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Sample records for devils wash shiprock

  1. Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico | Department of Energy Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico (5.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Application of Environmental Isotopes to the

  2. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

  3. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    This report evaluates the chemistry of seep water occurring in three desert drainages near Shiprock, New Mexico: Many Devils Wash, Salt Creek Wash, and Eagle Nest Arroyo. Through the use of geochemical plotting tools and multivariate statistical analysis techniques, analytical results of samples collected from the three drainages are compared with the groundwater chemistry at a former uranium mill in the Shiprock area (the Shiprock site), managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The objective of this study was to determine, based on the water chemistry of the samples, if statistically significant patterns or groupings are apparent between the sample populations and, if so, whether there are any reasonable explanations for those groupings.

  4. Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock - Shiprock (19.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Tuba City Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports

  5. Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for LED Roadway

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico | Department of Energy Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico (13.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination

  6. Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico | Department of Energy Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo:

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shiprock Mill Site - NM 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock Mill Site - NM 0-04 Site ID (CSD Index Number): NM.0-04 Site Name: Shiprock Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Shiprock Disposal, New Mexico, Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Shiprock Mill Site Uranium Mill at Shiprock Alternate Name Documents: Location: Shiprock, New Mexico, Navajo Nation Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I

  8. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock Site, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-07-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of the stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and(c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shiprock AEC Ore Buying...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AEC Ore Buying Station - NM 0-04A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Shiprock AEC Ore Buying Station (NM.0-04A) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site ...

  10. September 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2016 LMS/SHP/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Shiprock, New Mexico February 2016 RINs 15097348 and 15097349 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Planned Sampling Map Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

  11. GO-DEVILS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jefferson, S.

    1958-01-28

    This patent relates to a device normally termed a godevil for use in clearing pipes of sludge, and in particular describes an arrangement for housing a radioactive source within a go-devil whereby the source is removed from a radioactivity shield for detection purposes only when the go-devil is in use. In the described go-devil the radioactive source is housed in a member attached to a piston. Under normal pressure conditions the piston is forced in a direction to position the source within a lead shield. A bellows senses the pressure external to the go-devil and acts through a hydraulic line to force the piston in a direction to remove the source from the shield as long as the pressure is above a pre-set value.

  12. Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale (5.02 MB) More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New

  13. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings site, Shiprock, New Mexico: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-05-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the shiprock uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, one mile south of Shiprock, New Mexico. The site contains 72 acres of tailings and four of the original mill buildings. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A seven-foot-thick radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Three other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a more remote location. The no action alternative is also assessed. 99 refs., 40 figs., 58 tabs.

  14. Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  15. Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win $1 Million for Innovative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win 1 Million for Innovative Inverter Design NREL ... Google and IEEE announced today that Belgium's Red Electrical Devils, a team from CE+T ...

  16. Applications of permeable barrier technology to ground water contamination at the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, B.M.; Henry, E.J.; Thombre, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Shiprock uranium mill tailings pile in far northwestern New Mexico consists of approximately 1.5 million tons of uranium mill tailings from an acid leach mill which operated from 1954 to 1968. Located on land owned by the Navajo Nation, it was one of the first tailings piles stabilized under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project. Stabilization activities were completed in 1986 and consisted principally of consolidating the tailings, contouring the pile to achieve good drainage, and covering the pile with a multi-layer cap to control infiltration of water, radon emanation, and surface erosion. No ground water protection or remediation measures were implemented other than limiting infiltration of water through the pile, although a significant ground water contamination plume exists in the flood plain adjacent to the San Juan River. The major contaminants at the Shiprock site include high concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium. One alternative for remediation may be the use of a permeable barrier in the flood plain aquifer. As proposed for the Shiprock site, the permeable barrier would be a trench constructed in the flood plain that would be backfilled with a media that is permeable to ground water, but would intercept or degrade the pollutants. Work to date has focused on use of a mixed microbial population of sulfate and nitrate reducing organisms. These organisms would produce strongly reducing conditions which would result in precipitation of the metal contaminants (i.e., Se(IV) and U(IV)) in the barrier. One of the first considerations in designing a permeable barrier is developing an understanding of ground water flow at the site. Accordingly, a steady state numerical model of the ground water flow at the site was developed using the MODFLOW code.

  17. Solvent wash solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  18. Solvent wash solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  19. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  20. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River.

  2. Town of Kill Devil Hills- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2007, the town of Kill Devil Hills adopted an ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems. The ordinance directs any individual or organization wishing to install a wind-energy...

  3. Report. Results of a Piezocone Investigation - Shiprock, New Mexico - February 2002. GJO-2001-276-TAR. MAC-GWSHP 13.3-1.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-276-TAR MAC-GWSHP13.3-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Results of A Piezocone Investigation Shiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0020-28-003 Document Number U0145400 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0145400 DOE/Grand Junction Office Results of A Piezocone InvestigationShiprock, New Mexico February 2002 Page 2 Executive Summary A piezocone

  4. Remedial Action Plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, T.V.; Morley, J.A. . Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Began, E.T. )

    1985-06-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a twofold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to effect long-term control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located on the Navajo Reservation at Shiprock, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Shiprock site. Detailed supporting information can be found in appendices and referenced documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3.0 traces the history of operations at the Shiprock site with a description of the present site characteristics. Section 4.0 provides a definition of site-specific problems, a listing of remedial action alternatives which have been considered, and the action which is being proposed. Section 5.0 presents a summary of the conceptual design for the proposed action which includes objectives, design features, schedule, cost, and implementation methods. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the onsite workers. Section 7.0 presents a detailed listing of the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the quality assurance process that will be used by the RAC during construction. Section 9.0 describes the features of the long-term maintenance and surveillance plan. Section 10.0 documents the on-going activities to keep the public informed and participating in the project. Attached as part of the RAP are five appendices which describe in more detail various aspects of the remedial action.

  5. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  6. Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Midea Washing Appliance Mfg. Co., Ltd. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Midea Washing Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  7. Wash

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    set of definitions, guidelines, and savings categories. When the Contractor Supply Chain Council (CSCC) was chartered, one of its primary objectives was to look for ways to...

  8. WASH-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Measurement of External Gamma and Beta-Gamma Radiation Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . ... of Water and Mud Samples External Gamma Radiation Levels (in pRhr) at 1 Meter above ...

  9. Wash

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Walk-In Panels Walk-In Panels The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. Walk-In Panels - v1.2.xlsx (70.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Refrigerators and

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  11. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing

  12. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  13. TANK 7 CHARACTERIZATION AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2010-02-04

    A 3-L PUREX sludge sample from Tank 7 was characterized and then processed through a series of inhibited water washes to remove oxalate, sodium, and other soluble ions. Current plans use Tank 7 as one of the feed sources for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7). Tank 7 is high in oxalate due to the oxalic acid cleaning of the sludge heels from Tanks 5 and 6 and subsequent transfer to Tank 7. Ten decant and nine wash cycles were performed over a 47 day period at ambient temperature. Initially, seven decants and seven washes were completed based on preliminary estimates of the number of wash cycles required to remove the oxalate in the sludge. After reviewing the composition data, SRNL recommended the completion of 2 or 3 more decant/wash cycles to ensure all of the sodium oxalate had redissolved. In the first 7 washes, the slurry oxalate concentration was 12,300 mg/kg (69.6% oxalate removal compared to 96.1% removal of the other soluble ions). After all ten decants were complete, the slurry oxalate concentration was 3,080 mg/kg (89.2% oxalate removal compared to 99.0% of the other soluble ions). The rate of dissolution of oxalate increased significantly with subsequent washes until all of the sodium oxalate had been redissolved after seven decant/wash cycles. The measured oxalate concentrations agreed very well with LWO predictions for washing of the Tank 7 sample. Highlights of the analysis and washing of the Tank 7 sample include: (1) Sodium oxalate was detected in the as-received filtered solids. 95% of the oxalate was insoluble (undissolved) in the as-received slurry. (2) No sodium oxalate was detected in the post-wash filtered solids. (3) Sodium oxalate is the last soluble species that redissolves during washing with inhibited water. In order to significantly reduce the sodium oxalate concentration, the sludge must be highly washed, leaving the other soluble anions and cations (including sodium) very low in concentration. (4) The post-wash slurry had 1% of the soluble anions

  14. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  15. Soil washing enhancement with solid sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Shoubary, Y.M.; Woodmansee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Soil washing is a dynamic, physical process that remediates contaminated soil through two mechanisms: particle size separation and transfer of the contaminant into the (mostly) liquid stream. The performance of different sorbents and additives to remove motor oil from sea sand was tested. Hydrocyclone, attrition scrubber, and froth flotation equipment were used for the decontamination study. Sorbents and additives were mixed with soils in the attrition scrubber prior to flotation. Sorbents used were granular activated carbon, powder activated carbon, and rubber tires. Chemical additives used were calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, Alconox{reg_sign}, Triton{reg_sign} X-100 and Triton{reg_sign} X-114. When a froth flotation run was performed using no additive, washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). However, when carbon or rubber (6% by weight) was added to the contaminated soils the washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). The addition of sodium carbonate or calcium hydroxide (6% by weight) had same effects as sorbents. In both cases washed soil {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained total oil and grease of less than 1000 ppm. The use of these non-hazardous additives or sorbent can enhance the soil washing process and consequently saves on time (residence time in equipment design) required to achieve the target clean up levels. 18 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Wash solvent reuse in paint production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, A.B.; Heater, K.J.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1994-04-01

    The project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. Reusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. The evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology was conducted by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Pollution Prevention Research Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The evaluation was conducted with the cooperation and assistance of Vanex Color, Inc. The product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic impacts of this technology change, as it has been implemented by Vanex, were examined. Two batches of a solvent-borne alkyd house paint were prepared at Vanex--one batch made with 100%-new solvent and the other with 30%-wash solvent--and sampled for laboratory analysis at Battelle.

  17. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Descriution of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process

  18. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    February 1998 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Descrivtion of Contents 1. Site Sampling Lead/ Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. 3. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems

  19. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1999 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: I ~ ~ N S L pescrintion of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  20. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1999 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: ltcm.& 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the'following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Contirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Contirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the

  1. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JanuaryRebmary 2000 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data

  2. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 . . DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custodv was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  3. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 2000 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  4. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2000 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  5. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    November 2000 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS I This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. I 3. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data

  6. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September 2001 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data

  7. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    March 2002 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  8. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September 2002 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data

  9. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. 3. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation

  10. SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... QUALIFIERS: DETECTION UN- PARAMETER UNITS ID TYPE DATE I D COMPL REL. RESULT LAB DATA CIA LIMIT CERTAINTY RECORDS: SELECTED FROM USEUOO WHERE site-mde'SHPOl' AND ...

  11. Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining ...

  12. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    Abstract A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  13. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: WARRP Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This activity demonstrated, on a practical scale, the primary unit operations for building a containment structure for radioactive wash waters, washing down a hypothetically radioactively contaminated vehicle, collecting the hypothetically radioactive slurry waste water, filtering the hypothetically radioactive wash waters, disassembling the containment, and transporting the materials for final disposition.

  14. TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2009-09-29

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an

  15. The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation Place: Cambridge, England, United Kingdom Zip: CB24 8RX Product: Company building a tidal barrier...

  16. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  17. Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, Richard P.; Morrison, Stan J.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 μg/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

  18. Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards.

  19. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a ``Late Wash` facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  20. Wash-out in N{sub 2}-dominated leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn-Woernle, F.

    2010-08-01

    We study the wash-out of a cosmological baryon asymmetry produced via leptogenesis by subsequent interactions. Therefore we focus on a scenario in which a lepton asymmetry is established in the out-of-equilibrium decays of the next-to-lightest right-handed neutrino. We apply the full classical Boltzmann equations without the assumption of kinetic equilibrium and including all quantum statistical factors to calculate the wash-out of the lepton asymmetry by interactions of the lightest right-handed state. We include scattering processes with top quarks in our analysis. This is of particular interest since the wash-out is enhanced by scatterings and the use of mode equations with quantum statistical distribution functions. In this way we provide a restriction on the parameter space for this scenario.

  1. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  2. Radioactive demonstration of the late wash'' Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the late wash'' flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  3. Radioactive demonstration of the ``late wash`` Precipitate Hydrolysis Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibler, N.E.; Ferrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.

    1992-06-30

    This report presents results of the radioactive demonstration of the DWPF Precipitate Hydrolysis Process as it would occur in the ``late wash`` flowsheet in the absence of hydroxylamine nitrate. Radioactive precipitate containing Cs-137 from the April, 1983, in-tank precipitation demonstration in Tank 48 was used for these tests.

  4. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Apparatus for washing particulate material. [Removal of silicone oil from microspheres by trichloroethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivera, A.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Justice, G.V.

    1983-12-29

    Transport of nuclear fuel microspheres through a wash liquid is facilitated by feeding a slurry containing the microspheres into the wash liquid via a column having a vibrating tubular screen located under its lower end.

  6. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  7. C60 -induced Devil's Staircase transformation on a Pb/Si(111) wetting layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Johnson, Duane D.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2015-12-03

    Density functional theory is used to study structural energetics of Pb vacancy cluster formation on C60/Pb/Si(111) to explain the unusually fast and error-free transformations between the “Devil's Staircase” (DS) phases on the Pb/Si(111) wetting layer at low temperature (~110K). The formation energies of vacancy clusters are calculated in C60/Pb/Si(111) as Pb atoms are progressively ejected from the initial dense Pb wetting layer. Vacancy clusters larger than five Pb atoms are found to be stable with seven being the most stable, while vacancy clusters smaller than five are highly unstable, which agrees well with the observed ejection rate of ~5 Pbmore » atoms per C60. Furthermore, the high energy cost (~0.8 eV) for the small vacancy clusters to form indicates convincingly that the unusually fast transformation observed experimentally between the DS phases, upon C60 adsorption at low temperature, cannot be the result of single-atom random walk diffusion but of correlated multi-atom processes.« less

  8. Initial technical basis for late washing filter cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, M.F.; Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1992-07-23

    Bench scale filter cleaning tests at the Savannah River Technology Center have shown that cross-flow filter elements can be cleaned between late wash filtration runs and restored to original clean water flux conditions. The most effective cleaning technique was high flow axial recirculation, followed by flushing with caustic solution. Simple flushing with oxalic acid and caustic is less effective and is not recommended because of adverse experience in ITP filter cleaning and uncertainty in the.nature of radiolysis by-product contaminants.

  9. Behavior of actinide ions during sludge washing of alkaline radioactive.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, A. H.; Nash, K. L.; Gelis, A. V.; Jensen, M. P.; Sullivan, J. C.; Rao, L.

    1999-11-15

    It is difficult to accurately predict actinide behavior during the alkaline leaching of Hanford's radioactive sludges due to the diverse chemical and radiolytic conditions existing in these wastes. The results of Pu dissolution during experimental washing of sludge simulants from the BiPO{sub 4} Redox, and PUREX processes shows that {le} 2.l% Pu is dissolved during contact with alkaline media, but up to 65.5% Pu may be dissolved in acidic media. The dissolution of Cr, Fe, Nd, and Mn has also been observed, and the results of solid state, radioanalytical, and spectroscopic investigations are detailed.

  10. Alternative washing strategy during in-tank precipitation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-30

    If late washing of precipitate is available, it is possible to modify the normal washing phase of the ITP process so that tank corrosion is prevented by inhibiting with sodium hydroxide rather than sodium nitrite. Hydroxide inhibition has numerous advantages to a hydroxide/nitrite flowsheet.1 However, the rate of hydroxide depletion due to radiolysis and C0{sub 2} absorption were uncertainties. Based on recent experiments and calculations: hydroxide consumption by radiolysis will be 0.01 molar per month during Tank 49 storage, hydroxide depletion due to C0{sub 2} absorption will vary from 0.0006 to 0.025 molar per month for waste volumes between 50,000 and 1 million gallons and air flowrates between 100 and 200 cfm. A nominal rate of 0.006 molar/month (or less) is expected in Tank 49 after the first two ITP cycles have been completed. A material balance for the ITP process based on hydroxide inhibition has been calculated and the potential savings have been estimated.

  11. Alternative washing strategy during in-tank precipitation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-30

    If late washing of precipitate is available, it is possible to modify the normal washing phase of the ITP process so that tank corrosion is prevented by inhibiting with sodium hydroxide rather than sodium nitrite. Hydroxide inhibition has numerous advantages to a hydroxide/nitrite flowsheet.1 However, the rate of hydroxide depletion due to radiolysis and C0[sub 2] absorption were uncertainties. Based on recent experiments and calculations: hydroxide consumption by radiolysis will be 0.01 molar per month during Tank 49 storage, hydroxide depletion due to C0[sub 2] absorption will vary from 0.0006 to 0.025 molar per month for waste volumes between 50,000 and 1 million gallons and air flowrates between 100 and 200 cfm. A nominal rate of 0.006 molar/month (or less) is expected in Tank 49 after the first two ITP cycles have been completed. A material balance for the ITP process based on hydroxide inhibition has been calculated and the potential savings have been estimated.

  12. Hydrolysis of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants I: Phenylboric acid hydrolysis kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J.C.

    2000-02-10

    The attached report details the kinetics of phenylboric acid reaction at 90 degrees C during precipitate hydrolysis processing of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants.

  13. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  14. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wash-Rite Co - IN 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WASH-RITE CO. (IN.08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1410 Cornell Avenue , Indianapolis , Indiana IN.08-2 Evaluation Year: 1991 IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Site Operations: Conducted washing test to decontaminate gloves and recover uranium. IN.08-1 IN.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities at this site

  16. Alternatives to traditional water washing used to remove impurities in superheated geothermal steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.W.; Jung, D.B. [Two-Phase Engineering & Research, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The method of water washing impurities from superheated geothermal steam as adopted from traditional steam boiler operations in electric power generation stations has been used for a decade and a half under several pseudonyms, e.g., de-superheating, enthalpy modification, de-scaling, etc. Water washing can be effective, but it is costly. It is not necessarily expensive to implement or operate, but the cost of unrecoverable energy lost due to steam enthalpy reduction can be quite high. Are there other ways to remove these undesirables from superheated geothermal steam? That question is the focus of this paper. Several alternatives to water washing will be proposed including dry scrubbing, oil washing, and hybrid cleaning. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each method will be presented along with the various geothermal steam impurities and their effects on the process and equipment.

  17. Characterization of the SRNL-Washed tank 51 sludge batch 9 qualification sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel have been requested to qualify the next sludge batch (Sludge Batch 9 – SB9) for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To accomplish this task, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) sent SRNL a 3-L sample of Tank 51H slurry to be characterized, washed, and then used in a lab-scale demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet (after combining with Tank 40H sludge). SRNL has washed the Tank 51H sample per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. A part of the qualification process is extensive radionuclide and chemical characterization of the SRNL-washed Tank 51H slurry. This report documents the chemical characterization of the washed slurry; radiological characterization is in progress and will be documented in a separate report. The analytical results of this characterization are comparable to the Tank Farm projections. Therefore, it is recommended that SRNL use this washed slurry for the ongoing SB9 qualification activities.

  18. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  19. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation. Small-Scale Demonstration and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Irreversible Wash Aid Additive process has been under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). This process for radioactive cesium mitigation consists of a solution to wash down contaminated structures, roadways, and vehicles and a sequestering agent to bind the radionuclides from the wash water and render them environmentally immobile. The purpose of this process is to restore functionality to basic services and immediately reduce the consequences of a radiologically-contaminated urban environment. Research and development have resulted in a down-selection of technologies for integration and demonstration at the pilot-scale level as part of the Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) under the Department of Homeland Security and the Denver Urban Area Security Initiative. As part of developing the methods for performing a pilot-scale demonstration at the WARRP conference in Denver in 2012, Argonne conducted small-scale field experiments at Separmatic Systems. The main purpose of these experiments was to refine the wash water collection and separations systems and demonstrate key unit operations to help in planning for the large scale demonstration in Denver. Since the purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the operations of the system, we used no radioactive materials. After a brief set of experiments with the LAKOS unit to familiarize ourselves with its operation, two experiments were completed on two separate dates with the Separmatic systems.

  20. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal

  1. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, C.; Kono, J.

    2015-04-01

    This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  2. Gene Wash and Copper Basin Dams are surviving alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Gene Wash and Copper Basin Dams were constructed in 1937 and 1938, and are owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). The dams are located in San Bernardino County, California, close to the Colorado River, and very close to the easternmost point of California. They form two intermediate storage facilities on the Colorado River Aqueduct system which conveys water from Lake Havasu to the Los Angeles and San Diego areas. The locations of the dams are shown. Gene Wash Dam is a concrete arch structure, with a maximum height of arch of 131 feet. There is a gravity thrust block on the right abutment and the total crest length is 430 feet. Copper Basin Dam is a concrete arch dam with a maximum height of arch of 187 feet and a crest length of 253 feet. Plans, elevations and sections for both dams. The dams are in the Whipple Mountains at the eastern edge of the Mojave Desert. Between June and October, maximum temperatures usually exceed 100 degrees Farenheit, while daily low temperatures in this period are generally in the 60`s and 70`s. Winter temperatures are mild, with daytime highs in the 70`s and 80`s, and lows only occasionally below freezing. The area is arid, with total annual rainfall generally between two and ten inches. Both dams were built in desert washes with no permanent flow. The foundation for both structures is a strong, erosion-resistant, red-brown, non-marine sandstone and conglomerate of Tertiary age known as the Copper Basin Formation (Buwalda, 1937). Spillways for both dams are ungated ogee crests, which are separate from the dams. Gene Wash Dam and Copper Basin Dam are geographically close together, are of similar design, and were constructed at the same time, using the same materials. Their performance since construction, not surprisingly, has been similar.

  3. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E.; Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

  4. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. ); Natsis, M.E. ); Walker, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  5. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  6. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J.; Natsis, M.E.; Walker, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  7. DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

  8. Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity in varying thicknesses of wood and steel cargo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P; Descalle, M; Hall, J; Manatt, D; Mauger, J; Norman, E; Petersen, D; Prussin, S

    2006-10-05

    The influence of incident neutron attenuation on signal strengths in the Nuclear Car Wash has been observed experimentally for both wood and steel-pipe mock cargos. Measured decay curves are presented for {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-rays and thermalized neutrons following neutron-induced fission of HEU through varying irradiation lengths. Error rates are extracted for delayed-{gamma} and delayed-n signals integrated to 30 seconds, assuming Gaussian distributions for the active background. The extrapolation to a field system of 1 mA deuterium current and to a 5 kg sample size is discussed.

  9. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H.

    2008-07-01

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  10. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, Charles R.; Kono, Jamie

    2015-04-13

    With U.S. Department of Energy goals of reducing existing home energy use by 30% and new home energy use by 50%, it is imperative to focus on several energy efficiency measures, including the quality of air and thermal barriers. This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  11. Laser damage by ns and sub-ps pulses on hafnia/silica anti-reflection coatings on fused silica double-sided polished using zirconia or ceria and washed with or without an alumina wash step.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellum, John Curtis; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kletecka, Damon; Atherton, Briggs W.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Smith, Ian Craig; Smith, Douglas; Hobbs, Zachary

    2010-10-01

    Sandia's Large Optics Coating Operation has extensive results of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) testing of its anti-reflection (AR) and high reflection coatings on substrates pitch polished using ceria and washed in a process that includes an alumina wash step. The purpose of the alumina wash step is to remove residual polishing compound to minimize its role in laser damage. These LIDT tests are for multi longitudinal mode, ns class pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm (NIF-MEL protocol) and mode locked, sub-ps class pulses at 1054 nm (Sandia measurements), and show reasonably high and adequate laser damage resistance for coatings in the beam trains of Sandia's Z-Backlighter terawatt and petawatt lasers. An AR coating in addition to coatings of our previous reports confirms this with LIDTs of 33.0 J/cm{sup 2} for 3.5 ns pulses and 1.8 J/cm{sup 2} for 350 fs pulses. In this paper, we investigate both ceria and zirconia in doublesided polishing (common for large flat Z-Backlighter laser optics) as they affect LIDTs of an AR coating on fused silica substrates washed with or without the alumina wash step. For these AR coated, double-sided polished surfaces, ceria polishing in general affords better resistance to laser damage than zirconia polishing and laser damage is less likely with the alumina wash step than without it. This is supported by specific results of laser damage tests with 3.5 ns, multi longitudinal mode, single shot pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm, with 7.0 ns, single and multi longitudinal mode, single and multi shot pulses at 532 nm, and with 350 fs, mode-locked, single shot pulses at 1054 nm.

  12. C60 -induced Devil's Staircase transformation on a Pb/Si(111) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Johnson, Duane D.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2015-12-03

    Density functional theory is used to study structural energetics of Pb vacancy cluster formation on C60/Pb/Si(111) to explain the unusually fast and error-free transformations between the “Devil's Staircase” (DS) phases on the Pb/Si(111) wetting layer at low temperature (~110K). The formation energies of vacancy clusters are calculated in C60/Pb/Si(111) as Pb atoms are progressively ejected from the initial dense Pb wetting layer. Vacancy clusters larger than five Pb atoms are found to be stable with seven being the most stable, while vacancy clusters smaller than five are highly unstable, which agrees well with the observed ejection rate of ~5 Pb atoms per C60. Furthermore, the high energy cost (~0.8 eV) for the small vacancy clusters to form indicates convincingly that the unusually fast transformation observed experimentally between the DS phases, upon C60 adsorption at low temperature, cannot be the result of single-atom random walk diffusion but of correlated multi-atom processes.

  13. Bescorp soil washing system for lead battery site treatment. Applications analysis report. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaire, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Brice Environmental Services Corporation (BESCORP) Soil Washing System (BSWS) and its applicability in remediating lead-contaminated soil at lead battery sites was evaluated. The report presents performance and economic data, developed from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demonstration (three test runs) and additional data provided by the developer. The demonstration took place at the Alaskan Battery Enterprises (ABE) site in Fairbanks, Alaska. Economic data for a commercial 20-tph unit processing wastes similar to those treated in the SITE Demonstration, including disposal of waste effluents, project operating costs to be about $165/ton of soil (dry basis) containing 6.6 wt percent moisture. This figure does not reflect any revenue from recycling of metallic lead or cashing chips.

  14. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin intermediate grade project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Intermediate Grade Drilling Project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 19 drill holes ranging in depth from 275 to 1220 feet (83.9 to 372.1 m). A total of 11,569 feet (3528.5 m) was rotary drilled and 130 feet (39.7 m) were cored for a total of 11,699 feet (3568.2 m) for the project. The project objective was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to Intermediate Grade uranium mineralization of the Browns Park Formation in the Sugar Loaf Peak Site A, and the Little Juniper Mountain Site B areas. All boreholes are located on the USGS Juniper Hot Springs and the Lay 7.5-Minute Series (Topographic) Quadrangles. The project began May 2, 1980; drilling was completed June 3, 1980. Site restoration and clean up was initiated immediately upon the completion of the last borehole and was completed June 8, 1980.

  15. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin, Colorado. [In support of NURE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callihan, M C

    1980-01-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 27 drill holes ranging in depth from 110 feet (33.5 m) to 1,995 feet (608.1 m). A total of 25,514 feet (7,471.9 m) was rotary drilled, and 1,593.5 feet (485.7 m) were cored resulting in a total of 26,107.5 feet (7,957.6 m) drilled for the project. The objective of the project was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to uranium mineralization. This was accomplished by drilling in major outcrop areas of the Browns Park Formation in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado. The project began May 18, 1979; drilling was completed November 4, 1979. Most site restoration and cleanup was completed during the fall of 1979 with the remainder to be completed during the spring of 1980.

  16. Stratigraphy and petroleum potential of Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siepman, B.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Trout Creek and Twentymile Sandstones (Mesaverde Group) in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado, are thick, upward-coarsening sequences that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior basin during Campanian time. These units trend northeast-southwest and undergo a facies change to coal-bearing strata on the northwest. Surface data collected along the southeastern rim of the Sand Wash basin were combined with well-log data from approximately 100 drill holes that have penetrated the Trout Creek or Twentymile in the subsurface. The sandstones exhibit distinctive vertical profiles with regard to grain size, sedimentary structures, and biogenic structures. A depositional model that incorporates the key elements of the modern Nile River (northeast Africa) and Nayarit (west-central Mexico) coastal systems is proposed for the Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones and associated strata. The model depicts a wave-dominated deltaic, strand-plain, and barrier-island system. Depositional cycles are asymmetrical in cross section as they are largely progradational and lack significant transgressive deposits. Source rock-reservoir rock relationships are ideal as marine shales underlie, and coal-bearing strata overlie sheetlike reservoir sandstones. Humic coal, the dominant source of Mesaverde gas, generates major quantities of methane upon reaching thermal maturity. Existing Mesaverde gas fields are largely structural traps, but stratigraphic and combination traps may prove to be equally important. The sparsely drilled deeper part of the basin warrants testing as large, overpressured-gas accumulations in tight-sandstone reservoirs are likely to be found.

  17. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas.

  18. shiprock info sheet 08.20.13.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    operations. 1986 Mill tailings are put in a disposal cell and a cover is constructed over the materials. The disposal cell cover is a barrier that prevents radon gas from ...

  19. Navajo Coal Combustion and Respiratory Health Near Shiprock, New Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.; Furst, Jill M.; Lerch, Harry; Olea, Ricardo A.; Suitt, Stephen E.; Kolker, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Indoormore » air pollution has been identified as a major risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory diseases throughout the world. In the sovereign Navajo Nation, an American Indian reservation located in the Four Corners area of the USA, people burn coal in their homes for heat. To explore whether/how indoor coal combustion might contribute to poor respiratory health of residents, this study examined respiratory health data, identified household risk factors such as fuel and stove type and use, analyzed samples of locally used coal, and measured and characterized fine particulate airborne matter inside selected homes. In twenty-five percent of homes surveyed coal was burned in stoves not designed for that fuel, and indoor air quality was frequently found to be of a level to raise concerns. The average winter 24-hour PM 2.5 concentration in 20 homes was 36.0  μ g/ m 3 . This is the first time that PM 2.5 has been quantified and characterized inside Navajo reservation residents' homes.« less

  20. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  1. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    In many two-story homes, there are attic spaces above the first-floor of the home that border portions of the second-story conditioned space. These spaces have breaches of the air and thermal boundaries, creating a phenomenon known as wind washing. This can cause attic air above the first-floor space to be driven into the cavity between the first and second floors by wind, thermal buoyancy forces, or mechanical driving forces as well as circulation of hot attic air against the wallboard because of gaps between insulation batts installed on knee walls and the gypsum wallboard. In this project, the U.S. Department of Energy team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) investigated wind washing in 56 homes. The goals were to identify the failure mechanisms that lead to wind washing, characterize the pathways for air and heat to enter the house, and evaluate the seasonal energy savings and peak demand reduction that can result from repairing these wind washing problems. Based on this research, the team developed recommendations for cost-effective retrofit solutions and information that can help avoid these problems in new construction.

  3. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to

  4. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non

  5. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    May 2009. Also, because the effectiveness of the subsurface drain in Many Devils Wash had been decreasing in previous years, DOE installed a new diversion structure in August 2009...

  6. Microsoft Word - S05030_Strategy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... progress has been made in terms of extraction rates and ... DOE plans to continue to search for a suitable background ... deposits from Many Devils Wash to enter the San Juan River. ...

  7. CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF CAUSTIC WASH TANK AND SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MCU FROM AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-01

    During processing of Salt Batches 3 and 4 in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the decontamination efficiency for cesium declined from historical values and from expectations based on laboratory testing. This report documents efforts to analyze samples of solvent and process solutions from MCU in an attempt to understand the cause of the reduced performance and to recommend mitigations. CWT Solutions from MCU from the time period of variable decontamination factor (DF) performance which covers from April 2011 to September 2011 (during processing of Salt Batch 4) were examined for impurities using chromatography and spectroscopy. The results indicate that impurities were found to be of two types: aromatic containing impurities most likely from Modifier degradation and aliphatic type impurities most likely from Isopar{reg_sign} L and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) degradation. Caustic washing the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) solution with 1M NaOH improved its extraction ability as determined from {sup 22}Na uptake tests. Evidence from this work showed that pH variance in the aqueous solutions within the range of 1M nitric acid to 1.91M NaOH that contacted the solvent samples does not influence the analytical determination of the TOA concentration by GC-MS.

  8. Processes for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil, and apparatuses for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-11-24

    Processes and apparatuses for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. An exemplary process for washing a spent ion exchange bed employed in purification of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil includes the step of providing a ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream is partially hydrotreated to reduce the oxygen content thereof, thereby producing a partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream having a residual oxygen content that is less than the original oxygen content. At least a portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream is passed through the spent ion exchange bed. Water is passed through the spent ion exchange bed after passing at least the portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream therethrough.

  9. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  10. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: Phase II. Selection and/or Modification of COTS Field Portable Waste Water Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Michael; Mertz, Carol; Kivenas, Nadia; Magnuson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    After an accidental or malicious release of radioactivity, large urban areas may be contaminated, compromising response efforts by first responders and law enforcement officials. In addition, some public services (e.g., drinking water and wastewater treatment, electrical power distribution, etc.) may be disrupted. In such an event, it may be important to deploy mitigation efforts in certain areas to restore response activities and public services (Fig. S-1). This report explores the state-of-the-art approach for a system to rapidly return critical infrastructure components to service following a cesium-137 (Cs-137) radiological dispersal device (RDD) release while avoiding the spread of Cs-137 beyond its original deposition area and minimizing the amount of Cs-137-contaminated wastewater. Specifically, we describe a wash system consisting of chemical additives added to fire hydrant water and irreversible solid sequestering agents added as the water is collected and treated for recycle in situ. The wash system is intended to be a rapidly deployable, cost-effective means of mitigating an urban setting for the purpose of restoring critical infrastructure and operational activities after a radiological release.

  11. Microsoft Word - SHP_2011_final

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title ...

  12. Microsoft Word - SHP 2009-draft_final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title ...

  13. Microsoft Word - Exec Summ 2010

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title ...

  14. Annual Performance Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico October 2014 Doc. ... 25 Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  15. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    remediation system at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal and Processing Site for ... Remediation Efficiency at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site (DOE 2005), an evaluation of ...

  16. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    remediation system at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal and Processing Site for ... Remediation Efficiency at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site (DOE 2005), and the more ...

  17. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water at Monument Valley, Arizona, and Shiprock, New Mexico 2006 Status Report ... Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Ground Water at Monument Valley, Arizona, and Shiprock, ...

  18. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  19. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  20. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  1. Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win $1 Million for Innovative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado, for testing. "The overall idea was to test these inverters in a similar fashion to how they would be used out in the field," said Blake Lundstrom, the NREL project lead. ...

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site | Department of Energy Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site (6.81 MB) More

  3. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2010-08-24

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  4. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  5. Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

    2001-05-31

    The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

  6. Annual Performance Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico August 2015 Doc. ... 25 Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  7. CX-001115: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hand Auger Samples in East Fork Arroyo, Shiprock, New Mexico Disposal SiteCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 03/04/2010Location(s): Shiprock, New MexicoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  8. Microsoft Word - SHP-2012_Final.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UMTRCA Title I Annual Report February 2013 Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Annual Inspection of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRCA Title I Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary ...

  9. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Location of the Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ship

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    New Mexico Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site UMTRCA Title I site shiprock_map The Shiprock Disposal Site, an Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I disposal site, is licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. The site transferred to the Office of Legacy Management in 2003 and requires routine inspection and maintenance, records-related activities, and stakeholder support. For more information about the Shiprock site, view the

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and May 2014 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  12. Microsoft Word - 10032912_10032913 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site June 2010 LMSSHP.........13 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. Microsoft Word - 09092562 09092565 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site November .........11 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  15. Microsoft Word - RIN 12074743 12074744 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........11 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. Microsoft Word - 10083299 10083302 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........11 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. Microsoft Word - 12034422 12034423 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    March and April 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, .........13 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  18. Microsoft Word - RIN 06020313 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    206 2006 - -L Data Validation Package U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management March 2006 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site June 2006 U.S. Department of Energy DVP-March 2006, Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site June 2006 RIN 06020313 Page ii Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

  19. Microsoft Word - RIN 11094067 & 11094068 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site January 2012 LMS/SHP/S00911 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2011, Shiprock, New Mexico January 2012 RIN 11094067 and 11094068 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Planned Monitoring Locations .........................................11 Data Assessment Summary

  20. Microsoft Word - RIN05080225_DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    071 2006 - -L Data Validation Package U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management September 2005 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Data Validation Package January 2006 U.S. Department of Energy DVP⎯September 2005, Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site January 2006 RIN 05080225 Page ii Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shiprock, New Mexico Sample Location

  1. DOE - Fossil Energy: Washing More Oil from Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    That's exactly what oil producers do in an oil reservoir. They drill wells called "injection wells" and use them like gigantic hoses to pump water into an oil reservoir. The water ...

  2. Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A quick internet search will provide you a list of retailers who are cutting down their prices on ENERGY STAR products this President’s day, many of them also providing buy-back programs for old appliances and even offering appliance rebates!

  3. Groundwater Makes a Splash NNSS Groundwater Experts Meet at Devils Hole

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Groundbreaking Leader of Computation at LLNL Retires Friday, February 12, 2016 - 10:50am Dona Crawford Dona Crawford, Associate Director for Computation at NNSA's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), announced her retirement last week after 15 years of leading Livermore's Computation Directorate. "Dona has successfully led a multidisciplinary 1000-person team that develops and deploys world-class supercomputers, computational science, and

  4. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    10 Through March 2011 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site January 2012 LMS/SHP/S07834 This page intentionally left blank LMS/SHP/S07834 Annual Performance Report April 2010 Through March 2011 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site January 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico January 2012 Doc. No. S07834 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  5. Microsoft Word - SHP 2008-final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 29, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures remained in good condition and were functioning as designed. Erosion along the southwest bank of the outflow channel was repaired and in good condition. Scattered deep-rooted shrubs on

  6. U.S. Department of Energy 2013 UMTRCA Title I Annual Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UMTRCA Title I Annual Report March 2014 Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 28, 2013. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures remained in good condition. No settling, slumping, erosion, animal intrusion, riprap deterioration, or other such disturbance was evident on the

  7. Microsoft Word - RIN 04090104_DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September 2004 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2005 RIN 04090104 Page ii Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map ......................................................................................................................2 Data Assessment

  8. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ... groundwater from the interceptor drains and extraction wells is solar evaporation. ...

  9. Microsoft Word - S05575_AP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico December 2009 Doc. ... groundwater from the interceptor drains and extraction wells is solar evaporation. ...

  10. Microsoft Word - S0244800.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... ground water from the interceptor drains and extraction wells is solar evaporation. ... Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  11. Microsoft Word - U0200600-Semi-Annual Report Sept 03 to March...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... U.S. Department of Energy Semi-Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico September ... ground water from the interceptor drains and extraction wells is solar evaporation. ...

  12. Microsoft Word - S04243_2007 Nat Atten Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater at Monument Valley, Arizona, and Shiprock, New Mexico, DOE Legacy Waste Sites 2007 Pilot Study Status Report June 2008 Office of Legacy Management LMSMONS04243 Work ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ship

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Legacy Management Site LMSSHPS05037 March 2009 Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at Monument Valley, Arizona, and Shiprock, New Mexico, DOE Legacy ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- MonValley

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site-2008 Pilot Study Status Report ... Arizona, and Shiprock, New Mexico, DOE Legacy Waste Sites-2007 Pilot Study Status ...

  15. Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... multiple Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites (Grand Junction, Shiprock, Monument Valley, Mexican Hat, and Tuba City), while the Fernald and ...

  16. LM 32-15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NEPA ID: LM 32-15 Short Title: Install Four New Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Determination: B3.1

  17. LM 32-15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NEPA ID: LM 32-15Short Title: Install Four New Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal SiteDetermination: B3.1

  18. Microsoft Word - RIN 11033665 & 11033666 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site July 2011 LMSSHPS00311 This .........13 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  19. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New ... In these sparkline diagrams, red markers denote maximum (max) concentrations and green ...

  20. EERE Success Story-NREL Partners with Google in Little Box Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineers (IEEE) announced Belgium's Red Electrical Devils (a team from CE+T Power) ... Judges declared Red Electrical Devils the winner because the team's inverter had a power ...

  1. CX-005682: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Routine Monitoring, Maintenance, Research, General Site, and Administrative Actions at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal SiteCX(s) Applied: A1, A8, B1.3, B1.11, B1.20, B3.1Date: 04/14/2011Location(s): Shiprock, New MexicoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  2. U.S. Department of Energy 2014 UMTRCA Title I Annual Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 29, 2014. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in good condition. A missing entrance sign was replaced, sediment was removed from under a gate, a damaged portion of the perimeter fence was repaired, and weeds and deep-rooted

  3. Heavy medium recovery in coal washing by continuous high gradient magnetic separation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelland, D.R.

    1983-09-01

    We have adapted high grade magnetic separation (HGMS) for magnetite recovery because of its insensitivity to coal/magnetite ratio and slurry density and its ability to capture fine magnetite at high velocity. An open vertical matrix able to capture 10 ..mu..m (avg. size) magnetite without entraining 2 mm coal has been incorporated in a 1.85 m diameter continuous high gradient magnetic separator. Three-quarter ton samples of magnetite (in 1000 gallons of water) have been recovered with the matrix ring turning at 40 cm/s through a field of 6 kOe. A laminated core demagnetizing coil followed by water sprays removes the recovered magnetite. The recovery is high, particularly for two passes which could be accomplished by two magnet heads on a single carousel ring. Coal entrainment is low for a wide range of operating conditions. A 4.8 m diameter separator, the largest currently available, with multiple heads, should be able to treat 350 tons of magnetite and coal per hour. 29 references, 52 figures, 13 tables.

  4. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  5. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  6. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  7. File:WASH-Notice of Construction Application.pdf | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    modified 02:40, 6 February 2013 Software used Acrobat PDFMaker 10.1 for Word Short title NOC Application - New Project or Modification of Existing Stationary Source ver 8-11...

  8. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in 2-Story Florida Homes; Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James B.; Withers, Charles R.; LaHiff, Ian L.

    2009-12-01

    This report is about a study to identify air flow failures and possible insulation system failures. Field testing was ocmpleted on 32 homes and 6 homes were monitored and repaired.

  9. Universe Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Natl....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. IASF, Milan Padua U. AIM, Saclay ASDC, Frascati INFN, Perugia Perugia U. NASA, Goddard NASA, Goddard CRESST, Greenbelt CSST, Baltimore SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park...

  10. Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

  11. File:WASH-Air Operating Permit Application and Instructions.pdf...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Go next page next page Full resolution...

  12. CX-011206: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kayenta-Shiprock 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/30/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, New Mexico Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  13. CX-011205: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lost Canyon-Shiprock 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/30/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Road Repair at the L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 07192016 B1.3 LM 10-16 Unmanned Aerial Systems Operations at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 07132016 B1.3 ...

  15. 1. Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. University of California, CA 1982 1998 6. AcidPueblo Canyons, NM 1984 1999 7. Chupadera Mesa, NM 1984 1999 8. Canonsburg, PA 1986 1999 9.Shiprock, NM 1987 2000 10. Middlesex ...

  16. CX-000284: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brush Clearing for Well InstallationCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 12/14/2009Location(s): Shiprock, New MexicoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  17. CX-012357: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shiprock Substation Stormwater Erosion Control Maintenance, San Juan County, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B1.33 Date: 07/01/2014 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  18. CX-012770: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shiprock Access Road Repair Project San Juan County, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41858 Location(s): New MexicoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. DOEIAL162350-158

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The UMTRCA also directed the DOE to enter into cooperative ... were identified in a field search in 1993. Treated San Juan ... Shiprock will likely have similar requirements in terms of ...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Mexico

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexico New Mexico NM_map_2012 Acid/Pueblo Canyon Site Ambrosia Lake Site Bayo Canyon Site Bluewater Site Chupadera Mesa Site Gasbuggy Site Gnome-Coach Site Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory L-Bar Site Shiprock Site

  1. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand ...

  2. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 2000. Final Site Observational Work Plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site, GJO-2000-169-TAR, Rev. 2, Grand Junction Office, Grand ...

  3. Microsoft Word - u01493_July2002.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site July 2002 U0149300 GJO-2001-297-TAR GWSHP1.9 Final Ground Water Compliance Action ...

  4. GJO-2001-208-TAR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2001-208-TAR MAC-GWSHP 11.7-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Biological Assessment for Ground Water Remediation at the Shiprock Site Final April 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of ...

  5. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off April 24,2001 ACTION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER COMPLIANCE ACTIVITIES AT THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE, SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO ISSUE: DraR Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Shiprock, New Mexico, to the Navajo Nation, federal and tribal regulatoly agencies, and other interested stakeholders for review and comment. RECOMMENDATION: The Management Review Team

  6. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Shiprock Remediation Contractor: S. M. Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 8300 No Se 530 Yes 0.05 U 2600 Yes 0.044 Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Sr 11000 No Explosives Present?

  7. Microsoft Word - RIN 06080459 DVP_112806.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    383 2006 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 September 2006 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2006 U.S. Department of Energy DVP-Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2006 RIN 06080459 Page ii Contents Sampling Event Summary

  8. Microsoft Word - RIN 07081119 DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    85 2008 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Work Performed by the S.M. Stoller Corporation Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 September 2007 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site January 2008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2007, Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

  9. Bethel Census Area, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Nunapitchuk, Alaska Oscarville, Alaska Platinum, Alaska Quinhagak, Alaska Red Devil, Alaska Sleetmute, Alaska Stony River, Alaska Toksook Bay, Alaska Tuluksak,...

  10. CX-013456: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Obtain Subsurface Soil Samples from Five Locations on the San Juan River Floodplain near Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 03/26/2015 Location(s): New MexicoOffices(s): Legacy Management

  11. CX-008396: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Shiprock-Four Corners 345 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/13/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    This report contains environmental monitoring information for the following UMTRA sites for the 1992 Calendar Year: Lakeview, OR; Lowman, ID; Mexican Hat, UT; Monument Valley, AZ; Rifle, CO; Riverton, WY; Shiprock, NM; Spook, WY; Tuba City, AZ. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  13. Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Ashtabula Fernald Environmental Management Project Maybell Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Shiprock Slick Rock South Valley Spook Tuba City Weldon Spring Miscellaneous

  14. CX-013928: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Curecanti-Lost Canyon-Shiprock 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Insulator Replacement Montezuma County CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/24/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  15. CX-013943: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lost Canyon-Shiprock 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Vegetation Management and Herbicide Treatments Montezuma County, CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/26/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. LM 06-15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 LM 06-15 NEPA ID: LM 06-15 Short Title: Obtain subsurface soil samples from five locations on the San Juan River floodplain near Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. Determination: B3.1 LM 06-15 (806.43 KB) More Documents & Publications CX-013456: Categorical Exclusion Determination LM 17-15 LM 10-16

  17. LM 10-16 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0-16 LM 10-16 NEPA ID: LM 10-16 Short Title: Unmanned Aerial Systems Operations at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Determination: B1.3 and B3.2 LM 10-16 (320.67 KB) More Documents & Publications CX-013312: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-013695: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-014551: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  18. EIS-0516: Clean Path Energy Center Project; San Juan County, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EIS for the proposed interconnection of the Clean Path Energy Center Project to Western’s transmission system at the Shiprock Substation. The planned Clean Path Energy Center will consist of a 680 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant co-located with a 70 MW solar photovoltaic project.

  19. The Struggle between States and the Federal Government on the Siting of LNG Import Terminals: Has a Red Tide Washed Ashore in the Blue States?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desautels, Denise; Ray, Peter

    2005-10-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 transfers, in some circumstances, implementation of the public trust doctrine from the state to the federal government. Implicit in the public trust doctrine is the issue of public safety and environmental concerns. Proponents of such facilities are challenged with weighing such factors to make a successful proposal to federal and state agencies.

  20. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

  1. BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wash. * Shahala Middle School, Vancouver, Wash. * Pierce County Home School Club, Milton, Wash. BPA sponsors the science bowl to showcase students' talents in science,...

  2. Westview Team 1 of Portland wins BPA Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wash. Shahala Middle School, Vancouver, Wash. Pierce County Home School Club, Milton, Wash. BPA sponsors the science bowl to showcase students' talents in science,...

  3. Stoller Middle School of Beaverton, Ore., emerges undefeated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wash. Shahala Middle School, Vancouver, Wash. Pierce County Home School Club, Milton, Wash. BPA sponsors the science bowl to showcase students' talents in science,...

  4. Microsoft Word - S06815_2010 Ann Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5-1 5.0 Recommendations The following recommendations are provided to help improve the performance and evaluation of the Shiprock remediation system: * The floodplain extraction system appears to be functioning as expected. The addition of the two trenches at the base of the escarpment enhances the removal of contaminant mass from groundwater in the alluvium. However, given the success demonstrated in the previous evaluation of Trench 2 (DOE 2009b), DOE is proposing similar instrumentation and

  5. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 4.0 Performance Summary This section summarizes the findings of the most recent (April 2010 through March 2011) assessment of the floodplain and terrace groundwater remediation systems at the Shiprock site, marking the end of the eighth year of active groundwater remediation. * Groundwater in the floodplain system is currently being extracted from two wells (wells 1089 and 1104) adjacent to the San Juan River north of the disposal cell, two collection trenches (Trench 1 and Trench 2), and a

  6. Ten Things You Didn't Know About the Electron Racetrack at Brookhaven...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    painted with a bugle and the words "Baptized by Fire," which was linked with the 14th regiment, known as the "Fighting Fourteenth" and the "Red-legged Devils" from Brooklyn. ...

  7. Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at 0.5 to 1.2 km in depth below Devil's Kitchen, Nicol Prospects, and Coso Hot Springs. A vertical, low Q ( 36 in contrast with surrounding rock of 80) region is interpreted as...

  8. Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at 0.5 to 1.2 km in depth below Devil's Kitchen, Nicol Prospects, and Coso Hot Springs. A vertical, low Q ( 36 in contrast with surrounding rock of 80) region is interpreted as...

  9. Telluric Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trend runs through the Coso Hot Springs--Devil's Kitchen geothermal area. References Jackson, D.B. ODonnell, J.E.; Gregory, D. I. (1 January 1977) Schlumberger soundings,...

  10. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Devil's Kitchen fumarole area and from Coso production wells. Authors Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Adams, M.C.; Norman and D.I. Published PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-fourth Workshop on...

  11. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Devil's Kitchen fumarole area and from Coso production wells. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Adams, M.C.; Norman, D.I. (1 January 1999) TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO...

  12. NNSS Groundwater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Devils Hole meeting puts focus on NNSS groundwater. See page 8. See page 7. Moniz Confirmed Energy Secretary; Replaces Chu Dr. Ernest Moniz was officially sworn in as the 13th ...

  13. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed ...

  14. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. ... with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted ...

  15. Microsoft Word - AOWC-FinalEA-June2012

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    OST communication depot; aboveground water tank; fuel station with wash rack; a ... OST communication depot; aboveground water tank; fuel station and wash rack; a ...

  16. Microsoft Word - S01790-April 04 to March 05_Sept.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Through March 2005 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site September 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ933-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management S0179000 DOE-LM/GJ933-2005 Annual Performance Report April 2004 through March 2005 for the

  17. Microsoft Word - S04378_AnnRep.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 Through March 2008 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site September 2008 Office of Legacy Management LMS/SHP/S04378 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AM01-07LM00060 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank LMS/SHP/S04378 Annual Performance Report April 2007 Through March

  18. Microsoft Word - U0194500July2005.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4500 GJO-2004-579-TAC Office of Legacy Management Refinement of Conceptual Model and Recommendations for Improving Remediation Efficiency at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site July 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Conceptual Model Refinement and Efficiency Recommendations July 2005 Doc. No.

  19. Microsoft Word - Appendix A (Mar-11 redux)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling Summary and Descriptive Statistics for Floodplain Monitoring Wells This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico December 2010 Doc. No. S06815 Page A-1 Table A-1. Summary of Floodplain Locations Sampled, September 2009-March 2010 Well ID ZOC Area Sampling Water Levels Comments/Notes Sep-09 Mar-10 Sep-09 Mar-10 0608 KM S-SE FP X X X X Base of escarpment 0610 AL S-SE FP X X X X Base of escarpment 0611 AL S-SE FP X X X X Base

  20. EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management is preparing an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington, and a new Three Rivers Substation on Western's reserved lands.

  1. Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit and Site Tour

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz recently visited the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State.

  2. Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA (DOE/EIS-0364) (08/13/04)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    76 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 156 / Friday, August 13, 2004 / Notices Houston Ship Channel (Mile -3) to SH 146 (Mile 11.4); (2) Deepening and widening the channel from Mile 3 to Mile 11.4 to match the currently maintained channel from the Houston Ship Channel to Mile 3 (10 ft deep and 100 ft wide); (3) Deepening the channel to 9 feet from Mile 3 to Mile 11.4; (4) Eliminating a series of tight bends known as the Devil's Elbow by dredging a new channel (Devil's Elbow Cutoff) to the north of

  3. SUBTASK 7.2 GLOBAL WARMING AND GREEHOUSE GASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Kurt Eylands; Jaroslav Solc Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of current climatic trends and reconstruction of paleoclimatic conditions for Devils Lake have been conducted based on diatom-inferred salinity for the last 2000 years. The 3-year cross-disciplinary research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was carried out by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and St. Croix Watershed Research Station (SCWRS) at the Science Museum of Minnesota. The results indicate that frequent climatic fluctuations resulting in alternating periods of drought and wet conditions are typical for the northern Great Plains and suggest that the severity and length of extremes exceeded those on modern record. Devils Lake has experienced five fresh periods and two minor freshening periods in the last 2000 years. Transitions between fresh and saline periods have been relatively fast, representing lake level changes that have been similar to those observed in the last 150 years. From 0 to 1070 A.D., Devils Lake showed more variable behavior, with fresh phases centered at 200, 500, 700, and 1000 A.D. From 1070 A.D. to present, Devils Lake was generally saline, experiencing two minor freshening periods at 1305-1315 and 1800-1820 A.D and the major current freshening from 1960 A.D. to present.

  4. Subharmonic structure of Shapiro steps in frustrated superconducting arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Kim, B.J.; Choi, M.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Two-dimensional superconducting arrays with combined direct and alternating applied currents are studied both analytically and numerically. In particular, we investigate in detail current-voltage characteristics of a square array with 1/2 flux quantum per plaquette and triangular arrays with 1/2 and 1/4 flux quantum per plaquette. At zero temperature reduced equations of motion are obtained through the use of the translational symmetry present in the systems. The reduced equations lead to a series of subharmonic steps in addition to the standard integer and fractional giant Shapiro steps, producing devil`s staircase structure. This devil`s staircase structure reflects the existence of dynamically generated states in addition to the states originating from degenerate ground states in equilibrium. Widths of the subharmonic steps as functions of the amplitudes of alternating currents display Bessel-function-type behavior. We also present results of extensive numerical simulations, which indeed reveal the subharmonic steps together with their stability against small thermal fluctuations. Implications for topological invariance are also discussed.

  5. Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with a ribbon cutting at the Auto-Spa car wash. Mercer Island celebrates the 500th Solarize installation in the state of Washington with a ribbon cutting at the Auto-Spa car wash. ...

  6. CX-013884: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BH Anhydrite Pond Chlorides Wash - Pilot Test and Full Pond Chlorides Wash CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/06/2015 Location(s): None ProvidedOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    JAXA, SagamiharaTokyo U.Rice U.Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.New Hampshire U.NASA, GoddardArizona State U.SLACNaval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.UC, Berkeley, Space Sci....

  8. Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in June for September Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford will hold its annual DOE Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Champions Workshop on September 12-15, 2011, at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, Wash.

  9. After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford’s Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears Completion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Hanford workers are fast approaching the successful completion of a long-term cleanup project.

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for its residential and commercial customers to install energy efficient washing machines and dishwashers. The rebate application is... Eligibility: Commercial,...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shrewsbury Electric offers rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances. Eligible products include washing machines, dishwashers, refrigerators, and room air conditioners. Customers......

  12. Contractors Cleaned Up Most of Hanford Site's River Corridor, But Work Remains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor.

  13. Results from tests of DuPont crossflow filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-05-05

    Crossflow filtration will be used to filter radioactive waste slurry as part of the Late Wash Process.

  14. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  15. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    FY 1985 project accomplishments include: completed 90% of the processing site remedial actions at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, and initiated remedial actions at Salt Lake City, Utah, and Shiprock, New Mexico; awarded remedial action contracts on 329 vicinity properties at seven designated locations and completed survey and inclusion activities on a total of 1620 vicinity properties; published the Environmental Assessment (EA) for Lakeview, Oregon, issued the draft and prepared the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Durango, Colorado; completed the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) for Lakeview, Oregon, and prepared the draft RAP for Durango, Colorado; executed cooperative agreements with Idaho, New Mexico, and the Navajo Nation/Hopi Tribe; executed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and developed proposed UMTRA Project design review criteria between DOE and the NRC.

  16. Laura Berzak Hopkins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity & Fuel » Appliances & Electronics » Laundry Laundry Save energy and more with ENERGY STAR. ENERGY STAR clothes washers use 20% less energy to wash clothes than standard washing machines. Save energy and more with ENERGY STAR. ENERGY STAR clothes washers use 20% less energy to wash clothes than standard washing machines. There are two ways to reduce the amount of energy used for washing clothes-use less water and use cooler water. Unless you're dealing with oily stains, the

  17. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is a brief progress report from each of the research and education projects that are currently funded through the ERWM contract. During third quarter 1993, approval was given by DOE for purchase of equipment. Equipment purchases were initiated and much of the equipment has been received and installed. The committees in charge of coordination of sampling and analyses associated with the collaborative research groups continued to meet and address these issues. Sampling has been done in the lower part of Devil`s Swamp and in the Devil`s Swamp Lake area. In addition, extensive sampling has been done in Bayou Trepagnier and in Bayou St. John. During this period, Tulane and Xavier Universities continued working closely with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The ORNL 1993 summer student internship program was completed. Plans were made for expanding the program to support 8 students next summer. Leonard Price, a Xavier University Chemistry professor and John Walz, a Tulane University Engineering professor each spent 5 weeks at ORNL. During this time these faculty worked with ORNL researchers exploring mutual interests and discussing possible future collaborations. In September, Drs. Carl Gehrs, Lee Shugart and Marshall Adams of ORNL, visited the Tulane and Xavier campuses. They presented two seminars and met with several of the investigators being supported by the ERWM contract. Tulane/Xavier project administrators participated in the Office of Technology Development`s ``New Technologies and Program Exhibition`` in the Rayburn House Office Building on September 23 and in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27.

  18. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States | Department of Energy Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States In this project, the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential

  19. Hanford Contractor Receives Awards for Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – A Hanford site contractor supporting EM’s cleanup program has again received a prestigious safety award from DOE’s Voluntary Protection Program (VPP).

  20. NextGen Advanced Framing for High Performance Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Heel H>9.25" Insulation Air sealing Ventilation Wind washing Raised Heel Truss 7 Reduced thermal bridging Improved durability BUT Reduced structural stability ...

  1. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Systems * Catalyst Compatible Engine Oil Aftertreatment Poisoning * Efficiency and ... Oxalic Acid Wash From "Future Engine Oil Trends", Filter Technology Workshop, Stefan ...

  2. New Braunfels Utilities- Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Braunfels Utilities offer a variety of programs encouraging its customers to make their homes more energy efficiency. Rebates are available for washing machines, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

  3. In a First, Yakama Indian Nation Teens Explore Tribal Sacred Areas at Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Yakama Indian Nation teenagers saw tribal sacred areas on the Hanford Site for the first time this month.

  4. Trace rare earth element analysis in briny groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    A rare-earth element (REE) group separation scheme has been developed. REE data for two briny groundwaters representing Granite Wash and Wolfcamp Carbonate formations are reported. (DLC)

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as cleaning, window washing, lawn mowing, trash collection, painting, and snow removal). ... mills, pumps, and presses; (b) Door and window repair or replacement; (c) Wall, ceiling, ...

  6. Puda Coal Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Puda Coal Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Puda Coal, Inc Place: Taiyuan, Shaanxi Province, China Product: Specializes in coal preparation by applying a water jig washing...

  7. Royalstar Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Royalstar Group Place: Hefei, Anhui Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Chinese manufacturer of washing machines, solar water heaters, and as of June 2006,...

  8. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    solutions and information that can help avoid these problems in new construction. PDF icon Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase ...

  9. For Immediate Release Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Leaders Industrial companies make exceptional progress toward improved energy efficiency Olympia, Wash. - Gov. Jay Inslee today honored nine industrial companies in...

  10. Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection and its tank farm contractor, Washington ... An engineering evaluation of Tank C-110 determined the waste volume is below the ...