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1

Test of a magnetic device for the amelioration of scale formation at Treatment Facility D  

SciTech Connect

A commercial device (Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign}, Norfolk, VA) designed to treat water by means of a magnetic field has been evaluated for its effect on the formation of calcite scale at LLNL Treatment Facility D. At this facility, volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) are removed by air stripping, which raises the water pH, causing the deposition of calcium carbonate as calcite scale downstream. To evaluate the magnetic treatment technique, the ground water was passed through the Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign} device before treatment by the air stripping unit, and the resulting scale formation and other water characteristics were compared with those found during a test with no water treatment and a test with chemical treatment with a polyphosphate additive. No beneficial effect was found when using the magnetic device. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Krauter, P.W., Harrar, J.E., Orloff, S.P., Bahowick, S.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Iris Device Qualification Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Device Qualification Test (IDQT). July 15, 2013 - Slides from Workshop. Slides that give the detailed technical approach toward the IDQT tests are ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

Gonsalves, J.M.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gunshot triangulation device testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gunshot triangulation device testing Gunshot triangulation device testing Report to the Fermilab Community Advisory Board, Oct. 28, 2010 The Fermilab security director outlined for the board last month a recurring problem of people shooting guns near the edges of the laboratory and bullets coming onto the site. Fermilab is installing a system to triangulate the gunshots to improve police response time. This will require a set-up calibration of two dozen gunshots during a total of 6 minutes at the laboratory site. The board was asked for recommendations about how and whom to inform of the test firing. In response to the board discussion, Fermilab plans to take the following actions: ď‚· The test firing will occur during the mid-day of a week day to minimize the number of residents

6

Portable basketball rim testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable basketball rim rebound testing device 10 is illustrated in two preferred embodiments for testing the rebound or energy absorption characteristics of a basketball rim 12 and its accompanying support to determine likely rebound or energy absorption charcteristics of the system. The apparatus 10 includes a depending frame 28 having a C-clamp 36 for releasably rigidly connecting the frame to the basketball rim 12. A glide weight 60 is mounted on a guide rod 52 permitting the weight 60 to be dropped against a calibrated spring 56 held on an abutment surface on the rod to generate for deflecting the basketball rim and then rebounding the weight upwardly. A photosensor 66 is mounted on the depending frame 28 to sense passage of reflective surfaces 75 on the weight to thereby obtain sufficient data to enable a processing means 26 to calculate the rebound velocity and relate it to an energy absorption percentage rate of the rim system 12. A readout is provided to display the energy absorption percentage.

Abbott, W. Bruce (610 Clover St., Cheney, WA 99004); Davis, Karl C. (Box 722, Richland, WA 99352)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Device Scale Model Development for Transport Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gary J. stiegel Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Chris Guenther Computational Science Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P. O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4483 chris.guenther@netl.doe.gov 8/2006 Gasification Technologies Device Scale MoDel DevelopMent for tranSport reactor Background Coal gasification is an efficient and environmentally acceptable technology that can utilize the vast coal reserves in the United States to produce clean affordable power and reduce dependence on foreign oil. Coal and other carbon containing materials can be gasified to produce a synthesis gas. This syngas can be fed to a

8

Probing Graphene Electronic Devices with Atomic Scale ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... News Articles: Real-World Graphene Devices May Have a Bumpy Ride. Two Graphene Layers May Be Better Than One. ...

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection...

10

TEST DEVICE FOR MEASURING PERMEABILITY OF A BARRIER ...  

A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed ...

11

Test report : Milspray Scorpion energy storage device.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NREL: Water Power Research - Device and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing NREL houses the nation's premier laboratory facilities for testing offshore wind and water power devices and maintains a staff of offshore-trained test engineers and...

13

Design of scaled electronic devices based on III-V materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance and power consumption in terms of device design.length. The power consumption of a single device furtherthe current device scaling is the power consumption, which

Wang, Lingquan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device  

SciTech Connect

The project conducted under DOE contract DE?EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven?stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy? technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling?up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke? unlimited Power Take?Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager] [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact] [Business Point of Contact

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

Disposable Point-of-Care Testing Device for Nucleic Acid ...  

home \\ technologies \\ disposable point of care testing device. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: ... Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, ...

16

First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested December 31, 1952 Enewetak Atoll First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested

17

Property:Scale Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Test Scale Test Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Scale Test Property Type Text Pages using the property "Scale Test" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + Prototype model has been constructed and tested in a specially designed wave tank MHK Technologies/AirWEC + They had to file a our SBIR Phase I technical report before we could conduct comprehensive open water testing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + Atlantis conducted tow testing configuration optimisation and performance enhancement of the Nereus150 prior to offshore installation Tow testing took place in November 2007 and February 2008 the results of this testing were observed verified and validated by Black Veatch B V High correlation between the actual and predicted power output were observed during this testing It is noted that at higher flows the AN400 outperformed the predicted power generation performance during this testing

18

Generic Testability and Test Methods Guidelines for ASIC Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) devices can cost- effectively perform the same functions as analog modules. In fact, functions performed by several analog modules can be incorporated into one ASIC device. Qualification testing, however, is needed to ensure the high reliability required of ASIC devices used in nuclear power plant safety and control systems. This report presents guidelines for designing high- reliability ASIC devices that support cost-effective qualification testing.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Thermonuclear Device Successfully...

20

Centrifugal contractors for laboratory-scale solvent extraction tests  

SciTech Connect

A 2-cm contactor (minicontactor) was developed and used at Argonne National Laboratory for laboratory-scale testing of solvent extraction flowsheets. This new contactor requires only 1 L of simulated waste feed, which is significantly less than the 10 L required for the 4-cm unit that had previously been used. In addition, the volume requirements for the other aqueous and organic feeds are reduced correspondingly. This paper (1) discusses the design of the minicontactor, (2) describes results from having applied the minicontactor to testing various solvent extraction flowsheets, and (3) compares the minicontactor with the 4-cm contactor as a device for testing solvent extraction flowsheets on a laboratory scale.

Leonard, R.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Testing of Kaonetics Devices at BNL  

SciTech Connect

The goal of these measurements was to evaluate whether there is evidence of emission of X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons by devices developed by Kaonetics Technologies, Inc. during their operation.

Bolotnikov, A.; Smith, G.; and James, R.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Property:Full-Scale Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full-Scale Test Full-Scale Test Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Full-Scale Test Property Type Text Pages using the property "Full-Scale Test" Showing 13 pages using this property. M MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + The AN150 system was connected to the SPAusNet Victorian electricity grid exporting renewable power for from 2008 to 2012 Atlantis received power sales revenue and RECs Renewable Energy Certificates during this period of operation MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + Atlantis connect its 1MW AR1000 tidal turbine to the grid at the European Marine Energy Centre EMEC in Orkney Scotland on Thursday the 11th August 2011 Atlantis Resources Corporation will continue its AR1000 tidal turbine testing programme at the National Renewable Energy Centre Narec in Blyth Northumberland The company s AR1000 nacelle was retrieved from its test berth at the European Marine Energy Centre EMEC in Orkney in late November following successful open ocean testing It will be transported to Blyth for preparation ahead of the spring opening of Narec s 3MW capacity turbine drive train testing facility The independent onshore facility has been developed to de risk in field activities conducting reliability and performance appraisals of new devices and system components through accelerated lifetime testing

23

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Remote plunger removal device for small-scale incremental pressing  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale pressing of high explosives (HE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere is routinely performed using pneumatic presses. Blast shields provide protection to the operator during the pressing procedure, but safety of the operator is a concern during removal of the plunger, which is currently performed manually. To minimize this risk, very high tolerances between the plunger and the die are required. These tolerances are often very costly, especially in the case of long, relatively narrow dies. The safety issue is an even greater concern with incremental pressing in which cleaning the die between increments is difficult or impossible. To better protect press operators, a device has been designed and constructed to allow remote plunger removal in a standard HE press. In this report the authors describe this modified press that allows remote removal of the plunger.

Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes. 4 figs.

Murphy, R.J. Jr.; Jamison, D.E.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes.

Murphy, Jr., Robert J. (Bellaire, TX); Jamison, Dale E. (Humble, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing, Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection community. As part of our national security mission, and in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we are producing unique test objects for passive gamma ray signature analysis. Y-12 is fabricating new Highly Enriched Uranium Equivalent Radiological Signature Training Devices, tools that use an innovative method to replicate a much larger mass of uranium. These objects contain small amounts of U-235 embedded in an aluminum alloy. When seen by a detector, however, the gamma ray signature is nearly equivalent to a much larger amount of U-235, due to the alloying effect that minimizes the uranium

28

Building Technologies Office: Test Homes and Community Scale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Homes and Community Scale Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Test Homes and Community Scale Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building...

29

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests  

SciTech Connect

This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Molecke, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

A simple device for high-precision head image registration: Preliminary performance and accuracy tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present a new device for multimodal head study registration and to examine its performance in preliminary tests. The device consists of a system of eight markers fixed to mobile carbon pipes and bars which can be easily mounted on the patient's head using the ear canals and the nasal bridge. Four graduated scales fixed to the rigid support allow examiners to find the same device position on the patient's head during different acquisitions. The markers can be filled with appropriate substances for visualisation in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography images. The device's rigidity and its position reproducibility were measured in 15 repeated CT acquisitions of the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and in two SPECT studies of a patient. The proposed system displays good rigidity and reproducibility characteristics. A relocation accuracy of less than 1,5 mm was found in more than 90% of the results. The registration parameters obtained using such a device were compared to those obtained using fiducial markers fixed on phantom and patient heads, resulting in differences of less than 1 deg. and 1 mm for rotation and translation parameters, respectively. Residual differences between fiducial marker coordinates in reference and in registered studies were less than 1 mm in more than 90% of the results, proving that the device performed as accurately as noninvasive stereotactic devices. Finally, an example of multimodal employment of the proposed device is reported.

Pallotta, Stefania [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze (Italy)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

BARRIER SYSTEM FULL SCALE FIRE TESTING ADDRESSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All holders of operating licenses for nuclear power reactors, except those who have permanently ceased operations and have certified that fuel has been permanently removed from the reactor vessel, and fuel facilities licensees. PURPOSE The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this information notice (IN) to inform addressees of the results of Hemyc electrical raceway fire barrier system (ERFBS) full-scale fire tests. The Hemyc ERFBS did not perform for one hour as designed because shrinkage of the Hemyc ERFBS occurred during the testing. It is expected that recipients will review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider actions as appropriate to avoid similar problems. However, suggestions contained in this information notice are not NRC requirements; therefore, no specific action or written response is required. BACKGROUND The Hemyc ERFBS, manufactured by Promatec, Inc., has been installed at nuclear power plants (NPPs) to protect circuits in accordance with regulatory requirements (Reference 1) and plant-specific commitments. As a result of fire protection inspections, unresolved items (URIs) were opened at some nuclear power stations due to questions raised regarding the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 2). The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) performed a review of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 3) and requested the NRC’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to perform confirmatory testing of this ERFBS. RES performed the testing at the Omega Point Laboratories in Elmendorf, Texas. DISCUSSION This information notice describes the results of the investigation of the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Attachment 1). The NRC performed two ASTM E 119 furnace tests on a number of cable raceway types that are protected by the Hemyc ERFBS (with and without air gaps) in accordance with the Hemyc ERFBS test plan (see ADAMS Accession No. ML043210141 for a preliminary version of the test plan). The test plan provides ML050890089 IN 2005-07

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Voltage Control Devices on the IEEE 8500 Node Test Feeder  

SciTech Connect

The IEEE Test Cases provide researchers with distribution system models that can be used to validate new analytic methods. The newest of these models is the 8500-node test feeder which contains multiple devices for voltage control. In addition to a substation regulator there are multiple inline regulators as well as capacitor banks. This paper will discuss the detail in which voltage control devises should be modeled when examining large distribution systems. This discussion will include issues associated with power flow analysis for a single time step as well as for time series analysis.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Research-scale melter test report  

SciTech Connect

The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.

None

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Data processing device test apparatus and method therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus mechanism for testing data processing devices are implemented. The test mechanism isolates critical paths by correlating a scanning microscope image with a selected speed path failure. A trigger signal having a preselected value is generated at the start of each pattern vector. The sweep of the scanning microscope is controlled by a computer, which also receives and processes the image signals returned from the microscope. The value of the trigger signal is correlated with a set of pattern lines being driven on the DUT. The trigger is either asserted or negated depending the detection of a pattern line failure and the particular line that failed. In response to the detection of the particular speed path failure being characterized, and the trigger signal, the control computer overlays a mask on the image of the device under test (DUT). The overlaid image provides a visual correlation of the failure with the structural elements of the DUT at the level of resolution of the microscope itself.

Wilcox, Richard Jacob (Austin, TX); Mulig, Jason D. (Austin, TX); Eppes, David (Austin, TX); Bruce, Michael R. (Austin, TX); Bruce, Victoria J. (Austin, TX); Ring, Rosalinda M. (Austin, TX); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (New Bernalillo, NM); Tangyunyong, Paiboon (Bernalillo, NM); Hawkins, Charles F. (Bernalillo, NM); Louie, Arnold Y. (Santa Clara, CA)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fabrication and testing of thermoelectric thin film devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two thin-film thermoelectric devices are experimentally demonstrated. The relevant thermal loads on the cold junction of these devices are determined. The analytical form of the equation that describes the thermal loading of the device enables one to model the performance based on the independently measured electronic properties of the films forming the devices. This model elucidates which parameters determine device performance, and how they can be used to maximize performance.

Wagner, A.V.; Foreman, R.J.; Summers, L.J.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Farmer, J.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Towards the manufacturing of microfluidic devices : fluid flow in multilayer devices as a test case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the area of microfluidics is analyzed for advances that could be made in the manufacturing of a microfluidic device, and then one area - the alignment of multilayer devices - is selected for greater focus. ...

Korb, Samuel N. (Samuel Noaa), 1984-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Large-Scale Structures Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a 13.7m-high reaction buttress equipped with a horizontal hydraulic ram. ... Another test series evaluated fracture propagation in steel plates 1 m wide ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

Lundstrom, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Full Scale Tornado Missile Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the time of this interim report, approximately half the tests scheduled in the EPRI/Sandia Tornado-Missile Program had been completed. This report was issued to disseminate the results of the initial tests as quickly as possible, in order to satisfy the needs of utilities and architect-engineers engaged in plant-licensing procedures. The findings are presented with a minimum of interpretation.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

3D-FBK Pixel Sensors: Recent Beam Tests Results with Irradiated Devices  

SciTech Connect

The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider, and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary vertices from the collisions and secondary vertices produced by short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradiated 3D devices produced at FBK (Trento, Italy). The performance of these devices, all bump-bonded with the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 read-out chip, is compared to that observed before irradiation in a previous beam test.

Micelli, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Udine U.; Helle, K.; /Bergen U.; Sandaker, H.; /Bergen U.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Hugging, F.; /Bonn U.; Karagounis, M.; /Bonn U.; Kostyukhin, V.; /Bonn U.; Kruger, H.; /Bonn U.; Tsung, J.W.; /Bonn U.; Wermes, N.; /Bonn U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U.; Fazio, S.; /Calabria U.; Mastroberardino, A.; /Calabria U.; Susinno, G.; /Calabria U.; Gallrapp, C.; /CERN; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; La Rosa, A.; /CERN; Pernegger, H.; /CERN; Roe, S.; /CERN /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Hawaii U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /New Mexico U. /New Mexico U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /VTT Electronics, Espoo /VTT Electronics, Espoo

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing  

SciTech Connect

For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waalâ??s forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have studied the effect of x-rays and Îł-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals â?? materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Small scale heater tests in argillite of the Eleana Formation at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Near-surface heater tests were run in the Eleana Formation at the Nevada Test Site, in an effort to evaluate argillaceous rock for nuclear waste storage. The main test, which employed a full-scale heater with a thermal output approximating commercial borosilicate waste, was designed to operate for several months. Two smaller, scaled tests were run prior to the full-scale test. This report develops the thermal scaling laws, describes the pretest thermal and thermomechanical analysis conducted for these two tests, and discusses the material properties data used in the analyses. In the first test, scaled to a large heater of 3.5 kW power, computed heater temperatures were within 7% of measured values for the entire 96-hour test run. The second test, scaled to a large heater having 5.0 kW power, experienced periodic water in-flow onto the heater, which tended to damp the temperature. For the second test, the computed temperatures were within 7% of measured for the first 20 hours. After this time, the water effect became significant and the measured temperatures were 15 to 20% below those predicted. On the second test, rock surface spallation was noted in the bore hole above the heater, as predicted. The scaled tests indicated that in-situ argillite would not undergo major thermostructural failure during the follow-on, 3.5 kW, full-scale test. 24 figures, 6 tables.

McVey, D.F.; Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing June 10, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three Recovery Act funded projects have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to continue testing large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) from industrial sources. The projects - located in Texas, Illinois, and Louisiana - were initially selected for funding in October 2009 as part of a $1.4 billion effort to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources for storage or beneficial use. The first phase of research and development (R&D) included $21.6 million in Recovery Act funding and $22.5 million in private funding for a total initial investment of $44.1 million.

54

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas...

55

Full-Scale Tornado-Missile Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The testing described in this report provides data from full-scale simulated tornado-missile impacts on reinforced concrete walls. These data can be used directly for design and for the development of improved design and analysis techniques.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

57

Nonlinear dependence of the renormalization scale on test functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum electrodynamics exhibits an informal nonlinear dependence on Lorentz invariant test function properties that determine the renormalization scale, such as Mandelstam variables, contrary to the linear dependence on test functions that is required by the Wightman axioms. A first example of an alternative interacting quantum field formalism that has a comparable weakly nonlinear dependence on Dirac spinor test functions is constructed, using U(1)-gauge connections and U(1)-gauge invariant Dirac spinor test functions.

Morgan, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined.

Andrews, Lowell B. (2181-13th Ave. SW., Largo, FL 34640)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined. 17 figs.

Andrews, L.B.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Usability evaluation for mobile device: a comparison of laboratory and field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usability testing of mobile devices is an emerging area of research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. Guidelines had been established as to how usability tests should be conducted. However, there are limitations to the effectiveness of conventional ... Keywords: dynamics environment, mobile devices, usability

Henry Been-Lirn Duh; Gerald C. B. Tan; Vivian Hsueh-hua Chen

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Test of a Calibration Device for Airborne Lyman-? Hygrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A calibration device was designed to fit over the Lyman-? (LA) probes on the NCAR King Air aircraft to allow the introduction of pure nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide gases into the probe's radiation path. With these three gases, it was ...

Edwin W. Eloranta; Roland B. Stull; Elizabeth E. Ebert

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned May 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon capture and storage technologies, has completed a preliminary geologic characterization and sequestration field test at FirstEnergy's R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The project provided significant geologic understanding and "lessons learned" from a region of the Appalachian Basin with few existing deep well penetrations for geologic characterization. The initial targets for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the

63

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains two different research topics. One is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Plasmonic Nanolithography – Optical Antenna’ and the other is a ‘Nano Scale Device for Rapid Sensing of Bacteria – SEPTIC’. Since these two different research topics have little analogy to each other, they were divided into different chapters throughout the whole dissertation. The ‘Optical Antenna’ and ‘Nanowell / Microwell / ISFET Sensor’ represent the device names of each topic ‘Plasmonic Nanolithography’ and ‘Rapid Sensing of Bacteria’, respectively. For plasmonic nanolithography, we demonstrated a novel photonic device - Optical Antenna (OA) - that works as a nano scale object lens. It consists of a number of sub-wavelength features in a metal film coated on a quartz substrate. The device focuses the incident light to form a narrow beam in the near-field and even far-field region. The narrow beam lasts for up to several wavelengths before it diverges. We demonstrated that the OA was able to focus a subwavelength spot with a working distance (also the focal length) of several µm, theoretically and experimentally. The highest imaging resolution (90-nm spots) is more than a 100% improvement of the diffraction limit (FWHM = 210 nm) in conventional optics. A model and 3D electromagnetic simulation results were also studied. Given its small footprint and subwavelength resolution, the PL holds great promise in direct-writing and scanning microscopy. Collaborative work demonstrated a Nanowell (or Microwell) device which enables a rapid and specific detection of bacteria using nano (or micro) scale probe to monitor the electric field fluctuations caused by ion leakage from the bacteria. When a bacteriophage infects a bacterium and injects its DNA into the host cell, a massive and transitory ion efflux from the host cell occurs. SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascade) technology developed by collaboration uses a nanowell device to detect the nano-scale electric field fluctuations caused by this ion efflux. The SEPTIC provides fast (within several minutes), effective (living cell only), phage specific (simple and less malfunction), cheap, compact and robust method for bacteria sensing. We fabricated a number of devices, including ‘Nanowell’, ‘Microwell’, and ‘ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor)’, which detect bacteria-phage reactions in frequency domain and time domain. In the frequency domain, detected noise spectrum is characterized by ? f / 1 . The positive reaction showed much higher 1 ? ? than that of background noise or negative reaction ( 0 ? ? ). For the time domain, we observed abnormal pulses (> ? 8 ) lasting 0.1 ~ 0.3 s which match the duration of ion flux reported by prior literatures. And the ISFET showed the phage-infection-triggered pulse in the form of the deviated drain current. Given the size of nanowell (or microwell, ISFET) and the simplified detection electronics, the cost of bacteria sensing is significantly reduced and the robustness is well improved, indicating very promising applications in clinical diagnosis and bio-defense.

Seo, Sungkyu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nano scale devices for plasmonic nanolithography and rapid sensing of bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains two different research topics. One is a "Nano Scale Device for Plasmonic Nanolithography - Optical Antenna' and the other is a 'Nano Scale Device for Rapid Sensing of Bacteria - SEPTIC'. Since these two different research topics have little analogy to each other, they were divided into different chapters throughout the whole dissertation. The 'Optical Antenna' and 'Nanowell / Microwell / ISFET Sensor' represent the device names of each topic 'Plasmonic Nanolithography' and 'Rapid Sensing of Bacteria' respectively. For plasmonic nanolithography, we demonstrated a novel photonic device - Optical Antenna (OA) - that works as a nano scale object lens. It consists of a number of sub-wavelength features in a metal film coated on a quartz substrate. The device focuses the incident light to form a narrow beam in the near-field and even far-field region. The narrow beam lasts for up to several wavelengths before it diverges. We demonstrated that the OA was able to focus a subwavelength spot with a working distance (also the focal length) of several µm, theoretically and experimentally. The highest imaging resolution (90-nm spots) is more than a 100% improvement of the diffraction limit (FWHM = 210 nm) in conventional optics. A model and 3D electromagnetic simulation results were also studied. Given its small footprint and subwavelength resolution, the PL holds great promise in direct-writing and scanning microscopy. Collaborative work demonstrated a Nanowell (or Microwell) device which enables a rapid and specific detection of bacteria using nano (or micro) scale probe to monitor the electric field fluctuations caused by ion leakage from the bacteria. When a bacteriophage infects a bacterium and injects its DNA into the host cell, a massive and transitory ion efflux from the host cell occurs. SEPTIC (SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascade) technology developed by collaboration uses a nanowell device to detect the nano-scale electric field fluctuations caused by this ion efflux. The SEPTIC provides fast (within several minutes), effective (living cell only), phage specific (simple and less malfunction), cheap, compact and robust method for bacteria sensing. We fabricated a number of devices, including 'Nanowell', 'Microwell' and 'ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor)', which detect bacteria-phage reactions in frequency domain and time domain. In the frequency domain, detected noise spectrum is characterized by 1/f[beta]. The positive reaction showed much higher [beta] =?1 than that of background noise or negative reaction ( [beta] =?0). For the time domain, we observed abnormal pulses (> 8[omega] ) lasting 0.1 ~ 0.3 s which match the duration of ion flux reported by prior literatures. And the ISFET showed the phage-infection-triggered pulse in the form of the deviated drain current. Given the size of nanowell (or microwell, ISFET) and the simplified detection electronics, the cost of bacteria sensing is significantly reduced and the robustness is well improved, indicating very promising applications in clinical diagnosis and bio-defense.

Seo, Sungkyu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A MICROCOMPUTER BASED TEST SYSTEM FOR CHARGE COUPLED DEVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the full scale output of 20 volts. Sense re­ sistors andregisters which sample input volt­ age every 100 ns. Whenin the range of 2 to 10 volts. The high gain mode is used in

Sidman, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

Nelson, E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Towards large-scale multi-socket, multicore parallel simulations: Performance of an MPI-only semiconductor device simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary study considers the scaling and performance of a finite element (FE) semiconductor device simulator on a set of multi-socket, multicore architectures with nonuniform memory access (NUMA) compute nodes. These multicore architectures include ... Keywords: Drift-diffusion, MPI-only, Multicore, Multicore efficiency, Multilevel preconditioners, Newton-Krylov, Semiconductor devices

Paul T. Lin; John N. Shadid

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: from fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to power wireless devices and increase operation time on ato power wireless devices and increase operation time on a

Miller, Lindsay Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

REDUCING DEVICE YIELD FALLOUT AT WAFER LEVEL TEST WITH ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC (EHD) CLEANING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unstable contact resistance (CRES) during wafer test cansignificantly affect device yield, the need for reprobe, andequipment uptime. Abrasive cleaning during off-lineprobe card repair and maintenance is effective forreducing CRES and removing surface ...

Jerry J. Broz; Ph. D. ,. James C. Andersen; Reynaldo M. Rincon

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation  

SciTech Connect

This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

Tuck, J.A.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i.e., Newtonian or non-Newtonian). The most important properties for testing with Newtonian slurries are the Archimedes number distribution and the particle concentration. For some test objectives, the shear strength is important. In the testing to collect data for CFD V and V and CFD comparison, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. In the high temperature testing, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. The Archimedes number distribution combines effects of particle size distribution, solid-liquid density difference, and kinematic viscosity. The most important properties for testing with non-Newtonian slurries are the slurry yield stress, the slurry consistency, and the shear strength. The solid-liquid density difference and the particle size are also important. It is also important to match multiple properties within the same simulant to achieve behavior representative of the waste. Other properties such as particle shape, concentration, surface charge, and size distribution breadth, as well as slurry cohesiveness and adhesiveness, liquid pH and ionic strength also influence the simulant properties either directly or through other physical properties such as yield stress.

Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Prototype testing for a hybrid gas-gun/railgun device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1984 Los Alamos began the design of the lethality test system (LTS), a facility to be used for the study of impact physics at velocities up to 15 km/s. The key component of LTS was an electromagnetic launcher capable of accelerating a 30 gram mass to 15 km/s. By the time of the Preliminary Design Review (July 1985) it was known from laboratory experiments that a conventional railgun was incapable of reaching 15 km/s starting at low velocity (/approximately/1 km/s) and a hybrid design was adopted for the LTS launcher. The hybrid launcher consisted of a two-stage hydrogen gun that preaccelerated the test mass to 6.5 km/s and an electromagnetic launcher for the final acceleration from 6.5 to 15 km/s. Design calculations predicted that injection into the railgun at 6.5 km/s would reduce ablation sufficiently to permit operation at 12 km/s with reasonable probability of achieving 15 km/s. The hybrid launcher design adopted for LTS presents some unique mechanical and electrical issues. In particular, the hybrid design requires that the plasma armature be established in a high pressure gas environment behind the projectile. To address this issue, as well as to evaluate the mechanical and electrical design, an 1.83 meter long prototype of the electromagnetic launcher barrel was built and tested. This paper describes the prototype launcher tests and the performance achieved. In addition, testing of a plasma initiator operating in a high pressure gas environment is discussed. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Parker, J.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Large scale test simulations using the Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO)  

SciTech Connect

The Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO) is a set of simulation tools under development at Sandia to enable test engineers to do computer simulations of tests. The tool set utilizes analysis codes and test information to optimize design parameters and to provide an accurate model of the test environment which aides in the maximization of test performance, training, and safety. Previous VETO effort has included the development of two structural dynamics simulation modules that provide design and optimization tools for modal and vibration testing. These modules have allowed test engineers to model and simulate complex laboratory testing, to evaluate dynamic response behavior, and to investigate system testability. Further development of the VETO tool set will address the accurate modeling of large scale field test environments at Sandia. These field test environments provide weapon system certification capabilities and have different simulation requirements than those of laboratory testing.

Klenke, S.E.; Heffelfinger, S.R.; Bell, H.J.; Shierling, C.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

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81

A Small-Scale Safety Test for Initiation Components  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a small-scale safety test for initiation train components. A low-cost test was needed to assess the response of initiation components to an abnormal shock environment and to detect changes in the sensitivity of initiation components as they age. The test uses a disk of Detasheet to transmit a shock through a PMMA barrier into a the test article. A schematic drawing of the fixture is shown. The 10-cm-diameter disk of 3-mm-thick Detasheet, initiated at its center by a RISI, RP detonator, produces a shock wave that is attenuated by a variable-thickness PMMA spacer (gap). Layers of metal and plastic above the test article and the material surrounding the test article may be chosen to mock up the environment of the test article at its location in a warhead. A metal plate at the bottom serves as a witness plate to record whether or not the test article detonated. For articles containing a small amount of explosive, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a detonation has occurred. In such cases, one can use a pressure transducer or laser velocimeter to detect the shock wave from the detonation of the article. The assembly is contained in a 10-cm-ID section of PVC pipe and fired in a containment vessel rated at 100 g. Test results are given for a hemispherical, exploding-bridgewire (EBW) detonator.

Cutting, J; Chow, C; Chau, H; Hodgin, R; Lee, R

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Full- Scale Testing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD The goal of this project is to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The two specific objectives of this project are 1) ninety percent (90%) total mercury removal and 2) costs below 1/4 to 1/2 of today's commercially available activated carbon mercury removal technologies. Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc's (B&W/MTI's) will demonstrate their wet scrubbing mercury removal technology (which uses very small amounts of a liquid reagent to achieve increased mercury removal) at two locations burning high-sulfur Ohio bituminous coal: 1) Michigan South Central Power Agency's (MSCPA) 55 MWe Endicott Station located in Litchfield, Michigan and 2) Cinergy's 1300 MWe Zimmer Station located near Cincinnati, Ohio.

83

Wind tunnel test of 1/30 scale heliostat field array model. Test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 9 January through 20 January 1978, Honeywell conducted a wind tunnel test on a 1/30 scale partial heliostat field. The heliostats were per Honeywell's design developed under the 10 megawatt central receiver pilot electrical power plant subsystem research experiment contract. Likewise, the scaled section of the field geometry duplicated the proposed circular layout. Testing was conducted at the Georgia Institute of Technology's 9 foot subsonic tunnel. The objective of the test was to ascertain from a qualitative standpoint the field effects upon wind loading within a heliostat field. To accomplish this, numerous pressure tap measurements at different heights and at different field positions were taken with varying wind speeds, fence designs, and heliostat gimbal orientations. The Department of Energy specified boundary layer profile was also scaled by 1/30 in order to simulate the total wind effects as accurately as possible taking into account the potentially severe scaling or Reynolds number effects at a 1/30 scale. After initial model set-up within the tunnel and scaled boundary layer generated, 91 separate runs were accomplished. The results do demonstrate the high sensitivity of wind loading upon the collector field due to the actual heliostat orientation and fence geometry. Vertical pressure gradients within the model field and flow reentry angles provide a good qualitative feel as to the full scale environment that might be expected and point to the need for specific additional testing to further explore potentially dangerous conditions.

Brown, G. L.

1978-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electroville: Grid-Scale Batteries: High Amperage Energy Storage Device—Energy for the Neighborhood  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by MIT professor Donald Sadoway, the Electroville project team is creating a community-scale electricity storage device using new materials and a battery design inspired by the aluminum production process known as smelting. A conventional battery includes a liquid electrolyte and a solid separator between its 2 solid electrodes. MIT’s battery contains liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt electrolyte. Because metals and salt don’t mix, these 3 liquids of different densities naturally separate into layers, eliminating the need for a solid separator. This efficient design significantly reduces packaging materials, which reduces cost and allows more space for storing energy than conventional batteries offer. MIT’s battery also uses cheap, earth-abundant, domestically available materials and is more scalable. By using all liquids, the design can also easily be resized according to the changing needs of local communities.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

TESTING TECHNIQUE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cooling bath should ... When testing super-high energy level specimens ... upon the resolution of the scale or readout device at the low end and the ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hydrogen-combustion analyses of large-scale tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report uses results of the large-scale tests with turbulence performed by the Electric Power Research Institute at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate hydrogen burn-analysis procedures based on lumped-parameter codes like COMPARE-H2 and associated burn-parameter models. The test results: (1) confirmed, in a general way, the procedures for application to pulsed burning, (2) increased significantly our understanding of the burn phenomenon by demonstrating that continuous burning can occur, and (3) indicated that steam can terminate continuous burning. Future actions recommended include: (1) modification of the code to perform continuous-burn analyses, which is demonstrated, (2) analyses to determine the type of burning (pulsed or continuous) that will exist in nuclear containments and the stable location if the burning is continuous, and (3) changes to the models for estimating burn parameters.

Gido, R.G.; Koestel, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A test of first order scaling in Nf=2 QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We complete our analysis of Nf=2 QCD based on the lattice staggered fermion formulation. Using a series of Monte Carlo simulations at fixed (amq*Ls^yh) one is able to test the universality class with given critical exponent yh. This strategy has been used to test the O(4) universality class and it has been presented at the previous Lattice conferences. No agreement was found with simulations in the mass range amq=[0.01335,0.15] using lattices with Ls=16 up to 32 and Lt=4. With the same strategy, we now investigate the possibility of a first order transition using a new set of Monte Carlo data corresponding to yh=3 in the same mass and volume range as the one used for O(4). A substantial agreement is observed both in the specific heat scaling and in the scaling of the chiral condensate, while the chiral susceptibilities still presents visible deviation from scaling in the mass range explored.

G. Cossu; M. D'Elia; A. Di Giacomo; C. Pica

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Security Testing Tool for End-User Devices (PT2) Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Penetration Testing Toolkit is a software tool to aid end users in the security assessment of power systems sector specific embedded devices.  The PT2 provides the end user with a centralized interface for managing and executing penetration test activities.  The PT2 gives the end user the ability to execute the full range of penetration test activities such as: script execution, data collection, data analysis, traffic injection, and fuzzing.  Additionally, the PT2 provides access ...

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scaled Testing of Hydrogen Gas Getters for Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage and shipment containers. Hydrogen forms a flammable mixture with air over a wide range of concentrations (5% to 75%), and very low energy is needed to ignite hydrogen-air mixtures. For these reasons, the concentration of hydrogen in waste shipment containers (Transuranic Package Transporter-II or TRUPACT-II containers) needs to remain below the lower explosion limit of hydrogen in air (5 vol%). Accident scenarios and the resulting safety analysis require that this limit not be exceeded. The use of 'hydrogen getters' is being investigated as a way to prevent the build up of hydrogen in TRUPACT-II containers. Preferred getters are solid materials that scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and chemically and irreversibly bind it into the solid state. In this study, two getter systems are evaluated: a) 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl)benzene or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds; and b) a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter, VEI or TruGetter, characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds. Carbon in both getter types may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. With oxygen present, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB and VEI performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests using small test volumes (ml-scale), high hydrogen generation rates, and short time spans of hours to days. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether DEB and VEI perform satisfactorily in actual drum-scale tests with realistic hydrogen generation rates and time frames. The two getter systems were evaluated in test vessels comprised of a Gas Generation Test Program-style bell-jar and a drum equipped with a composite drum filter. The vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and volume of a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were conducted in an atmosphere of air for 60 days at ambient temperature (15 to 27 deg. C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60 E-07 moles hydrogen per second (0.35 cc/min). Hydrogen was successfully 'gettered' by both systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant mechanism in both getters as evidenced by 1) consumption of oxygen in the bell-jars; 2) production of free water in the bell-jars; and 3) absence of chemical changes in both getters as shown by NMR spectra. (authors)

Kaszuba, J.; Mroz, E.; Haga, M.; Hollis, W. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States); Peterson, E.; Stone, M.; Orme, C.; Luther, T.; Benson, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multi-scale Simulation Methodology for Stress Assessment in 3D IC: Effect of Die Stacking on Device Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress distributions and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D integrated circuit (IC) technologies are outlined. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, ... Keywords: 3D IC, FEA, Layout, Packaging, Strain engineering, Stress, TSV

Valeriy Sukharev; Armen Kteyan; Jun-Ho Choy; Henrik Hovsepyan; Ara Markosian; Ehrenfried Zschech; Rene Huebner

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Full-Scale Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Full-Scale Test (FST) program was performed by Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions to assess the performance of full-scale centrifugal contactors specified for the Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF, to be located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, will remove highly radioactive waste constituents, principally actinides, strontium (Sr), and cesium (Cs) radionuclides, from salt waste solutions currently stored in SRS high-level waste tanks. Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) removes Cs from waste feed that has been treated upstream to remove actinides and Sr. CSSX uses a custom solvent to extract Cs from the salt solution in a series of single stage centrifugal contactors. The test system comprised (a) eleven 25.4 cm (10'') full-scale contactors (versus 36 in SWPF) for the extraction, scrub, strip, and wash stages; (b) two solvent recovery coalescers; and (c) the associated hardware and control system, packaged in four skid mounted modules. This paper describes the results of tests performed to define both hydraulic performance parameters (maximum hydraulic capacity and phase carryover) and solvent extraction performance parameters (Cs mass transfer efficiencies) using simulated SWPF waste and actual CSSX solvent. The test results confirmed key design features of the CSSX process and, as a consequence, the use of CSSX in the SWPF. In conclusion: Total throughput was initially limited to 85% of maximum flow during FST. Minor system modifications performed prior to mass transfer testing series resulted in the realization of 100% throughput. The 100% flow equates to slightly more than 35.6 x 10{sup 6} L/yr (9.4 Mgal/yr) of waste processed in SWPF which is anticipated to be the peak plant throughput. To achieve the best hydraulic performance in extraction, it is recommended that the extraction contactors be operated at the highest reasonable speed possible (>2100 rpm). Vibration, hardware limitations, bearing life, and other factors should be considered prior to final selection of extraction contactor speeds in SWPF. In strip (also scrub and wash) aqueous carryover decreased and organic carryover increased as the rotor speeds increased. It is recommended that the strip, scrub, and wash contactors be operated at intermediate speeds (between 1500 and 2100 rpm) to achieve a performance compromise between aqueous and organic carryover. Curved-vane bottom plates showed a significant hydraulic performance (aqueous and organic carryover) advantage over straight-vane bottom plates in extraction. There was no significant mass transfer performance advantage for either plate type in extraction. Thus, curved-vane bottom plates in extraction may be the better option for use in SWPF. There was no significant hydraulic performance difference between the plate types in strip. Straight-vanes provided significantly better mass transfer performance in strip compared to curved-vanes. Based solely on mass transfer performance, straight-vane bottom plates in the strip, scrub, and wash contactors are recommended for use in SWPF. Utilizing straight-vanes in the stripping section, the overall SWPF CSSX performance is expected to meet or exceed the target DF of 40,000 with minimum extraction D{sub Cs} of 10. (authors)

Lentsch, R.D.; Stephens, A.B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Bartling, K.E. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States); Singer, S.A. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Baseline neutron logging measurements in the drift scale test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Drift Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). One of the objectives of the DST is to study the coupled thermal-mechanical- hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the ESF at the repository horizon of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives, the test design, and the test layouts of the DST are included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. The configuration of the DST includes a declining Observation Drift driven mostly east and downward from main tunnel in the ESF, at about 2.827 km from the North portal. The downward slope of the Observation Drift (11.5 to 14.0 percent) ensures a minimum 10 m of middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff as the overburden for the DST. The length of the Observation Drift is about 136 m. At the elevation of the DST crown (nominally 10 m below the upper extent of the middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff) the Connecting Drift breaks out to the north from the Observation Drift, 136 m from the main tunnel of the ESF. The Connecting Drift extends approximately 40 m to the north from the Observation Drift. A Heater Drift breaks out westward from the Connecting Drift at about 30 m from the Observation Drift. The Heater Drift consists of an 11 m long entry, which includes a plate- loading niche, and a 47 m long heated drift. The nominal diameter of the drifts is 5 m. The detail configuration of the DST, including diagrams showing the drift and borehole layout, is included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. Thermal neutron logging is a method used to determine moisture content in rocks and soils and will be used to monitor moisture content in boreholes ESF-HD-NEU-1 to ESF-HD-NEU-10 (Boreholes 47 to 51 and 64 to 68), ESF-HD-TEMP-1 (Borehole 79), and ESF-HD-TEMP-2 (Borehole 80) in the DST. The neutron probe contains a source of high energy neutrons and a detector for slow (thermal) neutrons. Water present in rocks slows down the neutrons making them detectable (because of the presence of hydrogen).

Lin, W.; Carlson, R.; Neubaurer, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Assessment And Testing of Industrial Devices Robustness Against Cyber Security Attacks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research),like any organization, needs to achieve the conflicting objectives of connecting its operational network to Internet while at the same time keeping its industrial control systems secure from external and internal cyber attacks. With this in mind, the ISA-99[0F1] international cyber security standard has been adopted at CERN as a reference model to define a set of guidelines and security robustness criteria applicable to any network device. Devices robustness represents a key link in the defense-in-depth concept as some attacks will inevitably penetrate security boundaries and thus require further protection measures. When assessing the cyber security robustness of devices we have singled out control system-relevant attack patterns derived from the well-known CAPEC[1F2] classification. Once a vulnerability is identified, it needs to be documented, prioritized and reproduced at will in a dedicated test environment for debugging purposes. CERN - in collaboration ...

Tilaro, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Small-Scale Testing of Potential Small Column Ion Exchange ...  

Hockmeyer Test Setup - August 2010 • Based (partly) on previous grinding of zeolite at SRS, in Tank 18/19 in 2008 • Batch processing tested with ...

103

Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.  

SciTech Connect

Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Testscale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. In.t J.and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In.t J.

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the perforated plate configuration on bag protection and AHPC overall performance and to optimize the perforated plate design. Five different perforated plate configurations were evaluated in a coal combustion system. The AHPC performed extremely well even at a low current level (1.5-3.0 mA) and a low pulse trigger pressure of 6.5 in. W.C. (1.62 kPa), resulting in a bag-cleaning interval of over 40 min at an A/C ratio of 12 ft/min (3.7 m/min) for most of the test period. The longest bag-cleaning interval was 594 min, which is the best to date. The residual drag was reduced to the range from 0.25 to 0.35 in. H{sub 2}O/ft/min, showing an excellent bag-cleaning ability under the perforated plate configurations. The K{sub 2}C{sub i} at the current level of 3 mA was as low as 1.0, indicating excellent ESP performance. All the results are the best achieved to date.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

FAST Code Verification of Scaling Laws for DeepCwind Floating Wind System Tests: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates scaling laws that were adopted for the DeepCwind project for testing three different floating wind systems at 1/50 scale in a wave tank under combined wind and wave loading.

Jain, A.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Goupee, A. J.; Kimball, R. W.; Swift, A. H. P.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy consumption in mobile devices: why future systems need requirements–aware energy scale-down  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current proliferation of mobile devices has resulted in a large diversity of designs, each optimized for a specific application, form-factor, battery life, and functionality (e.g., cell phone, pager, MP3 player, PDA, laptop). Recent trends, motivated ...

Robert N. Mayo; Parthasarathy Ranganathan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Large-Scale Software Unit Testing on the Grid Yaohang Li, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale and cost-efficient computational grid resources as a software testing test bed to support automated. Grid computing is characterized by large-scale sharing and cooperation of dynamically distributed a grid-based software testing framework to facilitate the automated process of utilizing the grid

Li, Yaohang

109

Infrastructure for large-scale tests in marine autonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the development of infrastructure for research with large-scale autonomous marine vehicle fleets and the design of sampling trajectories for compressive sensing (CS). The newly developed infrastructure ...

Hummel, Robert A. (Robert Andrew)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste ...  

PEP Testing Objectives • Qualitatively demonstrate leaching and ultrafiltration processes, equipment design and process control strategies • Obtain data to ...

111

Micro and Macro Scale Mechanical Testing and Characterization on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we present micro compression testing and nanoindentation results performed on spallation source (neutron) and ion beam irradiated engineering ...

112

Synchrophasor Measurement Using Substation Intelligent Electronic Devices: Algorithms and Test Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation studies the performance of synchrophasor measurement obtained using substation Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) and proposes new algorithms and test methodology to improve and verify their performance when used in power system applications. To improve the dynamic performance when exposed to sinusoidal waveform distortions, such as modulation, frequency drift, abrupt change in magnitude, etc, an adaptive approach for accurately estimating phasors while eliminating the effect of various transient disturbances on voltages and currents is proposed. The algorithm pre-analyzes the waveform spanning the window of observation to identify and localize the discontinuities which affect the accuracy of phasor computation. A quadratic polynomial signal model is used to improve the accuracy of phasor estimates during power oscillations. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the advantages. This algorithm can also be used as reference algorithm for testing the performance of the devices extracting synchronized phasor measurements. A novel approach for estimating the phasor parameters, namely frequency, magnitude and angle in real time based on a newly constructed recursive wavelet transform is developed. This algorithm is capable of estimating the phasor parameters in a quarter cycle of an input signal. It features fast response and achieves high accuracy over a wide range of frequency deviations. The signal sampling rate and data window size can be selected to meet desirable application requirements, such as fast response, high accuracy and low computational burden. In addition, an approach for eliminating a decaying DC component, which has significant impact on estimating phasors, is proposed using recursive wavelet transform. This dissertation develops test methodology and tools for evaluating the conformance to standard-define performance for synchrophasor measurements. An interleaving technique applied on output phasors can equivalently increase the reporting rate and can precisely depict the transient behavior of a synchrophasor unit under the step input. A reference phasor estimator is developed and implemented. Various types of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) and PMU-enabled IEDs (Intelligent Electronic Devices) and time synchronization options have been tested against the standards using the proposed algorithm. Test results demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages.

Ren, Jinfeng

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NETL: News Release - Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hole would be ideal to develop a robust logging, coring, and testing program. Formation Stimulation-As part of the project design process, project developers should request the...

114

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

Gary Blythe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades July 23, 2010 - 1:19pm Addthis Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE America's first-of-its-kind wind blade testing facility - capable of testing a blade as long as a football field - almost never was. Because of funding woes, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC),

116

A Parallel Unstructured-Mesh Methodology for Device-Scale Combustion Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Los Alamos we are developing a parallel, unstructured-mesh, finite-volume CFD methodology for the simulation of chemically reactive flows in complex geometries. The methodology is embodied in the CHAD (Computational Hydrodynamics for Advanced Design) code. In this report we give an overview of the CHAD numerical methodology and present parallel scaling results for calculations of flows in a four-valve diesel engine.

O'Rourke, P.J.; Sahota, M.S.; Zhang, S.

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cycle timer for testing electric vehicles. [Device to assist test driver to follow stop-and-go driving cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cycle timer was developed to assist the driver of an electric vehicle in more accurately following and repeating SAE driving schedules. These schedules require operating an electric vehicle in a selected stop-and-go driving cycle and repeating this pattern until the vehicle ceases to meet the requirements of the cycle. The heart of the system is a programmable read-only memory (PROM) that has the required test profiles permanently recorded on plug-in cards, one card for each different driving schedule. The PROM generates a direct-current analog signal that drives a speedometer displayed on one scale of a dual-movement meter. The second scale of the dual-movement meter displays the actual speed of the vehicle as recorded by the fifth wheel. The vehicle operator controls vehicle speed to match the desired profile speed. One second before a speed transition (such as acceleration to cruise or cruise to coast), a small buzzer sounds for /sup 1///sub 2/ s to forewarn the operator of a change. A longer signal of 1 s is used to emphasize the start of a new cycle. The PROM controls the recycle start time as well as the buzzer activation. The cycle programmer is powered by the test vehicle's 12-V accessory battery, through a 5-V regulator and a 12-V dc-to-dc converter.

Soltis, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Design Attributes and Scale Up Testing of Annular Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annular centrifugal contactors are being used for rapid yet efficient liquid- liquid processing in numerous industrial and government applications. Commercialization of this technology began eleven years ago and now units with throughputs ranging from 0.25 to 700 liters per minute are readily available. Separation, washing, and extraction processes all benefit from the use of this relatively new commercial tool. Processing advantages of this technology include: low in-process volume per stage, rapid mixing and separation in a single unit, connection-in-series for multi-stage use, and a wide operating range of input flow rates and phase ratios without adjustment. Recent design enhancements have been added to simplify maintenance, improve inspection ability, and provide increased reliability. Cartridge-style bearing and mechanical rotary seal assemblies that can include liquid-leak sensors are employed to enhance remote operations, minimize maintenance downtime, prevent equipment damage, and extend service life. Clean-in-place capability eliminates the need for disassembly, facilitates the use of contactors for feed clarification, and can be automated for continuous operation. In nuclear fuel cycle studies, aqueous based separations are being developed that efficiently partition uranium, actinides, and fission products via liquid-liquid solvent extraction. Thus, annular centrifugal contactors are destined to play a significant role in the design of such new processes. Laboratory scale studies using mini-contactors have demonstrated feasibility for many such separation processes but validation at an engineering scale is needed to support actual process design.

David H. Meikrantz; Jack D. Law

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Life Cycle Testing and Evaluation of Energy Storage Devices - Summer Ferreira, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Life C ycle T es,ng a nd Evalua,on o f E nergy S torage Devices Summer Ferreira, Wes Baca, Tom Hund and David Rose September 28, 2012 Photos placed in horizontal position with even amount of white space between photos and header Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2011-XXXXP Sandia Battery Testing Introduction FY-10 East Penn UltraBattery® Lead-Acid/Supercap Furukawa UltraBattery® Lead-Acid/Supercap International Battery Li-FePO 4 GS Yuasa granular silica tubular gel The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of Dr. Imre Gyuk and the

120

A test and validation approach for the standard-based implementation of intelligent electronic devices in smart grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability and functionality of reliable and efficient electric energy systems are pre-requisites for economic and social welfare. The continuous growth of electric energy consumption as well as the upcoming large-scale integration of distributed and ... Keywords: IEC 61499, IEC 61850, controller-hardware-in-the-Loop (CHIL), distributed intelligent control, intelligent electronic device (IED), simulation, smart grids, standards

Thomas Strasser; Filip Andren; Matthias Stifter

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing Overview The Penn State Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering to completely re-design with five weeks left. This left minimal time for machining, assembly, testing

Demirel, Melik C.

122

Design of a Scaled-down DRACS Test Facility for an AHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) has been proposed for an Advanced-High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) that uses fluoride salt as the coolant. A study is being carried out to test its performance and provide experimental data for model validation. A detailed scaling analysis has been performed for the DRACS, as reported in a companion paper [1], in which a scaling methodology is developed. In this paper, scaling results for a protoltypic DRACS design are presented to design a scaled-down DRACs test facility.

Christensen, R. N. [Ohio State University; Lv, Q. NMN [Ohio State University; Subharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sun, X NMN [Ohio State University; Blue, T. E. [Ohio State University; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Wang, X. NMN [Ohio State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Integrated Technology for Distribution Systems Applications: Survey and Testing of Voltage Detecting/Indicating Devices for AC Power Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes product reviews and testing commercially available voltage-sensing devices used to detect energized electric distribution lines, with particular focus on minimum detection and indication performance. To adequately detect line energization across the entire spectrum of possible voltage levels on a power line (from 40 Vac to full line voltage), multiple devices are currently necessary. The ideal improvement to address current gaps in voltage sensing would be the development of a ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

Longanbach, J.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of a Scale Model Wind Turbine for Testing of Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the development of a 1/50th scale 5 MW wind turbine intended for wind and wave basin model testing of commercially viable floating… (more)

Martin, Heather Rae

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DieCast: Testing Distributed Systems with an Accurate Scale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale network services can consist of tens of thousands of machines running thousands of unique software configurations spread across hundreds of physical networks. Testing such services for complex performance problems and configuration errors ... Keywords: Virtualization, Xen, network emulation

Diwaker Gupta; Kashi Venkatesh Vishwanath; Marvin McNett; Amin Vahdat; Ken Yocum; Alex Snoeren; Geoffrey M. Voelker

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

James O'Brien

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Silica precipitation and scaling in a dynamic loop system. [Design and testing of titanium corrosion test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A titanium corrosion test loop was modified to provide a dynamic facility for studying the formation of silica precipitates and scale from simulated geothermal brines as a function of composition, temperature, and flow conditions. A schematic of the modified loop system is presented. The principal components and connecting piping are all constructed of commercially pure titanium. These components include a centrifugal pump, silica saturator column, segmented heat exchanger, reheat heat exchanger, and a high pressure feed pump (stainless steel). The system is designed to circulate simulated geothermal brines saturated with silica to approximately 300/sup 0/C for study of silica scaling. Data obtained from a test run are included. (JGB)

Bohlmann, E.G.; Shor, A.J.; Berlinski, P.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Standard Test Method for Determination of the Spectral Mismatch Parameter Between a Photovoltaic Device and a Photovoltaic Reference Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the determination of a spectral mismatch parameter used in performance testing of photovoltaic devices. 1.2 The spectral mismatch parameter is a measure of the error, introduced in the testing of a photovoltaic device, caused by mismatch between the spectral responses of the photovoltaic device and the photovoltaic reference cell, as well as mismatch between the test light source and the reference spectral irradiance distribution to which the photovoltaic reference cell was calibrated. Examples of reference spectral irradiance distributions are Tables E490 or G173. 1.3 The spectral mismatch parameter can be used to correct photovoltaic performance data for spectral mismatch error. 1.4 This test method is intended for use with linear photovoltaic devices. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

TOPOLOGY OF A LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE AS A TEST OF MODIFIED GRAVITY  

SciTech Connect

The genus of the isodensity contours is a robust measure of the topology of a large-scale structure, and it is relatively insensitive to nonlinear gravitational evolution, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortion. We show that the growth of density fluctuations is scale dependent even in the linear regime in some modified gravity theories, which opens a new possibility of testing the theories observationally. We propose to use the genus of the isodensity contours, an intrinsic measure of the topology of the large-scale structure, as a statistic to be used in such tests. In Einstein's general theory of relativity, density fluctuations grow at the same rate on all scales in the linear regime, and the genus per comoving volume is almost conserved as structures grow homologously, so we expect that the genus-smoothing-scale relation is basically time independent. However, in some modified gravity models where structures grow with different rates on different scales, the genus-smoothing-scale relation should change over time. This can be used to test the gravity models with large-scale structure observations. We study the cases of the f(R) theory, DGP braneworld theory as well as the parameterized post-Friedmann models. We also forecast how the modified gravity models can be constrained with optical/IR or redshifted 21 cm radio surveys in the near future.

Wang Xin; Chen Xuelei [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical ObservatoriesChinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Park, Changbom [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NETL: Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Project No.: DE-FE0007948 InnoSepra, LLC is demonstrating the effectiveness of an innovative adsorption-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology utilizing a combination of novel microporous materials and process cycles. The process utilizes physical sorbents with much lower heats of adsorption compared to competing processes. Lab scale testing has produced greater than 99 percent CO2 purity and greater than 90 percent CO2 recovery from synthetic flue gas. Projections based on detailed engineering evaluations show that at commercial scale, the technology can reduce the power consumption for CO2 capture by more than 40 percent and the capital cost for the CO2 capture equipment by more than 60 percent, resulting in a more than a 40 percent reduction in the CO2 capture cost compared to alternate technologies such as amines and chilled ammonia.

133

Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using the temperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofunsaturated model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofE. , and Spycher, N. , Yucca Mountain single heater test

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young Unit 2 and TXU Monticello Unit 3. The work involves establishing Hg oxidation levels upstream of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with those removal rates, investigating the possibility of the APCD acting as a multipollutant control device, quantifying the balance of plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization.

Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Continued Need for Modeling and Scaled Testing to Advance the Hanford Tank Waste Mission  

SciTech Connect

Hanford tank wastes are chemically complex slurries of liquids and solids that can exhibit changes in rheological behavior during retrieval and processing. The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) recently abandoned its planned approach to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) supported by testing at less than full scale to verify the design of vessels that process these wastes within the plant. The commercial CFD tool selected was deemed too difficult to validate to the degree necessary for use in the design of a nuclear facility. Alternative, but somewhat immature, CFD tools are available that can simulate multiphase flow of non-Newtonian fluids. Yet both CFD and scaled testing can play an important role in advancing the Hanford tank waste mission—in supporting the new verification approach, which is to conduct testing in actual plant vessels; in supporting waste feed delivery, where scaled testing is ongoing; as a fallback approach to design verification if the Full Scale Vessel Testing Program is deemed too costly and time-consuming; to troubleshoot problems during commissioning and operation of the plant; and to evaluate the effects of any proposed changes in operating conditions in the future to optimize plant performance.

Peurrung, Loni M.; Fort, James A.; Rector, David R.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimation of the two-dimensional presampled modulation transfer function of digital radiography devices using one-dimensional test objects  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The modulation transfer function (MTF) of medical imaging devices is commonly reported in the form of orthogonal one-dimensional (1D) measurements made near the vertical and horizontal axes with a slit or edge test device. A more complete description is found by measuring the two-dimensional (2D) MTF. Some 2D test devices have been proposed, but there are some issues associated with their use: (1) they are not generally available; (2) they may require many images; (3) the results may have diminished accuracy; and (4) their implementation may be particularly cumbersome. This current work proposes the application of commonly available 1D test devices for practical and accurate estimation of the 2D presampled MTF of digital imaging systems. Methods: Theory was developed and applied to ensure adequate fine sampling of the system line spread function for 1D test devices at orientations other than approximately vertical and horizontal. Methods were also derived and tested for slit nonuniformity correction at arbitrary angle. Techniques were validated with experimental measurements at ten angles using an edge test object and three angles using a slit test device on an indirect-detection flat-panel system [GE Revolution XQ/i (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI)]. The 2D MTF was estimated through a simple surface fit with interpolation based on Delaunay triangulation of the 1D edge-based MTF measurements. Validation by synthesis was also performed with simulated images from a hypothetical direct-detection flat-panel device. Results: The 2D MTF derived from physical measurements yielded an average relative precision error of 0.26% for frequencies below the cutoff (2.5 mm{sup -1}) and approximate circular symmetry at frequencies below 4 mm{sup -1}. While slit analysis generally agreed with the results of edge analysis, the two showed subtle differences at frequencies above 4 mm{sup -1}. Slit measurement near 45 Degree-Sign revealed radial asymmetry in the MTF resulting from the square pixel aperture (0.2 mm Multiplication-Sign 0.2 mm), a characteristic which was not necessarily appreciated with the orthogonal 1D MTF measurements. In simulation experiments, both slit- and edge-based measurements resolved the radial asymmetries in the 2D MTF. The average absolute relative accuracy error in the 2D MTF between the DC and cutoff (2.5 mm{sup -1}) frequencies was 0.13% with average relative precision error of 0.11%. Other simulation results were similar to those derived from physical data. Conclusions: Overall, the general availability, acceptance, accuracy, and ease of implementation of 1D test devices for MTF assessment make this a valuable technique for 2D MTF estimation.

Wells, Jered R.; Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Program on Technology Innovation: Small-Scale Testing of Woody and Herbaceous Biomass -Torrefaction and Pelleting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fall 2009, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a project to conduct small-scale testing of biomass torrefaction in order to investigate the feasibility of torrefying and pelleting different woody and herbaceous biomass feedstocks. Testing was done by Integro Earth Fuels, LLC, using a Wyssmont directly heated torrefaction reactor. The results of this research serve as a first step in determining the feasibility of using torrefaction and pelleting to improve the value of different bio...

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Summary of Large-and Small-Scale Unreinforced Masonry Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A five-year, large- and small-scale, static and dynamic experimental research program, in which more than 700 tests were conducted, has demonstrated that unreinforced masonry infills are more ductile and resist lateral loads more effectively than anticipated by conventional code procedures. The tests were conducted both in the laboratory and on existing structures at the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex. The experimental data indicate that the combination of a steel frame and infill material efficiently resists lateral loads--the infilling provides significant lateral stiffness while the surrounding frame adds ductility and confinement to the overall system. The results from approximately 25 moderate- and full-scale tests on infills showed that with simulated seismic loads, the frames confined the masonry, and the load-carrying capacity of the infill was considerably above the load that caused initial cracking. This finding was a significant departure from classical code approaches that assumed first cracking to be failure of an unreinforced masonry wall. The experimental program, performed for the US Department of Energy, consisted of the following large-scale tests on infills: in situ airbag pressure testing, shake-table tests, and the application of quasi-static in-plane and out-of-plane drift loads. This paper provides a summary of the overall experimental methodology and results.

Fricke, K.E.

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

Design, testing and optimization of a microfluidic device for capture and concentration of bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective detection of bacterial pathogens in large sample volumes is a challenging problem. Pre-concentration routines currently in practice before the actual detection process are cumbersome and hard to automate. An effort is made to address the problem of volume discrepancy between day-to-day samples and the concentrated samples needed for analysis. Principles of conceptual design are used in formulating the �Need Statement�, �Function Structure� and in identifying the �Critical Design Parameters� and �Design Constraints�. Electrokinetic phenomena are used to exploit the surface charges on bacteria. Electrophoresis is used to transport the bacteria to electrode surface and �Electrostatic trapping� is then used to capture these microbes on the electrode surface. The captured microbes can then be concentrated in a concentrator unit. A prototype microfluidic device is fabricated for showing the proof of concept. Optimization is done to minimize hydraulic power consumption and wetted volume. Observations from the initial prototype device along with the optimization results are used in building a new prototype device. Operation of this device is demonstrated by capture of bacteria from flow. Qualitative studies are conducted and preliminary quantification is also done.

Cherla, Srinivas

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

MHK Projects/Neptune Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.7123,"lon":-0.38306,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Commercial-Scale Tests Demonstrate Secure CO2 Storage in Underground Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe SeCure Co 2 STorage in unDergrounD FormaTionS Two industry-led commercial-scale projects, the Sleipner Project off the coast of Norway and the Weyburn Project in Ontario, Canada, have enhanced the option of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in underground geologic formations. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated in both projects, primarily by providing rigorous monitoring of the injected CO 2 and studying CO 2 behavior to a greater extent than the project operators would have pursued on their own - creating a mutually beneficial public/private partnership. The most significant outcome from both field projects is that CO 2 leakage has not been observed, nor is there any indication that CO 2 will leak in the future.

147

MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 10 Scale Model Test 1 10 Scale Model Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6948,"lon":8.33559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test J.mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Testscale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Int J Rock

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test - Comparison of field measurements to predictions of four different numerical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –Chemical Responses in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test.Heating Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test. In:

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Testing of Large-Scale ICV Glasses with Hanford LAW Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary glass compositions for immobilizing Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) by the in-container vitrification (ICV) process were initially fabricated at crucible- and engineering-scale, including simulants and actual (radioactive) LAW. Glasses were characterized for vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) responses and crystallinity (both quenched and slow-cooled samples). Selected glasses were tested for toxicity characteristic leach procedure (TCLP) responses, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. This testing showed that glasses with LAW loading of 20 mass% can be made readily and meet all product constraints by a far margin. Glasses with over 22 mass% Na2O can be made to meet all other product quality and process constraints. Large-scale testing was performed at the AMEC, Geomelt Division facility in Richland. Three tests were conducted using simulated LAW with increasing loadings of 12, 17, and 20 mass% Na2O. Glass samples were taken from the test products in a manner to represent the full expected range of product performance. These samples were characterized for composition, density, crystalline and non-crystalline phase assemblage, and durability using the VHT, PCT, and TCLP tests. The results, presented in this report, show that the AMEC ICV product with meets all waste form requirements with a large margin. These results provide strong evidence that the Hanford LAW can be successfully vitrified by the ICV technology and can meet all the constraints related to product quality. The economic feasibility of the ICV technology can be further enhanced by subsequent optimization.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Smith, Donald E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Yeager, John D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Scale-Up Testing-Foam as a Remedial Amendment Carrier  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes results from intermediate-scale, two-dimensional testing of foam injection into sedimentary materials collected from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The testing was performed to evaluate the effects of delivery pressure, injection rate, foam stability, foam quality, and formation heterogeneities on the migration of foam, water, remediation amendment, and contaminants within a sedimentary volume. Testing was accomplished in a test bed that is configured in the form of two thin rectangular boxes. Each of the boxes holds approximately 135 liters (255 kilograms) of sediment. Foam was injected into each box through a segment of polyvinyl chloride slotted well casing, and air was extracted from the boxes through a similar system. Four sets of tests were conducted. During Test 1, both of the boxes were loaded in a homogeneous manner, while in Tests 2, 3, and 4, both of the boxes were loaded so as to contain two rectangular zones of heterogeneity. In addition, a zone of the sediment contained in the test bed used for Test 4 was augmented with uranium-rich calcite to produce a known concentration of uranium. The injection rate varied between the boxes during the Test 1 but was the same for each box during the final three tests. The foam generation formula for Tests 1 and 2 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant. The foam generation formula used in Test 3 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant and contained 25,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of phosphate in the form of a 9:1 mixture of sodium phosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate. The foam generating formula used in Test 4 consisted of an aqueous solution of an anionic surfactant and a nonionic surfactant and also contained 5,000 mg/L of phosphate as the aforementioned mixture. Subsequent to each of the four tests, the test beds were disassembled, and samples of the sediments were taken and analyzed for a number of parameters, depending on the specific test. This paper presents the results of the intermediate-scale testing.

Foote, Martin; Hart, Andrea T.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Standard and modified electrode engineering-scale in situ vitrification tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) electrode tests conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).(a) The purpose of these tests was to establish baseline data to serve as a foundation on which to improve the design of standard graphite rod electrodes, which are currently used in all applications. Changes in electrode design are proposed as one method to increase ISV melt depths that typically reach about 5 m. Melt depths of 10 m are needed to remediate some contaminated soil sites within the DOE complex. To establish baseline data, we performed a thermal distribution analysis and tested three electrode designs: (1) the standard graphite rod electrodes, (2) a modified design referred to as the composite graphite/molybdenum electrode, and (3) a second modified design, the dilated-tip graphite electrode. In total we performed six tests, two of each design. Within the scope of these tests, there were four specific objectives. Our first objective was to determine the influence of electrode design on monolith mass and shape. Our second objective was to determine the correlation between the actual test results and the results of the numerical heat distribution analysis using the TEMPEST code. Our third objective was to qualitatively evaluate the melt resistance and the electrode contact resistance that resulted from the three electrode designs. Finally, our fourth objective was to verify the reproducibility of the engineering-scale test results.

Thompson, L.E.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Winkelman, R.G. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Scaling test of two-flavor O(a)-improved lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a scaling test of several mesonic observables in the non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson theory with two flavors of dynamical quarks. The observables are constructed in a fixed volume of 2.4fm x (1.8fm)^3 with Schroedinger functional boundary conditions. No significant scaling violations are found. Using the kaon mass determined in \\cite{cernI}, we update our estimate of the Lambda parameter to Lambda^(2)_{msbar}/m_K = 0.52(6).

Michele Della Morte; Patrick Fritzsch; Harvey B. Meyer; Hubert Simma; Rainer Sommer; Shinji Takeda; Oliver Witzel; Ulli Wolff

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Consistency test of general relativity from large scale structure of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a consistency test of General Relativity (GR) on cosmological scales. This test enables us to distinguish between the two alternatives to explain the late-time accelerated expansion of the universe, that is, dark energy models based on GR and modified gravity models without dark energy. We derive the consistency relation in GR which is written only in terms of observables - the Hubble parameter, the density perturbations, the peculiar velocities and the lensing potential. The breakdown of this consistency relation implies that the Newton constant which governs large-scale structure is different from that in the background cosmology, which is a typical feature in modified gravity models. We propose a method to perform this test by reconstructing the weak lensing spectrum from measured density perturbations and peculiar velocities. This reconstruction relies on Poisson's equation in GR to convert the density perturbations to the lensing potential. Hence any inconsistency between the reconstructed lensing spectrum and the measured lensing spectrum indicates the failure of GR on cosmological scales. The difficulties in performing this test using actual observations are discussed.

Yong-Seon Song; Kazuya Koyama

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation SCALES Fish are stream-lined. They have to be. Some kinds, like the catfish, are covered with a...

162

Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada S. Mukhopadhyay * , Y.waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scalerock; Radioactive waste; Yucca Mountain, Nevada Introduction

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING SENSOR NETWORK, MESO-SCALE TEST BED - PHASE 3 FLUID INJECTION TEST SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

Serrato, M.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Analysis of Soluble Re Concentrations in Refractory from Bulk Vitrification Full-Scale Test 38B  

SciTech Connect

The capacity of the waste treatment plant (WTP) being built at the Hanford Site is not sufficient to process all of the tank waste accumulated from more than 40 years of nuclear materials production. Bulk vitrification can accelerate tank waste treatment by providing some supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) treatment capacity. Bulk vitrification combines LAW and glass-forming chemicals in a large metal container and melts the contents using electrical resistance heating. A castable refractory block (CRB) is used along with sand to insulate the container from the heat generated while melting the contents into a glass waste form. This report describes engineering-scale (ES) and full-scale (FS) tests that have been conducted. Several ES tests showed that a small fraction of soluble Tc moves in the CRB and results in a groundwater peak different than WTP glass. The total soluble Tc-99 fraction in the FS CRB is expected to be different than that determined in the ES tests, but until FS test results are available, the best-estimate soluble Tc-99 fraction from the ES tests has been used as a conservative estimate. The first FS test results are from cold simulant tests that have been spiked with Re. An estimated scale-up factor extrapolates the Tc-99 data collected at the ES to the FS bulk vitrification waste package. Test FS-38A tested the refractory design and did not have a Re spike. Samples were taken and analyzed to help determine Re CRB background concentrations using a Re-spiked, six-tank composite simulant mixed with soil and glass formers to produce the waste feed. Although this feed is not physically the same as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System feed , the chemical make-up is the same. Extensive sampling of the CRB was planned, but difficulties with the test prevented completion of a full box. An abbreviated plan is described that looks at duplicate samples taken from refractory archive sections, a lower wall sample, and two base samples to gain early information about Re and projected Tc-99 levels in the FS box.

Cooley, Scott K.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Scale-up Testing—Foam as A Remedial Amendment Carrier - 11029  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes results from intermediate-scale, two-dimensional testing of foam injection into sedimentary materials collected from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site area. The testing was performed to evaluate the transport of new, more robust, foam generation formulas developed by PNNL on field applicability. The mechanisms of transport , foam stability, delivery pressure, foam migration and the ability of foam to deliver remedial amendments for stabilization of uranium contamination were evaluated. Testing was accomplished in a test bed that is designed to focus on two-dimensional flow, in the form of two, thin rectangular boxes. Each of the boxes holds approximately 135 liters (255 kilograms) of sediment. A total of six sets of tests have been conducted, the last two of which will be described here. During the fifth and sixth tests, foam, generated by means of mechanical blending, was injected into the central screened segment of the left side of each box while air was extracted from multiple screened segments along the right side of each box. During these two tests both of the boxes were loaded to contain a rectangular zones of fine material and a rectangular zone of coarse material . Portions of the sediment were augmented with uranium-rich calcite to produce known concentrations of uranium. The foam generating formulas used in both tests contained sodium phosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate as a remedial amendment. Subsequent to each of the two tests, the test beds were disassembled, and samples of the sediments were taken and analyzed for a number of parameters, depending on the specific test. The data indicated that uranium contamination may be successfully immobilized and that that directional movement of the injected foam can be controlled.

Foote, Martin W.; Bickford, Jody; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Jansik, Danielle P.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

DOE/NETL's Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing Air Quality III September 12, 2002 Arlington, Va Scott Renninger, Project Manager for Mercury Control Technology Enviromental Projects Division Presentation Outline * Hg Program goals & objectives * Focus on Future Hg control R&D * Q&As President Bush's Clear Skies Initiative Current Mid-Term 2008-2010 2018 SO 2 11 million tons 4.5 million tons 3 million tons NOx 5 million tons 2.1 million tons 1.7 million tons Mercury 48 tons 26 tons 15 tons Annual U.S. Power Plant Emissions Mercury Control * Developing technologies ready for commercial demonstration: - By 2005, reduce emissions 50-70% - By 2010, reduce emissions by 90% - Cost 25-50% less than current estimates 2000 Year 48 Tons $2 - 5 Billion @ 90% Removal w/Activated

171

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

CALMOS: Innovative device for the measurement of nuclear heating in material testing reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An R and D program has been carried out since 2002 in order to improve gamma heating measurements in the 70 MWth OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Div. at the Saclay research center. Throughout this program an innovative calorimetric probe associated to a specific handling system has been designed in order to make measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating rates still remain high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for the process validation, while a displacement system has been especially designed to move the probe axially. A final probe has been designed thanks to modeling results and to preliminary measurements obtained with mock-ups irradiated to a heating level of 2W/g, This paper gives an overview of the development, describes the calorimetric probe, and expected advantages such as the possibility to use complementary methods to get the nuclear heating measurement. Results obtained with mock-ups irradiated in ex-core area of the reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

Carcreff, H. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission CEA, Saclay Center, DEN/DANS/DRSN/SIREN, Gif Sur Yvette, 91191 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800ş-900şC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

Albin, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form.

Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frank, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Conceptual and Numerical Model for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes in the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, NV from three-Scale Heater Test. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 MilestoneReport, Chapter 6. Yucca Mountain Project Level 4 Milestone

Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Conrad, Mark; Apps, John

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 16 General Considerations for Designing Laboratory Scale Fry-Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 16 General Considerations for Designing Laboratory Scale Fry-Tests Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition -

184

Determining the basic operational characteristics of a solar thermostat in the conditions of full-scale tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of calculating a heat-receiver-heater and the volume of the heat store is presented, together with the results of full-scale tests of a solar thermostat with stochastic variations of climatic factors.

Gryadunov, A.I.; Mamedova, A.I.; Razaev, P.F.; Sadykov, S.A.; Velieva, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/. The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO/sub 2/ adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO/sub 2/. Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO/sub 2/ removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective.

Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

Bert Zauderer

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices  

SciTech Connect

Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

None

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Full-scale Up-Flo^® stormwater filter field performance verification tests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Up-Flo® Filter is an innovative high-rate, small footprint, stormwater treatment device based on upward filtration technology. It was originally developed by environmental engineers at… (more)

Cai, Yezhao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Siegrist, R.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Bechtel-Jacobs, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 2008 contacts thomas J. Feeley III Technology Manager Environmental & Water Resources National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov charles E. Miller Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5745 charles.miller@netl.doe.gov Gary Blythe Principal Investigator URS Corp. 9400 Amberglen Blvd. P.O. Box 201088 Austin, Texas 78720 512-419-5321 gary_blythe@urscorp.com Environmental and Water Resources Full-Scale TeSTing oF a Mercury oxidaTion caTalyST upSTreaM oF a WeT Fgd SySTeM Background To provide alternatives for power plant owners to comply with the Clean Air Mercury Rule promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NETL is

195

Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Scaling test of quenched Wilson twisted mass QCD at maximal twist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of an extended scaling test of quenched Wilson twisted mass QCD. We fix the twist angle by using two definitions of the critical mass, the first obtained by requiring the vanishing of the pseudoscalar meson mass m_PS for standard Wilson fermions and the second by requiring restoration of parity at non-zero value of the twisted mass mu and subsequently extrapolating to mu=0. Depending on the choice of the critical mass we simulate at values of beta in [5.7,6.45], for a range of pseudoscalar meson masses 250 MeV < m_PS < 1 GeV and we perform the continuum limit for the pseudoscalar meson decay constant f_PS and various hadron masses (vector meson m_V, baryon octet m_oct and baryon decuplet m_dec) at fixed value of r_0 m_PS. For both definitions of the critical mass, lattice artifacts are consistent with O(a) improvement. However, with the second definition, large O(a^2) discretization errors present at small quark mass with the first definition are strongly suppressed. The results in the continuum limit are in very good agreement with those from the Alpha and CP-PACS Collaborations.

K. Jansen; M. Papinutto; A. Shindler; C. Urbach; I. Wetzorke

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Residential Energy Display Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy display devices provide direct feedback to consumers about their electricity use and cost, direct feedback that potentially can help customers manage electricity consumption. EPRI tested five different stand-alone display devices in its Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Living Laboratory to assess whether devices functioned according to manufacturer specifications. In addition to providing results of these tests, this Technology Brief describes how display devices operate, summariz...

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Test and evaluation of hot-gas cleanup devices, Phase I and II (Task 1). Technical progress report, September 1, 1981 - November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the status of the work performed on a program for test and evaluation of gas cleanup devices for PFBC combined cycle systems. The work was performed during the period September 1, 1981 through November 30, 1981. This is the second quarterly report since the start of the program. Work has continued to restore the pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) technology plant at Wood-Ridge, N.J. to an operational status. Preliminary designs to incorporate each of three advanced gas cleanup devices following a first stage low pressure drop inertial type separator were previously completed. The advanced devices provided by suppliers under a separate DOE contract include a ceramic bag filter, an electrostatic precipitator and an electrostatically enhanced inertial separator. The final design activity necessary to modify the facility for the test of the ceramic bag filter has been completed. Testing of each hot gas cleanup device concurrently with a DOE supplied advanced concept particle sampling system and an alkali metal content measurement system is planned to start in April 1982.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 Nanoparticles-based Test Strip Immunosensing Device for Rapid Detection of Phosphorylated Butyrylcholinesterase  

SciTech Connect

An integrated magnetic nanoparticles-based test-strip immunosensing device was developed for rapid and sensitive quantification of phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the biomarker of exposure to organophosphous pesticides (OP), in human plasma. In order to overcome the difficulty in scarce availability of OP-specific antibody, here magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles were used and adsorbed on the test strip through a small magnet inserted in the device to capture target OP-BChE through selective binding between TiO2 and OP moiety. Further recognition was completed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anti-BChE antibody (Ab) co-immobilized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Their strong affinities among Fe3O4@TiO2, OP-BChE and HRP/Ab-GNPs were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) measurements. After cutting off from test strip, the resulted immunocomplex (HRP/Ab-GNPs/OP-BChE/Fe3O4@TiO2) was measured by SWV using a screen printed electrode under the test zone. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by introduction of GNPs to link enzyme and antibody at high ratio, which amplifies electrocatalytic signal significantly. Moreover, the use of test strip for fast immunoreactions reduces analytical time remarkably. Coupling with a portable electrochemical detector, the integrated device with advanced nanotechnology displays great promise for sensitive, rapid and in-filed on-site evaluation of OP poisoning.

Ge, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Equilibrium Modeling, Design, Construction, and Validation Testing of a Pilot Scale, USS Gasification Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fluidized bed gasification is currently not economically feasible on small and medium scales due to the expensive catalytic reformation of tar. It has been proposed… (more)

Hlebak, Joshua J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Efficient Digital Logic Using Nanoscale Magnetic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the power consumption of future digital logic devices. Theimpact of device scaling on power consumption [6, 7].

Lambson, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Underground tank vitrification: A pilot-scale in situ vitrification test of a tank containing a simulated mixed waste sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report documents research on sludge vitrification. The first pilot scale in-situ vitrification test of a simulated underground tank was successfully completed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The vitrification process effectively immobilized the vast majority of radionuclides simulants and toxic metals were retained in the melt and uniformly distributed throughout the monolith.

Thompson, L.E.; Powell, T.D.; Tixier, J.S.; Miller, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Owczarski, P.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Large scale DNA microsequencing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide a means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus cosists of a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 17 figs.

Foote, R.S.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Atomic-scale characterization of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon films and devices. Annual subcontract report, 14 February 1994--14 April 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Properties of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films used in photovoltaic (PV) panels are reported. The atomic-scale topology of the surface of intrinsic a-Si:H films, measured by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as a function of film thickness, are reported and diagnosed. For 1-500-nm-thick films deposited under normal device-quality conditions from silane discharges, most portions of these surfaces are uniformly hilly without indications of void regions. However, the STM images indicate that 2-6-nm silicon particulates are continuously deposited into the growing film from the discharge and fill approximately 0.01% of the film volume. Although the STM data are not sensitive to the local electronic properties near these particulates, it is very likely that the void regions grow around them and have a deleterious effect on a-Si:H photovoltaics. Preliminary observations of particulates in the discharge, based on light scattering, confirm that particulates are present in the discharge and that many collect and agglomerate immediately downstream of the electrodes. Progress toward STM measurements of the electronic properties of cross-sectioned a-Si:H PV cells is also reported.

Gallagher, A.; Tanenbaum, D.; Laracuente, A.; Jelenkovic, B. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification scheme is created to map the synoptic-scale (large scale) atmospheric state to distributions of local-scale cloud properties. This mapping is accomplished by a neural network that classifies 17 months of synoptic-scale initial ...

Roger Marchand; Nathaniel Beagley; Sandra E. Thompson; Thomas P. Ackerman; David M. Schultz

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Built-in data-flow integration testing in large-scale component-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern large-scale component-based applications and service ecosystems are built following a number of different component models and architectural styles, such as the data-flow architectural style. In this style, each building block receives data from ...

Éric Piel; Alberto Gonzalez-Sanchez; Hans-Gerhard Gross

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Test of the ECMWF Model in Tropical Synoptic-Scale Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The originally disseminated ECMWF-FGGE analyses for January and February 1979 are used to study the model performance in the deep tropics. Vertical velocities representing both the normal-mode initialized and uninitialized synoptic-scale flow are ...

Ray-qing Lin; Donald R. Mock

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Test of the Strict Quasi-Equilibrium Theory on Long Time and Space Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-equilibrium convective parameterizations share the common assumption that in regions of sustained deep convection rates of change in convective available potential energy (CAPE) are small compared to the magnitude of the large-scale and ...

Randy G. Brown; Christopher S. Bretherton

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Photochemical Numerics for Global-Scale Modeling: Fidelity and GCM Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric photochemistry lies at the heart of global-scale pollution problems, but it is a nonlinear system embedded in nonlinear transport and so must be modeled in three dimensions. Total earth grids are massive and kinetics require dozens of ...

Scott Elliott; Xuepeng Zhao; Richard P. Turco; Chih-Yue Jim Kao; Mei Shen

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Measuring Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Compressed Natural Gas Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers; Hydrogen Measuring Devices; Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices; Loading ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

Kleinfelder, W.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) in flue gas from coal combustion. The project was conducted from July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. It was conducted with cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, "Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System." Private secto...

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbine Generators (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to understand the behavior of wind turbines experiencing grid disturbances, it is necessary to perform a series of tests and accurate transient simulation studies. The latest edition of the IEC 61400-21 standard describes methods for such tests that include low voltage ride-through (LVRT), active power set-point control, ramp rate limitations, and reactive power capability tests. The IEC methods are being widely adopted on both national and international levels by wind turbine manufacturers, certification authorities, and utilities. On-site testing of wind turbines might be expensive and time consuming since it requires both test equipment transportation and personnel presence in sometimes remote locations for significant periods of time because such tests need to be conducted at certain wind speed and grid conditions. Changes in turbine control software or design modifications may require redoing of all tests. Significant cost and test-time reduction can be achieved if these tests are conducted in controlled laboratory environments that replicate grid disturbances and simulation of wind turbine interactions with power systems. Such testing capability does not exist in the United States today. An initiative by NREL to design and construct a 7-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

McDade, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Wallen, R.; Erdman, W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Full-Scale Fire Tests With Automatic Sprinklers in A Patient ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Fire Research National Engineering Laboratory National Bureau ... of Health and Human Services (HHS) are ... of health care facilities and in the test ...

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Initial Laboratory-Scale Melter Test Results for Combined Fission Product Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results used to vitrify a baseline glass, CSLNTM-C-2.5 in support of the AFCI (Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) using a Quartz Crucible Scale Melter at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Document number AFCI-WAST-PMO-MI-DV-2009-000184.

Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rieck, Bennett T.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Vienna, John D.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heap leach studies on the removal of uranium from soil. Report of laboratory-scale test results  

SciTech Connect

This report details the initial results of laboratory-scale testing of heap leach that is being developed as a method for removing uranium from uranium-contaminated soil. The soil used was obtained from the site of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near the village of Fernald in Ohio. The testing is being conducted on a laboratory scale, but it is intended that this methodology will eventually be enlarged to field scale where, millions of cubic meters of uranium-contaminated soil can be remediated. The laboratory scale experiments show that, using carbonate/bicarbonate solutions, uranium can be effectively removed from the soil from initial values of around 600 ppM down to 100 ppM or less. The goal of this research is to selectively remove uranium from the contaminated soil, without causing serious changes in the characteristics of the soil. It is also hoped that the new technologies developed for soil remediation at FEMP will be transferred to other sites that also have uranium-contaminated soil.

Turney, W.R.J.R.; York, D.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Dander, D.C.; Longmire, P.A.; Morris, D.E.; Strait, R.K.; Brewer, J.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Most Severe Test for Hydrophobicity Scales: Two Proteins with 88% Sequence Identity but Different Structure and Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protein-protein interactions (protein functionalities) are mediated by water, which compacts individual proteins and promotes close and temporarily stable large-area protein-protein interfaces. In their classic paper Kyte and Doolittle (KD) concluded that the "simplicity and graphic nature of hydrophobicity scales make them very useful tools for the evaluation of protein structures". In practice, however, attempts to develop hydrophobicity scales (for example, compatible with classical force fields (CFF) in calculating the energetics of protein folding) have encountered many difficulties. Here we suggest an entirely different approach, based on the idea that proteins are self-organized networks, subject to finite-scale criticality (like some network glasses). We test this proposal against two small proteins that are delicately balanced between alpha and alpha/beta structures, with different functions encoded with only 12% of their amino acids. This example explains why protein structure prediction is so challenging, and it provides a severe test for the accuracy and content of hydrophobicity scales. The new method confirms KD's evaluation, and at the same time suggests that protein structure, dynamics and function can be best discussed without using CFF.

Alexander E. Kister; James C. Phillips

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07  

SciTech Connect

Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite-based activated (800 C, 1472 F) carbons required a shorter (15-minute) conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas and captured gaseous mercury more effectively than those activated at 750 C (1382 F). Subsequent tests with higher acid gas concentrations including 50 ppm HCl showed no early mercury breakthrough for either the activated (750 C, 1382 F) Bienfait carbon or the DARCO FGD. Although these high acid gas tests yielded better mercury capture initially, significant breakthrough of mercury ultimately occurred sooner than during the simulated lignite flue gas tests. The steam-activated char, provided by Luscar Ltd., and DARCO FGD, provided by NORIT Americas, were evaluated for mercury removal potential in a 580 MJ/hr (550,000-Btu/hr) pilot-scale coal combustion system equipped with four particulate control devices: (1) an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), (2) a fabric filter (FF), (3) the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter, and (4) an ESP and FF in series, an EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} technology. The Ontario Hydro method and continuous mercury monitors were used to measure mercury species concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the control technology devices with and without sorbent injection. Primarily Hg{sup o} was measured when lignite coals from the Poplar River Plant and Freedom Mine were combusted. The effects of activated Luscar char, DARCO FGD, injection rates, particle size, and gas temperature on mercury removal were evaluated for each of the four particulate control device options. Increasing injection rates and decreasing gas temperatures generally promoted mercury capture in all four control devices. Relative to data reported for bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases, higher sorbent injection rates were generally required for the lignite coal to effectively remove mercury. Documented results in this report provide the impacts of these and other parameters and provide the inputs needed to direct Phase II of the project.

John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan  

SciTech Connect

Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature devices (RTD) installed in 26 boreholes areare spatially interpolated to the RTD locations. These 26

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

Kearney, D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Determination of soil liquefaction characteristics by large-scale laboratory tests. [Sand  

SciTech Connect

The testing program described in this report was carried out to study the liquefaction behavior of a clean, uniform, medium sand. Horizontal beds of this sand, 42 inches by 90 inches by 4 inches were prepared by pluviation with a special sand spreader, saturated, and tested in a shaking table system designed for this program, which applied a horizontal cyclic shear stress to the specimens. Specimen size was selected to reduce boundary effects as much as possible. Values of pore pressures and shear strains developed during the tests are presented for sand specimens at relative densities of 54, 68, 82, and 90 percent, and the results interpreted to determine the values of the stress ratio causing liquefaction at the various relative densities.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Strain mapping with nm-scale resolution for the silicon-on-insulator generation of semiconductor devices by advanced electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Strain engineering in the conduction channel is a cost effective method of boosting the performance in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices. However, given the small dimensions of these devices, it is difficult to quantitatively measure the strain with the required spatial resolution. Three different transmission electron microscopy techniques, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, dark field electron holography, and nanobeam electron diffraction have been applied to measure the strain in simple bulk and SOI calibration specimens. These techniques are then applied to different gate length SiGe SOI pFET devices in order to measure the strain in the conduction channel. For these devices, improved spatial resolution is required, and strain maps with spatial resolutions as good as 1 nm have been achieved. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using these three different techniques when used for strain measurement.

Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Hutin, Louis; Le Royer, Cyrille [CEA, LETI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beche, Armand [CEA, LETI, and FEI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Full-scale hot cell test of an acoustic sensor dedicated to measurement of the internal gas pressure and composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale hot cell test of the internal gas pressure and composition measurement by an acoustic sensor was carried on successfully between 2008 and 2010 on irradiated fuel rods in the LECA-STAR facility at Cadarache Centre. The acoustic sensor has been specially designed in order to provide a nondestructive technique to easily carry out the measurement of the internal gas pressure and gas composition of a LWR nuclear fuel rod. This sensor has been achieved in 2007 and is now covered by an international patent. The first positive result, concerning the device behaviour, is that the sensor-operating characteristics have not been altered by a two-year exposure in the hot cell ambient. We performed the gas characterisation contained in irradiated fuel rods. The acoustic method accuracy is now {+-}5 bars on the pressure measurement result and {+-}0.3% on the evaluated gas composition. The results of the acoustic method were compared to puncture results. Another significant conclusion is that the efficiency of the acoustic method is not altered by the irradiation time, and possible modification of the cladding properties. These results make it possible to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique on irradiated fuel rods. The transducer and the associated methodology are now operational. (authors)

Ferrandis, J. Y.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Leveque, G. [CNRS - Univ. Montpellier 2, Southern Electronic Inst., UMR 5214, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Baron, D. [EDF, R and D, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Segura, J. C. [EDF, SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France); Cecilia, G.; Provitina, O. [CEA - Nuclear Energy Direction DEN - Fuel Studies Dept. - Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

Develop and test an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) for large scale MHD magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work conducted under DOE/PETC Contract DE-AC22-84PC70512 has included four principal tasks, (1) development of a Design Requirements Definition for a retrofit MHD magnet system, (2) analysis of an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) to use in that design, (3) design of an experiment to test a subscale version of that conductor, which is a NbTi, copper stabilized superconductor, and (4) proof-of-concept testing of the conductor. The program was carried forth through the third task with very successful development and test of a conventional ICCS conductor with 27 multifilamentary copper-superconductor composite strands and a new concept conductor in which, in each triplet, two strands were pure copper and the third strand was a multifilamentary composite. In reviewing the magnet design and the premises for the conductor design it became obvious that, since the principal source of perturbation in MHD magnets derives from slippage between coils, or between turns in a coil, thereby producing frictional heat which must flow through the conductor sheath and the helium to the superconductor strands, an extra barrier might be highly effective in enhancing magnet stability and protection. This concept was developed and a sample conductor manufactured and tested in comparison with an identical conductor lacking such an additional barrier. Results of these conductor tests confirm the potential value of such a barrier. As the work of tasks 1 through 3 has been reported in detail in quarterly and semiannual reports, as well as in special reports prepared throughout the course of this project, this report reviews early work briefly and then discusses this last phase in great detail. 8 refs., 36 figs.

Marston, P.G.; Hale, J.R.; Dawson, A.M.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tests of an ensemble Kalman filter for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the performance of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) implemented in a mesoscale model in increasingly realistic contexts from under a perfect model assumption and in the presence of significant model error with synthetic observations to real-world data assimilation in comparison to the three-dimensional variational (3DVar) method via both case study and month-long experiments. The EnKF is shown to be promising for future application in operational data assimilation practice. The EnKF with synthetic observations, which is implemented in the mesoscale model MM5, is very effective in keeping the analysis close to the truth under the perfect model assumption. The EnKF is most effective in reducing larger-scale errors but less effective in reducing errors at smaller, marginally resolvable scales. In the presence of significant model errors from physical parameterization schemes, the EnKF performs reasonably well though sometimes it can be significantly degraded compared to its performance under the perfect model assumption. Using a combination of different physical parameterization schemes in the ensemble (the so-called �multi-scheme� ensemble) can significantly improve filter performance due to the resulting better background error covariance and a smaller ensemble bias. The EnKF performs differently for different flow regimes possibly due to scale- and flow-dependent error growth dynamics and predictability. Real-data (including soundings, profilers and surface observations) are assimilated by directly comparing the EnKF and 3DVar and both are implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. A case study and month-long experiments show that the EnKF is efficient in tracking observations in terms of both prior forecast and posterior analysis. The EnKF performs consistently better than 3DVar for the time period of interest due to the benefit of the EnKF from both using ensemble mean for state estimation and using a flow-dependent background error covariance. Proper covariance inflation and using a multi-scheme ensemble can significantly improve the EnKF performance. Using a multi-scheme ensemble results in larger improvement in thermodynamic variables than in other variables. The 3DVar system can benefit substantially from using a short-term ensemble mean for state estimate. Noticeable improvement is also achieved in 3DVar by including some flow dependence in its background error covariance.

Meng, Zhiyong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this manual is solely for the purpose of operating the POC-scale equipment for fine coal processing as described herein. This manual provides a general description of the process technology and guidelines for plant operating procedures. It is intended for use by the operators and maintenance personnel who will be responsible for the operations of the plant. No attempt should be made to operate the plant until the principles of the process and operating instructions contained in this manual are fully understood. Operating personnel should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all processing equipment prior to commencing plant operation. All equipment is skid mounted to provide a self-contained unit. The dimensions of the unit are comply with standard guidelines. A minimum distance of 2 feet is provided between equipment for walkway and maintenance.

W. Pawlak; K. Szymocha

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Testing nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the TeV scale  

SciTech Connect

Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of nonlinear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here, we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program at the Large Hadron Collider would provide a set of measurements, which allow for unprecedented tests of the factorization assumption, underlying global nPDF fits.

Quiroga-Arias, Paloma [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Milhano, Jose Guilherme [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica-CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Wiedemann, Urs Achim [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Operated device estimation framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution systems. Operation of a protective device in response to a particular fault condition depends upon the protective device’s operating behavior and coordination of various such protective devices. This thesis presents the design and implementation of a protective device estimation algorithm which helps in identifying which protective devices have operated to clear a short circuit condition. The algorithm uses manufacturer’s device details, power quality data measured from substation monitoring devices and power system event features estimated using existing DFA algorithms. The proposed technique can be used to evaluate coordination of these protective devices and helps in locating a fault in a distribution system feeder. This approach is independent of feeder topology and could be readily used for any distribution system. The effectiveness of this algorithm is verified by simulated and actual test data. Suggestions are included for future research and application by electric utilities.

Rengarajan, Janarthanan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE TESTING OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ENGINEERING AND PLANT SCALE ANNULAR CENTRIFUGAL CONTACTORS FOR THE PROCESSING OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annular centrifugal contactors are being evaluated for process scale solvent extraction operations in support of United State Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative goals. These contactors have the potential for high stage efficiency if properly employed and optimized for the application. Commercially available centrifugal contactors are being tested at the Idaho National Laboratory to support this program. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency have been measured for portions of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle using 5-cm diameter annular centrifugal contactors. Advanced features, including low mix sleeves and clean-in-place rotors, have also been evaluated in 5-cm and 12.5-cm contactors.

Jack D. Law; David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Nick Mann; Scott Herbst

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using the temperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the wing heaters, and the RTD temperature holes in the DSTtemperature devices (RTD) placed in 26 boreholes (Borehole

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

GrenchMark: A Framework for Testing Large-Scale Distributed Computing Systems Alexandru Iosup (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computing - Computing as utility (similar to electricity) - Small components, distributed cost of ownership://grenchmark.st.ewi.tudelft.nlgrenchmark.st.ewi.tudelft.nl// The GrenchMark framework for testing large-scale distributed systems Testing Multi-Cluster Grids · Generate and annotation data · Tested in grids, peer-to-peer systems, and heterogeneous clusters - Extensible reference

Iosup, Alexandru

246

Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

FULL SCALE TESTING TECHNOLOGY MATURATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT AT HANFORD - 12125  

SciTech Connect

Simulant testing of a full-scale thin-film evaporator system was conducted in 2011 for technology development at the Hanford tank farms. Test results met objectives of water removal rate, effluent quality, and operational evaluation. Dilute tank waste simulant, representing a typical double-shell tank supernatant liquid layer, was concentrated from a 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.5 using a 4.6 m{sup 2} (50 ft{sup 2}) heated transfer area Rototherm{reg_sign} evaporator from Artisan Industries. The condensed evaporator vapor stream was collected and sampled validating efficient separation of the water. An overall decontamination factor of 1.2E+06 was achieved demonstrating excellent retention of key radioactive species within the concentrated liquid stream. The evaporator system was supported by a modular steam supply, chiller, and control computer systems which would be typically implemented at the tank farms. Operation of these support systems demonstrated successful integration while identifying areas for efficiency improvement. Overall testing effort increased the maturation of this technology to support final deployment design and continued project implementation.

TEDESCHI AR; CORBETT JE; WILSON RA; LARKIN J

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect

To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

SAMS T; HAGERTY K

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations Drawn from the DeepCWind Scaled Floating Offshore Wind System Test Campaign: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DeepCwind consortium is a group of universities, national labs, and companies funded under a research initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to support the research and development of floating offshore wind power. The two main objectives of the project are to better understand the complex dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind systems and to create experimental data for use in validating the tools used in modeling these systems. In support of these objectives, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a model test campaign in 2011 of three generic floating wind systems, a tension-leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy (spar), and a semisubmersible (semi). Each of the three platforms was designed to support a 1/50th-scale model of a 5 MW wind turbine and was tested under a variety of wind/wave conditions. The focus of this paper is to summarize the work done by consortium members in analyzing the data obtained from the test campaign and its use for validating the offshore wind modeling tool, FAST.

Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Masciola, M. D.; Molta, P.; Goupee, A. J.; Coulling, A. J.; Prowell, I.; Browning, J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

MCHF calculations of isotope shifts; I program implementation and test runs II large-scale active space calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new isotope shift program, part of the MCHF atomic structure package, has been written and tested. The program calculates the isotope shift of an atomic level from MCHF or CI wave functions. The program is specially designed to be used with very large CI expansions, for which angular data cannot be stored on disk. To explore the capacity of the program, large-scale isotope shift calculations have been performed for a number of low lying levels in B I and B II. From the isotope shifts of these levels the transition isotope shift have been calculated for the resonance transitions in B I and B II. The calculated transition isotope shifts in B I are in very good agreement with experimental shifts, and compare favourably with shifts obtained from a many-body perturbation calculation.

Joensson, P. [Lund Institute of Technology, Lund (Sweden); Fischer, C.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the direct sulfur recovery process. Final report, February 1990--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently recovering up to 99% or higher amounts of elemental sulfur from SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration tail-gas produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems by reacting the tail-gas with a small slipstream of coal gas. In this project, the DSRP was demonstrated with simulated gases at bench-scale with 3-in. diameter, 1-L size catalytic reactors. Fundamental kinetic and modeling studies were conducted to explain the significantly higher than thermodynamically expected sulfur recoveries in DSRP and to enable prediction of sulfur recovery in larger reactors. Technology transfer activities to promote the DSRP consisted of publications and discussions with architectural engineering firms and industrial parties especially IGCC system developers. Toward the end of the project, an agreement was signed with an IGCC system developer to scale up the DSRP and test it with actual gases in their 10-MW (thermal) coal gasification pilot-plant under a cooperative R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy.

Gangwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

MHK Technologies/Floating Duck Type Device | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Device Type Device < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating Duck Type Device.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion GIEC of Chinese Academy of Sciences CAS plans to build an isolated power system with renewable energy on Dawanshan Island Guangdong Province before August 2012 with total installed capacity of 500kW including 300kW from wave energy device and 200kW from wind turbine The design of 100kW floating duck type device charging process and special transporting boat has been completed and the scale prototype is testing Technology Dimensions

254

Diffusionless fluid transport and routing using novel microfluidic devices.  

SciTech Connect

Microfluidic devices have been proposed for 'Lab-on-a-Chip' applications for nearly a decade. Despite the unquestionable promise of these devices to allow rapid, sensitive and portable biochemical analysis, few practical devices exist. It is often difficult to adapt current laboratory techniques to the microscale because bench-top methods use discrete liquid volumes, while most current microfluidic devices employ streams of liquid confined in a branching network of micron-scale channels. The goal of this research was to use two phase liquid flows, creating discrete packets of liquid. Once divided into discrete packets, the packets can be moved controllably within the microchannels without loss of material. Each packet is equivalent to a minute test tube, holding a fraction from a separation or an aliquot to be reacted. We report on the fabrication of glass and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) devices that create and store packets.

Barrett, Louise Mary; Shediac, Renee; Reichmuth, David S.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Preliminary Study of a Vented Attic Radiant Barrier System in Hot, Humid Climates Using Side-by-Side, Full-Scale Test Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of side-by-side tests was performed using two full scale test houses to determine the effectiveness of a Vented Radiant Barrier System (VRBS) in reducing the ceiling heat flux during the summer cooling season in North Florida. Another series of side-by-side tests was conducted to evaluate the effect of a VRBS on ceiling heat losses under typical North Florida winter conditions. The effect of a VRBS on the expected life of roof shingles was also evaluated.

Lear, W. E.; Barrup, T. E.; Davis, K. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electrochromic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

Allemand, Pierre M. (Tucson, AZ); Grimes, Randall F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Ingle, Andrew R. (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Kennedy, Steve R. (Tuscon, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Boulton, Jonathan M. (Tucson, AZ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included. (RME)

Fowler, T.K.

1977-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Results of HWVP transuranic process waste treatment laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests using specially ground zeolite  

SciTech Connect

Process waste streams from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) may require treatment for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) element removal in order to meet criteria for incorporation in grout. The approach planned for cesium and strontium removal is ion exchange using a zeolite exchanger followed by filtration. Filtration using a pneumatic hydropulse filter is planned to remove TRU elements which are associated with process solids and to also remove zeolite bearing the cesium and strontium. The solids removed during filtration are recycled to the melter feed system to be incorporated into the HWVP glass product. Fluor Daniel, Inc., the architect-engineering firm for HWVP, recommended a Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) filter manufactured by Mott Metallurgical Corporation for use in the HWVP. The primary waste streams considered for application of zeolite contact and filtration are melter off-gas condensate from the submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and equipment decontamination solutions from the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT). Other waste streams could be treated depending on TRU element and radionuclide content. Laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests were conducted to provide a preliminary assessment of the adequacy of the recommended filter for application to HWVP waste treatment.

Eakin, D.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of a Reduced Scale High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Test Facility and its Prototype with MELCOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to the energy policy act of 2005, the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has been selected as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) that will become the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Although plans to build a demonstration plant at Idaho National Laboratories (INL) are currently on hold, a cooperative agreement on HTGR research between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and several academic investigators remains in place. One component of this agreement relates to validation of systems-level computer code modeling capabilities in anticipation of the eventual need to perform HTGR licensing analyses. Because the NRC has used MELCOR for LWR licensing in the past and because MELCOR was recently updated to include gas-cooled reactor physics models, MELCOR is among the system codes of interest in the cooperative agreement. The impetus for this thesis was a code-to-experiment validation study wherein MELCOR computer code predictions were to be benchmarked against experimental data from a reduced-scale HTGR testing apparatus called the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF). For various reasons, HTTF data is not yet available from facility designers at Oregon State University, and hence the scope of this thesis was narrowed to include only computational studies of the HTTF and its prototype, General Atomics’ Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). Using the most complete literature references available for MHTGR design and using preliminary design information on the HTTF, MELCOR input decks for both systems were developed. Normal and off-normal system operating conditions were modeled via implementation of appropriate boundary and inititial conditions. MELCOR Predictions of system response for steady-state, pressurized conduction cool-down (PCC), and depressurized conduction cool-down (DCC) conditions were checked against nominal design parameters, physical intuition, and some computational results available from previous RELAP5-3D analyses at INL. All MELCOR input decks were successfully built and all scenarios were successfully modeled under certain assumptions. Given that the HTTF input deck is preliminary and was based on dated references, the results were altogether imperfect but encouraging since no indications of as yet unknown deficiencies in MELCOR modeling capability were observed. Researchers at TAMU are in a good position to revise the MELCOR models upon receipt of new information and to move forward with MELCOR-to-HTTF benchmarking when and if test data becomes available.

Beeny, Bradley 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nanocomposite Materials for Energy Storage Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High power energy storage devices are critical for the development of zero-emission electrical vehicles, large scale smart grid, and energy ...

263

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, Results of the Phase II Testing of Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International collaborative effort to construct a laboratory-scale Sulfur-Iodine process capable of producing 100-200 L/hr of hydrogen.

Benjamin Russ; G. Naranjo; R. Moore; W. Sweet; M. Hele; N. Pons

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Superconductive devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 2 years there have been several suggestions advanced for computer devices which utilize the unique properties of superconductors. Some of these take advantage of the strong nonlinear dependence of resistance on magnetic field which makes ...

Albert E. Slade; Howard McMahon

1958-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Device Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Device Performance group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we measure the performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reporting conditions--defined as a reference temperature (25 C), total irradiance (1000 Wm-2), and spectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3). Typically, these are ''global'' reference conditions, but we can measure with respect to any reference set. To determine device performance, we conduct two general categories of measurements: spectral responsivity (SR) and current versus voltage (I-V). We usually perform these measurements using standard procedures, but we develop new procedures when required by new technologies. We also serve as an independent facility for verifying device performance for the entire PV community. We help the PV community solve its special measurement problems, giving advice on solar simulation, instrumentation for I-V measurements, reference cells, measurement procedures, and anomalous results. And we collaborate with researchers to analyze devices and materials.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Special Tests for Thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special Tests for Thermometry. ... Proficiency-test artifacts (eg SPRTs); Bridge certification; Evaluation of prototype thermometric devices. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development and testing of a risk indexing framework to determine field-scale critical source areas of faecal bacteria on grassland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper draws on lessons from a UK case study in the management of diffuse microbial pollution from grassland farm systems in the Taw catchment, southwest England. We report on the development and preliminary testing of a field-scale faecal indicator ... Keywords: Critical source area, Diffuse pollution, Escherichia coli, Expert knowledge, Faecal indicator organism, Index, Pathogens, Risk, Water quality

David M. Oliver; Trevor Page; Chris J. Hodgson; A. Louise Heathwaite; Dave R. Chadwick; Rob D. Fish; Michael Winter

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE/EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment for Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26 26 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test Decatur, Illinois October 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy MGSC Phase III National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ______________________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents i October 2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................... v LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................................................................................

269

MicroLink Devices Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MicroLink Devices Inc MicroLink Devices Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name MicroLink Devices, Inc. Place Niles, Illinois Product MicroLink Devices is a semiconductor manufacturer and system integrator that provides the latest semiconductor technology to wireless and RF test instrument applications. Coordinates 41.180995°, -80.765144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.180995,"lon":-80.765144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

270

Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

TESTS ON HALF-SCALE FLOW MODEL OF 40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HTGR (PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION)  

SciTech Connect

A half-scale clear plastic nonnuclear flow model of the 40-Mw(e) Peach Bottom High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) vessel and internals was operated during the period from January 1981, through October 1981. The model was operated as an induced system using ambient air as the working fluid. The maximum Reynolds number achieved in the model was approximately one-half of the Reynolds number corresponding to the full-load design conditions in the prototype. The prototype reactor pressure-drop values extrapolated from the flow-model data indicated a pressure drop of 2.0 psi for a helium flow rate of 468,000 lb/hr and pressure of 350 psia, and a constant inlet and Outlet temperature of 650 deg F. The corresponding conservatively calculated pressure-drop value was approximately 2.9 psi. No areas of serious flow starvation were observed within the model during tests with flow through only one nozzle or through both nozzles. The inlet flow divided almost equally into the upward and downward directions. Regions where low velocities were indicated appeared to be turbulent and free from stagnation. Completely closing the four off-center openings in the top head reduced the flow of air from the outer flow jacket to the inner flow jackets by only about 20%. This result supported the design approach of providing only one nozzle in the center of the top head for flow from the outer to the inner flow jackets. The heat-transfer coefficients measured at the inner surface of the pressure vessel varied over a range from 50 to 200 Btu/(hr)(ft2)( deg F), at the design flow rate, and in general were about twice the caiculated values for corresponding points. The tilting reflector was found to be a workable concept. No vibration or movement could be induced in the core by manual manipulation of various reflector blocks. There was no detectable vibration of the core during any mode of flowmodel operation. (auth)

Ross, S.; Dav, E.A.; Skeehan, R.A.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Finite-size scaling tests for spectra in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I carry out a finite-size scaling study of the correlation length in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions, using recent data published by Fodor, Holland, Kuti, Nogradi and Schroeder. I make the assumption that the system is conformal in the zero-mass, infinite volume limit, that scaling is violated by both nonzero fermion mass and by finite volume, and that the scaling function in each channel is determined self-consistently by the data. From several different observables I extract a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length xi with the fermion mass m_q, xi proportional to m_q to the power -1/y_m, with y_m ~ 1.35. Shortcomings of the analysis are discussed.

Thomas DeGrand

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part work, the feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation through various observing system simulation experiments was demonstrated assuming a perfect forecast ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pyrotechnic study and test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unidynamics/Phoenix entered into LANL contract {number_sign}9-X51-D9928-1 on March 11, 1991. The contract was to perform chemical analysis and provide analytical data, provide test data from functioning units, build and test pyrotechnic devices and fabricate and test approximately 100 pyrotechnic devices to approximate the chemical and functioning characteristics of the devices from the Army inventory. Because of government regulations, it became nearly impossible to ship the units from White Sands to Unidynamics. Consequently a series of functional tests were conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Comments on the functional tests are included herein. In addition, small scale tests were conducted at Unidynamics. These tests were to demonstrate a so called {open_quotes}line{close_quotes} charge and a {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} charge. A discussion of these two charges is presented. The program was put on hold on November 6, 1991 and subsequently reopened to prepare and submit this report.

Smith, R.D.; Fronabarger, J.W. [Unidynamics/Phoenix, AZ (US)

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electrochemical device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Bellows, Richard J. (Westfield, NJ)

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

Smith, J.E.

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Small-scale cookoff bomb (SSCB) tests on solutions of DMSO/LX-10-1 and DMSO/PBX-9404  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The small-scale cookoff bomb test was developed by the Navy at China Lake as a method for evaluation of the violence of thermal decomposition of explosives and propellants. The UN {open_quotes}Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Tests and Criteria{close_quotes} (ST/SG/AC.10/11) have accepted the small-scale cookoff bomb test as a test for classification of a substance as an explosive (class 1 substance) for storage and shipment. The US Departments of Transportation and Defense have agreed to use the UN tests as US criteria for storage and shipment. The UN scheme is designed to assess the relative hazard of explosives so that an appropriate classification for transport can be made by the competent authority (DOT). Three thermal tests have been approved: the Koenen test, the internal ignition test and the small-scale cookoff bomb (SSCB) test. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed a dissolution work station for removal of the plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 from two artillery fired atomic projectiles (AFAPs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the solvent. The DOE Explosives Safety Manual allows up to 33% solutions of explosives to be handled as non-explosive in the laboratory and 25% solutions to be stored as non-explosives unless the explosive precipitates out. In order to ship solutions of LX-10-1 or PBX-9404 in DMSO on US highways for waste or recycling as non-explosives, these solutions must be approved for shipping by the DOT based on the results of UN test series 1. The compositions of LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 are given in Table 1. The shock sensitivity of solutions of these two plastic bonded explosives in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been evaluated using the UN series 1 gap test for liquids as described in a previous report. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the SSCB tests on pure DMSO and 25% PBX solutions in DMSO to assist in the classification of these solutions.

Helm, F.; Hoffman, D.M.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wafer-scale charge isolation technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are described which improve the performance of charge-coupled devices (CCD) in the presence of ionizing radiation. The invention is a wafer scale charge isolation technique which inhibits or reduces the flow of electrons created by the passage of ionizing radiation in the bulk regions of a silicon CCD. The technique has been tested in a device designed for operating in the infra-red wavelength band. The technique prevents charge from reaching the active charge collection volume of a pixel in a CCD.

Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO2-EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting October 15-17, 2011 Pittsburgh, PA Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000441 Contract #FE0006821 $11,484,499 DOE $3.236 million cost share KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 12/2/2011 1 Outline * Background * The Participants * The Plan * Leveraging Current Research at Wellington Field * Inject, Monitor, Verification, and Accounting of CO 2 2 ORGANIZATION CHART Kansas Geological Survey Name Project Job Title Primary Responsibility Lynn Watney Project Leader, Joint Principal Investigator

283

Scaling Isoprene Fluxes from Leaves to Canopies: Test Cases over a Boreal Aspen and a Mixed Species Temperate Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate at which isoprene is emitted by a forest depends on an array of environmental variables, the forest’s biomass, and its species composition. At present it is unclear whether errors in canopy-scale and process-level isoprene emission ...

Dennis D. Baldocchi; Jose D. Fuentes; David R. Bowling; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Russell K. Monson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

285

1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic assemblies weighing up to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) The RGHB performs advanced thermal testing of full-size wall/fenestration systems. It accommodates systems content in materials, vapor pressure, temperature, heat flux, humidity, and condensation. 7. MAXLAB MAXLAB. It is adequate for testing in most residential and light commercial buildings. 12. Duct Blaster A Duct Blaster

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

286

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

LOADING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

Ohlinger, L.A.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NIST Chip-Scale Atomic Device Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Local communications hubs • Instrumentation level flywheels ... Local communications hubs • Instrumentation level flywheels ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Implementation of a Two-Axis Servo-Hydraulic System for Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, the blade fatigue testing capabilities at NREL were upgraded from single-axis to two-axis loading. To implement this, several practical challenges were addressed, as hardware complexity increased dramatically with two actuators applying the loads at right angles to each other. A custom bellcrank was designed and implemented to minimize the load angle errors and to prevent actuator side loading. The control system was upgraded to accept load and displacement feedback from two actuators. The inherent long strokes uniquely associated with wind turbine blade-tests required substantial real-time corrections for both the control and data systems. A custom data acquisition and control system was developed using a National Instruments LabVIEW platform that interfaces with proprietary servo-hydraulic software developed by MTS Corporation. Before testing, the program is run under quasi-static (slow speed) conditions and iterates to determine the correct operational control parameters for the controller, taking into consideration geometry, test speed, and phase angle errors between the two actuators. Comparisons are made between single-axis and two-axis test loads using actual test load data and load uncertainties are qualitatively described. To date, two fatigue tests have been completed and another is currently ongoing using NREL's two-axis capability.

Hughes, S. D.; Musial, W. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Stensland, T. [Stensland Technologies (US)

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Annular centrifugal contactors as rapid oil-water separation devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of preliminary test to apply devices known as annular centrifugal contactors to the rapid separation of oil-water mixtures are presented. Separation efficiencies of oil from water of >99% have been demonstrated on both light and heavy oils. Equilibrium within the separating zone of the contractor is reached within seconds. Dynamic testing in which water to oil flow ratios of 1:5 and 5:1 have been conducted without loss of performance. The laboratory scaled contactors tested have total throughout of 80 cc/min. The design and construction of larger devices with total throughputs of hundreds of gallons per minute is feasible. Such contactors would be compact units capable of allowing rapid recovery from a broad range of hydrocarbon spills on waterways. The efficiency of these contactors is such that water discharged can be returned directly to the environment. Recovered hydrocarbons may be useful without further refinement. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Bourne, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Annular centrifugal contactors as rapid oil-water separation devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of preliminary tests to apply devices known as annular centrifugal; contactors to the rapid separation of oil-water mixtures are presented. Separation efficiencies of oil from water of >99% have been demonstrated on both light and heavy oils. Equilibrium within the separating zone of the contactor is reached within seconds. Dynamic testing in which water to oil flow ratios of 1:5 and 5:1 have been conducted without loss of performance. The laboratory scaled contactors tested have total throughput of 80 cc/min. The design and construction of larger devices with total throughputs of hundreds of gallons per minute is feasible. Such contactors would be compact units capable of allowing rapid recovery from a broad range of hydrocarbon spills on waterways. The efficiency of these contactors is such that water discharged can be returned to the environment. Recovered hydrocarbons may be useful without further refinement.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Bourne, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electrochromic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

Schwendemanm, Irina G. (Wexford, PA); Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Finley, James J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Boykin, Cheri M. (Kingsport, TN); Knowles, Julianna M. (Apollo, PA)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gripping device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a gripping device having at least two fingers: one movable finger and at least one stationary finger. The fingers are attached to a support by a collar, the movable finger being pivotally attached. The support carries an air cylinder with a shaft to actuate the movable finger. The movable finger has a wide portion with a slot. On the distal end of the air cylinder's shaft is a travelerthat rides int he slot and, as it does, causes the movable finger to pivot toward and away from the two stationary fingers.

Hapstack, M.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

OLED devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Pilot-scale Pilot scale Testing Questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. DE-FC26 DE FC26-07NT42785

Alan E. Bl; Collin Greenwell; Jesse Newcomer Wri; Barbara Carney; Us Doe Netl; High Temperature; Sorbent Testing; De-fc De Fc-nt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filter Testing in Support of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions conducted a series of tests to assess the constructability and performance of the Cross-Flow Filter (CFF) system specified for the Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The testing determined the optimum flow rates, operating pressures, filtrate-flow control techniques, and cycle timing for filter back pulse and chemical cleaning. Results have verified the design assumptions made and have confirmed the suitability of cross-flow filtration for use in the SWPF. In conclusion: The CFF Test Program demonstrated that the SWPF CFF system could be successfully fabricated, that the SWPF CFF design assumptions were conservative with respect to filter performance and provided useful information on operational parameters and techniques. The filter system demonstrated performance in excess of expectations. (authors)

Stephens, A.B.; Gallego, R.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Singer, S.A.; Swanson, B.L. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Bartling, K. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Review of Sub-Scale Test Methods to Evaluate the Friction and Wear of Ring and Liner Materials for Spark- and Compression Ignition Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review was conducted of past laboratory-scale test methods and to assess their validity for ranking materials and lubricants for use as piston and liner materials in compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) engines. Most of the previous work was aimed at simulating SI engine environments. This report begins with a discussion of the numerous factors that can affect the validity of an approach to simulating engine conditions in a laboratory. These include not only mechanical, chemical and thermal factors, but also human factors as regards how the vehicle is operated and maintained. The next section provides an annotated review of open literature publications that address the issues of laboratory simulation of engine components. A comparison of these studies indicates a lack of sufficient standardization in procedures to enable a systematic comparison of one publication to another. There were just a few studies that compared several laboratory test methods to engine test results, and these indicated that some test methods correlate, at least qualitatively, better than others. The last section provides a series of recommendations for improving the accuracy and validity of laboratory-scale simulations of engine behavior. It became clear that much of the engine wear damage occurs during start-up when the engine is cold, and this calls into the question the usefulness of test methods that attempt to simulate steady-state running conditions. It is recommended that a new standard test method, perhaps developed with the help of the ASTM wear and erosion committee, be developed. It would use cold start-up conditions in the presence of degraded oil, or simulated degraded oil.

Blau, P.J.

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Removal of H{sub2}S from geothermal steam by catalytic oxidation process: bench scale testing results. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

A process was investigated to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub2}S) from geothermal steam. This process is an upstream steam treatment process which utilizes a catalytic oxidation reaction to convert H{sub2}S in geothermal steam to water vapor and sulfur. The process consists of passing geothermal steam, containing H{sub2}S and other noncondensible gases, through fixed beds of activated carbon catalyst. Oxygen is provided by injection of air or oxygen upstream of the catalyst beds. The treated steam, with H{sub2}S being almost completely removed, passes to steam turbines for power generation. The elemental sulfur produced deposits on the catalyst surface and is retained. The catalyst activity decreases gradually with sulfur accumulation. Sulfur removal, and catalyst regeneration, is accomplished by solvent extraction. Sulfur is recovered from solvent by evaporation/crystallization. Bench scale experimental work on this process was performed to determine its performance and limits of applicability to power generation systems employing geothermal steam. The bench scale system employed a one-inch diameter reactor, a steam supply with controlled temperature and pressure, an injection system for adding {Hsub2}S and other gases at controlled rates, and instrumentation for control and measurement of temperatures, pressures, flow rates and presssure drop. H{sub2}S and other analyses were performed by wet chemistry techniques.

Li, C.T.; Brouns, R.A.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Star Polymers Confined in a Nanoslit: A Simulation Test of Scaling and Self-Consistent Field Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free energy cost of confining a star polymer where $f$ flexible polymer chains containing $N$ monomeric units are tethered to a central unit in a slit with two parallel repulsive walls a distance $D$ apart is considered, for good solvent conditions. Also the parallel and perpendicular components of the gyration radius of the star polymer, and the monomer density profile across the slit are obtained. Theoretical descriptions via Flory theory and scaling treatments are outlined, and compared to numerical self-consistent field calculations (applying the Scheutjens-Fleer lattice theory) and to Molecular Dynamics results for a bead-spring model. It is shown that Flory theory and self-consistent field (SCF) theory yield the correct scaling of the parallel linear dimension of the star with $N$, $f$ and $D$, but cannot be used for estimating the free energy cost reliably. We demonstrate that the same problem occurs already for the confinement of chains in cylindrical tubes. We also briefly discuss the problem of a free or grafted star polymer interacting with a single wall, and show that the dependence of confining force on the functionality of the star is different for a star confined in a nanoslit and a star interacting with a single wall, which is due to the absence of a symmetry plane in the latter case.

J. Paturej; A. Milchev; S. A. Egorov; K. Binder

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NSLS Insertion Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insertion Devices MGU-25 VUV Ring Insertion Devices X-Ray Ring Insertion Devices VISA NISUS Flux & Brightness of NSLS IDs Magnetic Measurement Lab...

309

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Preliminary results from bench-scale testing of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of a bench-scale model of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle have been operated at General Atomic Company as part of a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technology for hydrogen production from nonfossil sources. The hydrogen program is funded by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, and General Atomic Company. The bench-scale model consists of three subunits which can be operated separately or together and is capable of producing as much as 4 std liters/min (6.7 x 10/sup -5/ m/sup 3//s at standard conditions) of gaseous hydrogen. One subunit (main solution reaction) reacts liquid water, liquid iodine (I/sub 2/) and gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to form two separable liquid phases: 50 wt % sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) and a solution of iodine in hydriodic acid (HI/sub x/). Another subunit (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentration and decomposition) concentrates the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ phase to the azeotropic composition, then decomposes it at high temperature over a catalyst to form gaseous SO/sub 2/ and oxygen. The third subunit (HI separation and decomposition) separates the HI from water and I/sub 2/ by extractive distillation with phosphoric acid (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) and decomposes the HI in the vapor phase over a catalyst to form I/sub 2/ and product hydrogen. This paper presents the results of on-going parametric studies to determine the operating characteristics, performance, and capacity limitations of major components.

O'Keefe, D.; Allen, C.; Besenbruch, G.; McCorkle, K.; Norman, J.; Sharp, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

Baker, W.R.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.  

SciTech Connect

In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

FED-R: a fusion engineering device utilizing resistive magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal purpose of the FED-R tokamak facility is to provide a substantial quasi-steady flux of fusion neutrons irradiating a large test area in order to carry out thermal, neutronic, and radiation effects testing of experimental blanket assemblies having a variety of configurations, compositions, and purposes. The design of the FED-R device also suggests potential for an upgrade that could be employed as a full-scale demonstration reactor for some specific fusion-neutron application when required.

Jassby, D.L.; Kalsi, S.S. (eds.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup reactor.

Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Data Analysis, Pre-Ignition Assessment, and Post-Ignition Modeling of the Large-Scale Annular Cookoff Tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the implications that cookoff of plastic-bonded explosive-9501 could have on safety assessments, we analyzed the available data from the large-scale annular cookoff (LSAC) assembly series of experiments. In addition, we examined recent data regarding hypotheses about pre-ignition that may be relevant to post-ignition behavior. Based on the post-ignition data from Shot 6, which had the most complete set of data, we developed an approximate equation of state (EOS) for the gaseous products of deflagration. Implementation of this EOS into the multimaterial hydrodynamics computer program PAGOSA yielded good agreement with the inner-liner collapse sequence for Shot 6 and with other data, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector and resistance wires. A metric to establish the degree of symmetry based on the concept of time of arrival to pin locations was used to compare numerical simulations with experimental data. Several simulations were performed to elucidate the mode of ignition in the LSAC and to determine the possible compression levels that the metal assembly could have been subjected to during post-ignition.

G. Terrones; F.J. Souto; R.F. Shea; M.W.Burkett; E.S. Idar

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

Meigs, Richard A. (East Concord, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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321

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

Meigs, R.A.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

Meigs, R.A.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Performance of powder-filled evacuated panel insulation in a manufactured home roof cavity: Tests in the Large Scale Climate Simulator  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale section of half the top of a single-wide manufactured home has been studied in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A small roof cavity with little room for insulation at the eaves is often the case with single-wide units and limits practical ways to improve thermal performance. The purpose of the current tests was to obtain steady-state performance data for the roof cavity of the manufactured home test section when the roof cavity was insulated with fiberglass batts, blown-in rock wool insulation or combinations of these insulations and powder-filled evacuated panel (PEP) insulation. Four insulation configurations were tested: (A) a configuration with two layers of nominal R{sub US}-7 h {center_dot} ft{sup 2} {center_dot} F/BTU (R{sub SI}-1.2 m{sup 2} {center_dot} K/W) fiberglass batts; (B) a layer of PEPs and one layer of the fiberglass batts; (C) four layers of the fiberglass batts; and (D) an average 4.1 in. (10.4 cm) thick layer of blown-in rock wool at an average density of 2.4 lb/ft{sup 3} (38 kg/m{sup 3}). Effects of additional sheathing were determined for Configurations B and C. With Configuration D over the ceiling, two layers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) boards, each about the same thickness as the PEPs, were installed over the trusses instead of the roof. Aluminum foils facing the attic and over the top layer of EPS were added. The top layer of EPS was then replaced by PEPs.

Petrie, T.W.; Kosny, J.; Childs, P.W.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REPORT DETAILING DATA COLLECTION IN SUPPORT OF POTENTIAL FY13 PILOT SCALE MELTER TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the “reference ceramic” waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste forms indicated that the pour spout must be maintained above 1400{deg}C to avoid flow blockages due to crystallization. In-situ electron irradiations simulate radiolysis effects indicated hollandite undergoes a crystalline to amorphous transition after a radiation dose of 10{sup 13} Gy which corresponds to approximately 1000 years at anticipated doses (2×10{sup 10}-2×10{sup 11} Gy). Dual-beam ion irradiations employing light ion beam (such as 5 MeV alpha) and heavy ion beam (such as 100 keV Kr) studies indicate that reference ceramic waste forms are radiation tolerant to the ?–particles and ?-particles, but are susceptible to a crystalline to amorphous transition under recoil nuclei effects. A path forward for refining the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere with the use of Ti/TiO2 buffers, and the addition of Cr to the transition metal additives to facilitate Cs-incorporation in the hollandite phase. In addition to melt processing, alternative fabrication routes are being considered including Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP).

Brinkman, K.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.; Fox, K.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Report Detailing Data Collection In Support Of Potential FY13 Pilot Scale Melter Test  

SciTech Connect

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the ?reference ceramic? waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste forms indicated that the pour spout must be maintained above 1400{deg}C to avoid flow blockages due to crystallization. In-situ electron irradiations simulate radiolysis effects indicated hollandite undergoes a crystalline to amorphous transition after a radiation dose of 10{sup 13} Gy which corresponds to approximately 1000 years at anticipated doses (2?10{sup 10}-2?10{sup 11} Gy). Dual-beam ion irradiations employing light ion beam (such as 5 MeV alpha) and heavy ion beam (such as 100 keV Kr) studies indicate that reference ceramic waste forms are radiation tolerant to the ??particles and ?-particles, but are susceptible to a crystalline to amorphous transition under recoil nuclei effects. A path forward for refining the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere with the use of Ti/TiO2 buffers, and the addition of Cr to the transition metal additives to facilitate Cs-incorporation in the hollandite phase. In addition to melt processing, alternative fabrication routes are being considered including Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP).

Brinkman, K. S.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

327

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Design and Testing of a Landfill Gas Cleanup System for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants: Volume II: Full Scale Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants (Proprietary)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a proprietary version of section 5 of EPRI technical report TR-108043-V1. The volume contains detailed design information and operating conditions for a full-scale, low-cost cleanup system that would enable landfill gas to be used in carbonate fuel cells or other power generation devices. The EPRI-developed system is now available for license to commercial applications.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Hydrostratigraphic System for Modeling Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration at the Corrective Action Unit Scale, Nevada Test Site and Surrounding Areas, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Underground Test Area (UGTA) corrective action unit (CAU) groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity are built upon hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) that utilize the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) as the fundamental modeling component. The delineation and three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of HSUs within the highly complex geologic terrain that is the NTS requires a hydrostratigraphic system that is internally consistent, yet flexible enough to account for overlapping model areas, varied geologic terrain, and the development of multiple alternative HFMs. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system builds on more than 50 years of geologic and hydrologic work in the NTS region. It includes 76 HSUs developed from nearly 300 stratigraphic units that span more than 570 million years of geologic time, and includes rock units as diverse as marine carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, granitic intrusives, rhyolitic lavas and ash-flow tuffs, and alluvial valley-fill deposits. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system uses a geology-based approach and two-level classification scheme. The first, or lowest, level of the hydrostratigraphic system is the hydrogeologic unit (HGU). Rocks in a model area are first classified as one of ten HGUs based on the rock’s ability to transmit groundwater (i.e., nature of their porosity and permeability), which at the NTS is mainly a function of the rock’s primary lithology, type and degree of postdepositional alteration, and propensity to fracture. The second, or highest, level within the UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system is the HSU, which is the fundamental mapping/modeling unit within UGTA CAU-scale HFMs. HSUs are 3-D bodies that are represented in the finite element mesh for the UGTA groundwater modeling process. HSUs are defined systematically by stratigraphically organizing HGUs of similar character into larger HSUs designations. The careful integration of stratigraphic information in the development of HSUs is important to assure individual HSUs are internally consistent, correlatable, and mappable throughout all the model areas.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack Jr., Jennifer Mercadante

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lab Scale Hydraulic Parameter Estimation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic tomography has been tested at the field scale, lab scale and in synthetic experiments. Recently Illman and Berg have conducted studies at the lab… (more)

Hartz, Andrew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Simple Candle Filter Safeguard Device  

SciTech Connect

In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal utilization. Two main designs employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs) and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCCs). In both designs, the suspended particulates, or dust, must be cleaned from the gas before it enters the turbine to prevent fouling and erosion of the blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in commercial use. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the dust on the surface. The three main configurations are candle, cross-flow, and tube. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are primarily composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer o n the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle, and individual elements can fail, allowing the particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Because of the possibility of occasional filter breakage, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the dust streaming through broken filters from reaching the turbine. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) safeguard device is composed of three main parts: the ceramic substrate, the adhesive coating, and the safeguard device housing. This report describes the development and laboratory testing of each of those parts as well as the bench-scale performance of both types of complete SGDs.

Hurley, J.P.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

DeShong, J.A.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Device Performance Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device Performance Measurement Device Performance Measurement The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the premier U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research laboratory for testing performance of commercial, developmental, and research photovoltaic (PV) devices. Our Device Performance group is one of only two laboratories in the world to hold an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 17025 accreditation for primary reference cell and secondary module calibration, in addition to accreditation for secondary reference cell calibration under American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. One of only four laboratories in the world certified in accordance with the IEC standard for calibrating terrestrial primary reference PV cells, we

335

Testing of Residential Homes under Wind Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... At such scales, model dimensions for a residential home are of the order of ... To de- velop flow management devices efficiently, a small-scale (1?8 ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Scaling self-timed systems powered by mechanical vibration energy harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive energy harvesting from mechanical vibration has wide application in wearable devices and wireless sensors to complement or replace batteries. Energy harvesting efficiency can be increased by eliminating AC/DC conversion. A test chip demonstrating ... Keywords: AC power supply, DRAM, energy harvesting, energy-aware systems, integrated circuits, low-power design, power-on reset, scaling, self-timed

Justin Wenck; Jamie Collier; Jeff Siebert; Rajeevan Amirtharajah

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Efficient data management on lightweight computing devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computation platforms have extended to small intelli-gent devices like cellphones, sensors, smartcards, PDAs, etc. As new functionalities and features are being addedto these devices, increasing number of applications dealing with significant amounts of data are being developedleading to the need of embedded database support on these devices [1]. The queries go beyond simple Select-Project-Join queries but still have to be locally executed on the device [4]. There is an increasing need to facilitate the execu-tion of complex queries locally on a variety of lightweight computing devices.However, scaling down the database footprint poses challenges since these lightweight devices come with verylimited computing resources. While the amount of main

Rajkumar Sen; Krithi Ramamrithamindian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Disappearing mobile devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we extrapolate the evolution of mobile devices in one specific direction, namely miniaturization. While we maintain the concept of a device that people are aware of and interact with intentionally, we envision that this concept can become ... Keywords: gesture, input device, interaction technique, miniaturization, mobile device, sensor, ubicomp, wearable

Tao Ni; Patrick Baudisch

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Integrating window pyranometer for beam daylighting measurements in scale-model buildings  

SciTech Connect

An experimental device has been developed to measure the total amount of solar radiation transmitted through glazed apertures in scale-model buildings. The device, an integrating window pyranometer (IWP), has two distinguishing characteristics: (1) it provides a measure of transmitted solar radiation integrated over a representative portion of the model glazing, accounting for nonuniform radiation distributions; and (2) it is spectrally independent. In applications to scale-model daylighting experiments, the IWP, together with photometric sensors mounted in the model, allows the direct measurement of the fraction of transmitted solar gains reaching the work plane as useful illumination, a convenient measure of the daylighting system performance. The IWP has been developed as part of an outdoor experimental facility to perform beam daylighting measurements in scale-model buildings. In this paper, the integrating window pyranometer is described; the results of calibration tests are presented and evaluated; the advantages and limitations of the device are discussed.

Bauman, F.; Place, W.; Thornton, J.; Howard, T.C.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

Salari, K; Ortega, J

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Programmable logic devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Erasable programmable logic devices (EPLDs) were investigated to determine their advantages and/or disadvantages in Test Equipment Engineering applications. It was found that EPLDs performed as well as or better than identical circuits using standard TTL logic. The chip count in these circuits was reduced, saving printed circuit board space and shortening fabrication and prove-in time. Troubleshooting circuits of EPLDs was also easier with 10 to 100 times fewer wires needed. The reduced number of integrated circuits (ICs) contributed to faster system speeds and an overall lower power consumption. In some cases changes to the circuit became software changes using EPLDs instead of hardware changes for standard logic. Using EPLDs was fairly easy; however, as with any new technology, a learning curve must be overcome before EPLDs can be used efficiently. The many benefits of EPLDs outweighed this initial inconvenience.

Jacobs, J.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ceramics for fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Iris Device Qualification Test (IDQT) Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rationale: Capture Optical Traits of ... 24 Commercial Grade Star Target Carbon-based Inkjet ... Multiple captures with fiber fed USB spectrometer ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 Earn 11 R&D 100 Awards Jul 2, 2013 US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone View All > Timeline Curious about NNSA...

347

Device testing and characterization of thermoelectric nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has become evident in recent years that developing clean, sustainable energy technologies will be one of the world's greatest challenges in the 21st century. Thermoelectric materials can potentially make a contribution ...

Muto, Andrew (Andrew Jerome)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pneumatic Conveyance Device  

The Pneumatic Conveyance Device is capable of dislodging, capturing, and conveying solid material, wet or dry, from a depth of 70+ feet, while discharging through a 100+ foot conveyance hose.  The device was developed to remove water and solid ...

349

ICRF heating on helical devices  

SciTech Connect

Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ICRF heating on helical devices  

SciTech Connect

Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pulse detecting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, W.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Integration of a Novel Microfluidic Device with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light emitting diode antifuse has been integrated into a microfluidic device that is realized with extended standard CMOS technological steps. The device comprises of a microchannel sandwiched between a photodiode detector and a nanometer-scale diode antifuse light emitter. In this chapter, the device fabrication process, working principle and properties will be discussed. Change in the interference fringe of the antifuse spectra has been measured due to the filling of the channel. Preliminary possible applications are electro-osmotic flow speed measurement, detection of absorptivity of liquids in the channel...

Silicon Light Emitting; J. W. Berenschot; N. R. Tas; A. Van Den Berg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Articulating feedstock delivery device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biotransformation of PCBs in Substation Soils: A Review of Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Testing for the Development of an In Situ Proc ess for PCB Biotransformation in Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ methods are desirable for remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to prevent disruption of activities at industrial sites such as substations. This study follows the development, from laboratory testing through pilot-scale demonstration, of an in situ soil irrigation process for biotransformation of PCBs in soils.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Portable data collection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

French, Patrick D. (Aurora, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Unitary lens semiconductor device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Property:Lab Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Test Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Lab Test Property Type Text Pages using the property "Lab Test" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/AirWEC + A small scale model was tank tested MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine + The device underwent a series of tests designed to assess the fatigue life of Anaconda when deployed These tests have now been completed and finalised Time will be spent collating all the data gathered and this will then be passed to Messrs Black and Veatch the international consulting engineers that Checkmate Seaenergy and Carbon Trust have chosen to conduct a fully independent review of the technology this in preparation for an approach to prospective investors

359

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III: Comparison with 3DVAR in a Real-Data Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation has been demonstrated in the authors’ recent studies via observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) both under a perfect-model ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Intercept: Profiling Windows Network Device Drivers* Manuel Mendona Nuno Neves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testing, or reverse engineering. Experi- ments using Ethernet, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device drivers showIntercept: Profiling Windows Network Device Drivers* Manuel Mendonça Nuno Neves University of Lisboa, Faculty of Sciences, LASIGE, Portugal manuelmendonca@msn.com, nuno@di.fc.ul.pt Abstract. Device

Neves, Nuno

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, C.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chalcopyrite Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This indicates that a p-n junction with photovoltaic response was formed between the films and Si. The estimated open -circuit voltage VOC for these devices is ...

365

High efficiency photovoltaic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Xu, Xi Xiang (Findlay, OH)

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Medical Device Interoperability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The research effort includes a gap analysis of the medical device communication standard IEEE 11073 versus use case scenarios outlined in ...

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Each element within an array of metamaterial (MM) elements comprises multiple loops and at least one gap. The MM elements may comprise resonators with conductive loops and insulated gaps, or the inverse in which insulated loops are present with conductive gaps; each providing useful transmissive control properties. The metamaterial elements are fabricated on a semiconducting substrate configured with a

368

Mobile Device Management Android Device Enrollment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Play Store. b. Search for Zenprise for Employees. c. Tap Install. #12;d. Tap Accept and download. 4 your device. b. Tap Enroll Android. c. Enter your LSUHSC email address. #12;d. Enter LSUHSC password and click Enroll. i. StrongId should be blank. e. Accept the Terms and Conditions. 5. Installing Touchdown a

369

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Jeffrey R. Belt

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Jeffrey R. Belt

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Grey man devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Vision Slaved to Walking Device i s one in a series of devices that are a result of the experimental ambulation series. The ability to see only when one's feet are moving allows for a distorted perspective of ones own ...

Sethi, Sanjit (Sanjit Singh), 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Verifiably secure devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We put forward the notion of a verifiably secure device, in essence a stronger notion of secure computation, and achieve it in the ballot-box model. Verifiably secure devices 1. Provide a perfect solution to the problem of achieving correlated equilibrium, ...

Sergei Izmalkov; Matt Lepinski; Silvio Micali

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Self-actuated device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

Hecht, Samuel L. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chronology of Computing Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chronology of computing devices is given. It begins with the abacus and counting tables, and traces the development through desk calculators, analog computers, and finally stored program automatic digital computers. Significant dates relative to the ... Keywords: Calculating machines, chronology, computers, computing devices, history.

H. D. Huskey; V. R. Huskey

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part III: Forecasting with Secondary-Applications Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from the Army Test and Evaluation Command’s Four-Dimensional Weather System’s mesoscale model is used to drive secondary-applications models to produce forecasts of quantities of importance for daily decision making at U.S. Army test ...

Robert D. Sharman; Yubao Liu; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Thomas T. Warner; Daran L. Rife; James F. Bowers; Charles A. Clough; Edward E. Ellison

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Seventeenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In the first quarter of calendar year 1996, 9 days of combust-boiler tests were performed. Between these tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. In January and early February, the modifications and installations indicated by the 6 days of testing in December 1995 were implemented. This was followed by 6 additional consecutive test days in mid- February. This was in turn followed by additional modifications, followed by a series of 3 one day, coal fired tests at end of March. These latter tests were the first ones in which slagging conditions were achieved in the combustor. The maximum thermal input was 13 MMBtu/hr, which equals two-thirds of the rated boiler heat input. The measured thermal, combustion, and slagging performance achieved in the combustor was superior to that achieved in the final series of tests conducted in Williamsport in 1993. The combustor-boiler facility is now ready for implementation of the task 5 site demonstration.

Zauderer, B.

1996-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fish Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales Name: Kaylee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do all fish have scales? Replies: No, some like catfish and bullheads, have smooth skins. J. Elliott No,...

380

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Title Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5265E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 3 Pagination 224-234 Date Published 06/2012 Keywords carbon monoxide, natural gas burners, nitrogen dioxide, range hood, task ventilation, unvented combustion, indoor environment group, Range Hood Test Facility Abstract The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) - including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances - were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "device testing scale" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Residential Energy Display Devices: Utility Pilot Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief is a snapshot of selected utility-sponsored programs and test pilots of residential energy display devices as of the third quarter of 2008. Also known as in-home displays, the devices used in these programs are stand-alone units; they are not incorporated with an advanced metering infrastructure system. Such displays provide real-timeor near real-timeinformation about a household's electricity consumption.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Planar electrochemical device assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

Jacobson; Craig P. (Lafayette, CA), Visco; Steven J. (Berkeley, CA), De Jonghe; Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Planar electrochemical device assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); De Jonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fluidic nanotubes and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fluidic nanotubes and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Device for cutting protrusions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

Bzorgi, Fariborz M. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound August 6, 2010 - 11:27am Addthis The 1:15 scale prototype being lowered into the wave flume at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory | Photo courtesy of Columbia Power The 1:15 scale prototype being lowered into the wave flume at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory | Photo courtesy of Columbia Power Lindsay Gsell Columbia Power Technologies plans to test an intermediate-scale version of its wave energy converter device in Puget Sound later this year. After the successful control tests, the company will move testing to open water in Puget Sound this fall. Columbia will test the intermediate 1:7

388

Applying enterprise architectures and technology to the embedded devices domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale networks of embedded devices present a challenge in terms of performance management and other quality of service issues, such as security or transaction management. Current commercial off-the-shelf software designed for use in the Internet ... Keywords: GPRS, GSM, SCADA, clustering, embedded device, enterprise architecture, failover, middleware

Ken Taylor; Doug Palmer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Redox Flow Batteries for Grid-scale Energy Storage - Energy ...  

Though considered a promising large-scale energy storage device, the real-world deployment of redox flow batteries has been limited by their inability ...

390

Assessment of Retrofit Energy Savings Device (RESD) Technologies -- Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and documents the energy savings, energy efficiency, and limited power quality and performance assessment of six retrofit energy-saving devices that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) tested. These devices include lighting controls, electric motor controls, and one residential home energy saver. These devices were selected based on industry interest and for informational purposes for customers. Most of the testing was conducted at EPRI’s Knoxville laboratory ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Eighteenth quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In the second quarter of calendar year 1996, 16 days of combust- boiler tests were performed, including 2 days of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a slagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days to the end of June in the task 5 effort to 28, increased to 36 as of the date of this Report, 8/18/96. This compares with a total of 63 test days needed to complete the task 5 test effort. It is important to note that the only major modification to the Williamsport combustor has been the addition of a new downstream section, which lengthens the combustor and improves the combustor-boiler interface. The original combustor section, which includes the fuel, air, and cooling water delivery systems remained basically unchanged. Only the refractory liner was completely replaced, a task which occurs on an annual basis in all commercial slagging utility combustors. Therefore, this combustor has been operated since 1988 without replacement. The tests in the present reporting period are of major significance in that beginning with the first test on March 31st, for the first time slagging opening conditions were achieved in the upgraded combustor. The first results showed that the present 20 MMBtu/hr combustor design is far superior to the previous one tested since 1988 in Williamsport, PA. The most important change is that over 95% of the slag was drained from the slag tap in the combustor. This compares with an range of one-third to one-half in Williamsport. In the latter, the balance of the slag flowed out of the exit nozzle into the boiler floor. In addition, the overall system performance, including the combustor, boiler, and stack equipment, ranged from good to excellent. Those areas requiring improvement were of a nature that could be corrected with some work. but in no case were the problems encountered of a barrier type.

Zauderer, B.

1996-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

Russell, W.H. Jr.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

SLUG HANDLING DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for handling fuel elements of a neutronic reactor. The device consists of two concentric telescoped contalners that may fit about the fuel element. A number of ratchet members, equally spaced about the entrance to the containers, are pivoted on the inner container and spring biased to the outer container so thnt they are forced to hear against and hold the fuel element, the weight of which tends to force the ratchets tighter against the fuel element. The ratchets are released from their hold by raising the inner container relative to the outer memeber. This device reduces the radiation hazard to the personnel handling the fuel elements.

Gentry, J.R.

1958-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

Cheung, Kerry

396

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Multimaterial rectifying device fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic and optoelectronic device processing is commonly thought to be incompatible with much simpler thermal drawing techniques used in optical fiber production. The incorporation of metals, polymer insulators, and ...

Orf, Nicholas D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DEVICE RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2004 ... Inverter in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes. D. Tsuya1,2, M. Suzuki 1,3, Y. Aoyagi2, K. Ishibashi1,3,. 1Advanced Device Laboratory, The Institute.

399

Raney nickel catalytic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

O' Hare, Stephen A. (Vienna, VA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); LeBlanc, Edward J. (Kennewick, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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