furnaces Ultrasonic bath ZAP-cell (for in situ diffraction at high P) Infrared spectrometer Brewster angle microscope

302

Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

Pravica, Michael; Bai Ligang; Liu Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center (HiPSEC) and Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4002 (United States); Park, Changyong [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60437 (United States); Hatchett, David [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

A high-pressure nanoimaging breakthrough | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers A high-pressure nanoimaging breakthrough July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A team of researchers made a major breakthrough in measuring the structure of nanomaterials under extremely high pressures. Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a promising tool to probe the internal strains of nanometer-sized crystals. But for high-pressure studies the x-ray beam must pass through a component of the diamond anvil cell, which can significantly affect the coherence properties of the beam. The researchers have developed a technique to deal with this that could lead to

304

Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography Mao of HP-CAT Awarded Aminoff Prize in Crystallography The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded David H. Mao of the Geophysical Laboratory the Gregori Aminoff Prize in Crystallography 2005 "for pioneering research of materials at ultrahigh pressures and temperatures." Dr. Mao is the Director of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, which manages the beamlines at Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 16. Named after Gregori Aminoff, the pioneering Swedish crystallographer, the prize is given annually to recognized scientists, or to a group of no more than three persons of international distinction, who have made a major contribution to crystallography. David H. Mao showing a panoramic high-pressure diamond-anvil cell to Murray Gibson

305

Oxygen to the core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-01 1-01 For immediate release: 01/10/2013 | NR-13-01-01 Oxygen to the core Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly An artist's conception of Earth's inner and outer core. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- An international collaboration including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has discovered that the Earth's core formed under more oxidizing conditions than previously proposed. Through a series of laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at high pressure (350,000 to 700,000 atmospheres of pressure) and temperatures (5,120 to 7,460 degrees Fahrenheit), the team demonstrated that the depletion of siderophile (also known as "iron loving") elements can be produced by core formation under more oxidizing conditions than earlier

306

When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure | Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth Breakthrough in Nanocrystals' Growth Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants? A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution At the Crossroads of Chromosomes Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed When Size Matters: Yttrium Oxide Breaking Down Under Pressure NOVEMBER 2, 2010 Bookmark and Share Top: Pair distribution function (PDF) of 16 nm-sized Y2O3 at high pressures. Bottom: Lin Wang (left) and Wenge Yang (right) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington shown with the diamond anvil cell and x-ray instrumentation used to probe the PDF of the sample at high applied

307

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

308

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS) Proposal Team: L. Carr 1 , D. Dolan 2 , R. Hemley 3 , S. Jacobson 4 , S. Karato 5 , Z. Liu 3 , W. Panero 6 , M. Pravica 7 , and T. Zhou 8 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Sandia National Laboratories, 3 Carnegie Institution of Washington, 4 Northwestern University, 5 Yale University, 6 Ohio State University, 7 University of Nevada, 8 New Jersey Institute of Technology TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * TECHNIQUE(S): Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Raman and visible spectroscopy; Diamond anvil cell techniques for static high pressure; Gas-gun launchers for dynamic compression; Cryogenic techniques combined with DACs;

309

2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 2008 3-Way Meeting The 2008 3-Way Meeting In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award APRIL 24, 2008 Bookmark and Share Oleg Shpyrko The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Users Organization has named Oleg G. Shpyrko of the University of California, San Diego, as the recipient of the 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. The award recognizes an important technical or scientific accomplishment by a young investigator that depended on, or is beneficial to, the APS. Shpyrko will receive the

310

The 2008 3-Way Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed The 2008 3-Way Meeting MARCH 25, 2008 Bookmark and Share The assembled 3WM attendees in the Argonne Bldg. 401 atrium. The 2008 Three-Way Meeting (3WM) between the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) was held at Argonne on March 18-19, 2008, with more than 20 representatives from each facility. Topics discussed at the meeting

311

Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Hatchett, David (UNLV); (CIW)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

Shock Experiments on Pre-Compressed Fluid Helium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize current methods and results for coupling laser-induced shocks into pre-compressed Helium contained in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). We are able to load helium, hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-hydrogen mixtures into a DAC and propagate a laser-generated shock into the pre-compressed sample. This technique has allowed us to measure the Hugoniot for helium at initial densities ranging from 1 to 3.5 times liquid density. We have developed and used a methodology whereby all of our measurements are referenced to crystalline quartz, which allows us to update our results as the properties of quartz are refined in the future. We also report the identification and elimination of severe electro-magnetic pulses (EMP) associated with plasma stagnation associated with ablation in a DAC.

Eggert, J. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA (United States); Brygoo, S.; Loubeyre, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); McWilliams, R. S.; Spaulding, D.; Jeanloz, R. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boehly, T. R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Microscale X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the GSECARS Sector 13 at the APS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotrons radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotrons light source. The research conducted at this facility will advance our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials, the processes they control and the processes that produce them. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (5) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis and microspectroscopy; and (6) mic...

Stephen-Sutto

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Science and technology in the stockpile stewardship program, S & TR reprints  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on these topics: Computer Simulations in Support of National Security; Enhanced Surveillance of Aging Weapons; A New Precision Cutting Tool: The Femtosecond Laser; Superlasers as a Tool of Stockpile Stewardship; Nova Laser Experiments and Stockpile Stewardship; Transforming Explosive Art into Science; Better Flash Radiography Using the FXR; Preserving Nuclear Weapons Information; Site 300Ňs New Contained Firing Facility; The Linear Electric Motor: Instability at 1,000 gŇs; A Powerful New Tool to Detect Clandestine Nuclear Tests; High Explosives in Stockpile Surveillance Indicate Constancy; Addressing a Cold War Legacy with a New Way to Produce TATB; JumpinŇ Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen; Keeping the Nuclear Stockpile Safe, Secure, and Reliable; The Multibeam FabryđPerot Velocimeter: Efficient Measurements of High Velocities; Theory and Modeling in Material Science; The Diamond Anvil Cell; Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometry; X-Ray Lasers and High-Density Plasma

Storm, E

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling of Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond chemical vapor deposition in a bell-jar cavity reactor were characterized by both experimental and modeling investigations. Discharges containing 1% CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} percentages ranging between 2% and 7% were analyzed as a function of the input microwave power under a pressure of 200 mbar. Emission spectroscopy and broadband absorption spectroscopy were carried out in the UV-visible spectral range in order to estimate the gas temperature and the C{sub 2} density within the plasma. Infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was achieved in order to measure the mole fractions of carbon-containing species such as CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. A thermochemical model was developed and used in order to estimate the discharge composition, the gas temperature, and the average electron energy in the frame of a quasihomogeneous plasma assumption. Experiments and calculations yielded consistent results with respect to plasma temperature and composition. A relatively high gas temperature ranging between 3000 and 4000 K is found for the investigated discharge conditions. The C{sub 2} density estimated from both experiments and modeling are quite high compared with what is generally reported in the literature for the same kind of plasma system. It ranges between 10{sup 13} and 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} in the investigated power range. Infrared absorption measurements and model predictions indicate quite low densities of methane and acetylene, while the atomic carbon density calculated by the model ranges between 10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The methane and hydrogen introduced in the feed gas are subject to a strong dissociation, which results in a surprisingly high H-atom population with mole fraction ranging between 0.04 and 0.16. Result analysis shows that the power coupling efficiency would range between 70% and 90%, which may at least explain the relatively high values obtained, as compared with those reported in the literature for similar discharges, for gas temperature and C{sub 2} population. The high H-atom densities obtained in this work would indicate that growing nanocrystalline diamond films would experience a very high etching. Simulation results also confirm that sp species would play a key role in the surface chemistry that governs the diamond growth.

Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Benedic, F.; Mohasseb, F.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A. [Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, UPR 1311 CNRS, Universite Paris 13, 99 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); INP Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, UPR 1311 CNRS, Universite Paris 13, 99 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterization of hyperfine interaction between single electron and single nuclear spins in diamond assisted by quantum beat from the nuclear spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise characterization of a hyperfine interaction is a prerequisite for high fidelity manipulations of electron and nuclear spins belonging to a hybrid qubit register in diamond. Here, we demonstrate a novel scheme for determining a hyperfine interaction, using single-quantum and zero-quantum Ramsey fringes, by applying it to the system of a Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) center and a $^{13}$C nuclear spin in the 1$^{\\mathrm{st}}$ shell. The zero-quantum Ramsey fringe, analogous to the quantum beat in a $\\Lambda$-type level structure, particularly enhances the measurement precision for non-secular hyperfine terms. Precisions less than 0.5 MHz in the estimation of all the components in the hyperfine tensor were achieved. Furthermore, for the first time we experimentally determined the principal axes of the hyperfine interaction in the system. Beyond the 1$^{\\mathrm{st}}$ shell, this method can be universally applied to other $^{13}$C nuclear spins interacting with the NV center.

J. H. Shim; B. Nowak; I. Niemeyer; J. Zhang; F. D. Brandao; D. Suter

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

Schwen, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Bringa, E. [CONICET and Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Krauser, J. [Hochschule Harz, Friedrichstrasse 57-59, 38855 Werningerode (Germany); Weidinger, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Planckstr. 1, 64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofsaess, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electron spin resonance shift and linewidth broadening of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond as a function of electron irradiation dose  

SciTech Connect

A high-nitrogen-concentration diamond sample was subjected to 200-keV electron irradiation using a transmission electron microscope. The optical and spin-resonance properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers were investigated as a function of the irradiation dose up to 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} e{sup -}/cm{sup 2}. The microwave transition frequency of the NV{sup -} center was found to shift by up to 0.6% (17.1 MHz) and the linewidth broadened with increasing electron-irradiation dose. Unexpectedly, the measured magnetic sensitivity is best at the lowest irradiation dose, even though the NV concentration increases monotonically with increasing dose. This is in large part due to a sharp reduction in optically detected spin contrast at higher doses.

Kim, Edwin [Ramtron International Corporation, 1850 Ramtron Drive, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80921 (United States); Acosta, Victor M. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Bauch, Erik [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 28, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Budker, Dmitry [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hemmer, Philip R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind-fuel cell hybrid project in rural Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a summary of the work performed on the Wind-Fuel Cell Hybrid Project: (1) On October 5th, Tim Howell of the Golden Field Office and Tom Anderson of Battelle Labs arrived in Anchorage. They met with David Lockard, Project Manager, and Percy Frisby, Director of the Alaska Rural Energy Programs Group. (2) On October 6th, Tim, Tom and David flew to Nome to inspect the proposed wind turbine site and meet with John Handeland, Director of the Nome Joint Utility System. They visited the proposed site as well as several private, residential-sized wind turbines operating in the Nome area. (3)Tim and Tom flew to Unalaska on October 7th to meet with Mike Golat, City of Unalaska Public Utility Director, and to inspect the proposed wind turbine sites at Pyramid Creek and Pyramid Valley. (4)Tim sent a scoping letter on December 17th to a variety of local, state and federal agencies requesting comments on the proposed wind turbine project. (5) David discussed this project with Marc Schwartz and Gerry Nix at NREL. Marc provided David with a list of wind prospectors and meteorologists. (6) Tom raised the question of FAA permits for structures over 200 feet tall. Gerry provided information on NREL's experience with FAA permitting on other projects. David summarized the potential turbine choices and heights in a spreadsheet and initiated contact with the Alaska region FAA office regarding the permitting process. (7) David responded to a list of design questions from Tom regarding the project foundations, power output, and size for use in developing the environmental assessment. (8) David tried to get wind data for the Nome Anvil Mountain White Alice site from the Corps of Engineers and the Air Force, but was not able to find any. (9) David solicited quotes from vendors of wind monitoring equipment and provided cost information to Doug Hooker, federal grant manager in preparation for ordering the equipment.

David Lockard

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cell separator and cell  

SciTech Connect

There is disclosed a novel cell separator made of a grafted membrane comprising a polyethylene film which is graft copolymerized with a monomer having an ion exchange group, characterized in that said membrane has an area which is not grafted at all or an area of low degree grafting. By making use of this membrane, a small size and thin cell having excellent performance as well as satisfactory mechanical strength can be produced at low cost with great advantages.

Ishigaki, I.; Machi, S.; Murata, K.; Okada, T.; Senoo, K.; Sugo, T.; Tanso, S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Spectroscopic determination of C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas for nanocrystalline diamond synthesis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have measured the steady state concentration of gas phase C{sub 2} in Ar/H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and Ar/H{sub 2}/C{sub 60} microwave plasmas used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. High sensitivity white light absorption spectroscopy is used to monitor the C{sub 2} density using the d{sup 3}II {l_arrow} A{sup 3}II (0,0) vibrational band of C{sub 2} as chamber pressure, microwave power, substrate temperature and feed gas mixtures are varied in both chemistries. Understanding how these parameters influence the C{sub 2} density in the plasma volume provides insight into discharge mechanisms relevant to the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond.

Goyette, A. N.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T. G.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Photovoltaic Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electricity. PV cells are the building blocks of all PV systems because they are the devices that...

325

cell tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. cell tree. (data structure). ... Concave objects are decomposed into convex pieces. Each convex piece is indexed in every cell which it overlaps. ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

327

Activity of tungsten and rhenium filaments in CH sub 4 /H sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 /H sub 2 mixtures: Importance for diamond CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The resistance R, spectral emissivity {epsilon}, and power consumption of W and Re filaments heated to 2500 {degree}C in mixtures of CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} have been measured in a series of experiments focusing on the state of the filament activity, i.e., its ability to dissociate the reactant gases. It has been found that these properties of the filaments, as well as the partial pressures of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the reaction chamber, depend critically on both the filament temperature and the reactant ratio, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}. Specifically, both W and Re filaments show sharp jumps in power consumption at essentially the same temperature, signaling strong increases in filament activity and, hence, production of atomic hydrogen. These results are proposed to be due to the removal of non-reactive carbon from the surface of the filament via etching by atomic hydrogen and are consistent with the predictions of our thermodynamic model for the C-H system. Evidence for gas phase reactions is presented and the role of thermal diffusion is discussed. The emissivities of the W and Re filaments are observed to have significantly different temperature dependences which are attributed to differences in the phase diagrams for the W-C and Re-C systems. The implications of these results for hot-filament diamond CVD are discussed.

Sommer, M.; Smith, F.W. (Department of Physics, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

329

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

330

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

331

Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices.

332

Electrochemical cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is disclosed that has a lithium anode, a thionyl chloride depolarizer and a sulphur dioxide passivation control agent which further includes having the pressure relieved to substantially reduce the internal pressure of the cell. The internal cell pressure is relieved by venting for sufficient time at an elevated temperature to reduce the internal cell pressure to less than five psi at room temperature, preferably by a plurality of venting cycles and a temperature ranging from room temperature to the elevated temperature. Normally, the elevated temperature ranges from at least 100/sup 0/ to greater than 150/sup 0/ F.

Chua, D.L.; Garoutte, K.F.; Levy, L.L.

1982-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

334

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science ┬╗ Materials Science ┬╗ Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

335

Cell Image Visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biological cell image analysis projects include methods to measure cell segmentation accuracy and new segmentation methods to track live cells. ...

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Metal That Becomes Transparent under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Under Pressure, Atoms Make Unlikely Alloys Under Pressure, Atoms Make Unlikely Alloys Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Metal That Becomes Transparent under Pressure APRIL 20, 2009 Bookmark and Share Sodium clamped in a metallic rhenium gasket between diamond anvils. The photographs were taken through a diamond anvil under combined transmitted and reflected illumination. Sodium, a white metal at pressures below 1.1 Mbar (1 Mbar = 1 million atm), turns black at 1.3 Mbar and becomes

337

Cell mitosis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the nuclear membrane in each of the daughter cells would conclude the cycle. Chromatin needs to uncoil and key genes become active again via transcription of mRNA. Lou...

338

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

Spletzer, B.L.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Section 19  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite visible satellite image 0530 UTC 27 November 1995 showing the development of the convective cell over Aspley Strait and the westward development of the cirrus anvil. Figure 2. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite visible satellite image 0630 UTC 27 November 1995 showing the westward movement of the convective cell and the further development of the cirrus anvil. Anvil Cirrus Outflow During the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment M. P. Jensen, T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. M. Sekelsky and R. E. McIntosh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts W. L. Ecklund and K. S. Gage

346

A Simulation of a Supercell Thunderstorm with Emulated Radiative Cooling beneath the Anvil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note reports the preliminary results of an ongoing numerical study designed to investigate what effects, if any, radiative transfer processes can have on the evolution of convective storms. A pair of idealized three-dimensional simulations ...

Paul M. Markowski; Jerry Y. Harrington

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documentation during January and February 2000 of the structure of severe convective storms in Mendoza, Argentina, with a cloud-physics jet aircraft penetrating the major feeder clouds from cloud base to the ?45░C isotherm level is reported. ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; William L. Woodley; Terrence W. Krauss; Viktor Makitov

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Mesoscale Vortex Couplet Observed in the Trailing Anvil of a Multicellular Convective Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations collected during the OklahomaľKansas PRE-STORM experiment are used to document the evolution and structure of a mesoscale vortex couplet that developed in the mesoscale convective system that occurred on 16ľ17 June 1985. The ...

Johannes Verlinde; William R. Cotton

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Doppler Radar Study of the Trailing Anvil Region Associated with a Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinematic structure and reflectivity distribution within a region of widespread precipitation associated with a summertime midlatitude (Illinois) squall line, as revealed by an analysis of Doppler radar data, are presented and discussed. The ...

R. C. Srivastava; T. J. Matejka; T. J. Lorello

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ULTRANANOCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND (UNCD MECHANICAL SEALS  

industrial research program, comprised of leading-edge materials research, ... waste, refrigeration, automotive, and appliance industries. They are ...

351

CURRICULUM VITAE Howard J. Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of interest, and large part of my work, is dedicated to the regional Pacific Islands GCOS program. In that, I Change Research Program's Data Information Working #12;Group, and the Committee on Earth Observing Change Science Program's Observations Working Group. My goal as the U.S. GCOS Program Manager is to aid

352

Diamond-free Degree Sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miller,A. Prosser,P. DCS Technical Report Series pp 1 to 9 Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Miller, A.

353

Recreating the Strength of Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

momentum, inductance L "Low torque" state LL "Lower than low" torque state lb. Pounds LED Light emitting diode m Meters m Azimuthal wavenumber, spherical harmonic order xv #12;MHz Megahertz MOSFET Metal oxide

354

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 900 in either direction while maintaining the working-and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, C.A.

1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stability of hume rothery phases in Cu?Zn alloys at pressures up to 50 GPa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structure of the {gamma}-brass phase Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} is confirmed with single-crystal X-ray diffraction and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector to be cubic with 52 atoms in the unit cell, space group I{bar 4}3m, and the refined atomic positions are in good agreement with previously reported data. The structural behavior of {alpha}-(fcc), {beta}-brass (cI52) phases of the Cu-Zn alloy system has been studied under pressure using diamond anvil cells and powder X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation. The appearance of additional peaks in the diffraction patterns of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases indicates the beginning of transitions to new phases at 17 and 37 GPa, respectively. The complex cubic {gamma}-brass phase (52 atoms in the unit cell, space group I{bar 4}3m) is observed to be stable up to at least 50 GPa. The bulk modulus K 0 was determined as 140(4) GPa for {alpha}-, 139(5) for {beta}-, and 121(2) for {gamma}-phase assuming K 0 = 4. The structural stability of brass phases of the Cu-Zn system under pressure is discussed in terms of the Hume-Rothery mechanism.

Degtyareva, V.F.; Sakharov, M.K.; Novokhatskaya, N.I.; Degtyareva, O.; Dera, P.; Mao, H.-K.; Hemley, R.J. (Edinburgh); (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (CIW)

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA); Kurtz, Sarah (Somerville, MA)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

359

Photoelectrodialytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

Murphy, George W. (2328 Ashwood, Norman, OK 73069)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research on organic photovoltaic cells since small molecule10 years prior (4). Photovoltaic cells with an active layerof the associated photovoltaic cells. 2.4 Charge transport

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High-pressure structural phase transitions in chromium-doped BaFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the results from high pressure x-ray powder diffraction and electrical resistance measurements for hole doped BaFe{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x}As{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.4, 0.61) up to 81 GPa and down to 10 K using a synchrotron source and diamond anvil cell (DAC). At ambient temperature, an isostructural phase transition from a tetragonal (T) phase (I4/mmm) to a collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase is observed at 17 GPa. This transition is found to be dependent on ambient pressure unit cell volume and is slightly shifted to higher pressure upon increase in the Cr-doping. Unlike BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} which superconduct under high pressure, we have not detected any evidence of pressure induced superconductivity in chromium doped samples in the pressure and temperature range of this study. The measured equation of state parameters are presented for both the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases for x = 0.05, 0.15, 0.40 and 0.61.

Uhoya, W.O.; Montgomery, J.M.; Samudrala, G.K.; Tsoi, G.M.; Vohra, Y.K.; Weir, S.T.; Sefat, A.S. (UAB); (LLNL); (ORNL)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

High-pressure structural phase transitions in chromium-doped BaFe2As2  

SciTech Connect

We report on the results from high pressure x-ray powder diffraction and electrical resistance measurements for hole doped BaFe{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x}As{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.4, 0.61) up to 81 GPa and down to 10 K using a synchrotron source and diamond anvil cell (DAC). At ambient temperature, an isostructural phase transition from a tetragonal (T) phase (I4/mmm) to a collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase is observed at 17 GPa. This transition is found to be dependent on ambient pressure unit cell volume and is slightly shifted to higher pressure upon increase in the Cr-doping. Unlike BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} which superconduct under high pressure, we have not detected any evidence of pressure induced superconductivity in chromium doped samples in the pressure and temperature range of this study. The measured equation of state parameters are presented for both the tetragonal and collapsed tetragonal phases for x = 0.05, 0.15, 0.40 and 0.61.

Uhoya, Walter [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Brill, Joseph W. [University of Kentucky; Montgomery, Jeffrey M [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Samudrala, G K [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Tsoi, Georgiy [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Vohra, Y. K. [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Weir, S. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

364

Corrosion and Electrochemical Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1┬á┬á┬áCell conditions for commercial and industrial electrode processes...fuel cells Electrolytic e cell > e cell,rev I Ô?á 0 (impressed current

365

Electrorefining cell evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Operational characteristics of the LANL electrorefining cell, a modified LANL electrorefining cell, and an advanced electrorefining cell (known as the CRAC cell) were determined. Average process yields achieved were: 75% for the LANL cell, 82% for the modified LANL cell, and 86% for the CRAC cell. All product metal from the LANL and modified LANL cells was within foundry specifications. Metal from one run in the CRAC cell exceeded foundry specifications for tantalum. The LANL and modified LANL cells were simple in design and operation, but product separation was more labor intensive than with the CRAC cell. The CRAC cell was more complicated in design but remained relatively simple in operation. A decision analysis concluded that the modified LANL cell was the preferred cell. It was recommended that the modified LANL cell be implemented by the Plutonium Recovery Project at Rocky Flats and that development of the CRAC cell continue. 8 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

Bronson, M.C.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Microfluidic Cell Culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... microfluidic device with access to optical imaging, electrochemical interrogation, controlled lysis of desired cells, and collection of cell contents for ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Boudreau, Robert A. (Norton, MA)

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermal equation of state of lower-mantle ferropericlase across the spin crossover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal equation of state of ferropericlase [(Mg{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 0.25})O] has been investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 140 GPa and 2000 K in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Based on results at high pressure-temperature conditions, the derived phase diagram shows that the spin crossover widens at elevated temperatures. Along the lower-mantle geotherm, the spin crossover occurs between 1700 km and 2700 km depth. Compared to the high-spin state, thermoelastic modeling of the data shows a {approx}1.2% increase in density, a factor of two increase in thermal expansion coefficient over a range of 1000 km, and a maximum decrease of 37% and 13% in bulk modulus and bulk sound velocity, respectively, at {approx}2180 km depth across the spin crossover. These anomalous behaviors in the thermoelastic properties of ferropericlase across the spin crossover must be taken into account in order to understand the seismic signatures and geodynamics of the lower mantle.

Mao, Zhu; Lin, Jung-Fu; Liu, Jin; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (UC); (Texas)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Equation of state and phase diagram of FeO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wuestite, Fe{sub 1-x}O, is an important component in the mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle and may also be a component in the core. Therefore the high pressure, high temperature behavior of FeO, including its phase diagram and equation of state, is essential knowledge for understanding the properties and evolution of Earth's deep interior. We performed X-ray diffraction measurements using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to achieve simultaneous high pressures and temperatures. Wuestite was mixed with iron metal, which served as our pressure standard, under the assumption that negligible oxygen dissolved into the iron. Our data show a positive slope for the subsolidus phase boundary between the B1 and B8 structures, indicating that the B1 phase is stable at the P-T conditions of the lower mantle and core. We have determined the thermal equation of state of B1 FeO to 156 GPa and 3100 K, finding an isothermal bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 149.4 {+-} 1.0 GPa and its pressure derivative K'{sub 0} = 3.60 {+-} 0.4. This implies that 7.7 {+-} 1.1 wt.% oxygen is required in the outer core to match the seismologically-determined density, under the simplifying assumption of a purely Fe-O outer core.

Fischer, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Shofner, Gregory A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (Bristol); (Maryland); (UC)

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Ammonia?Hydrogen System under Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary mixtures of hydrogen and ammonia were compressed in diamond anvil cells to 15 GPa at room temperature over a range of compositions. The phase behavior was characterized using optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Below 1.2 GPa we observed two-phase coexistence between liquid ammonia and fluid hydrogen phases with limited solubility of hydrogen within the ammonia-rich phase. Complete immiscibility was observed subsequent to the freezing of ammonia phase III at 1.2 GPa, although hydrogen may become metastably trapped within the disordered face-centered-cubic lattice upon rapid solidification. For all compositions studied, the phase III to phase IV transition of ammonia occurred at {approx}3.8 GPa and hydrogen solidified at {approx}5.5 GPa, transition pressures equivalent to those observed for the pure components. A P-x phase diagram for the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2} system is proposed on the basis of these observations with implications for planetary ices, molecular compound formation, and possible hydrogen storage materials.

Chidester, Bethany A.; Strobel, Timothy A. (CIW)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

ôStructural Transformations in Ceramics: Perovskite-like Oxides and Group III, IV, and V Nitridesö  

SciTech Connect

1 Overview of Results and their Significance Ceramic perovskite-like oxides with the general formula (A. A0. ...)(B. B0. ...)O3and titanium-based oxides are of great technological interest because of their large piezoelectric and dielectric response characteristics.[1] In doped and nanoengineered forms, titantium dioxide finds increasing application as an organic and hydrolytic photocatalyst. The binary main-group-metal nitride compounds have undergone recent advancements of in-situ heating technology in diamond anvil cells leading to a burst of experimental and theoretical interest. In our DOE proposal, we discussed our unique theoretical approach which applies ab initio electronic calculations in conjunction with systematic group-theoretical analysis of lattice distortions to study two representative phase transitions in ceramic materials: (1) displacive phase transitions in primarily titanium-based perovskite-like oxide ceramics, and (2) reconstructive phase transitions in main-group nitride ceramics. A sub area which we have explored in depth is doped titanium dioxide electrical/optical properties.

James P. Lewis (PI, former Co-PI), Dorian M. Hatch (Co-PI, former PI), and Harold T. Stokes (Co-PI)

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

High P-T phase transitions and P-V-T equation of state of hafnium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measured the volume of hafnium at several pressures up to 67 GPa and at temperatures between 300 to 780 K using a resistively heated diamond anvil cell with synchrotron x-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured data allows us to determine the P-V-T equation of state of hafnium. The previously described [Xia et al., Phys. Rev. B 42, 6736-6738 (1990)] phase transition from hcp ({alpha}) to simple hexagonal ({omega}) phase at 38 GPa at room temperature was not observed even up to 51 GPa. The {omega} phase was only observed at elevated temperatures. Our measurements have also improved the experimental constraint on the high P-T phase boundary between the {omega} phase and high pressure bcc ({beta}) phase of hafnium. Isothermal room temperature bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium were measured to be B{sub 0} = 112.9{+-}0.5 GPa and B{sub 0}'=3.29{+-}0.05, respectively. P-V-T data for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium was used to obtain a fit to a thermodynamic P-V-T equation of state based on model by Brosh et al. [CALPHAD 31, 173-185 (2007)].

Hrubiak, Rostislav; Drozd, Vadym; Karbasi, Ali; Saxena, Surendra K. (FIU)

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Campaign 2 Level 2 Milestone Review 2009: Milestone # 3131 Grain Scale Simulation of Pore Collapse  

SciTech Connect

The milestone reviewed on Sept. 16, 2009 was 'High-fidelity simulation of shock initiation of high explosives at the grain scale using coupled hydrodynamics, thermal transport and chemistry'. It is the opinion of the committee that the team has satisfied the milestone. A detailed description of how the goals were met is provided. The milestone leveraged capabilities from ASC Physics and Engineering Materials program combined with experimental input from Campaign 2. A combined experimental-multiscale simulation approach was used to create and validate the various TATB model components. At the lowest length scale, quantum chemical calculations were used to determine equations of state, thermal transport properties and reaction rates for TATB as it is decomposing. High-pressure experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells, gas guns and the Z machine were used to validate the EOS, thermal conductivity, specific heat and predictions of water formation. The predicted reaction networks and chemical kinetic equations were implemented in Cheetah and validated against the lower length scale data. Cheetah was then used within the ASC code ALE3D for high-resolution, thermo-mechanically coupled simulations of pore collapse at the micron size scale to predict conditions for detonation initiation.

Schwartz, A J

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Synthesis of super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by femtosecond laser pulses in sapphire  

SciTech Connect

We describe synthesis of a new super-dense phase of aluminum under extreme pressure and temperature conditions created by laser-induced microexplosions in sapphire. Micro explosions in sub-micrometer sized regions of sapphire were induced by tightly-focused femtosecond laser pulses with a temporal length of {approx} 100 fs and an energy of {approx} 100 nJ. Fast, explosive expansion of photogenerated high-density plasma created strong heating and pressure transients with peak temperature and pressure of {approx} 105 K and 10 TPa, respectively. Partial decomposition of sapphire in the shock-compressed sapphire led to formation of nanocrystalline bcc-Al phase, which is different from ambient fcc-Al phase, and was permanently preserved by fast quenching. The existence of super-dense bcc-Al phase was confirmed using X-ray diffraction technique. This is the first observation of bcc-Al phase, which so far has been only predicted theoretically, and a demonstration that laser-induced micro explosions technique enables simple, safe and cost-efficient access to extreme pressures and temperatures without the tediousness typical to traditional techniques that use diamond anvil cells, gas guns, explosives, or megajoule-class lasers.

Mizeikis, Vygantas; Vailionis, Arturas; Gamaly, Eugene G.; Yang, Wenge; Rode, Andrei V.; Juodkazis, Saulius (Swinburne); (Shizuoka); (Stanford); (CIW); (ANU)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Extended CO Solid: A New Class of High Energy Density Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Covalently bonded extended phases of molecular solids made of first- and second-row elements at high pressures are a new class of materials with advanced optical, mechanical and energetic properties. The existence of such extended solids has recently been demonstrated using diamond anvil cells in several systems, including N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2},and CO. However, the microscopic quantities produced at the formidable high-pressure/temperature conditions have limited the characterization of their predicted novel properties including high-energy content. In this paper, we present the first experimental evidence that these extended low-Z solids are indeed high energy density materials via milligram-scale high-pressure synthesis, recovery and characterization of polymeric CO (p-CO). Our spectroscopic data reveal that p-CO is a random polymer made of lactonic entities and conjugated C=C with an energy content rivaling or exceeding that of HMX. Solid p-CO explosively decomposes to CO{sub 2} and glassy carbon and thus might be used as an advanced energetic material.

Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Baer, B J; Yoo, C

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Suppression of magnetism and development of superconductivity within the collapsed tetragonal phase of Ca[subscript 0.67]Sr[subscript 0.33]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and electronic characterizations of (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been performed as a function of pressure up to 12 GPa using conventional and designer diamond anvil cells. The compound (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} behaves intermediately between its end members, displaying a suppression of magnetism and the onset of superconductivity. Like other members of the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family, (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes a pressure-induced isostructural volume collapse, which we associate with the development of As-As bonding across the mirror plane of the structure. This collapsed tetragonal phase abruptly cuts off the magnetic state and supports superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 22.2 K. The maximum T{sub c} of the superconducting phase is not strongly correlated with any structural parameter, but its proximity to the abrupt suppression of magnetism as well as the volume-collapse transition suggests that magnetic interactions and structural inhomogeneity may play a role in its development.

Jeffries, J.R.; Butch, N.P.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Saha, S.R.; Samudrala, G.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K.; Paglione, J. (LLNL); (UAB); (Maryland)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radial Diffraction Strength and Elastic Behavior of CaF2 in Low- and High-Pressure Phases  

SciTech Connect

The radial-diffraction lattice behavior of CaF2 was analyzed in its low-pressure (fluorite) and high-pressure phase up to 11.5 GPa using radial x-ray diffraction techniques in the diamond anvil cell. Between 3.5 and 7.1 GPa, fluorite develops a radial-diffraction strength of {approx}0.8 GPa. The corresponding lattice anisotropy of the fluorite phase was measured to be equal to 0.73, in good agreement with previous Brillouin spectroscopy measurements. By 8.8 GPa, CaF2 has undergone a phase transformation to its high-pressure (orthorhombic) phase, with a corresponding volume decrease of 10.4%. By 11.5 GPa, the volume drop between the low-pressure and high-pressure phase has increased to 11.5%. In addition, the high-pressure phase is found to withstand a significantly larger differential stress than the low-pressure fluorite phase, with a large degree of lattice anisotropy. In the maximum stress direction at 8.8 GPa, we observe a time-dependent evolution of the lattice parameters of CaF2, indicating that the high-pressure structure is still undergoing deformation on time scales of hours after the phase boundary has been crossed.

Kavner,A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Study of liquid gallium at high pressure using synchrotron x-ray  

SciTech Connect

Liquid gallium has been studied at high pressure up to 2 GPa and ambient temperature in a diamond anvil cell using high energy synchrotron x-ray beam. The total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium were collected up to Q = 12 A{sup -1} and analyzed using pair distribution functions (PDF). The results indicate that the first nearest neighbor peak and second nearest neighbor (shoulder) peak of PDF in liquid gallium does not change with pressure, whereas the higher order (i.e., third and fourth) nearest neighbor peaks shift towards shorter distance with increasing pressure. Reverse Monte Carlo modeling based on the observed data shows that the coordination number in the liquid gallium increases with pressure from 10.5 at 0.3 GPa to 11.6 at 2 GPa. An atomic arrangement similar to the crystalline phase of Ga(II) with coordination number of 12 is proposed for the locally dense-packed rigid unit in liquid gallium. The volume compression data derived from the structure modeling yield a bulk modulus of 12.1(6) GPa for liquid gallium.

Yu, Tony; Guo Quanzhong; Parise, John [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Chen Jiuhua [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Huang Shu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Luo Shengnian [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Photo Gallery from LLNL's High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

DOE/NNSA has identified LLNL's High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) as the complex-wide "Center of Excellence" for High-Explosives Research and Development. In this capacity HEAF is a source of subject matter expertise for high explosives and other energetic materials. Its mission is to provide this expertise to serve multiple government agencies including DOE, DoD, TSA, Homeland Security, the FBI and other law enforcement and government intelligence organizations. From its conception, HEAF was designed to integrate the operations of synthesis, formulation, and explosives testing in a single synergistic facility. Today, the nationally recognized team of approximately 120 chemists, physicists, engineers, and technicians contribute to the nation's understanding of explosives by developing new explosives in the synthesis and formulation laboratories, conducting explosives properties testing, developing experimental diagnostics, designing and executing diamond-anvil-cell experiments for basic explosives properties research, studying explosives at the micron scale in its microdetonics laboratory, and utilizing multiple firing tanks for larger scale explosives experiments. No other facility in the world supports such a multidisciplinary mission under one roof. (Extracted from text found at https://wci.llnl.gov/fac/heaf/mission_statement.html).

380

Structure Stability of Methane Hydrate at High Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P6{sub 3}/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methanehydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methanehydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methanehydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3mstructure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH{sub 4})-host (H{sub 2}O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydratestructures under pressure.

J Shu; X Chen; I Chou; W Yang; J Hu; R Hemley; K Mao

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In Situ High-Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of H2O Ice VII  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ice VII was examined over the entire range of its pressure stability by a suite of x-ray diffraction techniques in order to understand a number of unexplained characteristics of its high-pressure behavior. Axial and radial polycrystalline (diamond anvil cell) x-ray diffraction measurements reveal a splitting of diffraction lines accompanied by changes in sample texture and elastic anisotropy. In situ laser heating of polycrystalline samples resulted in the sharpening of diffraction peaks due to release of nonhydrostatic stresses but did not remove the splitting. Radial diffraction measurements indicate changes in strength of the material at this pressure. Taken together, these observations provide evidence for a transition in ice VII near 14 GPa involving changes in the character of the proton order/disorder. The results are consistent with previous reports of changes in phase boundaries and equation of state at this pressure. The transition can be interpreted as ferroelastic with the appearance of spontaneous strain that vanishes at the hydrogen bond symmetrization transition near 60 GPa.

Somayazulu,M.; Shu, J.; Zha, C.; Goncharov, A.; Tschauner, O.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

In situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of H[subscript 2]O ice VII  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ice VII was examined over the entire range of its pressure stability by a suite of x-ray diffraction techniques in order to understand a number of unexplained characteristics of its high-pressure behavior. Axial and radial polycrystalline (diamond anvil cell) x-ray diffraction measurements reveal a splitting of diffraction lines accompanied by changes in sample texture and elastic anisotropy. In situ laser heating of polycrystalline samples resulted in the sharpening of diffraction peaks due to release of nonhydrostatic stresses but did not remove the splitting. Radial diffraction measurements indicate changes in strength of the material at this pressure. Taken together, these observations provide evidence for a transition in ice VII near 14 GPa involving changes in the character of the proton order/disorder. The results are consistent with previous reports of changes in phase boundaries and equation of state at this pressure. The transition can be interpreted as ferroelastic with the appearance of spontaneous strain that vanishes at the hydrogen bond symmetrization transition near 60 GPa.

Somayazulu, M.; Shu, J.; Zha, C.-S.; Goncharov, A.F. (CIW)

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electrical resistivity studies on graphite at high pressure and low temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High pressure is shown to give a valuable insight into the intrinsic c-axis resistivity of Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG). For the purpose of improving the understanding of the fundamental behavior of this technologically important material, additional forms of graphitic material such as Grafoil, Single Crystal Graphite (SCG) and polycrystalline natural graphite were explored for a comparative analysis. A novel technique utilizing a gasketed diamond-anvil cell is described that permits four probe resistivity measurements at pressures of up to 40 kbar and temperatures extending down to 2 K while maintaining the integrity of samples as fragile as graphite. The four-lead arrangement is designed to avoid contact and lead-wire resistances which might otherwise obscure the comparatively small resistance changes of interest typical of highly conductive materials. The data on HOPG can be fitted well to a model describing conduction along the c-axis as composed of two components acting in parallel: an ordinary metallic one and a tunnelling conduction between crystallites. The total conductivity was found to be a superposition of both conductivities, and their respective weights depend on the quality of the graphite material.

Hockey, R.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fabrication of transparent [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] from nanosize particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compaction and heat-treatment behavior of nanosize [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder (average diameter = 20 nm) was studied. A diamond anvil high-pressure cell was used to compact the powder at pressures up to 3 GPa, both in air at room temperature and under liquid nitrogen, followed by pressureless heat treatment at 800 C. For all conditions studied, the fabricated compacts were optically transparent. X-ray diffraction confirmed retention of the [gamma]-phase. The compacts were also characterized before and after heat treatment by microhardness measurements and by transmission electron microscopy. For both ambient and cryogenic compaction, sample hardness increased with pressure, and heat treatment resulted in about a 50% increase in hardness independent of the initial green-state value. Samples compacted in LN[sub 2] were significantly harder (up to 9.6 GPa) than those compacted in air. TEM examination revealed a random-dense-packed particle structure and interconnected porosity; interstitial void dimensions, however, were always less than the average particle diameter (20 nm). Observed effects on the increase in hardness could not be explained by microstructural changes normally attributed to increased compaction pressure or heat treatment, most notably densification. Alternative explanations are proposed.

Gallas, M.R.; Hockey, B.; Pechenik, A.; Piermarini, G.J. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermoelastic properties of ReB[subscript 2] at high pressures and temperatures and comparison with Pt, Os, and Re  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the phase stability and thermoelastic equation of state of ultrahard rhenium diboride at pressures up to 30 GPa and temperatures up to 2500 K using a laser heated diamond anvil cell in conjunction with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ReB{sub 2} is shown to be stable throughout this pressure and temperature region. The ratio of the c-axis to the a-axis provides a monitor of the annealing of plastic stresses during compression. We show that ReB{sub 2} has a small thermal anisotropy but a large mechanical anisotropy. Combining this new data set with previously existing results from a large volume press yields a thermoelastic equation of state with a Grueneisen parameter of 2.4 (0.08) and a q of 2.7. A comparison of ReB{sub 2} with other high electron density incompressible metals - Os, Re, and Pt - shows that ReB{sub 2} has the lowest thermal pressure and the highest bulk modulus.

Kavner, Abby; Armentrout, Matthew M.; Rainey, Emma S.G.; Xie, Miao; Weaver, Beth E.; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B. (UCLA)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bonding in boranes and their interaction with molecular hydrogen at extreme conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of high pressure and temperature on the bonding in ammonia borane (AB), NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} and decaborane (DB), B{sub 10}H{sub 14} and their interactions with molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) were investigated using Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell. At 0.7 GPa, AB becomes amorphous between 120 and 127 C, indicating a positive Clapeyron slope. Heated to 140 C, AB begins to undergo decomposition to polyaminoborane. The amorphous and decomposed AB does not recrystallize back to AB during slow cooling to room temperature or upon application of high pressure up to 3 GPa, underscoring the challenge of rehydrogenation of decomposed AB. The molecular Raman modes broaden in the reacted phase, and the NH{sub 3} modes show no pressure dependence. DB was studied at room temperature up to 11 GPa. The observed frequency dependence with pressure (d{sub {nu}}/dP) and mode Grueneisen parameters varied for different spectral groups, and a new transition was identified at approximately 3 GPa. In both DB and heated AB, we found that they could store additional H{sub 2} with the application of pressure. We estimate that we can store approximately 3 wt % H{sub 2} in heated AB at 3 GPa and 1 wt % H{sub 2} in DB at 4.5 GPa.

Wang, S.

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

Robbins, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures  

SciTech Connect

This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

Iota, V

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electrical conductivity of hydrogen shocked to megabar pressures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of ultra-high pressure hydrogen have been the subject of much experimental and theoretical study. Of particular interest is the pressure-induced insulator-to-metal transition of hydrogen which, according to recent theoretical calculations, is predicted to occur by band-overlap in the pressure range of 1.5-3.0 Mbars on the zero temperature isotherm. Extremely high pressures are required for metallization since the low-pressure band gap is about 15 eV. Recent static-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments have searched for evidence of an insulator-to-metal transition, but no conclusive evidence for such a transition has yet been supplied. Providing conclusive evidence for hydrogen metallization is difficult because no technique has yet been developed for performing static high-pressure electrical conductivity experiments at megabar pressures. The authors report here on electrical conductivity experiments performed on H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} multi-shocked to megabar pressures. Electrical conductivities of dense fluid hydrogen at these pressures and temperatures reached are needed for calculations of the magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn, the magnetic fields being generated by convective dynamos of hot, dense, semiconducting fluid hydrogen. Also, since electrical conduction at the pressure-temperature conditions being studied is due to the thermal excitation of charge carriers across the electronic band gap, these experiments yield valuable information on the width of the band gap at high densities.

Weir, S.T.; Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The first cell sorter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The first cell sorter The first cell sorter 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues ┬╗ submit The first cell sorter About fifty years ago, a Los Alamos scientist invented a method-still important in cellular biology labs today-to separate out particular types of cells. November 25, 2013 The first cell sorter Flow cytometry (cell measurement) uses cell sorting to divert cells of a chosen type out of a mixed stream of cells, like the blood cells shown here, for collection and study. Los Alamos invented, and has regularly improved upon, the technology to isolate different kinds of cells. In the early-mid 1960s, Los Alamos physicist Mack Fulwyler invented a device to isolate different types of cells. His invention, still a vital aspect of flow cytometry (cell measurement) in biological laboratories

392

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills Boro, PA)

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

Isenberg, A.O.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Tiny Conspiracies: cell-to-cell communication in bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tiny Conspiracies: cell-to-cell communication in bacteria. Purpose: Bacteria, primitive single-celled organisms, communicate ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fuel Cell Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Links Fuel Cell Links The links below are provided as additional resources for fuel-cell-related information. Most of the linked sites are not part of, nor affiliated with, fueleconomy.gov. We do not endorse or vouch for the accuracy of the information found on such sites. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet General Motors press release about the Chevrolet Fuel Cell Equinox Ford Ford overview of their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Honda FCX Clarity official site Hyundai Hyundai press release announcing the upcoming Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz Ener-G-Force Fuel-cell-powered concept SUV Nissan Nissan TeRRA concept SUV Toyota Overview of Toyota fuel cell technology Hydrogen- and Fuel-Cell-Related Information and Tools Fuel Cell Vehicles Brief overview of fuel cell vehicles provided by DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)

396

NETL: Fuel Cells - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel CellsSolid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Contacts For information on the Fuel CellsSECA program, contact: Fuel Cells Technology Manager: Shailesh Vora 412-386-7515...

397

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cells Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for...

398

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

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401

Parabolic cell analyzer  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to a cell analysis apparatus incorporating a paraboloidal cavity for maximum utilization for improved cell characteristic monitoring.

Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Skogen Hagenson, Mary J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although crystalline silicon cells are the most common type, photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells, can be made of many semiconductor materials. Each material has unique strengths and characteristics...

403

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Technical Cell Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

404

A fuel cell overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an overview of the fuel cell as an efficient and environmentally benign energy conversion technology. The topics of the paper include their physical arrangement, types of fuel cells, status of commercial development, applications of the fuel cell power plants and comparison with existing alternatives, and good design practice for fuel cell safety.

Krumpelt, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Reiser, C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Single Cell Mechanics BIOMATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Cell Mechanics BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to develop fundamental tools to measure the response of live cells to mechanical stimulation. The mechanisms by which cells convert mechanical forces evaluate the underlying mechanisms of cell mechanics. Objective Impact and Customers ┬Ě Cancer, heart

406

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Fuel Cells Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

407

FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark...

408

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Fuel cells seminar  

SciTech Connect

This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

412

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Fuel Cell - Solid Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolyzer Research and Development Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid oxide diagram In an SOFC, oxygen from air is reduced to ions at the cathode, which diffuse through the...

413

FCT Fuel Cells: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with water and heat as byproducts. (How much water?) Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide energy for systems as large as a utility

414

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: November 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

415

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

416

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter on...

417

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Portable Power Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

418

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/3/2012 4/3/2012 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Flow Cell Workshop Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal & Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3/7/2011 Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Purpose To understand the applied research and development needs and the grand challenges for the use of flow cells as energy-storage devices. Objectives 1. Understand the needs for applied research from stakeholders. 2. Gather input for future development of roadmaps and technical targets for flow cells for various applications. 3. Identify grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs. Flow cells combine the unique advantages of batteries and fuel cells and can offer benefits for multiple energy storage applications.

419

California Fuel Cell Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speaker(s): Bob Knight Date: October 19, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The California Fuel Cell Partnership is a current collaboration among major automakers, fuel cell...

420

Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The actual structural design of a photovoltaic (PV), or solar cell, depends on the limitations of the material used in the PV cell. The four basic device designs are:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "diamond anvil cell" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Crystalline silicon cells are made of silicon atoms connected to one another to form a crystal lattice. This lattice comprises the solid material that forms the photovoltaic (PV) cell's...

422

Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into electrical energy, or electricity....

423

Silicon solar cell assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silicon solar cell assembly comprising a large, thin silicon solar cell bonded to a metal mount for use when there exists a mismatch in the thermal expansivities of the device and the mount.

Burgess, Edward L. (Albuquerque, NM); Nasby, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM); Schueler, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Quantum efficiency (QE) is the ratio of the number of charge carriers collected by a photovoltaic (PV) cell to the number of photonsŚor packets of lightŚof a given energy shining on the solar cell....

425

Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} interconversion in hydrocarbon/H{sub 2} gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H{sub 2} gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm{sup -1} using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H{sub 2} plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400CH{sub 4} is favored in the more distant regions where T{sub gas}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion, whereas the reverse C{sub 2}H{sub 2}->CH{sub 4} process only requires H atoms to drive the reactions; H atoms are not consumed by the overall conversion.

Ma Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mankelevich, Yuri A. [Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

427

cell probe model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. cell probe model. (definition). Definition: A model of computation where the cost of a computation is measured by the ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electroluminescence in photovoltaic cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we propose two methods to get electroluminescence images from photovoltaic cells in a school or home lab.

Petraglia, Antonio; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/5/F01

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Solar Cell Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metalsá...

430

Irreversible Cell Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Cell conditions for commercial and industrial electrode processes...electrochemical machining,

431

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

Dirmi, Goberdhan P. (Simli U.P., IN); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA); Peacocke, Monica (Newton, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Rapidly refuelable fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

Dimri, Goberdhan P. (Simli U.P., IN); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA); Peacocke, Monica (Newton, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryThe characteristics of a photovoltaic cell. Generally,

Phuyal, Dibya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies...

438

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell...

439

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com... Early Adoption of Fuel Cells Early Market Applications for Fuel Cells

440

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

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DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

442

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

443

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

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3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

444

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

445

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

446

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

447

Fuel Cell Handbook update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Raman Investigation of The Uranium Compounds U3O8, UF4, UH3 and UO3 under Pressure at Room Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our current state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments are primarily sensitive to the position of the uranium atom. While the uranium - low-Z element bond (such as U-H or U-F) changes under pressure and temperature the X-ray diffraction investigations do not reveal information about the bonding or the stoichiometry. Questions that can be answered by Raman spectroscopy are (i) whether the bonding strength changes under pressure, as observed by either blue- or red-shifted peaks of the Raman active bands in the spectrum and (ii) whether the low-Z element will eventually be liberated and leave the host lattice, i.e. do the fluorine, oxygen, or hydrogen atoms form dimers after breaking the bond to the uranium atom. Therefore Raman spectra were also collected in the range where those decomposition products would appear. Raman is particularly well suited to these types of investigations due to its sensitivity to trace amounts of materials. One challenge for Raman investigations of the uranium compounds is that they are opaque to visible light. They absorb the incoming radiation and quickly heat up to the point of decomposition. This has been dealt with in the past by keeping the incoming laser power to very low levels on the tens of milliWatt range consequently affecting signal to noise. Recent modern investigations also used very small laser spot sizes (micrometer range) but ran again into the problem of heating and chemical sensitivity to the environment. In the studies presented here (in contrast to all other studies that were performed at ambient conditions only) we employ micro-Raman spectroscopy of samples situated in a diamond anvil cell. This increases the trustworthiness of the obtained data in several key-aspects: (a) We surrounded the samples in the DAC with neon as a pressure transmitting medium, a noble gas that is absolutely chemically inert. (b) Through the medium the sample is thermally heat sunk to the diamond anvils, diamond of course possessing the very best heat conductivity of any material. Therefore local heating and decomposition are avoided, a big challenge with other approaches casting doubts on their results. (c) This in turn benefits the signal/noise ratio tremendously since the Raman features of uranium-compounds are very small. The placement of the samples in DACs allows for higher laser powers to impinge on the sample spot while keeping the spot-size larger than in previous studies and keep the samples from heating up. Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive non-invasive technique and we will show that it is even possible to distinguish the materials by their origin / manufacturer as we have studied samples from Cameco (Canada) and IBI-Labs (US-Florida) and can compare with ambient literature data for samples from Strem (US-MA) and Areva (Pierrelatte, France).

Lipp, M J; Jenei, Z; Park-Klepeis, J; Evans, W J

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

A New Parameterization of Single Scattering Solar Radiative Properties for Tropical Anvils Using Observed Ice Crystal Size and Shape Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterizations of single scattering properties currently used in cloud resolving and general circulation models are somewhat limited in that they typically assume the presence of single particle habits, do not adequately account for the ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Ping Yang; Andreas Macke; Anthony J. Baran

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

In Situ Observations of the Microphysical Properties of Wave, Cirrus, and Anvil Clouds. Part I: Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical properties of wave clouds based on data collected during 17 missions flown by a Learjet research aircraft are presented and discussed. This extensive dataset expands upon previous aircraft studies of wave clouds and introduces ...

Brad A. Baker; R. Paul Lawson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

In Situ Observations of the Microphysical Properties of Wave, Cirrus, and Anvil Clouds. Part II: Cirrus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Learjet research aircraft was used to collect microphysical data, including cloud particle imager (CPI) measurements of ice particle size and shape, in 22 midlatitude cirrus clouds. The dataset was collected while the aircraft flew 104 ...

R. Paul Lawson; Brad Baker; Bryan Pilson; Qixu Mo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fuel Cells Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judith Valerio at one of our 31 single-cell test stands Fuel Cell Team The FC team focus is R&D on polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for commercial and military applications. Our program has had ongoing funding in the area of polymer electrolyte fuel cells since 1977 and has been responsible for enabling breakthroughs in the areas of thin film electrodes and air bleed for CO tolerance. For more information on the history of fuel cell research at Los Alamos, please click here. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation and the world. The FC team is exploring the potential of fuel cells as energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible alternatives that will

453

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING ANOIKIS CELL SHEDDING METASTASIS NORMAL CELLS) To the Cancer Cell Biology Program: As a Graduate Student in the Cancer Cell Biology Program, I acknowledge account of my laboratory work, commit to ethics before science and devote my full and undivided time

Mohaghegh, Shahab

454

Power from the Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars,ö Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productis most likely to be the fuel-cell vehicle. Fuel cells are

Lipman, Timothy E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Summary year 2: A study of potential high band-gap photovoltaic materials for a two step photon intermediate technique in fission energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of single crystal diamond thin films of large area would be a technological breakthrough for a variety of electronic and optical applications. In terms of the objectives of this contract, single crystal films would produce high quality doped regions and thus better barriers for energy conversion in the vacuum ultraviolet. To date, diamond single crystal films have been made homo-epitaxially on natural or synthetic diamond single crystals. As large single crystal diamond is prohibitively expensive, there is a need to find matching substrates for diamond heteropolarities. Cubic boron nitride has the diamond lattice structure and matches nearly perfectly the cell dimensions. However, large area cubic BN single crystal substrates are not available, as c-BN is stable, just like diamond, at high pressures and high temperatures only. The widely used Si substrates have a large lattice constant mismatch with diamond.

Prelas, M.A.; Charlson, E.J.; Charlson, E.M. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell TypesFuel Cell Types Note: ITSOFC is intermediate temperature SOFC and TSOFC is tubular SOFC #12

457

Using Geodesics in Cell Cytometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Several steps are involved in going from cells to geodesics. The process starts with fluorescence microscope images of cell populations. ...

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Cell Dynamics and Process Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY VII: Cell Dynamics And Process ... WITH RELEVANS TO POINT FEEDING ALUMINIUM CELL: Ove Kobbeltvedt,á...

459

Fuel Cells Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Fuel Cells Information at NIST. Fuel Cells Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation of programs ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

How Fuel Cells Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Fuel Cells Work How Fuel Cells Work Diagram: How a PEM fuel cell works. 1. Hydrogen fuel is channeled through field flow plates to the anode on one side of the fuel cell, while oxygen from the air is channeled to the cathode on the other side of the cell. 2. At the anode, a platinum catalyst causes the hydrogen to split into positive hydrogen ions (protons) and negatively charged electrons. 3. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) allows only the positively charged ions to pass through it to the cathode. The negatively charged electrons must travel along an external circuit to the cathode, creating an electrical current. 4. At the cathode, the electrons and positively charged hydrogen ions combine with oxygen to form water, which flows out of the cell.

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461

Fuel Cells publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science ┬╗ Materials Science ┬╗ Fuel Cells ┬╗ Fuel Cells Publications Fuel Cells publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Chemistry Communications Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

462

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

463

Distributed Energy Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Fuel Cells Energy Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen and and Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Fuel Cell Coordination Meeting June 2-3, 2003 Electricity Users Kathi Epping Kathi Epping Objectives & Barriers Distributed Energy OBJECTIVES * Develop a distributed generation PEM fuel cell system operating on natural gas or propane that achieves 40% electrical efficiency and 40,000 hours durability at $400-750/kW by 2010. BARRIERS * Durability * Heat Utilization * Power Electronics * Start-Up Time Targets and Status Integrated Stationary PEMFC Power Systems Operating on Natural Gas or Propane Containing 6 ppm Sulfur 40,000 30,000 15,000 Hours Durability 750 1,250 2,500 $/kWe Cost 40 32 30 % Electrical Efficiency Large (50-250 kW) Systems 40,000 30,000 >6,000 Hours Durability 1,000 1,500 3,000

464

Concentrator silicon cell research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell