Sample records for device testing scale

  1. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  2. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  3. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection...

  4. Reliability Testing of Polysilicon For MEMs Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaVan, D.A.; Buchheit, T.E.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Mission critical applications of MEMS devices require knowledge of the distribution in their material properties and long-term reliability of the small-scale structures. This project reports on a new testing program at Sandia to quantify the strength distribution using samples that reflect the dimensions of critical MEMS components. The strength of polysilicon fabricated with Sandia's SUMMiT 4-layer process was successfully measured using samples with gage sections 2.5 {micro}m thick by 1.7 {micro}m wide and lengths of 15 and 25 {micro}m. These tensile specimens have a freely moving pivot on one end that anchors the sample to the silicon die and prevents off axis loading during testing. Each sample is loaded in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a computer-controlled Nanoindenter. The stress-strain curve is calculated using the specimen cross section and gage length dimensions verified by measuring against a standard in the SEM. The first 48 samples had a means strength of 2.24 {+-} 0.35 GPa. Fracture strength measurements grouped into three strength levels, which matched three failure modes observed in post mortem examinations. The seven samples in the highest strength group failed in the gage section (strength of 2.77 {+-} 0.04 GPa), the moderate strength group failed at the gage section fillet and the lowest strength group failed at a dimple in the hub. With this technique, multiple tests can be programmed at one time and performed without operator assistance at a rate of 20-30 per day allowing the collection of significant populations of data. Since the new test geometry has been proven, the project is moving to test the distributions seen from real geometric features typical to MEMS such as the effect of gage length, fracture toughness, bonding between layers, etch holes, dimples and shear of gear teeth.

  5. Test report : Milspray Scorpion energy storage device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  6. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  7. Exploration of large scale manufacturing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hum, Philip W. (Philip Wing-Jung)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussion of the current manufacturing process of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) parts and the emergence of PDMS use in biomedical microfluidic devices addresses the need to develop large scale manufacturing processes for ...

  8. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager] [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact] [Business Point of Contact

    2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE?EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven?stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy? technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling?up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke? unlimited Power Take?Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  9. Structural Testing at the Micro and Nano Scales: Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarini, Roberto

    Structural Testing at the Micro and Nano Scales: Breaking Invisible Specimens With Zero Force). "Nano measurements with micro devices: mechanical properties of hydrated collagen fibrils," J. of the R tangential slots · Fuel swirls in the spin chamber and exits through the orifice in a hollow conical spray

  10. Dramatically Improved Yields in Molecular Scale Electronic Devices Using Ultra-smooth Platinum Electrodes Prepared By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Dramatically Improved Yields in Molecular Scale Electronic Devices Using Ultra-smooth Platinum scale electronic devices by using ultra- smooth platinum (Pt) electrodes made with chemical mechanically Terms -- Molecular electronics, CMP, SAM, Langmuir-Blodgett, Device yields. I. INTRODUCTION Molecular

  11. automatic testing devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gordon D. Logan 1992-01-01 107 Standard Test Method for Determining the Linearity of a Photovoltaic Device Parameter with Respect To a Test Parameter CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1...

  12. Testing of Kaonetics Devices at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolotnikov, A.; Smith, G.; and James, R.B.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of these measurements was to evaluate whether there is evidence of emission of X-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons by devices developed by Kaonetics Technologies, Inc. during their operation.

  13. Electrode holder useful in a corrosion testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.; Jamison, D.E.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for holding one or more test electrodes of precisely known exposed surface area. The present invention is particularly useful in a device for determining the corrosion properties of the materials from which the test electrodes have been formed. The present invention relates to a device and method for holding the described electrodes wherein the exposed surface area of the electrodes is only infinitesimally decreased. Further, in the present invention the exposed, electrically conductive surface area of the contact devices is small relative to the test electrode surface area. The holder of the present invention conveniently comprises a device for contacting and engaging each test electrode at two point contacts infinitesimally small in relation to the exposed surface area of the electrodes. 4 figs.

  14. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Tom

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  15. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dohner, Jeffrey L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  16. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  17. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  18. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  19. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  20. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  1. Data processing device test apparatus and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Richard Jacob (Austin, TX); Mulig, Jason D. (Austin, TX); Eppes, David (Austin, TX); Bruce, Michael R. (Austin, TX); Bruce, Victoria J. (Austin, TX); Ring, Rosalinda M. (Austin, TX); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (New Bernalillo, NM); Tangyunyong, Paiboon (Bernalillo, NM); Hawkins, Charles F. (Bernalillo, NM); Louie, Arnold Y. (Santa Clara, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus mechanism for testing data processing devices are implemented. The test mechanism isolates critical paths by correlating a scanning microscope image with a selected speed path failure. A trigger signal having a preselected value is generated at the start of each pattern vector. The sweep of the scanning microscope is controlled by a computer, which also receives and processes the image signals returned from the microscope. The value of the trigger signal is correlated with a set of pattern lines being driven on the DUT. The trigger is either asserted or negated depending the detection of a pattern line failure and the particular line that failed. In response to the detection of the particular speed path failure being characterized, and the trigger signal, the control computer overlays a mask on the image of the device under test (DUT). The overlaid image provides a visual correlation of the failure with the structural elements of the DUT at the level of resolution of the microscope itself.

  2. Research-scale melter test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

  3. Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

  4. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

  5. A Full Scale Wireless Ad Hoc Network Test Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    that are bench top, indoor, fixed outdoor, and mobile outdoor. Bench top test beds employ MAC filtering, RF and propagation of the outdoor environment. Full scale outdoor test beds are often restricted to fixed sites [1 features: 1. Test bed results are reproducible. 2. The test bed provides a common platform for testing

  6. Testing and Validation of Phasor Measurement Based Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering and Computer Science Director, Smart Grid Demonstration and Research Investigation Lab (SGDRIL #12;Executive Summary For upgrading the traditional electric power system to a smart power grid the integration of Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs), synchrophasor devices, advanced communication

  7. Towards the manufacturing of microfluidic devices : fluid flow in multilayer devices as a test case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Samuel N. (Samuel Noaa), 1984-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the area of microfluidics is analyzed for advances that could be made in the manufacturing of a microfluidic device, and then one area - the alignment of multilayer devices - is selected for greater focus. ...

  8. 3D-FBK Pixel Sensors: Recent Beam Tests Results with Irradiated Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micelli, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Udine U.; Helle, K.; /Bergen U.; Sandaker, H.; /Bergen U.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Hugging, F.; /Bonn U.; Karagounis, M.; /Bonn U.; Kostyukhin, V.; /Bonn U.; Kruger, H.; /Bonn U.; Tsung, J.W.; /Bonn U.; Wermes, N.; /Bonn U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U.; Fazio, S.; /Calabria U.; Mastroberardino, A.; /Calabria U.; Susinno, G.; /Calabria U.; Gallrapp, C.; /CERN; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; La Rosa, A.; /CERN; Pernegger, H.; /CERN; Roe, S.; /CERN /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Hawaii U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /New Mexico U. /New Mexico U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /VTT Electronics, Espoo /VTT Electronics, Espoo

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider, and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary vertices from the collisions and secondary vertices produced by short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradiated 3D devices produced at FBK (Trento, Italy). The performance of these devices, all bump-bonded with the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 read-out chip, is compared to that observed before irradiation in a previous beam test.

  9. Circuits & Systems Test Circuits for Characterization of Process, Device, and Interconnect Variation ................................................................................. CS.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Circuits & Systems Test Circuits for Characterization of Process, Device, and Interconnect................................................................................................. CS.2 45nm Direct-battery DC-DC Converter for Mobile Applications

  10. Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, Lowell B. (2181-13th Ave. SW., Largo, FL 34640)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined.

  11. Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, L.B.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined. 17 figs.

  12. Test Administration Instructions for the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Test Administration Instructions for the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale 1. Stand with feet: Stopwatch with lanyard (for placing around neck). Safety Procedures: Position person being tested n a corner at eye level so participant and time can be monitored simultaneously. Testing procedures: Demonstrate

  13. Hydrogen Station Test Device Design and Fabrication | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from potential suppliers are due no later than October 8, 2014, at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Device requirements and additional information can be found at the at the...

  14. Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov, and George Candea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov (EPFL), Switzerland Abstract DDT is a system for testing closed-source binary de- vice drivers against think of it as a pesticide against device driver bugs. DDT combines virtualization with a spe- cialized

  15. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  16. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  17. Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

  18. Nuzzer: A Large-Scale Device-Free Passive Localization System for Wireless Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seifeldin, Moustafa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread usage of wireless local area networks and mobile devices has fostered the interest in localization systems for wireless environments. The majority of research in the context of wireless-based localization systems has focused on device-based active localization, in which a device is attached to tracked entities. Recently, device-free passive localization (DfP) has been proposed where the tracked entity is neither required to carry devices nor participate actively in the localization process. DfP systems are based on the fact that RF signals are affected by the presence of people and objects in the environment. The DfP concept enables a wide range of applications including intrusion detection and tracking, border protection, and smart buildings automation. Previous studies have focused on small areas with direct line of sight and/or controlled environments. In this paper, we present the design, implementation and analysis of Nuzzer, a large-scale device-free passive localization system for real e...

  19. Synchrophasor Measurement Using Substation Intelligent Electronic Devices: Algorithms and Test Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Jinfeng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the performance of synchrophasor measurement obtained using substation Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) and proposes new algorithms and test methodology to improve and verify their performance when used in power system...

  20. Testing and examination of TMI-2 electrical components and discrete devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soberano, F.T.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the approach and results of the in situ test conducted on TMI-2 reactor building electrical components and discrete devices. Also included are the necessary presumptions and assumptions to correlate observed anomalies to the accident.

  1. Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, J.A.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

  2. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  3. Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy Technologies in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and scaled devices in both laboratory and open water settings. To facilitate testing wave energy conversion devices, OSU developed and built a mobile ocean testing platform...

  4. Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  5. Penn State University Pilot-scale Tests of Fixed Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn State University Pilot-scale Tests of Fixed Bed Reactors for Perchlorate Degradation: Plastic for inoculation #12;Penn State University PSU-O4 Process Patent: Perchlorate degradation in a fixed bed bioreactor in a packed bed reactor · Reactor performance compared with other studies · Stability of the bacterium used

  6. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  7. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i.e., Newtonian or non-Newtonian). The most important properties for testing with Newtonian slurries are the Archimedes number distribution and the particle concentration. For some test objectives, the shear strength is important. In the testing to collect data for CFD V and V and CFD comparison, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. In the high temperature testing, the liquid density and liquid viscosity are important. The Archimedes number distribution combines effects of particle size distribution, solid-liquid density difference, and kinematic viscosity. The most important properties for testing with non-Newtonian slurries are the slurry yield stress, the slurry consistency, and the shear strength. The solid-liquid density difference and the particle size are also important. It is also important to match multiple properties within the same simulant to achieve behavior representative of the waste. Other properties such as particle shape, concentration, surface charge, and size distribution breadth, as well as slurry cohesiveness and adhesiveness, liquid pH and ionic strength also influence the simulant properties either directly or through other physical properties such as yield stress.

  8. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Usof the ModifiedTesting,

  9. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  10. Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, A.; Sharafat, S.; Youssef, M.; An, J.; Hunt, R.; Rainsberry, P.; Abdou, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering scaling process is applied to the solid breeder ITER TBM designs in accordance with the testing objectives of validating the design tools and the database, and evaluating blanket performance under prototypical operating conditions. The goal of scaling is to ensure that changes in structural response and performance caused by changes in size and operating conditions do not reduce the usefulness of the tests. Initially, constitutive equations are applied to lay out the basic operating and design parameters that dominate blanket phenomena. The suitability of these similarity criteria for the TBM design is then confirmed by comparing finite element predictions of prototype and scale model responses. The TBM design also takes into account the need to check the codes and data for future design use. Specifically, predictability of tritium production and nuclear heating rates in a complex geometry, tritium release and permeation characteristics under fusion environments belong to this category. We conclude that this engineering scaling design process has maximized the value of ITER testing.

  11. Neuronal micro-culture engineering by microchannel devices of cellular scale dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Gaurav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of microchannel geometry on neuronal cultures and to maintain these cultures for long period of time (over several weeks) inside the closed microchannels of cellular scale dimensions. Methods: The primary hippocampal neurons from E-18 rat were cultured inside the closed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels of varying sizes. The effect of the channel geometry on the spatial and the temporal variations in the neural microenvironment was investigated by studying neural maturation and variation in the media osmolality respectively. The cultures were maintained for longer time spans by PDMS device pretreatment, control on media evaporation (by using hydrophobic ethylene propylene membrane) and an effective culture maintenance protocol. Further, the devices were integrated with the planar microelectrode arrays (MEA) to record spontaneous electrical activity. Results: A direct influence of channel geometry on neuron maturation was observed ...

  12. Development and evaluation of measurement devices used to support testing of radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uncapher, W. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Stenberg, D.R.; Bronowski, D. R.; Arviso, M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive material package designers use structural testing to verify and demonstrate package performance. A major part of evaluating structural response is the collection of instrumentation measurement data. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has an ongoing program to develop and evaluate measurement devices to support testing of radioactive material packages. Measurement devices developed in support of this activity include evaluation channels, ruggedly constructed linear variable differential transformers, and piezoresistive accelerometers with enhanced measurement capabilities. In addition to developing measurement devices, a method has been derived to evaluate accelerometers and strain gages for measurement repeatability, ruggedness, and manufacturers' calibration data under both laboratory and field conditions. The developed measurement devices and evaluation technique will be discussed and the results of the evaluation will be presented.

  13. Testing the scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments D. R. Mikkelsen, S. D. Scott Princeton the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] nondimensional to International Tokamak Experimental Reactor [2] (ITER) class tokamaks. This paper compares the predictions

  14. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  15. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

  16. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. For the combination of both test stands, the round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the much larger flow rates and equipment that would be required. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  17. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

  18. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  19. Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

  20. A test of first order scaling in Nf=2 QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cossu; M. D'Elia; A. Di Giacomo; C. Pica

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We complete our analysis of Nf=2 QCD based on the lattice staggered fermion formulation. Using a series of Monte Carlo simulations at fixed (amq*Ls^yh) one is able to test the universality class with given critical exponent yh. This strategy has been used to test the O(4) universality class and it has been presented at the previous Lattice conferences. No agreement was found with simulations in the mass range amq=[0.01335,0.15] using lattices with Ls=16 up to 32 and Lt=4. With the same strategy, we now investigate the possibility of a first order transition using a new set of Monte Carlo data corresponding to yh=3 in the same mass and volume range as the one used for O(4). A substantial agreement is observed both in the specific heat scaling and in the scaling of the chiral condensate, while the chiral susceptibilities still presents visible deviation from scaling in the mass range explored.

  1. Development and Testing of an Integrated Sandia Cooler Thermoelectric Device (SCTD).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry A.; Staats, Wayne Lawrence,; Leick, Michael Thomas; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Radermacher, Reinhard; Martin, Cara; Nasuta, Dennis; Kalinowski, Paul; Hoffman, William

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a FY14 effort to develop an integrated Sandia Cooler T hermoelectric D evice (SCTD) . The project included a review of feasible thermoelectric (TE) cooling applications, baseline performance testing of an existing TE device, analysis and design development of an integrated SCTD assembly, and performance measurement and validation of the integrated SCTD prototype.

  2. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

  3. Underground tank vitrification: Engineering-scale test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, B.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Bonner, W.F.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination associated with underground tanks at US Department of Energy sites and other sites may be effectively remediated by application of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology. In situ vitrification converts contaminated soil and buried wastes such as underground tanks into a glass and crystalline block, similar to obsidian with crystalline phases. A radioactive engineering-scale test performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in September 1989 demonstrated the feasibility of using ISV for this application. A 30-cm-diameter (12-in.-diameter) buried steel and concrete tank containing simulated tank sludge was vitrified, producing a solid block. The tank sludge used in the test simulated materials in tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system. The steel tank was converted to ingots near the bottom of the block and the concrete walls were dissolved into the resulting glass and crystalline block. Although one of the four moving electrodes froze'' in place about halfway into the test, operations were able to continue. The test was successfully completed and all the tank sludge was vitrified. 7 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 ?V K{sup ?1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  5. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007 Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco,...

  6. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology.

  7. A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

  8. Energy Department Announces $10 Million for Full-Scale Wave Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10 Million for Full-Scale Wave Energy Device Testing Energy Department Announces 10 Million for Full-Scale Wave Energy Device Testing October 29, 2014 - 2:55pm Addthis The Energy...

  9. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

  10. An advanced gray-scale technology and its applications to micro-devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhou

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Etching”, J. Microelectromechanical Systems, Vol. 13, No. 1,films for microelectromechanical systems devices”, J. mater.ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, Vol.11 No.

  11. Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: from fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Lindsay Margaret

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, especially where solar or thermal energy may not beSolar photovoltaic devices harvest the light energy while solar thermal

  12. Design, fabrication, and testing of a multichannel microfluidic device to dynamically control oxygen concentration conditions in-vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Rosa H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer microfluidic devices were designed and fabricated such that an array of different oxygen concentrations could be applied to a testing area in any desired sequence and with unconstraint application times. The ...

  13. FAST Code Verification of Scaling Laws for DeepCwind Floating Wind System Tests: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Goupee, A. J.; Kimball, R. W.; Swift, A. H. P.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates scaling laws that were adopted for the DeepCwind project for testing three different floating wind systems at 1/50 scale in a wave tank under combined wind and wave loading.

  14. Thermal Analysis of Ultra-Thin Body Device Scaling Eric Pop, Robert Dutton and Kenneth Goodson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutton, Robert W.

    geometries on the self-heating of ultra-thin body SOI and FinFET devices. A compact thermal model that of silicon, SOI devices have been associated with self-heating problems [3]. This is somewhat alleviated still lead to significant self- heating. This paper estimates such trends in single-gate (SG) UTB

  15. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vince Battaglia LBNL May 09, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  16. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  17. Infrastructure for large-scale tests in marine autonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hummel, Robert A. (Robert Andrew)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of infrastructure for research with large-scale autonomous marine vehicle fleets and the design of sampling trajectories for compressive sensing (CS). The newly developed infrastructure ...

  18. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  19. SMALL-SCALE IMPACT SENSITIVITY TESTING ON EDC37

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSU, P C; HUST, G; MAIENSCHEIN, J L

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    EDC37 was tested at LLNL to determine its impact sensitivity in the LLNL's drop hammer system. The results showed that impact sensitivities of the samples were between 86 cm and 156 cm, depending on test methods. EDC37 is a plastic bonded explosive consisting of 90% HMX, 1% nitrocellulose and binder. We recently conducted impact sensitivity testing in our drop hammer system and the results are presented in this report.

  20. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  1. An advanced gray-scale technology and its applications to micro-devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhou

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of photosensitive polyimide and its graphitization”, Proc.of photosensitive polyimide and its graphitization [17]. Indeveloping photosensitive polyimide, HD8820. Gray Scale

  2. Testing the ae \\Lambda scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments D. R. Mikkelsen, S. D. Scott Princeton the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] nondimensional to extrapo­ late [1] from current experiments to International Tokamak Experimental Reactor [2] (ITER) class

  3. Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longanbach, J.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

  4. Property:Full-Scale Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number Jump to: navigation,Full-Scale

  5. Program for large-scale underground-coal-gasification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammesfahr, F.W.; Winter, P.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuing development of underground coal gasification technology requires extended multi-module field programs in which the output gas is linked to surface usage. This effort was to appraise whether existing surface facilities in the utility, petroleum refinery, or natural gas industries could be used to reduce the cost of such an extended multi-module test and whether regional demand in areas having underground coal gasification coal resources could support the manufacture of transportation fuels from underground coal gasification gases. To limit the effort to a reasonable level but yet to permit a fair test of the concept, effort was focused on five states, Illinois, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wyoming, which have good underground coal gasification reserves. Studies of plant distribution located 25 potential sites within 3 miles of the underground coal gasification amenable reserves in the five states. Distribution was 44% to utilities, 44% to refineries, and 12% to gas processing facilities. The concept that existing surface facilities, currently or potentially gas-capable, might contribute to the development of underground coal gasification technology by providing a low cost industrial application for the gas produced in a multi-module test appears valid. To further test the concept, three industries were reviewed in depth. These were the electric utility, natural gas, and petroleum industries. When looking at a fuel substitution of the type proposed, each industry had its special perspective. These are discussed in detail in the report.

  6. Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ying

    , Missouri. 2 Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety velocity that increases their deposition on the surface of collectors (e.g., sand filter). Although placed stainless steel mesh electrodes embedded in a sand filter was tested at a local drinking water

  7. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THE STRIPA MINE AND,PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE ANDPERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND

  8. Standard Test Method for Determination of the Spectral Mismatch Parameter Between a Photovoltaic Device and a Photovoltaic Reference Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the determination of a spectral mismatch parameter used in performance testing of photovoltaic devices. 1.2 The spectral mismatch parameter is a measure of the error, introduced in the testing of a photovoltaic device, caused by mismatch between the spectral responses of the photovoltaic device and the photovoltaic reference cell, as well as mismatch between the test light source and the reference spectral irradiance distribution to which the photovoltaic reference cell was calibrated. Examples of reference spectral irradiance distributions are Tables E490 or G173. 1.3 The spectral mismatch parameter can be used to correct photovoltaic performance data for spectral mismatch error. 1.4 This test method is intended for use with linear photovoltaic devices. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, a...

  9. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  10. Fabrication of a SWATH vessel scale model for seakeeping tests using rapid prototyping methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiMino, John Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the techniques used to fabricate a one meter long, 1/6 scale model of a Small Waterplane Area, Twin Hull (SWATH) Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) that will be used primarily for dynamic seakeeping testing ...

  11. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AMR Berkeley Lab 129 Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vincent Battaglia, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 16, 2012 es029 This...

  12. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vincent Battaglia, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 15, 2013 ES029) This presentation does not...

  13. Novel Carbon Capture Solvent Begins Pilot-Scale Testing for Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pilot-scale testing of an advanced technology for economically capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas has begun at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville,...

  14. Laboratory and field-scale test methodology for reliable characterization of solidified/stabilized hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, K.E.; Holder, J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Earth Sciences and Engineering; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Hess, T.R.; Vempati, R.K.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for flow through leach testing is proposed and discussed and preliminary testing using strontium doped cement based S/S samples is presented. The complementary and necessary characterization of the S/S matrix before and after testing is discussed and placed in perspective to the total evaluation of the laboratory-field scale leach testing for predicting long term performance and S/S technology design and improvement.

  15. Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James O'Brien

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

  16. Evolution of Catalysts Directed by Genetic Algorithms in a Plug-Based Microfluidic Device Tested with Oxidation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Evolution of Catalysts Directed by Genetic Algorithms in a Plug-Based Microfluidic Device Tested with Oxidation of Methane by Oxygen Jason E. Kreutz, Anton Shukhaev, Wenbin Du, Sasha Druskin, Olafs Daugulis catalysts using the oxidation of methane by molecular oxygen as a model system. The parameters of the GA

  17. Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Daniel Harold

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode...

  18. Experimental test of scaling of mixing by chaotic advection in droplets moving through microfluidic channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Experimental test of scaling of mixing by chaotic advection in droplets moving through microfluidic that predicts the scaling of chaotic mixing in a droplet moving through a winding microfluidic channel microfluidic channels.1 In microfluidic systems2,3 operating at low values of the Reynolds number Re, streams

  19. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Alvarez; Tobias Baldauf; J. Richard Bond; Neal Dalal; Roland de Putter; Olivier Doré; Daniel Green; Chris Hirata; Zhiqi Huang; Dragan Huterer; Donghui Jeong; Matthew C. Johnson; Elisabeth Krause; Marilena Loverde; Joel Meyers; P. Daniel Meerburg; Leonardo Senatore; Sarah Shandera; Eva Silverstein; Anže Slosar; Kendrick Smith; Matias Zaldarriaga; Valentin Assassi; Jonathan Braden; Amir Hajian; Takeshi Kobayashi; George Stein; Alexander van Engelen

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc}$ ($f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\\Delta f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc, eq.} \\simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  20. Testing gravity on kiloparsec scales with strong gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan L. Smith

    2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications to GR generically predict time and scale-dependent effects which may be probed by observations of strong lensing by galaxies. Measurements of the stellar velocity dispersion determine the dynamical mass whereas measurements of the Einstein radius determine the lensing mass. In GR these two masses are equal; in alternative gravity theories they may not be. Using measurements of the stellar velocity dispersion and strong lensing around galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) survey we place constraints on lensing in modified gravity theories and extend previous studies by applying this data to explore its dependence on various properties of the lens such as the lens redshift or mass and thereby constrain scalar-tensor, f(R) gravity theories, and generic parameterizations of deviations from GR. Besides applying the observations to these specific gravity theories, the data places a constraint on a generic dependence of modifications to GR on the lens mass and redshift. At the 68% confidence level we find that the ratio between the lensing and dynamical masses can only vary by less then 50% over a mass range for the lens galaxies of 1E12 < M/Msun < 1E14 and less than 40% over the redshift range 0.06 < z < 0.36.

  1. Investigation of scaling and inhibition mechanisms and the influencing factors in static and dynamic inhibition tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, M.D.; Jamieson, E.; Hammonds, P. [Baker Petrolite, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of some recent laboratory study on barium sulfate scale inhibition in oilfield brines and investigation of several factors potentially effecting scale inhibition efficiency. In addition to well known mechanisms of scale nucleation inhibition and crystal growth retardation, dispersion/anti-conglomeration appears to be a significant inhibition mechanism associated with some scale inhibitors, which may play an important role in a dynamic flowing system. The contamination of a brine by an organic chelating agent such as EDTA or citric acid did not, in this study, show any significant effect on the barium sulfate inhibition efficiency of any of the three generically different scale inhibitors included. Experiments show that, in a properly enclosed system, the pH of an oilfield brine even with hydrogen bicarbonate presence can be sufficiently buffered with acetic acid. These new results are believed to be useful in evaluating/selecting scale inhibitors and improving barium sulfate scale inhibition test methods.

  2. Ris-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade to failure - flapwise loading Erik R F. Sřrensen Risř National Laboratory, Roskilde June 2004 #12;Abstract A 25m wind turbine blade test of a 25m Vestas wind turbine blade. The major results of the entire project can be found

  3. Do et al. 1 Full Scale Tests for the Assessment of Wear of Pavement Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Do et al. 1 Full Scale Tests for the Assessment of Wear of Pavement Surfaces Minh-Tan Do subjected to heavy traffic. Reports can be found in (1)(2). Evolution of pavements during its whole service shown in the figure 2. By this way, during tests on one track, pavement construction can be carried out

  4. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  5. Results from large scale ultimate strength tests of K-braced jacket frame structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolt, H.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 2 of the JIP Frames Project included four large scale collapse tests of K-braced frames in which both gap and overlap K joints were the critical components. The results are presented in this paper. The local failure modes differed from typical isolated component tests, yet were representative of structural damage observed following Hurricane Andrew. The frame test results therefore provide important insight to the ultimate response of offshore jacket structures.

  6. POC-scale testing of a dry triboelectrostatic separator for fine coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.-H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; A.D. Walters

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past quarter, the installation, testing and shakedown phases of commissioning the TES unit were completed (Tasks 4, 5.1 and 5.2). A representative from Carpco Inc. was on site to provide training in the operation of the test unit and assist with the initial test runs. Problems have been encountered with the recycle conveyor generating dust that neutralizes the particle charge. Testing has continued by batch feeding the unit while the recycle conveying problem is being solved. Good separations have been achieved while operating in this mode. Comparison tests have also been carried out using a bench-scale triboelectrostatic separator in parallel with the POC Carpco unit.

  7. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  8. Development of Modulator Pulse Stability Measurement Device and Test Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Morris, B.; Beukers, T.; Ciprian, R.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the development of a pulse stability measurement device is presented. The measurement accuracy is better than 250uV, about 4.2ppm of a typical 60V input pulse. Pulse signals up to +/- 80V peak can be measured. The device works together with an oscilloscope. The primary function of the measurement device is to provide a precision offset, such that variations in the flattop of the modulator voltage pulse can be accurately resolved. The oscilloscope records the difference between the pulse flattop and the reference for a series of waveforms. The scope math functions are utilized to calculate the rms variations over the series. The frequency response of the device is characterized by the measured cutoff frequency of about 6.5MHz. In addition to detailing the design and calibration of the precision pulse stability device, measurements of SLAC line-type linac modulators and recently developed induction modulators will be presented. Factors affecting pulse stability will be discussed.

  9. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  10. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zondervan, Daniel K; Palafox, Lorena; Hernandez, Jorge; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    device that mimics robotic active assistance Daniel K1,3 Abstract Background: Robotic arm therapy devices thatin the development of robotic and computer-based devices for

  11. The Continued Need for Modeling and Scaled Testing to Advance the Hanford Tank Waste Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, Loni M.; Fort, James A.; Rector, David R.

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford tank wastes are chemically complex slurries of liquids and solids that can exhibit changes in rheological behavior during retrieval and processing. The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) recently abandoned its planned approach to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) supported by testing at less than full scale to verify the design of vessels that process these wastes within the plant. The commercial CFD tool selected was deemed too difficult to validate to the degree necessary for use in the design of a nuclear facility. Alternative, but somewhat immature, CFD tools are available that can simulate multiphase flow of non-Newtonian fluids. Yet both CFD and scaled testing can play an important role in advancing the Hanford tank waste mission—in supporting the new verification approach, which is to conduct testing in actual plant vessels; in supporting waste feed delivery, where scaled testing is ongoing; as a fallback approach to design verification if the Full Scale Vessel Testing Program is deemed too costly and time-consuming; to troubleshoot problems during commissioning and operation of the plant; and to evaluate the effects of any proposed changes in operating conditions in the future to optimize plant performance.

  12. Design, testing and optimization of a microfluidic device for capture and concentration of bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherla, Srinivas

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    � is then used to capture these microbes on the electrode surface. The captured microbes can then be concentrated in a concentrator unit. A prototype microfluidic device is fabricated for showing the proof of concept. Optimization is done to minimize hydraulic...

  13. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  14. Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrey, E.V.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

  15. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  16. Testing of Large-Scale ICV Glasses with Hanford LAW Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Smith, Donald E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Yeager, John D.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary glass compositions for immobilizing Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) by the in-container vitrification (ICV) process were initially fabricated at crucible- and engineering-scale, including simulants and actual (radioactive) LAW. Glasses were characterized for vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) responses and crystallinity (both quenched and slow-cooled samples). Selected glasses were tested for toxicity characteristic leach procedure (TCLP) responses, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. This testing showed that glasses with LAW loading of 20 mass% can be made readily and meet all product constraints by a far margin. Glasses with over 22 mass% Na2O can be made to meet all other product quality and process constraints. Large-scale testing was performed at the AMEC, Geomelt Division facility in Richland. Three tests were conducted using simulated LAW with increasing loadings of 12, 17, and 20 mass% Na2O. Glass samples were taken from the test products in a manner to represent the full expected range of product performance. These samples were characterized for composition, density, crystalline and non-crystalline phase assemblage, and durability using the VHT, PCT, and TCLP tests. The results, presented in this report, show that the AMEC ICV product with meets all waste form requirements with a large margin. These results provide strong evidence that the Hanford LAW can be successfully vitrified by the ICV technology and can meet all the constraints related to product quality. The economic feasibility of the ICV technology can be further enhanced by subsequent optimization.

  17. LARGE SCALE DIRECT SHEAR TESTING WITH TIRE BALES By: Christopher J. LaRocque1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    2 , Advisor Abstract: There are growing environmental interests in the utilization of recycled tireLARGE SCALE DIRECT SHEAR TESTING WITH TIRE BALES By: Christopher J. LaRocque1 and Jorge G. Zornberg bales for civil engineering applications. Due to their lightweight and free-draining properties, tire

  18. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the sub...

  19. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  20. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Testing Nitric Acid Dissolution Testing of K East Area Sludge Composite, Small- and Large-Scale Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, C.D.; Delegard, C.H.; Burgeson, I.E.; Schmidt, A.J.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to support the development of the K Basin Sludge Treatment System. For this work, testing was performed to examine the dissolution behavior of a K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite, referred to as K East area sludge composite, in nitric acid at the following concentrations: 2 M, 4 M, 6 M and 7.8 M. With the exception of one high solids loading test the nitric acid was added at 4X the stoichiometric requirement (assuming 100% of the sludge was uranium metal). The dissolution tests were conducted at boiling temperatures for 24 hours. Most of the tests were conducted with {approximately}2.5 g of sludge (dry basis). The high solids loading test was conducted with {approximately}7 g of sludge. A large-scale dissolution test was conducted with 26.5 g of sludge and 620 mL of 6 M nitric acid. The objectives of this test were to (1) generate a sufficient quantity of acid-insoluble residual solids for use in leaching studies, and (2) examine the dissolution behavior of the sludge composite at a larger scale.

  1. Seismic testing of existing full-scale pile-to-deck connections : precast prestressed and steel piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Jared Keith

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of a Full-Scale Pile-Deck Connection Utilizing2001) “ Seismic Performance of Pile-Wharf Connections”, PEERp : Deformation component from pile flexibility. c : Extreme

  2. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  3. Testing No-Scale Supergravity with the Fermi Space Telescope LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a methodology for testing No-Scale Supergravity by the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi Space Telescope via observation of gamma ray emissions from lightest supersymmetric (SUSY) neutralino annihilations. For our test vehicle we engage the framework of the supersymmetric grand unified model No-Scale Flipped $SU(5)$ with extra vector-like flippon multiplets derived from F-Theory, known as $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$. We show that through compression of the light stau and light bino neutralino mass difference, where internal bremsstrahlung (IB) photons give a dominant contribution, the photon yield from annihilation of SUSY dark matter can be elevated to a number of events potentially observable by the Fermi-LAT in the coming years. Likewise, the increased yield in No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ may also have rendered the existing observation of a 133 GeV monochromatic gamma ray line visible, if additional data should exclude systematic or statistical explanations. The question of intensity aside, No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ can indeed provide a natural weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate with a mass in the correct range to yield $\\gamma \\gamma$ and $\\gamma Z$ emission lines at $m_{\\chi} \\sim 133$ GeV and $m_{\\chi} \\sim 145$ GeV, respectively. Additionally, we elucidate the emerging empirical connection between recent Planck satellite data and No-Scale Supergravity cosmological models which mimic the Starobinsky model of inflation. Together, these experiments furnish rich alternate avenues for testing No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$, and similarly structured models, the results of which may lend independent credence to observations made at the LHC.

  4. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

  5. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  6. Scaling test of two-flavor O(a)-improved lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Della Morte; Patrick Fritzsch; Harvey B. Meyer; Hubert Simma; Rainer Sommer; Shinji Takeda; Oliver Witzel; Ulli Wolff

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a scaling test of several mesonic observables in the non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson theory with two flavors of dynamical quarks. The observables are constructed in a fixed volume of 2.4fm x (1.8fm)^3 with Schroedinger functional boundary conditions. No significant scaling violations are found. Using the kaon mass determined in \\cite{cernI}, we update our estimate of the Lambda parameter to Lambda^(2)_{msbar}/m_K = 0.52(6).

  7. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Kapner; T. S. Cook; E. G. Adelberger; J. H. Gundlach; B. R. Heckel; C. D. Hoyle; H. E. Swanson

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 micrometers, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale $\\lambda_{\\rm d}=\\sqrt[4]{\\hbar c/\\rho_{\\rm d}}\\approx 85 \\mu$m. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds ($|\\alpha| \\leq 1$) down to a length scale $\\lambda = 56 \\mu$m and that an extra dimension must have a size $R \\leq 44 \\mu$m.

  8. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

  9. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

  10. CHI 99 15-20 MAY 1999 Papers Testing Pointing Device Performance and User

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Scott

    the International Standards Organization (ISO) has proposed a standard entitled IS0 9241Ergonomic Requirementsfor, Part 9 Draft International Standard for testing computerpointing devicesproposesanevaluation is in D&l International Standardversion and is currently awaiting a vote of member organizations

  11. Synchrophasor Measurement Using Substation Intelligent Electronic Devices: Algorithms and Test Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Jinfeng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    chnages. Some This dissertation follows the style of IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery. 2 disturbances, for example faults and switching operations, produce discontinuous points such as steps... respectively have been developed in this laboratory [34]-[36]. The NIST steady-state calibration service tests PMUs for compliance with the parameter requirements in IEEE C37.118-2005. In the dynamic test, modulated signals with varying magnitude...

  12. Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Breault, R.W.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  14. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the subgrid scale model in this paper as a basis for more advanced applications in numerical simulations of complex astrophysical phenomena involving turbulence.

  15. Testing a scale pulsed modulator for an IEC neutron source into a resistive load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wheat, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1/10th scaled prototype pulse modulator for an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) neutron source has been designed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The scaled prototype modulator is based on a solid-state Marx architecture and has an output voltage of 13 kV and an output current of 10 A. The modulator has a variable pulse width between 50 {micro}s and 1 ms with < 5% droop at all pulse widths. The modulator operates with a duty factor up to 5% and has a maximum pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The use of a solid-state Marx modulator in this application has several potential benefits. These benefits include variable pulse width and amplitude, inherent switch overcurrent and transient overvoltage protection, and increased efficiency over DC supplies used in this application. Several new features were incorporated into this design including inductorless charging, fully snubberless operation, and stage fusing. The scaled prototype modulator has been tested using a 1 k{Omega} resistive load. Test results are given. Short (50 {micro}s) and long (1 ms) pulses are demonstrated as well as high duty factor operation (1 kHz rep rate at a 50 {micro}s pulse width for a 5% duty factor). Pulse agility of the modulator is demonstrated through turning the individual Marx stages on and off in sequence producing ramp, pyramid, and reverse pyramid waveforms.

  16. 1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

  17. POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

  18. A full-scale thermal test and analytical evaluation of the beneficial uses shipping system cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, J.L.; Akau, R.L.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal test of the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask containing irradiation source capsules was conducted to verify a two-dimensional axisymmetric thermal model developed for the Safety Analysis Report. The BUSS cask is a Type B package developed to transport irradiation source capsules of cesium chloride or strontium fluoride to commercially licensed food and pharmaceutical irradiating facilities. The uniqueness of this test is that it was performed on an internally instrumented, full-scale cask with actual radioactive capsules. This resulted in more realistic system temperatures than those obtained if heaters were used to simulate the large gamma source. In addition, the thermal test provides benchmark data for other thermal codes. 12 refs.; 24 figs.; 2 tabs.

  19. Cooling for SC devices of test cryomodule for ADS Injector II at IMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Wang, S. Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, S. H.; Liu, Y. Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, CAS, Shanghai 201204 (China); Guo, X. L. [JiangSu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting half-wave resonance cavities connected in series with superconducting solenoids will be applied to the Injector II of the Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (ADS) to be built at the Modern Physics Institute, China. A test system has been developed for the purpose of performance test of the HWR cavities as well as validating the relevant technique for cooling the cavity and the solenoids together. It mainly comprises a cryogenic valve box (TVB), a test cryomodule (TCM1) and transfer lines. The TCM1 includes one HWR cavity, two superconducting solenoids, one cold BPM and their cooling system. The design of the TCM1 cryostat was carried out by the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), CAS. Both the cavity and the solenoids will work at 4.4 K by bath cooling. The fast cooling down for the cavity from around 100 K to 120 K is required to avoid degrading of the cavity performance. After cool down and before energization, the solenoids should be warmed up to above 10 K and re-cooled down for the purpose of degaussing. The TCM1 can not only be cooled by using the dewar-filling system, but also operated by the refrigerator system. For the purpose of reducing the heat loads to the cold mass at 4 K from room temperature, thermal radiation shields cooled by liquid nitrogen flowing in tubing were employed. This paper presents the design details of cooling circuits and thermal shields of the TCM1 as well as related calculations and analyses.

  20. A natural approach to extended Newtonian gravity: tests and predictions across astrophysical scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mendoza; X. Hernandez; J. C. Hidalgo; T. Bernal

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the pursuit of a general formulation for a modified gravitational theory at the non-relativistic level and as an alternative to the dark matter hypothesis, we construct a model valid over a wide variety of astrophysical scales. Through the inclusion of Milgrom's acceleration constant into a gravitational theory, we show that very general formulas can be constructed for the acceleration felt by a particle. Dimensional analysis shows that this inclusion naturally leads to the appearance of a mass-length scale in gravity, breaking its scale invariance. A particular form of the modified gravitational force is constructed and tested for consistency with observations over a wide range of astrophysical environments, from solar system to extragalactic scales. We show that over any limited range of physical parameters, which define a specific class of astrophysical objects, the dispersion velocity of a system must be a power law of its mass and size. These powers appear linked together through a natural constraint relation of the theory. This yields a generalised gravitational equilibrium relation valid for all astrophysical systems. A general scheme for treating spherical symmetrical density distributions is presented, which in particular shows that the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies, the Newtonian virial equilibrium, the Tully-Fisher and the Faber-Jackson relations, as well as the scalings observed in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies, are nothing but particular cases of that relation when applied to the appropriate mass-length scales. We discuss the implications of this approach for a modified theory of gravity and emphasise the advantages of working with the force, instead of altering Newton's second law of motion, in the formulation of a gravitational theory.

  1. Test of a scaling hypothesis for the structure factor of disordered diblock copolymer melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Glaser; Jian Qin; Pavani Medapuram; Marcus Müller; David Morse

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Coarse-grained theories of dense polymer liquids such as block copolymer melts predict a universal dependence of equilibrium properties on a few dimensionless parameters. For symmetric diblock copolymer melts, such theories predict a universal dependence on only chi N and Nbar, where chi is an effective interaction parameter, N is a degree of polymerization, and Nbar is a measure of overlap. We test whether simulation results for the structure factor S(q) obtained from several different simulation models are consistent with this two-parameter scaling hypothesis. We compare results from three models: (1) a lattice Monte Carlo model, the bond-fluctuation model, (2) a bead-spring model with harsh repulsive interactions, similar to that of Kremer and Grest, and (3) a bead-spring model with very soft repulsion between beads, and strongly overlapping beads. We compare results from pairs of simulations of different models that have been designed to have matched values of Nbar, over a range of values of chi N and N, and devise methods to test the scaling hypothesis without relying on any prediction for how the phenomenological interaction parameter chi depends on more microscopic parameters. The results strongly support the scaling hypothesis, even for rather short chains, confirming that it is indeed possible to give an accurate universal description of simulation models that differ in many details.

  2. 106-AN grout pilot-scale test HGTP-93-0501-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagaasen, L M

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes into a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), mixes liquid waste with cementitious materials to produce a waste form that immobilizes hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Over 1,000,000 gal of Phosphate/Sulfate Waste were solidified in the first production campaign with this facility. The next tank scheduled for treatment is 106-AN. After conducting laboratory studies to select the grout formulation, part of the normal formulation verification process is to conduct tests using the 1/4-scale pilot facilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The major objectives of these pilot-scale tests were to determine if the proposed grout formulation could be processed in the pilot-scale equipment and to collect thermal information to help determine the best way to manage the grout hydration heat.

  3. CALMOS: Innovative device for the measurement of nuclear heating in material testing reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcreff, H. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission CEA, Saclay Center, DEN/DANS/DRSN/SIREN, Gif Sur Yvette, 91191 (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An R and D program has been carried out since 2002 in order to improve gamma heating measurements in the 70 MWth OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Div. at the Saclay research center. Throughout this program an innovative calorimetric probe associated to a specific handling system has been designed in order to make measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating rates still remain high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for the process validation, while a displacement system has been especially designed to move the probe axially. A final probe has been designed thanks to modeling results and to preliminary measurements obtained with mock-ups irradiated to a heating level of 2W/g, This paper gives an overview of the development, describes the calorimetric probe, and expected advantages such as the possibility to use complementary methods to get the nuclear heating measurement. Results obtained with mock-ups irradiated in ex-core area of the reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

  4. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

  5. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  6. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  7. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.K. PAREKH; D. TAO; J.G. GROPPO

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean-coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high-sulfur and low-sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals.

  8. Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

  9. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  10. POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X.H. Wang; J. Wiseman; D.J. Sung; D. McLean; William Peters; Jim Mullins; John Hugh; G. Evans; Vince Hamilton; Kenneth Robinette; Tim Krim; Michael Fleet

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dewatering of ultra-fine (minus 150 {micro}m) coal slurry to less than 20% moisture is difficult using the conventional dewatering techniques. The main objective of the project was to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions and surfactants in combination for the dewatering of ultra-fine clean-coal slurries using various dewatering techniques on a proof-of-concept (POC) scale of 0.5 to 2 tons per hour. The addition of conventional reagents and the application of coal surface modification technique were evaluated using vacuum filtration, hyperbaric (pressure) filtration, ceramic plate filtration and screen-bowl centrifuge techniques. The laboratory and pilot-scale dewatering studies were conducted using the fine-size, clean-coal slurry produced in the column flotation circuit at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, St. Charles, VA. The pilot-scale studies were conducted at the Mayflower preparation plant in St. Charles, VA. The program consisted of nine tasks, namely, Task 1--Project Work Planning, Task 2--Laboratory Testing, Task 3--Engineering Design, Task 4--Procurement and Fabrication, Task 5--Installation and Shakedown, Task 6--System Operation, Task 7--Process Evaluation, Task 8--Equipment Removal, and Task 9--Reporting.

  11. Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800ş-900şC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

  12. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part I: Perfect Model Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Zhiyong

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part I the potential of using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation are assimilated. 1. Introduction The ensemble-based data assimilation method [en- semble Kalman filter (En

  13. Factor structure, validity and test re-test reliability of the Austin, Farrelly, Black and Moore emotional manipulation scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Charlotte

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A self report emotional manipulation scale was completed by 121 participants, who also completed a tactics of manipulation scale and a personality measure. A subset of the group (thirty three participants) also completed ...

  14. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

  15. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  16. Hole transport in strained SiGe-channel MOSFETs : velocity in scaled devices and mobility under applied mechanical strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Leonardo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 90 nm CMOS technology node, geometric scaling of CMOS has been supplemented with strain to boost transistor drive current. Future CMOS technology nodes (i.e. beyond the 32 nm node) will require more significant ...

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification program pilot-scale ceramic melter Test 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, R.W.; Nakaoka, R.K.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pilot-scale ceramic melter test, was conducted to determine the vitrification processing characteristics of simulated Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant process slurries and the integrated performance of the melter off-gas treatment system. Simulated melter feed was prepared and processed to produce glass. The vitrification system, achieved an on-stream efficiency of greater than 98%. The melter off-gas treatment system included a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber, demister, high-efficiency mist eliminator, preheater, and high-efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA). Evaluation of the off-gas system included the generation, nature, and capture efficiency of gross particulate, semivolatile, and noncondensible melter products. 17 refs., 48 figs., 61 tabs.

  18. Testing the statistical isotropy of large scale structure with multipole vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Zunckel; Dragan Huterer; Glenn D. Starkman

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental assumption in cosmology is that of statistical isotropy - that the universe, on average, looks the same in every direction in the sky. Statistical isotropy has recently been tested stringently using Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data, leading to intriguing results on large angular scales. Here we apply some of the same techniques used in the CMB to the distribution of galaxies on the sky. Using the multipole vector approach, where each multipole in the harmonic decomposition of galaxy density field is described by unit vectors and an amplitude, we lay out the basic formalism of how to reconstruct the multipole vectors and their statistics out of galaxy survey catalogs. We apply the algorithm to synthetic galaxy maps, and study the sensitivity of the multipole vector reconstruction accuracy to the density, depth, sky coverage, and pixelization of galaxy catalog maps.

  19. No corrosion caused by coal chlorine found in AFBC pilot scale tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, K.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Liu, K.; Smith, S.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of deposition and corrosion were made in the freeboard of a 3 m inner diameter pilot scale atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) during seven 1,000-hours tests using coals with chlorine (Cl) contents ranging from 0.026% up to 0.47% and sulfur contents ranging from 0.897{approximately}4.4%. Uncooled coupons of alloys 304, 309, 347 and a cooled tube of A210C medium carbon steel were exposed to the hot flue gases to investigate the effects of different coal compositions on deposition and corrosion behavior, if any. The uncooled coupons were installed at the tope of the freeboard to simulate the superheater tube conditions (1,020--1,100 F surface temperature), while the temperature of the cooled A210C test tube was controlled to match the conditions of the evaporator tubes. Specimens were removed for examination after 250, 500, 750, 1,000 hours of exposure and analyzed for deposit formation and corrosion. No chlorine was found in the corrosion scale or on the metal surfaces after any of the tests. High sulfur contents were found in the outer parts of the deposits, and appeared to be associated with calcium and magnesium suggesting that the fly ash may react further after being deposited on the surface of the metal. It was concluded that the limestone bed in the AFBC not only can capture the sulfur but also can effectively capture chlorine. This effect helps being the Cl in the AFBC flue gas down to a level of <50 ppm which is significantly lower than the 300{approximately}400 ppm expected from combustion of the coal in the absence of limestone. This reduction in chlorine species in the gas phase has possible implications for decreased corrosion problems not only in the freeboard, but also in the cold end of the boiler. No evidence was found in these tests that metal wastage or corrosion was accelerated, either directly or indirectly, by chlorine in the coal.

  20. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

  1. Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

  2. Bench-scale testing of fluidized-bed sorbents -- ZT-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. Specific objectives of this study are the following: {sm_bullet} Investigating various manufacturing methods to produce fluidizable zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents in a particle size range of 50 to 400 {mu}m; Characterizating and screening the formulations for chemical reactivity, attrition resistance, and structural properties; Testing selected formulations in an HTHP bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor to obtain an unbiased ranking of the promising sorbents; Investigating the effect of various process variables, such as temperature, nature of coal gas, gas velocity, and chemical composition of the sorbent, on the performance of the sorbent; Life-cycle testing of the superior zinc ferrite and zinc titanate formulations under HTHP conditions to determine their long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength; Addressing various reactor design issues; Generating a database on sorbent properties and performance (e.g., rates of reaction, attrition rate) to be used in the design and scaleup of future commercial hot-gas desulfurization systems; Transferring sorbent manufacturing technology to the private sector; Producing large batches (in tonnage quantities) of the sorbent to demonstrate commercial feasibility of the preparation method; and Coordinate testing of superior formulations in pilot plants with real and/or simulated coal gas.

  3. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  4. Magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 Nanoparticles-based Test Strip Immunosensing Device for Rapid Detection of Phosphorylated Butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated magnetic nanoparticles-based test-strip immunosensing device was developed for rapid and sensitive quantification of phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the biomarker of exposure to organophosphous pesticides (OP), in human plasma. In order to overcome the difficulty in scarce availability of OP-specific antibody, here magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles were used and adsorbed on the test strip through a small magnet inserted in the device to capture target OP-BChE through selective binding between TiO2 and OP moiety. Further recognition was completed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anti-BChE antibody (Ab) co-immobilized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Their strong affinities among Fe3O4@TiO2, OP-BChE and HRP/Ab-GNPs were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) measurements. After cutting off from test strip, the resulted immunocomplex (HRP/Ab-GNPs/OP-BChE/Fe3O4@TiO2) was measured by SWV using a screen printed electrode under the test zone. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by introduction of GNPs to link enzyme and antibody at high ratio, which amplifies electrocatalytic signal significantly. Moreover, the use of test strip for fast immunoreactions reduces analytical time remarkably. Coupling with a portable electrochemical detector, the integrated device with advanced nanotechnology displays great promise for sensitive, rapid and in-filed on-site evaluation of OP poisoning.

  5. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

  6. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

  7. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

  8. Design and testing of a low-cost exoskeletal trans-femoral prosthetic knee device for use in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartee, Jared Asher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prosthetic devices are designed for amputees in developed countries, made with materials, mechanisms, and research budgets prohibitive to individuals and communities in developing countries. A prosthetic knee for trans-femoral ...

  9. Development of adhesive bonding and functional testing systems for in-process inspection of hot embossed microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyda, Caitlin J. (Caitlin Jilaine)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidics has emerged as an increasingly popular field with a wide-variety of applications such as medical diagnostics, drug development, and DNA analysis. The transition of microfluidic devices from research to industry ...

  10. Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

  11. Qualification testing and full-scale demonstration of titanium-treated zeolite for sludge wash processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, W.J.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium-treated zeolite is a new ion-exchange material that is a variation of UOP (formerly Union Carbide) IONSIV IE-96 zeolite (IE-96) that has been treated with an aqueous titanium solution in a proprietary process. IE-96 zeolite, without the titanium treatment, has been used since 1988 in the West Valley Demonstration Project`s (WVDP) Supernatant Treatment System (STS) ion-exchange columns to remove Cs-137 from the liquid supernatant solution. The titanium-treated zeolite (TIE-96) was developed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Following successful lab-scale testing of the PNL-prepared TIE-96, UOP was selected as a commercial supplier of the TIE-96 zeolite. Extensive laboratory tests conducted by both the WVDP and PNL indicate that the TIE-96 will successfully remove comparable quantities of Cs-137 from Tank 8D-2 high-level radioactive liquid as was done previously with IE-96. In addition to removing Cs-137, TIE-96 also removes trace quantities of Pu, as well as Sr-90, from the liquid being processed over a wide range of operating conditions: temperature, pH, and dilution. The exact mechanism responsible for the Pu removal is not fully understood. However, the Pu that is removed by the TIE-96 remains on the ion-exchange column under anticipated sludge wash processing conditions. From May 1988 to November 1990, the WVDP processed 560,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive supernatant waste stored in Tank 8D-2. Supernatant is an aqueous salt solution comprised primarily of soluble sodium salts. The second stage of the high-level waste treatment process began November 1991 with the initiation of sludge washing. Sludge washing involves the mixing of Tank 8D-2 contents, both sludge and liquid, to dissolve the sulfate salts present in the sludge. Two sludge washes were required to remove sulfates from the sludge.

  12. Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

  13. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore »readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  14. Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

  15. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Zhiyong

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II In Part I of this two-part work, the feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale that using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the context of a perfect model (i.e., both the truth

  16. Underground tank vitrification: A pilot-scale in situ vitrification test of a tank containing a simulated mixed waste sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L.E.; Powell, T.D.; Tixier, J.S.; Miller, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Owczarski, P.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research on sludge vitrification. The first pilot scale in-situ vitrification test of a simulated underground tank was successfully completed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The vitrification process effectively immobilized the vast majority of radionuclides simulants and toxic metals were retained in the melt and uniformly distributed throughout the monolith.

  17. 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic assemblies weighing up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Envelope 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic assemblies weighing up to 9000 kg (10 tons) and as high as 1.83 m (6 ft.) under any inhabited climatic and outdoors but also captures a wide range of secondary metrics. 2. Rotatable Guarded Hot Box (Building 3144

  18. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work done under Phase I, the moisture tolerance testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The following coals were used in the test program: Western Bituminous (Utah), Eastern Bituminous (Pennsylvania), North Dakota Lignite, Sub-Bituminous (Montana), and Eastern Bituminous coal mixed with 20-percent Limestone. The coals were initially tested at the as-received moisture level and subsequently tested after surface moisture was added by water spray. Test results and recommendations for future research and development work are presented.

  19. Full-scale structural testing for severe wind, 1995. Proceedings of the INEL severe windstorm testing workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, C.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides brief background information and reports the discussions and findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Severe Windstorm Testing Workshop held November 29-30, 1995, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Section 1 presents a historical perspective on wind engineering and testing in the U.S. Section 2 discusses INEL`s and the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) interest in a new testing facility, and the efforts that led to the organization of the work-shop. The workshop discussions are then described in Sections 3 through 8. These sections focus on the interaction of the participants and are not intended to be exhaustive discussion of the subjects. A summary of the findings, along with the INEL`s recommendations, are presented in Section 9. A list of the workshop participants, a glossary, and additional technical information provided by selected participants are included in the Appendices.

  20. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  1. HIGH-TEMPERATURE HEAT EXCHANGER TESTING IN A PILOT-SCALE SLAGGING FURNACE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael E. Collings; Bruce A. Dockter; Douglas R. Hajicek; Ann K. Henderson; John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven; Greg F. Weber

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract, has designed, constructed, and operated a 3.0-million Btu/hr (3.2 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) slagging furnace system (SFS). Successful operation has demonstrated that the SFS meets design objectives and is well suited for testing very high-temperature heat exchanger concepts. Test results have shown that a high-temperature radiant air heater (RAH) panel designed and constructed by UTRC and used in the SFS can produce a 2000 F (1094 C) process air stream. To support the pilot-scale work, the EERC has also constructed laboratory- and bench-scale equipment which was used to determine the corrosion resistance of refractory and structural materials and develop methods to improve corrosion resistance. DOE projects that from 1995 to 2015, worldwide use of electricity will double to approach 20 trillion kilowatt hours. This growth comes during a time of concern over global warming, thought by many policy makers to be caused primarily by increases from coal-fired boilers in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions through the use of fossil fuels. Assuming limits on CO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers are imposed in the future, the most economical CO{sub 2} mitigation option may be efficiency improvements. Unless efficiency improvements are made in coal-fired power plants, utilities may be forced to turn to more expensive fuels or buy CO{sub 2} credits. One way to improve the efficiency of a coal-fired power plant is to use a combined cycle involving a typical steam cycle along with an indirectly fired turbine cycle using very high-temperature but low-pressure air as the working fluid. At the heart of an indirectly fired turbine combined-cycle power system are very high-temperature heat exchangers that can produce clean air at up to 2600 F (1427 C) and 250 psi (17 bar) to turn an aeroderivative turbine. The overall system design can be very similar to that of a typical pulverized coal-fired boiler system, except that ceramics and alloys are used to carry the very high-temperature air rather than steam. This design makes the combined-cycle system especially suitable as a boiler-repowering technology. With the use of a gas-fired duct heater, efficiencies of 55% can be achieved, leading to reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions of 40% as compared to today's coal-fired systems. On the basis of work completed to date, the high-temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) concept appears to offer a higher-efficiency technology option for coal-fired power generation systems than conventional pulverized coal firing. Concept analyses have demonstrated the ability to achieve program objectives for emissions (10% of New Source Performance Standards, i.e., 0.003 lb/MMBtu of particulate), efficiency (47%-55%), and cost of electricity (10%-25% below today's cost). Higher-efficiency technology options for new plants as well as repowering are important to the power generation industry in order to conserve valuable fossil fuel resources, reduce the quantity of pollutants (air and water) and solid wastes generated per MW, and reduce the cost of power production in a deregulated industry. Possibly more important than their potential application in a new high-temperature power system, the RAH panel and convective air heater tube bank are potential retrofit technology options for existing coal-fired boilers to improve plant efficiencies. Therefore, further development of these process air-based high-temperature heat exchangers and their potential for commercial application is directly applicable to the development of enabling technologies in support of the Vision 21 program objectives. The objective of the work documented in this report was to improve the performance of the UTRC high-temperature heat exchanger, demonstrate the fuel flexibility of the slagging combustor, and test methods for reducing corrosion of brick and castable refractory in such combustion environments. Specif

  2. DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

  3. Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinfelder, W.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

  4. Full Scale Test of a SSP 34m box girder 1. Data report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind turbine blade. The tests were performed at the Blaest test facility in August 2006. The test. Reffs, Rune F. Nielsen, Peter H. Jensen Risř DTU - Wind Energy Department Malcolm McGugan, Kaj K. Borum Risř DTU - Materials Research Department Rene S. Hansen Risř DTU - Optics and Plasma Research

  5. PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

  6. Test plan/procedure for the shock limiting device of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator package mounting subsystem 145. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, J.A.

    1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the procedure to be used in the 18 inch drop test to be used for design verification of the RTG Transportation System Package Mounting.

  7. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

  8. Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef, J. An, R. Hunt, P. Rainsberry, M. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef@fusion.ucla.edu An engineering scaling process is applied to the solid breeder ITER TBM designs in accordance with the testing objectives of validating the design tools and the database, and evaluating blanket performance under

  9. Proposal for a full-day (6 hours) or half-day (3 hours) tutorial on Power-Aware Testing and Test Strategies for Low-Power Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    circuits and systems Abstract: Managing the power consumption of circuits and systems is now considered as one of the most important challenges for the semiconductor industry. Elaborate power management, Low-Power Design, Power-Constrained Testing, Power Management, Test Power Issues, Design

  10. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  11. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, R.S.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 11 figs.

  12. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

  13. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus comprises a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means.

  14. Large scale DNA microsequencing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, R.S.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature sequencing apparatus and method provide a means for simultaneously obtaining sequences of plural polynucleotide strands. The apparatus cosists of a microchip into which plural channels have been etched using standard lithographic procedures and chemical wet etching. The channels include a reaction well and a separating section. Enclosing the channels is accomplished by bonding a transparent cover plate over the apparatus. A first oligonucleotide strand is chemically affixed to the apparatus through an alkyl chain. Subsequent nucleotides are selected by complementary base pair bonding. A target nucleotide strand is used to produce a family of labelled sequencing strands in each channel which are separated in the separating section. During or following separation the sequences are determined using appropriate detection means. 17 figs.

  15. Design, Construction, and Visualization of Transparent Full Scale High Pressure Test Facility for Electronic Submersible Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Joseph Michael

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain these proper testing conditions. To reasonably pump these large amounts of fluids without wasting the domestic water supply, and the compressor capacity at the Turbomachinery Laboratory, a closed loop 22 system was developed. A P&ID diagram...

  16. Testing theoretical game theory results on a large scale : prisoner's dilemma on Facebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Sunny (Sunny X.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In my research, I designed and implemented an online game accessable to a large diverse audience via the Facebook social network to test out game theoretic results and study social interactions. In this game, we designed ...

  17. Testing the profitability of Anaerobic Digestion in a large-scale UK dairy farm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coz Leniz, Luis Fernando

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    , a set price determined by the Ministry of Energy and Climate Change and paid by the energy supplying companies for every unit of electricity generated through renewable sources. This paper tests the economics, return on investment, and overall value...

  18. Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

  19. MMPI-A: test of behavioral correlates associated with elevated scales in a sample of female juvenile delinquents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Michael Lee

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Group Analysis Hypotheses??????..???????????????. 12 MMPI-A Scale 4 Hypotheses???????????????????.. 12 MMPI-A Scale 5 Hypotheses???????????????????.. 12 MMPI-A Scale 6 Hypotheses???????????????????.. 15 MMPI-A Scale 8 Hypotheses... Scale 5??????????????????????????? 28 Scale 6??????????????????????????? 28 Scale 8.??????????????????????????.. 28 Scale 9.??????????????????????????... 29 Adolescent anger??????????????????????? 29 Adolescent family...

  20. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  1. Determining equivalent damage loading for full-scale wind turbine blade fatigue tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freebury, G.; Musial, W.

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simplified method for converting wind turbine rotor design loads into equivalent-damage, constant-amplitude loads and load ratios for both flap and lead-lag directions. It is an iterative method that was developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using Palmgren-Miner's linear damage principles. The general method is unique because it does not presume that any information about the materials or blade structural properties is precisely known. According to this method, the loads are never converted to stresses. Instead, a family of M-N curves (moment vs. cycles) is defined with reasonable boundaries for load-amplitude and slope. An optimization program iterates and converges on the constant amplitude test load and load ratio that minimizes the sensitivity to the range of M-N curves for each blade section. The authors constrained the general method to match the NedWind 25 design condition for the Standards, Measurements, and Testing (SMT) blade testing pro gram. SMT participants agreed to use the fixed S-N slope of m = 10 from the original design to produce consistent test-loads among the laboratories. Unconstrained, the general method suggests that slightly higher test loads should be used for the NedWind 25 blade design spectrum. NedWind 25 blade test loads were computed for lead-lag and flap under single-axis and two-axis loading.

  2. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  3. 1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

  4. Dark-energy dependent test of general relativity at cosmological scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zolnierowski, Yves

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\Lambda$CDM framework offers a remarkably good description of our universe with a very small number of free parameters, which can be determined with high accuracy from currently available data. However, this does not mean that the associated physical quantities, such as the curvature of the universe, have been directly measured. Similarly, general relativity is assumed, but not tested. Testing the relevance of general relativity for cosmology at the background level includes a verification of the relation between its energy contents and the curvature of space. Using an extended Newtonian formulation, we propose an approach where this relation can be tested. Using the recent measurements on cosmic microwave background, baryonic acoustic oscillations and the supernova Hubble diagram, we show that the prediction of general relativity is well verified in the framework of standard $\\Lambda$CDM assumptions, i.e. an energy content only composed of matter and dark energy, in the form of a cosmological constant o...

  5. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  6. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  7. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communications. References Superconductor Applications: ~on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM Journal

  8. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM JournalJ. Matisoo, The Superconducting Computer," Scientific

  9. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  10. Full Scale Test of a SSP 34m box girder 2. Data report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DTU - Wind Energy Department Malcolm McGugan Risř DTU - Materials Research Department Carsten Skamris 2. Data report Department: Wind Energy Department Risř-R-1588(EN) May 2008 1 Risř ­ Materials of the reinforced glass fiber/epoxy box girder used in a 34m wind turbine blade. One test was without reinforcement

  11. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  12. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  13. LARGE SCALE REFRIGERATION PLANT FOR GROUND TESTING THE JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE AT NASA JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Arnold, Lutz Decker, D. Howe, J. Urbin, Jonathan Homan, Carl Reis, J. Creel, V. Ganni, P. Knudsen, A. Sidi-Yekhlef

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The James Webb Telescope is the successor to the Hubble Telescope and will be placed in an orbit of 1.5 million km from earth. Before launch in 2014, the telescope will be tested in NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) space simulation chamber, Chamber A. The tests will be conducted at deep space conditions. Chamber A's helium cryo-panels are currently cooled down to 20 K by two Linde 3.5 kW helium refrigerators. The new 12.5 kW, 20-K helium coldbox described in this paper is part of the upgrade to the chamber systems for this large test program. The Linde coldbox will provide refrigeration in several operating modes where the temperature of the chamber is being controlled with a high accuracy due to the demanding NASA test requirements. The implementation of two parallel expansion turbine strings and the Ganni cycle—Floating Pressure process results in a highly efficient and flexible process that minimizes the electrical input power. This paper will describe the collaboration and execution of the coldbox project.

  14. Develop and test an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) for large scale MHD magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marston, P.G.; Hale, J.R.; Dawson, A.M.

    1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The work conducted under DOE/PETC Contract DE-AC22-84PC70512 has included four principal tasks, (1) development of a Design Requirements Definition for a retrofit MHD magnet system, (2) analysis of an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) to use in that design, (3) design of an experiment to test a subscale version of that conductor, which is a NbTi, copper stabilized superconductor, and (4) proof-of-concept testing of the conductor. The program was carried forth through the third task with very successful development and test of a conventional ICCS conductor with 27 multifilamentary copper-superconductor composite strands and a new concept conductor in which, in each triplet, two strands were pure copper and the third strand was a multifilamentary composite. In reviewing the magnet design and the premises for the conductor design it became obvious that, since the principal source of perturbation in MHD magnets derives from slippage between coils, or between turns in a coil, thereby producing frictional heat which must flow through the conductor sheath and the helium to the superconductor strands, an extra barrier might be highly effective in enhancing magnet stability and protection. This concept was developed and a sample conductor manufactured and tested in comparison with an identical conductor lacking such an additional barrier. Results of these conductor tests confirm the potential value of such a barrier. As the work of tasks 1 through 3 has been reported in detail in quarterly and semiannual reports, as well as in special reports prepared throughout the course of this project, this report reviews early work briefly and then discusses this last phase in great detail. 8 refs., 36 figs.

  15. Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit.

  16. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  17. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their relative importance in the crust fracture mechanism at plant scale. The second half of this report describes the apparatus for measuring crust strength. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength).

  18. Device-Independent Verifiable Blind Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Hajdušek; Carlos A. Pérez-Delgado; Joseph F. Fitzsimons

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As progress on experimental quantum processors continues to advance, the problem of verifying the correct operation of such devices is becoming a pressing concern. Although recent progress has resulted in several protocols which can verify the output of a quantum computation performed by entangled but non-communicating processors, the overhead for such schemes is prohibitive, scaling at least as the 22nd power of the number of gates. We present a new approach based on a combination of verified blind quantum computation and Bell state self-testing. This approach has significantly reduced overhead, with resources scaling as a quartic polynomial in the number of gates.

  19. Practical-scale tests of cryogenic molecular sieve for separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willms, R.S.; Taylor, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Enoeda, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a number of cases in fusion fuel processing where low-concentration hydrogen isotopes need to be separated from helium. Usually the helium is a purge gas used to move hydrogen isotopes from one location to another. One of the most notable applications is associated with removing tritium from a solid ceramic breeder. For some designs which have been considered, helium with about 1 % protium is purged through the ceramic. The protium exchanges with tritium which has been bred in the solid. The resulting gas composed of helium ({approximately}99%), protium ({approximately}1%) and tritium ({approximately}0.01%) flows out of the blanket and, for further processing, requires separation of the hydrogen isotopes and the helium. Earlier bench-scale (about 50 cc of sieve) work at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory examined a number of adsorbents for their suitability for separating low-concentration hydrogen (no tritium) from helium. One of the effective adsorbents was Linde 5A molecular sieve. The purpose of this paper is to report practical-scale experiments including tritium. These tests used existing cryogenic molecular sieve beds (MSB`S) which each contain about 1.6 kg of Linde 5A molecular sieve.

  20. Practical-scale tests of cryogenic molecular sieve for separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willms, R.S.; Taylor, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earlier bench-scale work at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory examined a number of adsorbents for their suitability for separating low-concentration hydrogen (no tritium) from helium. One of the effective adsorbents was Linde 5A molecular sieve. Recently, experiments including tritium were conducted using practical-scale adsorbers. These tests used existing cryogenic molecular sieve beds (CMSB`s) which each contain about 1.6 kg of Linde 5A molecular sieve. They are part of the TSTA integrated tritium processing system. Gas was fed to each CMSB at about 13 SLPM with a nominal composition of 99% He, 0.98% H{sub 2} and 0.02% HT. In all cases, for an extended period of time, the beds allowed no detectable (via Raman spectroscopy) hydrogen isotopes to escape in the bed effluent. Thereafter, the hydrogen isotopes appeared in the bed exit with a relatively sharp breakthrough curve. This work concludes that cryogenic molecular sieve adsorption is an practical and effective means of separating low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from a helium carrier.

  1. OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

  2. OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

  3. Strain mapping with nm-scale resolution for the silicon-on-insulator generation of semiconductor devices by advanced electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Hutin, Louis; Le Royer, Cyrille [CEA, LETI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beche, Armand [CEA, LETI, and FEI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain engineering in the conduction channel is a cost effective method of boosting the performance in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices. However, given the small dimensions of these devices, it is difficult to quantitatively measure the strain with the required spatial resolution. Three different transmission electron microscopy techniques, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, dark field electron holography, and nanobeam electron diffraction have been applied to measure the strain in simple bulk and SOI calibration specimens. These techniques are then applied to different gate length SiGe SOI pFET devices in order to measure the strain in the conduction channel. For these devices, improved spatial resolution is required, and strain maps with spatial resolutions as good as 1 nm have been achieved. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using these three different techniques when used for strain measurement.

  4. Diffusionless fluid transport and routing using novel microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Louise Mary; Shediac, Renee; Reichmuth, David S.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices have been proposed for 'Lab-on-a-Chip' applications for nearly a decade. Despite the unquestionable promise of these devices to allow rapid, sensitive and portable biochemical analysis, few practical devices exist. It is often difficult to adapt current laboratory techniques to the microscale because bench-top methods use discrete liquid volumes, while most current microfluidic devices employ streams of liquid confined in a branching network of micron-scale channels. The goal of this research was to use two phase liquid flows, creating discrete packets of liquid. Once divided into discrete packets, the packets can be moved controllably within the microchannels without loss of material. Each packet is equivalent to a minute test tube, holding a fraction from a separation or an aliquot to be reacted. We report on the fabrication of glass and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) devices that create and store packets.

  5. Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations Drawn from the DeepCWind Scaled Floating Offshore Wind System Test Campaign: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Masciola, M. D.; Molta, P.; Goupee, A. J.; Coulling, A. J.; Prowell, I.; Browning, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DeepCwind consortium is a group of universities, national labs, and companies funded under a research initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to support the research and development of floating offshore wind power. The two main objectives of the project are to better understand the complex dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind systems and to create experimental data for use in validating the tools used in modeling these systems. In support of these objectives, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a model test campaign in 2011 of three generic floating wind systems, a tension-leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy (spar), and a semisubmersible (semi). Each of the three platforms was designed to support a 1/50th-scale model of a 5 MW wind turbine and was tested under a variety of wind/wave conditions. The focus of this paper is to summarize the work done by consortium members in analyzing the data obtained from the test campaign and its use for validating the offshore wind modeling tool, FAST.

  6. ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS T; HAGERTY K

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

  7. FULL SCALE TESTING TECHNOLOGY MATURATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR FOR HIGH-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT AT HANFORD - 12125

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR; CORBETT JE; WILSON RA; LARKIN J

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulant testing of a full-scale thin-film evaporator system was conducted in 2011 for technology development at the Hanford tank farms. Test results met objectives of water removal rate, effluent quality, and operational evaluation. Dilute tank waste simulant, representing a typical double-shell tank supernatant liquid layer, was concentrated from a 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.5 using a 4.6 m{sup 2} (50 ft{sup 2}) heated transfer area Rototherm{reg_sign} evaporator from Artisan Industries. The condensed evaporator vapor stream was collected and sampled validating efficient separation of the water. An overall decontamination factor of 1.2E+06 was achieved demonstrating excellent retention of key radioactive species within the concentrated liquid stream. The evaporator system was supported by a modular steam supply, chiller, and control computer systems which would be typically implemented at the tank farms. Operation of these support systems demonstrated successful integration while identifying areas for efficiency improvement. Overall testing effort increased the maturation of this technology to support final deployment design and continued project implementation.

  8. Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Power Technologies plans to test an intermediate-scale version of its wave energy converter device in Puget Sound later this year. The device, which is called Manta because its movements are similar to those of a manta stingray, sits like an iceberg on the water.

  9. Sub-micrometer scale minor element mapping in interplanetary dust particles: a test for stratospheric contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G.J.; Keller, L.P.; Sutton, S.R. (SUNYP); (NASA); (UC)

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We mapped the spatial distribution of minor elements including K, Mn, and Zn in 3 IDPs and found no evidence for the surface coatings (rims) of these elements that would be expected if the enrichments previously reported were due to contamination. Combined X-ray microprobe (XRM), energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), and electron microprobe measurements have determined that the average bulk chemical composition of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere is enriched relative to the CI meteorite composition by a factor of 2 to 4 for carbon and for the moderately volatile elements Na, K, P, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and Se, and enriched to {approx}30 times CI for Br. However, Jessberger et al., who have reported similar bulk enrichments using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), attribute the enrichments to contamination by meteor-derived atmospheric aerosols during the several weeks these IDPs reside in the Earth's atmosphere prior to collection. Using scanning Auger spectroscopy, a very sensitive surface analysis technique, Mackinnon and Mogk have observed S contamination on the surface of IDPs, presumably due to the accretion of sulfate aerosols during stratospheric residence. But the S-rich layer they detected was so thin ({approx}100 angstroms thick) that the total amount of S on the surface was too small to significantly perturb the bulk S-content of a chondritic IDP. Stephan et al. provide support for the contamination hypothesis by reporting the enrichment of Br on the edges of the IDPs using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass-Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), but TOF-SIMS is notorious for producing false edge-effects, particularly on irregularly-shaped samples like IDPs. Sutton et al. mapped the spatial distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, and Sr, at the {approx}2 {micro}m scale, in four IDPs using element-specific x-ray fluorescence (XRF) computed microtomography. They found the moderately volatile elements Zn and Br, although spatially inhomogeneous, were not concentrated on the surface of any of the IDPs they examined, suggesting that the Zn and the Br enrichments in the IDPs are not due to contamination during stratospheric residence.

  10. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  11. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Rawls, P. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. As the contract title suggests, the main focus of the program is on proof-of-concept testing of a dewatering technique for a fine clean coal product. The coal industry is reluctant to use the advanced fine coal recovery technology due to the non-availability of an economical dewatering process. in fact, in a recent survey conducted by U.S. DOE and Battelle, dewatering of fine clean coal was identified as the number one priority for the coal industry. This project will attempt to demonstrate an efficient and economic fine clean coal slurry dewatering process.

  12. Large-Scale Testing of Steel-Reinforced Concrete (SRC) Coupling Beams Embedded into Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motter, Christopher John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete Cylinder Testing the latter stages of testing, concrete spalling was observedObtained from Concrete Cylinder Testing f' c,test (ksi) ? 0,

  13. Seismic testing of existing full-scale pile-to-deck connections : precast prestressed and steel piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Jared Keith

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    test. 6.3 Post Testing Inspection The concrete in the lowerafter testing and removal of lose spalled soffit concretethe Roeder testing program. The specified concrete strength

  14. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouëné,J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9_9 cm2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5_5 mm2. This prototype enter sits construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R&D goal of10:1.

  15. Daydreaming Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Ponte, Ana Sofia Lopes

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daydreaming Devices is a project on aspects of daydream and the design of convertible furniture within the context of art. This thesis addresses the concepts and the design of two daydreaming devices developed during my ...

  16. ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  17. Engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from an engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration test. The electrostatic enclosure is part of an overall in-depth contamination control strategy for transuranic (TRU) waste recovery operations. TRU contaminants include small particles of plutonium compounds associated with defense-related waste recovery operations. Demonstration test items consisted of an outer Perma-con enclosure, an inner tent enclosure, and a ventilation system test section for testing electrostatic curtain devices. Three interchangeable test fixtures that could remove plutonium from the contaminated dust were tested in the test section. These were an electret filter, a CRT as an electrostatic field source, and an electrically charged parallel plate separator. Enclosure materials tested included polyethylene, anti-static construction fabric, and stainless steel. The soil size distribution was determined using an eight stage cascade impactor. Photographs of particles containing plutonium were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM also provided a second method of getting the size distribution. The amount of plutonium removed from the aerosol by the electrostatic devices was determined by radiochemistry from input and output aerosol samplers. The inner and outer enclosures performed adequately for plutonium handling operations and could be used for full scale operations.

  18. An evaluation of pocket-model, numerical readout breath alcohol testing instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Tassel, William Edward

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight small-scale breath alcohol measurement devices were tested for accuracy, precision and the ability to not yield false positive and false negative readings. These pocket-sized breath testers (PMBTs), which provided numerical readout of Br...

  19. An ultra-compact virtual source FET model for deeply-scaled devices: Parameter extraction and validation for standard cell libraries and digital circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mysore, Omar

    In this paper, we present the first validation of the virtual source (VS) charge-based compact model for standard cell libraries and large-scale digital circuits. With only a modest number of physically meaningful parameters, ...

  20. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: improve MHK device management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MHK device management Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  2. Electrochromic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allemand, Pierre M. (Tucson, AZ); Grimes, Randall F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Ingle, Andrew R. (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Kennedy, Steve R. (Tuscon, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Boulton, Jonathan M. (Tucson, AZ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

  3. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated...

  4. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III: Comparison with 3DVAR in a Real-Data Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III 8 May 2007) ABSTRACT The feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale application of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF; Evensen 1994) in the atmospheric sci- ences field (Houtekamer

  5. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-scale Data Assimilation. Part IV: Comparison with 3DVar in a Month-long Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-scale Data Assimilation. Part IV@tamu.edu #12;2 Abstract In previous works in this series study, an ensemble Kalman filter (En System. #12;4 1. Introduction The Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) (Evensen 1994), which estimates

  6. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

  7. Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, Results of the Phase II Testing of Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Russ; G. Naranjo; R. Moore; W. Sweet; M. Hele; N. Pons

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    International collaborative effort to construct a laboratory-scale Sulfur-Iodine process capable of producing 100-200 L/hr of hydrogen.

  8. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

  9. Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways 1) intravascularly, 2) extravascularly, 3) by vessel puncture, and 4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting.

  10. The Hierarchical Rater Model for Rated Test Items and its Application to Large-Scale Educational Assessment Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ended (or "constructed response") test items have become a standard part of the educational assessment

  11. Device Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Device Performance group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we measure the performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reporting conditions--defined as a reference temperature (25 C), total irradiance (1000 Wm-2), and spectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3). Typically, these are ''global'' reference conditions, but we can measure with respect to any reference set. To determine device performance, we conduct two general categories of measurements: spectral responsivity (SR) and current versus voltage (I-V). We usually perform these measurements using standard procedures, but we develop new procedures when required by new technologies. We also serve as an independent facility for verifying device performance for the entire PV community. We help the PV community solve its special measurement problems, giving advice on solar simulation, instrumentation for I-V measurements, reference cells, measurement procedures, and anomalous results. And we collaborate with researchers to analyze devices and materials.

  12. The Hierarchical Rater Model for Rated Test Items and its Application to LargeScale Educational Assessment Data 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ended (or ``constructed response'') test items have become a standard part of the educational assessment

  13. Finite-size scaling tests for spectra in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I carry out a finite-size scaling study of the correlation length in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions, using recent data published by Fodor, Holland, Kuti, Nogradi and Schroeder. I make the assumption that the system is conformal in the zero-mass, infinite volume limit, that scaling is violated by both nonzero fermion mass and by finite volume, and that the scaling function in each channel is determined self-consistently by the data. From several different observables I extract a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length xi with the fermion mass m_q, xi proportional to m_q to the power -1/y_m, with y_m ~ 1.35. Shortcomings of the analysis are discussed.

  14. Transactions of NAMRI/SME 543 Volume XXX, 2002 MICRO-SCALE LASER SHOCK PROCESSING MODELING, TESTING,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    Transactions of NAMRI/SME 543 Volume XXX, 2002 MICRO-SCALE LASER SHOCK PROCESSING ­ MODELING of NAMRI/SME 544 Volume XXX, 2002 implicitly assumed. Effects of finite size and complex geometry

  15. FUSION RESEARCH CENTER Physics Scaling of Reactor Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    point where the o-power just balances the losses from the plasma. Thermonuclear reactions are not plasma-T system are narrowly defined by the technical constraints of power loading on the first wall (3 such an expensive device we would like to test the physics in a scaled manner, by analogy with wind tunnel or ship

  16. Development and testing of a commercial-scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litka, A.F.; Breault, R.W.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant fuels used to meet the space-heating needs of schools, office buildings, apartment complexes, and other similar structures. In general, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a coal-fired combustion system for this sector. The commercial-scale coal-water slurry (CWS)-fired space heating system will be a scale-up of a CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system developed by Tecogen under contract to the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This system included a patented nonslagging combustor known as IRIS, for Inertial Reactor with Internal Separation. This combustion technology, which has demonstrated high combustion efficiency using CWS fuels at input rates of 100,000 Btu/hr, will be scaled to operate at 2 to 5 millon Btu/hr. Along with the necessary fuel storage and delivery, heat recovery, and control equipment, the system will include pollution control devices to meet targeted values of NO{sub x}, S0{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. In general, the system will be designed to match the reliability, safety, turndown, and ignition performance of gas or oil-fired systems.

  17. Recovery Act: Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications. Task 4 - Testing in Alstom's 15 MWth Boiler Simulation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levasseur, Armand

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), under U.S. DOE/NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005290, is conducting a development program to generate detailed technical information needed for application of oxy-combustion technology. The program is designed to provide the necessary information and understanding for the next step of large-scale commercial demonstration of oxy combustion in tangentially fired boilers and to accelerate the commercialization of this technology. The main project objectives include: Design and develop an innovative oxyfuel system for existing tangentially-fired boiler units that minimizes overall capital investment and operating costs; Evaluate performance of oxyfuel tangentially fired boiler systems in pilot scale tests at Alstom’s 15 MWth tangentially fired Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF); Address technical gaps for the design of oxyfuel commercial utility boilers by focused testing and improvement of engineering and simulation tools; Develop the design, performance and costs for a demonstration scale oxyfuel boiler and auxiliary systems; Develop the design and costs for both industrial and utility commercial scale reference oxyfuel boilers and auxiliary systems that are optimized for overall plant performance and cost; and, Define key design considerations and develop general guidelines for application of results to utility and different industrial applications. The project was initiated in October 2008 and the scope extended in 2010 under an ARRA award. The project is scheduled for completion by April 30, 2014. Central to the project is 15 MWth testing in the BSF, which provided in-depth understanding of oxy-combustion under boiler conditions, detailed data for improvement of design tools, and key information for application to commercial scale oxy-fired boiler design. Eight comprehensive 15 MWth oxy-fired test campaigns were performed with different coals, providing detailed data on combustion, emissions, and thermal behavior over a matrix of fuels, oxy-process variables and boiler design parameters. Significant improvement of CFD modeling tools and validation against 15 MWth experimental data has been completed. Oxy-boiler demonstration and large reference designs have been developed, supported with the information and knowledge gained from the 15 MWth testing. This report addresses the results from the 15 MWth testing in the BSF.

  18. Validation testing of the EERC pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed combustor using Salt Creek coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Moe, T.A.; Henderson, A.K.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the project was to provide a technical basis for assessing the economic and environmental feasibility of circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) technology, focusing on the effect of system configuration and coal properties on performance. Other underlying goals of the program were to (1) design and construct a CFBC test facility, thereby providing a test facility at an independent laboratory; (2) demonstrate that the test unit is capable of meeting the original design objectives; and (3) assess the ability of the unit to provide scalable data. The purpose of this interim report is to present data from validation testing to establish the scalability of data generated from this unit.

  19. Validation testing of the EERC pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed combustor using Salt Creek coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Moe, T.A.; Henderson, A.K.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the project was to provide a technical basis for assessing the economic and environmental feasibility of circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) technology, focusing on the effect of system configuration and coal properties on performance. Other underlying goals of the program were to (1) design and construct a CFBC test facility, thereby providing a test facility at an independent laboratory; (2) demonstrate that the test unit is capable of meeting the original design objectives; and (3) assess the ability of the unit to provide scalable data. The purpose of this interim report is to present data from validation testing to establish the scalability of data generated from this unit.

  20. Electrochemical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Bellows, Richard J. (Westfield, NJ)

    1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  1. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 12, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 1263 SOC Test Planning Using Virtual Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    (Cost of investing in a new ATE, also known as Capital Expenditure): Complex cores often re- quire test cost requires that once a new, expensive ATE has been purchased, its resources must be utilized-speed ATE channels to drive slower scan chains leads to an underutilization of resources, thereby resulting

  3. Missing Gamma-Rays from kpc-scale AGN Jets: A Test of the IC/CMB Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Eileen T; Sparks, William B; Godfrey, Leith; Perlman, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical origin of the X-ray emission in powerful quasar jets has been a long-standing mystery. Though these jets start out on the sub-pc scale as highly relativistic flows, we do not have any direct measurement of their speeds on the kpc scale, where the vast distances from the core necessitate in situ particle acceleration. If the jets remain highly relativistic on kpc scales, then the X-rays could be due to inverse-Compton upscattering of CMB photons. However, the IC/CMB explanation predicts a high level of gamma-ray emission, which should be detectible by the Fermi/LAT. We have searched for and ruled out this emission at a high level of significance for the well-known sources 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752, suggesting the X-rays are synchrotron, though of unknown origin. These recent results with Fermi also suggest that the kpc-scale jets in powerful quasars are significantly slower than have been presumed under the IC/CMB model. I will discuss the surprising implications of these findings for the energetics...

  4. Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

  5. Inclusive jet production at {radical}s =630 GeV and a test of scaling at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, A.A. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; CDF Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at {radical}{ital s} = 630 GeV is presented. The data are compared with NLO QCD predictions. The ratio of scaled inclusive jet cross section a {radical}{ital s} = 1800 GeV and {radical}{ital s} = 630 GeV is presented and compared with previous CDF results and QCD predictions.

  6. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

  7. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  8. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  9. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

  10. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

  12. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T. S. Cook, E. G. Adelberger, J. H. Gundlach, B. R. Heckel, C. D. Hoyle, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale D. J. Kapner,* T-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 m, probing of the gravitational inverse-square law we report in this Letter. Our tests were made with a substantially upgraded ver

  13. Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  14. Diversionary device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diversionary device has a housing having at least one opening and containing a non-explosive propellant and a quantity of fine powder packed within the housing, with the powder being located between the propellant and the opening. When the propellant is activated, it has sufficient energy to propel the powder through the opening to produce a cloud of powder outside the housing. An igniter is also provided for igniting the cloud of powder to create a diversionary flash and bang, but at a low enough pressure to avoid injuring nearby people.

  15. OLED devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

  16. Electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendemanm, Irina G. (Wexford, PA); Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Finley, James J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Boykin, Cheri M. (Kingsport, TN); Knowles, Julianna M. (Apollo, PA)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

  17. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    et al., 1992]. Thermal monitoring downgradient or in the vicinity of an artificial heat source has (TRTs) are a common field method in shallow geothermics to estimate thermal properties of the ground. During the test, a constantly heated fluid is circulated in closed tubes within a vertical borehole heat

  18. Static and fatigue testing of full-scale fuselage panels fabricated using a Therm-X(R) process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinicola, A.J.; Kassapoglou, C.; Chou, J.C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, curved, integrally stiffened composite panels representative of an aircraft fuselage structure were fabricated using a Therm-X process, an alternative concept to conventional two-sided hard tooling and contour vacuum bagging. Panels subsequently were tested under pure shear loading in both static and fatigue regimes to assess the adequacy of the manufacturing process, the effectiveness of damage tolerant design features co-cured with the structure, and the accuracy of finite element and closed-form predictions of postbuckling capability and failure load. Test results indicated the process yielded panels of high quality and increased damage tolerance through suppression of common failure modes such as skin-stiffener separation and frame-stiffener corner failure. Finite element analyses generally produced good predictions of postbuckled shape, and a global-local modelling technique yielded failure load predictions that were within 7% of the experimental mean.

  19. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  20. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  1. Optoelectronic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonekamp, Jeffrey E.; Boven, Michelle L.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an optoelectronic device comprising an active portion which converts light to electricity or converts electricity to light, the active portion having a front side for the transmittal of the light and a back side opposite from the front side, at least two electrical leads to the active portion to convey electricity to or from the active portion, an enclosure surrounding the active portion and through which the at least two electrical leads pass wherein the hermetically sealed enclosure comprises at the front side of the active portion a barrier material which allows for transmittal of light, one or more getter materials disposed so as to not impede the transmission of light to or from the active portion, and a contiguous gap pathway to the getter material which pathway is disposed between the active portion and the barrier material.

  2. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

  3. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

  4. Performance of powder-filled evacuated panel insulation in a manufactured home roof cavity: Tests in the Large Scale Climate Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, T.W.; Kosny, J.; Childs, P.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale section of half the top of a single-wide manufactured home has been studied in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A small roof cavity with little room for insulation at the eaves is often the case with single-wide units and limits practical ways to improve thermal performance. The purpose of the current tests was to obtain steady-state performance data for the roof cavity of the manufactured home test section when the roof cavity was insulated with fiberglass batts, blown-in rock wool insulation or combinations of these insulations and powder-filled evacuated panel (PEP) insulation. Four insulation configurations were tested: (A) a configuration with two layers of nominal R{sub US}-7 h {center_dot} ft{sup 2} {center_dot} F/BTU (R{sub SI}-1.2 m{sup 2} {center_dot} K/W) fiberglass batts; (B) a layer of PEPs and one layer of the fiberglass batts; (C) four layers of the fiberglass batts; and (D) an average 4.1 in. (10.4 cm) thick layer of blown-in rock wool at an average density of 2.4 lb/ft{sup 3} (38 kg/m{sup 3}). Effects of additional sheathing were determined for Configurations B and C. With Configuration D over the ceiling, two layers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) boards, each about the same thickness as the PEPs, were installed over the trusses instead of the roof. Aluminum foils facing the attic and over the top layer of EPS were added. The top layer of EPS was then replaced by PEPs.

  5. Contacts Integration into functional nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    from the very beginning of the design process. While the properties of nano-scale magnetic devices by magnetoresistive random- access memory (MRAM). The design challenges faced by CMOS and MRAM are very similar of this, the topographical influence of contacts on the overlying magnetic device must be taken account

  6. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  7. GE MEMS for LTE Advanced Mobile Devices | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can be scaled down and miniaturized. "Our cross-disciplinary expertise in materials, device design, fabrication, packaging, electronics and system integration has allowed us...

  8. SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

  9. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butler, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  10. Surface-micromachined microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Montague, Stephen (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Redmond, WA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Krygowski, Thomas W. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Nichols, Christopher A. (Hauppauge, NY); Jakubczak, II, Jerome F. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  11. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  12. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of measurement conditions.

  13. Medical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEMI Medical Electronics team to address short- and long-term reliability issues with medical devices. OurMedical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide medical device manufacturers, and consistency of active implantable medical devices. These devices, including pacemakers, cardiac defibrillators

  14. Connector device for building integrated photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Eurich, Gerald K.; Lesniak, Michael J.; Mazor, Michael H.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is premised upon a connector device and method that can more easily electrically connect a plurality of PV devices or photovoltaic system components and/or locate these devices/components upon a building structure. It also may optionally provide some additional sub-components (e.g. at least one bypass diode and/or an indicator means) and may enhance the serviceability of the device.

  15. Proposal for a Full-Scale Prototype Single-Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and Detector Beam Test at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutter, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will use a large liquid argon (LAr) detector to measure the CP violating phase, determine the neutrino mass hier- archy and perform precision tests of the three-flavor paradigm in long-baseline neutrino oscillations. The detector will consist of four modules each with a fiducial mass of 10 kt of LAr and due to its unprecedented size will allow sensitive searches for proton decay and the detection and measurement of electron neutrinos from core collapse supernovae [1]. The first 10 kt module will use single-phase LAr detection technique and be itself modular in design. The successful manufacturing, installation and operation of several full-scale detector components in a suitable configuration represents a critical engineering milestone prior to the construction and operation of the first full 10 kt DUNE detector module at the SURF underground site. A charged particle beam test of a prototype detector will provide critical calibration measurements as well as inva...

  16. Operated device estimation framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rengarajan, Janarthanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

  17. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is inadequate to permit steady-state operation at reasonable conditions. 4. To enable the HTTF to operate at a more representative steady-state conditions, DOE recently allocated funding via a DOE subcontract to HTTF to permit an OSU infrastructure upgrade such that 2.2 MW will become available for HTTF experiments. 5. Analyses have been performed to study the relationship between HTTF and MHTGR via the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology which has been used successfully in the past, e.g., APEX facility scaling to the Westinghouse AP600 plant. These analyses have focused on the relationship between key variables that will be measured in the HTTF to the counterpart variables in the MHTGR with a focus on natural circulation, using nitrogen as a working fluid, and core heat transfer. 6. Both RELAP5-3D and computational fluid dynamics (CD-Adapco’s STAR-CCM+) numerical models of the MHTGR and the HTTF have been constructed and analyses are underway to study the relationship between the reference reactor and the HTTF. The HTTF is presently being designed. It has Ľ-scaling relationship to the MHTGR in both the height and the diameter. Decisions have been made to design the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) simulation as a boundary condition for the HTTF to ensure that (a) the boundary condition is well defined and (b) the boundary condition can be modified easily to achieve the desired heat transfer sink for HTTF experimental operations.

  18. Modeling of microdischarge devices: Pyramidal structures Mark J. Kushnera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Microdischarge MD devices take advantage of the pd (pressure electrode separation scaling of low temperature Torr to atmospheric pressure with dimensions of 10s­100s m. Their design in based on pd (pressure devices operating with pd 1­10 Torr cm. MD devices have exhibited behavior that resemble both Townsend

  19. Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation M S Fairbanks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Richard

    Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation M S Fairbanks1 , D N McCarthy2 scattering, which caused the electrons to flow through micro and nano-scale devices along fractal in which novel electronic devices feature a fractal distribution of conducting channels. We will focus

  20. Surface-Micromachined Microfluidic Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Montague, Stephen (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Redmond, WA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Krygowski, Thomas W. (Coutlandt Manor, NY); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Nichols, Christopher A. (Hauppauge, NY); Jakubczak, II, Jerome F. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators. Microfluidic devices are disclosed which can be manufactured using surface-micromachining. These devices utilize an electroosmotic force or an electromagnetic field to generate a flow of a fluid in a microchannel that is lined, at least in part, with silicon nitride. Additional electrodes can be provided within or about the microchannel for separating particular constituents in the fluid during the flow based on charge state or magnetic moment. The fluid can also be pressurized in the channel. The present invention has many different applications including electrokinetic pumping, chemical and biochemical analysis (e.g. based on electrophoresis or chromatography), conducting chemical reactions on a microscopic scale, and forming hydraulic actuators.

  1. PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

  2. Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey R. Belt

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

  3. Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey R. Belt

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

  4. Device testing and characterization of thermoelectric nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muto, Andrew (Andrew Jerome)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become evident in recent years that developing clean, sustainable energy technologies will be one of the world's greatest challenges in the 21st century. Thermoelectric materials can potentially make a contribution ...

  5. Device Independent Random Number Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

  6. actuated impact device: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuators to control a high-lift device system. Aerodynamic tests investigated the potential of utilising (more) Chappell, S....

  7. advanced device structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of how these devices and systems are being used to improve productivity in oil & gas seismic analysis & well field planning; automotive design & test; and, industrialmilitary...

  8. Bipolar thermoelectric devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipe, Kevin P. (Kevin Patrick), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here is a theoretical and experimental study of heat production and transport in bipolar electrical devices, with detailed treatment of thermoelectric effects. Both homojunction and heterojunction devices ...

  9. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  10. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  11. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  12. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  13. INFORMATION DEVICES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    to access or hold sensitive, confidential or personal information on mobile devices, such as laptopsPROTECTION OF INFORMATION HELD ON MOBILE DEVICES AND ENCRYPTION POLICY (V3.5) the place of useful;Protection of Information Held on Mobile Devices and Encryption Policy (v3.5) Page 1 Table of Contents 1

  14. Directed random testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Carlos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Random testing can quickly generate many tests, is easy to implement, scales to large software applications, and reveals software errors. But it tends to generate many tests that are illegal or that exercise the same parts ...

  15. Portable data collection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick D. (Aurora, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

  16. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  17. Sensitivity analysis for joint inversion of ground-penetrating radar and thermal-hydrological data from a large-scale underground heater test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalsky, M.B.; Birkholzer, J.; Peterson, J.; Finsterle, S.; Mukhopadhya y, S.; Tsang, Y.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    first step toward comprehensive inversion of the heater testfirst step toward a full inversion of the heater test data,

  18. W4E HYDROPOWER DIRECT DRIVE IN-LINE HYDROTURBINE GENERATOR FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE VALIDATION TESTING REPORT MAY 2013 ALDEN LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Chad W [GZA GeoEnvironmental,Inc.] [GZA GeoEnvironmental,Inc.

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The W4E is a patent-pending, direct-drive, variable force turbine/generator. The equipment generates electricity through the water dependent engagement of a ring of rotating magnets with coils mounted on a stator ring. Validation testing of the W4e was performed at Alden Laboratories in the Spring of 2013. The testing was independently observed and validated by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. The observations made during testing and the results of the testing are included in the Test Summary Report

  19. Microfluidic devices for studying heterotypic cell-cell interactions and tissue specimen cultures under controlled microenvironments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.

    Microfluidic devices allow for precise control of the cellular and noncellular microenvironment at physiologically relevant length- and time-scales. These devices have been shown to mimic the complex in vivo microenvironment ...

  20. Noiseless nonreciprocity in a parametric active device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archana Kamal; John Clarke; Michel Devoret

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonreciprocal devices such as circulators and isolators belong to an important class of microwave components employed in applications like the measurement of mesoscopic circuits at cryogenic temperatures. The measurement protocols usually involve an amplification chain which relies on circulators to separate input and output channels and to suppress backaction from different stages on the sample under test. In these devices the usual reciprocal symmetry of circuits is broken by the phenomenon of Faraday rotation based on magnetic materials and fields. However, magnets are averse to on-chip integration, and magnetic fields are deleterious to delicate superconducting devices. Here we present a new proposal combining two stages of parametric modulation emulating the action of a circulator. It is devoid of magnetic components and suitable for on-chip integration. As the design is free of any dissipative elements and based on reversible operation, the device operates noiselessly, giving it an important advantage over other nonreciprocal active devices for quantum information processing applications.

  1. A study of RELAP5/MOD2 and RELAP5/MOD3 predictions of a small break LOCA simulation conducted at the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Sandra Mernell

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELAP5/MOD2 was performed in conjunction with International Standard Problem 26 (ISP-26), an open exercise organized by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The facility selected for modeling was the Large Scale Test Facility... performed utilizing RELAP5/MOD3 was not submitted for International Standard Problem 26, but is the final product of a series of calculations using the developmental versions of RELAP5/MOD3. The results presented were generated using the final version...

  2. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A. [Mentor Graphics Corporation, 46871 Bayside Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Zschech, E.; Huebner, R. [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing, Maria-Reiche-Strasse 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  3. Barrier breaching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  4. Barrier breaching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  5. Applications of micromachined devices to malaria and cancer detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, James O. (James Otey)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the many micromachined diagnostic devices currently being developed, suspended microchannel resonator technology seems unique in that is not a scaling down of an existing technique and does not require labeling of the ...

  6. Computational Study of the Development of Graphene Based Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellido Sosa, Edson

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a promising material for many technological applications. To realize these applications, new fabrication techniques that allow precise control of the physical properties, as well as large scale integration between single devices...

  7. Structure and dynamics of mangetorheological fluids confined in microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghgooie, Ramin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices and magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been two areas of intense research for several years. Traditionally, these two fields have remained separated from one another by scale. MR fluids are best known ...

  8. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimmer, Derrick P. (White Bear Lake, MN); Paulson, Kenneth R. (North St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  9. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Xu, Xi Xiang (Findlay, OH)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  10. Assessing the Energy Costs of Computing Devices in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simha, Rahul

    Assessing the Energy Costs of Computing Devices in Developing Countries K. Gopinath1 and Rahul to power these devices in developing countries. (2) the energy-efficient design of large information@gwu.edu Abstract Competition, technological developments, and economies of scale have together brought down

  11. Packaging of electro-microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Giunta, Rachel K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new architecture for packaging surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices is presented. This architecture relies on two scales of packaging to bring fluid to the device scale (picoliters) from the macro-scale (microliters). The architecture emulates and utilizes electronics packaging technology. The larger package consists of a circuit board with embedded fluidic channels and standard fluidic connectors (e.g. Fluidic Printed Wiring Board). The embedded channels connect to the smaller package, an Electro-Microfluidic Dual-Inline-Package (EMDIP) that takes fluid to the microfluidic integrated circuit (MIC). The fluidic connection is made to the back of the MIC through Bosch-etched holes that take fluid to surface micromachined channels on the front of the MIC. Electrical connection is made to bond pads on the front of the MIC.

  12. Packaging of electro-microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Giunta, Rachel K. (Albuquerque, NM); Zamora, David Lee (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new architecture for packaging surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices is presented. This architecture relies on two scales of packaging to bring fluid to the device scale (picoliters) from the macro-scale (microliters). The architecture emulates and utilizes electronics packaging technology. The larger package consists of a circuit board with embedded fluidic channels and standard fluidic connectors (e.g. Fluidic Printed Wiring Board). The embedded channels connect to the smaller package, an Electro-Microfluidic Dual-Inline-Package (EMDIP) that takes fluid to the microfluidic integrated circuit (MIC). The fluidic connection is made to the back of the MIC through Bosch-etched holes that take fluid to surface micromachined channels on the front of the MIC. Electrical connection is made to bond pads on the front of the MIC.

  13. Hydrogeologic investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, W L [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Trudeau, D A [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Drellack, S L [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)] [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices and, since 1963, all nuclear detonations there have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts with a small percentage conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks or alluvium. In the testing areas the water table is 450--700 m below the surface. Pre- and post- event geologic investigations are conducted for each test location and long-term studies assess the impact of underground testing on a more regional scale. Studies in progress have not identified any impact on the regional ground water system from testing, but some local effects have been recognized. In some areas where several large tests have been conducted below the water table, water levels hundreds of meters above the regional water table have been measured and radioactivity has been discovered associated with fractures in a few holes. Flow-through and straddle packer testing has revealed unexpectedly high hydraulic pressures at depth. Recently, a multiple completion monitoring well installed to study three zones has confirmed the existence of a significant upward hydraulic gradient. These observations of local pressurization and fracture flow are being further explored to determine the influence of underground nuclear testing on the regional hydrogeologic system.

  14. Mobile Device Management Android Device Enrollment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to manage your device. c. Enter your password. #12;d. Accept the Terms and Conditions e. You have completed. 2. Get Touchdown from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search for Touchdown. c. Use the application. #12;3. Get Citrix Mobile Connect from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search

  15. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gribkov, V. A. [A.I. Alikhanov Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, ul. Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, ul. Hery 23, Warsaw 01-497 (Poland)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement--MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  16. Capillary interconnect device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  17. Vehicle brake testing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Samuel S. (Harriman, TN); Hodgson, Jeffrey W. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a force measuring system capable of measuring forces associated with vehicle braking and of evaluating braking performance. The disclosure concerns an invention which comprises a first row of linearly aligned plates, a force bearing surface extending beneath and beside the plates, vertically oriented links and horizontally oriented links connecting each plate to a force bearing surface, a force measuring device in each link, a transducer coupled to each force measuring device, and a computing device coupled to receive an output signal from the transducer indicative of measured force in each force measuring device. The present invention may be used for testing vehicle brake systems.

  18. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  19. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  20. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  1. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson; Craig P. (Lafayette, CA), Visco; Steven J. (Berkeley, CA), De Jonghe; Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  2. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); De Jonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  3. Preface: The Dalmarnock Fire Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torero, Jose L; Carvel, Ricky O

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the current state of the art, the vibrancy of the profession and existing data from numerous large scale tests, why are new large scale experiments like the Dalmarnock Tests important or, indeed, even necessary?

  4. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  5. Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B.

    1993-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present reporting period, the first quarter of calendar year 1993, the effort was divided between Task 2. ``Pre Systems Tests`` and Task 4 ``Economics and Commercialization Plan.`` A major part of the task 2 effort was devoted converting the nozzle from adiabatic to air cooted operation. This conversion will allow immediate implementation of the longer duration task 3.2 tests after the completion of the task 2 tests. Therefore, a significant pan of the exit nozzle conversion effort is also part of task 3.1, ``Combustor Refurbishment.`` In task 1 the only activity remaining is to receive the results of the BYU combustion modeling. The results are anticipated this Spring. One of the three remaining tests in task 2 was implemented in late January under freezing weather and snow conditions. Ice plugged the coal feed lines and stack scrubber water outlet and ice jammed and damaged the coal metering auger. While these lines were thawed, the combustor was fired with oil. The coal used in this test contained fine fibrous tramp material which passed through the two tramp material retaining screens and eventually plugged several of the coal feed lines to the combustor. This cut the planned coal feed rate in half. As a result it was decided for the next test to increase the number of coal injection ports by 50% in order to provide excess capacity in the pneumatic feed feed. This will allow continued operation even in the presence of fine tramp material in the coal.

  6. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  7. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  8. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  9. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  10. Device control at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffner, S.; Barker, D.; Bookwalter, V. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CEBAF has undergone a major conversion of its accelerator control system from TACL to EPICS, affecting device control for the RF system, magnets, the machine protection system, the vacuum and valves, and the diagnostic systems including beam position monitors, harps, and the camera and solenoid devices (beam viewers, faraday cups, optical transition radiation viewers, synchrotron radiation monitor, etc.). Altogether these devices require approximately 125,000 EPICS database records. The majority of these devices are controlled through CAMAC; some use embedded microprocessors (RF and magnets), and newer interfaces are in VME. The standard EPICS toolkit was extended to include a driver for CAMAC which supports dual processors on one serial highway, custom database records for magnets and BPMs, and custom data acquisition tasks for the BPMs. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Multimaterial rectifying device fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orf, Nicholas D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic and optoelectronic device processing is commonly thought to be incompatible with much simpler thermal drawing techniques used in optical fiber production. The incorporation of metals, polymer insulators, and ...

  12. Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Kerry

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

  13. Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

  14. Electronic security device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); LeBlanc, Edward J. (Kennewick, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

  15. Electronic security device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

  16. AUTHENTICATED SENSOR INTERFACE DEVICE FOR JOINT USE SAFEGUARDS APPLICATIONS - CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poland, R.; Drayer, R.; Wilson, J.

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the key features of the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device that collectively provide the ability to share data among a number of parties while ensuring the authentication of data and protecting both the operator’s and the IAEA’s interests. The paper will also discuss the development of the prototype, the initial testing with an accountancy scale, and future plans and challenges to implementation into the joint use and remote monitoring applications. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent throughout the world and the capacity of plants increases, limited resources of the IAEA are being stretched near a breaking point. A strategy is to increase efficiency in safeguards monitoring using “joint use” equipment that will provide the facility operator process data while also providing the IAEA key safeguards data. The data, however, must be authenticated and validated to ensure the data have not been tampered with. The Authenticated Sensor Interface Device provides the capability to share data and can be a valuable component in the IAEA’s ability to collect accountancy data from scales in Uranium conversion and enrichment plants, as well as nuclear fuel fabrication plants. Likewise, the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device can be configured to accept a diverse array of input signals, ranging from analog voltage, to current, to digital interfaces and more. These modular capabilities provide the ability to collect authenticated, joint-use, data streams from various process monitoring sensors.

  17. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  18. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  19. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  20. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  1. Guided self-assembly of Au nanocluster arrays electronically coupled to semiconductor device layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Guided self-assembly of Au nanocluster arrays electronically coupled to semiconductor device layers clusters within patterned regions on GaAs device layers, thus demonstrating guided self-assembly on a substrate which can provide interesting semiconductor device characteristics. Uniform nanometer scale

  2. MULTISCALE DATABASES TO SUPPORT VISUALISATION ON MOBILE DEVICES M. Hampe a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrie, Lars

    devices like PDA's (Personal Digital Assistants) or Smartphones. With the increasing numberMULTISCALE DATABASES TO SUPPORT VISUALISATION ON MOBILE DEVICES M. Hampe a, *, M. Sester a , L display of mobile devices multiscale maps are created. The scale will decrease continuously starting

  3. Using FPGA Devices to Accelerate Biomolecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL; Smith, Melissa C [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Caliga, David E [ORNL

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field-programmable gate array implementation of the particle-mesh Ewald a molecular dynamics simulation method reduces the microprocessor time-to-solution by a factor of three while using only high-level languages. The application speedup on FPGA devices increases with the problem size. The authors use a performance model to analyze the potential of simulating large-scale biological systems faster than many cluster-based supercomputing platforms.

  4. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  5. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  6. Design, Development, Pre-Testing and Preparation for Full Scale Cold Testing of a System for Field Remediation of Vertical Pipe Units at the Hanford Site 618-10 Burial Grounds -12495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc. 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, New York, 11716 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford site, in the 1950's and 60's, radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from a number of laboratories were stored in vertical pipe units (VPUs) in what are now the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. Although the current physical condition of the VPUs is unknown, initial R and D studies had shown that in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents was feasible. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities to validate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents, and the design and pre-testing of major plant items and augering systems on full size simulated VPUs. The paper also describes the full size prototype equipment which will be used in full size cold testing of simulated VPUs off the Hanford site, to prove the equipment, develop operating procedures, and train operators prior to deployment on site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. (authors)

  7. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  8. Electrical apparatus lockout device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Rick (Chesapeake, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

  9. Electrical apparatus lockout device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, R.

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

  10. Structured SWNTs and Graphene for Photovoltaic devices , Takaaki Chiba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Structured SWNTs and Graphene for Photovoltaic devices Kehang Cui 1 , Takaaki Chiba 1 , Theerapol or ethanol vapor treatment of as-synthesized VA-SWNTs for such devices with higher performance. VA-SWNTs were bare n-type silicon contact window in the center. Our preliminary test showed that the photovoltaic

  11. Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S. Jr. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

  12. Nonaqueous Electrical Storage Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwen, Alan B. (Melrose, MA); Evans, David A. (Seekonk, MA); Blakley, Thomas J. (Woburn, MA); Goldman, Jay L. (Mansfield, MA)

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical capacitor is disclosed that features two, separated, high surface area carbon cloth electrodes sandwiched between two current collectors fabricated of a conductive polymer having a flow temperature greater than 130.degree. C., the perimeter of the electrochemical capacitor being sealed with a high temperature gasket to form a single cell device. The gasket material is a thermoplastic stable at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C., preferably a polyester or a polyurethane, and having a reflow temperature above 130.degree. C. but below the softening temperature of the current collector material. The capacitor packaging has good mechanical integrity over a wide temperature range, contributes little to the device equivalent series resistance (ESR), and is stable at high potentials. In addition, the packaging is designed to be easily manufacturable by assembly line methods. The individual cells can be stacked in parallel or series configuration to reach the desired device voltage and capacitance.

  13. Regenerative combustion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  14. Ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  15. Fragment capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Lloyd R. (Los Lunas, NM); Cole, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  16. Biochip scanner device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Belgovskiy, Alexander I. (Mayfield Heights, OH); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  17. Electrochromic optical switching device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.; Visco, S.J.

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source. 3 figs.

  18. Electrochromic optical switching device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, Carl M. (El Sobrante, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source.

  19. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  20. Phononic crystal devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  1. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Conrad D. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Mark S. (Tijeras, NM)

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  2. Development of crawler type device using new measuring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, T.; Sasaki, T.; Yagi, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development and field application of a new device which examine shell to shell weld joints of RPV. In a BWR type nuclear power plant, there is narrow space around the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) because RPV is enclosed by the Reactor Shield Wall (RSW) and thermal insulations. The developed device is characterized by a new position measuring system and magnet wheels for driving. The new position measuring system uses laser beam and ultrasonic wave. The magnet wheels make the device travel freely in the narrow space between RPV and insulation. This device is tested on mock-ups and applied examination of RPVs to verify field applicability.

  3. Condensate removal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  4. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  5. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  6. Cascaded thermoacoustic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoacoustic device is formed with a resonator system defining at least one region of high specific acoustic impedance in an acoustic wave within the resonator system. A plurality of thermoacoustic units are cascaded together within the region of high specific acoustic impedance, where at least one of the thermoacoustic units is a regenerator unit.

  7. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  8. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  9. Bench-scale testing of the Multi-Gravity separator in combination with Microcel. Third quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the proposed work is to design, install, and operate an advanced fine coal processing circuit combining the Microcel and Multi-Gravity-Separator (MGS) technologies. Both of these processes have specific advantages as stand-alone units. For example, the Microcel column effectively removes ash-bearing mineral matter, while the MGS efficiently removes coal-pyrite composites. By combining both unit operations into a single processing circuit, synergistic advantages can be gained. As a result, this circuit arrangement has the potential to improve coal quality beyond that achieved using the individual technologies. Work this quarter primarily focused on procurement and fabrication of the required process equipment. All fabrication work is underway and is expected to be completed prior to the installation deadline. Delays in the existing project within the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s Coal Preparations Process Research Facility have resulted in a shift in the original project schedule. A new installation date (June 28, 1993) has been established by DOE/PETC. The overall project schedule has been adjusted accordingly. Revisions to ESH subject plans were also completed during this quarter. Based on these plans, the ESH permitting procedure has been initiated by the contracting officer`s representative. The subject plans and circuit will be modified, if necessary, to reflect any changes suggested by DOE. It is anticipated that the ESH permit will be issued in the early part of the third quarter. Preliminary characterization studies continued this quarter. Modifications were made to the centrifugal washability procedure to minimize time material requirements. Using the modified procedure, tests were conducted on both the Pittsburgh No. 8 and Illinois No. 6 seam coals as a function of particle size.

  10. A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic Beads-Trapping Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a beads-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the beads-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a beads-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.

  11. Nuclear Spins in a Nanoscale Device for Quantum Information Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Ozdemir; A. Miranowicz; T. Ota; G. Yusa; N. Imoto; Y. Hirayama

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent oscillations between any two levels from four nuclear spin states of I=3/2 have been demonstrated in a nanometre-scale NMR semiconductor device, where nuclear spins are all-electrically controlled. Using this device, we discuss quantum logic operations on two fictitious qubits of the I=3/2 system, and propose a quantum state tomography scheme based on the measurement of longitudinal magnetization, $M_z$.

  12. Monitoring Sessile Droplet Evaporation on a Micromechanical Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, A.; Lin, A. T.-H.; Rao, V. R.; Seshia, A. A.

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    batch fabrication of miniaturized mechanical devices that may be co-integrated with chip-scale electronics and microfluidic handling systems to realize miniaturized and portable platforms for bio-chemical sensing and environmental monitoring [1... for mapping DNA on flat substrates [25], in microfluidics for optimizing device biochip designs [26], ARTICLE Journal Name 2 | J. Name., 2012, 00, 1-3 This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012 and dynamics of drying drops on nanostructured...

  13. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  14. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  15. Course Information --EE 531 Semiconductor Devices and Device Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    of Semiconductor Devices" by Hess "Si Processing for the VLSI Era: Vol. 3-- The Submicron MOSFET" by Wolf "Advanced: 20% Exam 1: 30% Exam 2: 30% Project: 20% Prerequisite: Semiconductor Devices (EE 482) or equivalent

  16. Support and maneuvering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, R.L.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

  17. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  18. Support and maneuvering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Richard L. (Arvada, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof.

  19. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

  20. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

  1. Regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  2. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  3. Hybrid electroluminescent devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Schenectady, NY)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electroluminescent (EL) device comprises at least one inorganic diode element and at least one organic EL element that are electrically connected in series. The absolute value of the breakdown voltage of the inorganic diode element is greater than the absolute value of the maximum reverse bias voltage across the series. The inorganic diode element can be a power diode, a Schottky barrier diode, or a light-emitting diode.

  4. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  5. Biomolecular detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode.

  6. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

  7. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  8. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Egley, J.L.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophotovoltaic device and a method for making the thermophotovoltaic device are disclosed. The device includes an n-type semiconductor material substrate having top and bottom surfaces, a tunnel junction formed on the top surface of the substrate, a region of active layers formed on top of the tunnel junction and a back surface reflector (BSR). The tunnel junction includes a layer of heavily doped n-type semiconductor material that is formed on the top surface of the substrate and a layer of heavily doped p-type semiconductor material formed on the n-type layer. An optional pseudomorphic layer can be formed between the n-type and p-type layers. A region of active layers is formed on top of the tunnel junction. This region includes a base layer of p-type semiconductor material and an emitter layer of n-type semiconductor material. An optional front surface window layer can be formed on top of the emitter layer. An optional interference filter can be formed on top of the emitter layer or the front surface window layer when it is used. 1 fig.

  9. Investigation of the Feasibility of a Small Scale Transmutation Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sit, Roger Carson

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    27], and the Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor (GCFTR)fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) and high temperature gas

  10. Fabricating Nano-Scale Devices: Block Copolymers and their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limaye, Aditya

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leaving behind cylindrical troughs where the polystyrenewas deposited into these cylindrical troughs using sputter

  11. Investigation of the Feasibility of a Small Scale Transmutation Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sit, Roger Carson

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1.2.2. Fast reactors …………………………………………………………… 5 1.2.3.thermal reactors, fast reactors, fusion sources, acceleratorconcept. [9] 1.2.2 Fast Reactors Fast reactors are reactors

  12. Investigation of the Feasibility of a Small Scale Transmutation Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sit, Roger Carson

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook: Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory, Volume 1 andnuclear fusion [53]. Unlike conventional fusion reactor theory,

  13. Device-scale perpendicular alignment of colloidal nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , Scher, E. C. & Alivisatos, A. P. Shape control ofW. U. , Dittmer, J. J. & Alivisatos, A. P. Hybrid nanorod-P. , Kanaras, A. G. & Alivisatos, A. P. Hybrid solar cells

  14. Investigation of the Feasibility of a Small Scale Transmutation Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sit, Roger Carson

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31 4.6. Heat load calculations …………………………………………………………. 33 5.188 9. Heat Load Calculations for Conceptual Transmutationtally [30, 63]. 4.6 Heat Load Calculations The heat load to

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyScaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground Testing Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground...

  16. Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -DRAFT - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Thermoelectric Generation ......

  17. Evaluation of a Local Air Conditioning Duty Cycling Device as a Load Management Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, K.; Thedford, M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1984, a test was performed to evaluate a local air conditioning duty cycling device as a tool to reduce TUEC's system summer peak demand. In addition to the local duty cycling device, a direct load control device using a power...

  18. A Soft Wearable Robotic Device for Active Knee Motions using Flat Pneumatic Artificial Muscles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    elastomer muscles were employed for assisted knee extension and flexion. The robotic device was testedA Soft Wearable Robotic Device for Active Knee Motions using Flat Pneumatic Artificial Muscles Yong present the design of a soft wearable robotic device composed of elastomeric artificial muscle actuators

  19. Vapor phase deposition of oligo,,phenylene ethynylene... molecules for use in molecular electronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, John C.

    , many groups have made headway fab- ricating molecular electronic test devices.1­18 These devices exceptions,22,23 the field of mo- lecular electronics is plagued by problems including a lack of deviceVapor phase deposition of oligo,,phenylene ethynylene... molecules for use in molecular electronic

  20. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  1. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  2. Nanoscale Josephson Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Chris

    , ferromagnetically (aligned ferromagnetic layers) FIB Focused Ion Beam GL Ginzburg-Landau GPIB General Purpose Interface Bus GMR Giant Magnetoresistance HTS High Temperature Superconductor I Insulator LED Light Emitting Diode LTS Low Temperature Superconductor MR... . The fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions in the high temperature superconductor Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 will then be discussed, as well as Nb/MoSi2/Nb junctions, superconducting quantum interference devices, and finally GaN light emitting diodes. The work on Tl2Ba2...

  3. Micro environmental sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polosky, Marc A. (Tijeras, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Tijeras, NM)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) acceleration switch is disclosed which includes a proof mass flexibly connected to a substrate, with the proof mass being moveable in a direction substantially perpendicular to the substrate in response to a sensed acceleration. An electrode on the proof mass contacts one or more electrodes located below the proof mass to provide a switch closure in response to the sensed acceleration. Electrical latching of the switch in the closed position is possible with an optional latching electrode. The MEM acceleration switch, which has applications for use as an environmental sensing device, can be fabricated using micromachining.

  4. Multiported storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of niultiported storage device 3 Linux file I/O subsystem 4 Windows NT layered I/O driver model 10 15 5 Location of multiported module in I/O stack 17 6 The bulfer cache . . . 20 7 Queuing of I/O requests 8 Processing of I/O requests by smart blkfiltcr 9... Registering of filter applet via Linux stacked module mechanism . 21 22 . . 26 10 Table of registered filter applets (functions) . . 27 11 Overhead due to presence of smart blkfilter alone . 12 Overhead of smart blkfilter using rot13 filter port 31 33...

  5. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  6. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  7. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  8. Page 1 of 8 AN INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE TO CHARACTERIZE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to determine the residual capacity of aged specimens. This paper aims at describing the proposed creep test test configuration and the creep load was applied to the specimens by means of a sustained dead weightPage 1 of 8 AN INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE TO CHARACTERIZE THE CREEP BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE

  9. Property:Scale Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This property is set byisPropertycustomers.Property

  10. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 3, MARCH 2003 769 A Wigner Function-Based Quantum Ensemble Monte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringhofer, Christian

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 3, MARCH 2003 769 A Wigner Function AS CURRENT device technologies quickly approach the scales whereby quantum effects due to the strong confine and trusted method for device simulation, as it is proven to be reliable and predictive [3]. However, as EMC

  12. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  13. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  14. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  15. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  16. Testing and modeling of a solar thermophotovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, K.W. [McDonnell Douglas, 5301 Bolsa Ave, Huntington Bch., California 92647 (United States); Chubb, D.L.; Wilt, D.M. [NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) power system has attractive attributes for both space and terrestrial applications. This paper presents the results of testing by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) over the last year with components furnished by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). The testing has included a large scale solar TPV testbed system and small scale laboratory STPV simulator using a small furnace. The testing apparatus, instrumentation, and operation are discussed, including a description of the emitters and photovoltaic devices that have been tested. Over 50 on-sun tests have been conducted with the testbed system. It has accumulated over 300 hours of on-sun time, and 1.5 MWh of thermal energy incident on the receiver material while temperatures and I-V measurements were taken. A summary of the resulting test data is presented that shows the measured performance at temperatures up to 1220{degree}C. The receiver materials and PV cells have endured the high temperature operation with no major problems. The results of this investigation support MDA belief that STPV is a viable power system for both space and terrestrial power applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  18. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinan E

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main bottleneck in modeling transport in molecular devices is to develop the correct formulation of the problem and efficient algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure and dynamics using, for example, the time-dependent density functional theory. We have divided this task into several steps. The first step is to developing the right mathematical formulation and numerical algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure using density functional theory. The second step is to study time-dependent density functional theory, particularly the far-field boundary conditions. The third step is to study electronic transport in molecular devices. We are now at the end of the first step. Under DOE support, we have made subtantial progress in developing linear scaling and sub-linear scaling algorithms for electronic structure analysis. Although there has been a huge amount of effort in the past on developing linear scaling algorithms, most of the algorithms developed suffer from the lack of robustness and controllable accuracy. We have made the following progress: (1) We have analyzed thoroughly the localization properties of the wave-functions. We have developed a clear understanding of the physical as well as mathematical origin of the decay properties. One important conclusion is that even for metals, one can choose wavefunctions that decay faster than any algebraic power. (2) We have developed algorithms that make use of these localization properties. Our algorithms are based on non-orthogonal formulations of the density functional theory. Our key contribution is to add a localization step into the algorithm. The addition of this localization step makes the algorithm quite robust and much more accurate. Moreover, we can control the accuracy of these algorithms by changing the numerical parameters. (3) We have considerably improved the Fermi operator expansion (FOE) approach. Through pole expansion, we have developed the optimal scaling FOE algorithm.

  19. Glow discharge based device for solving mazes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinov, Alexander E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Mironenko, Maxim S.; Selemir, Victor D. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ? All-Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), Sarov, Nizhni Novgorod region 607188 (Russian Federation); Sarov Institute of Physics and Technology (SarFTI) of National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” Sarov, Nizhni Novgorod region 607188 (Russian Federation); Maksimov, Artem N.; Pylayev, Nikolay A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ? All-Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), Sarov, Nizhni Novgorod region 607188 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A glow discharge based device for solving mazes has been designed and tested. The device consists of a gas discharge chamber and maze-transformer of radial-azimuth type. It allows changing of the maze pattern in a short period of time (within several minutes). The device has been tested with low pressure air. Once switched on, a glow discharge has been shown to find the shortest way through the maze from the very first attempt, even if there is a section with potential barrier for electrons on the way. It has been found that ionization waves (striations) can be excited in the maze along the length of the plasma channel. The dependancy of discharge voltage on the length of the optimal path through the maze has been measured. A reduction in discharge voltage with one or two potential barriers present has been found and explained. The dependency of the magnitude of discharge ignition voltage on the length of the optimal path through the maze has been measured. The reduction of the ignition voltage with the presence of one or two potential barriers has been observed and explained.

  20. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Eric A. (Rio Rancho, NM); Wasserman, Daniel (Lowell, MA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  1. Personal annunciation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angelo, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); Younkin, James (Oak Ridge, TN); DeMint, Paul (Kingston, TN)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal annunciation device (PAD) providing, in an area of interest, compensatory annunciation of the presence of an abnormal condition in a hazardous area and accountability of the user of the PAD. Compensatory annunciation supplements primary annunciation provided by an emergency notification system (ENS). A detection system detects an abnormal condition, and a wireless transmission system transmits a wireless transmission to the PAD. The PAD has a housing enclosing the components of the PAD including a communication module for receiving the wireless transmission, a power supply, processor, memory, annunciation system, and RFID module. The RFID module has an RFID receiver that listens for an RFID transmission from an RFID reader disposed in a portal of an area of interest. The PAD identifies the transmission and changes its operating state based on the transmission. The RFID readers recognize, record, and transmit the state of the PAD to a base station providing accountability of the wearer.

  2. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  3. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  4. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  5. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  6. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  7. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  8. Electrical safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, David B. (Greenock, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical safety device for use in power tools that is designed to automatically discontinue operation of the power tool upon physical contact of the tool with a concealed conductive material. A step down transformer is used to supply the operating power for a disconnect relay and a reset relay. When physical contact is made between the power tool and the conductive material, an electrical circuit through the disconnect relay is completed and the operation of the power tool is automatically interrupted. Once the contact between the tool and conductive material is broken, the power tool can be quickly and easily reactivated by a reset push button activating the reset relay. A remote reset is provided for convenience and efficiency of operation.

  9. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  10. Module isolation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  11. Air bag restraint device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  12. An interactive teaching device simulating intussusception reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1764-x TECHNICAL INNOVATION An interactive teaching deviceIRB. We developed an interactive teaching device to simulate

  13. Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Mori, H. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan); Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

  14. Strain-tuning of periodic optical devices : tunable gratings and photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Chee Wei, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of micro- and nano-scale optical devices has heralded micromirrors, semiconductor micro- and nano-lasers, and photonic crystals, among many. Broadly defined with the field of microphotonics and microelect ...

  15. Photovoltaic power plant as FACTS devices in multi-feeder systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moawwad, Ahmed

    This paper illustrates possible configurations for a large-scale photovoltaic power plant (PV), to operate as a FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) device in addition to operating as a source of renewable power generation. ...

  16. 722 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 23, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2002 Low-Frequency Noise Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey

    dimensions are scaled down [2]. Re- cently, fully depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices have been with the spacer lithography process [6], [7]. Following a sacrificial oxidation of the fin sidewalls, a 2.1-nm

  17. The development of novel passive and active photonic-crystal devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assefa, Solomon, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are anticipated to have impact on large-scale photonic integrated circuits by allowing the creation of compact and efficient devices such as waveguides, splitters, microcavity filters, light emitting ...

  18. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  19. Structured wafer for device processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  20. Quantum Electronic Devices Based on Metal-Dielectric Transition in Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Antoniou; B. Pavlov; A. Yafyasov

    1996-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of optically manipulated quantum electronic devices are considered: a quantum dot and a finite periodic molecular chain, with the period doubled under resonance optical excitation. The stability of the working regimes of the devices in large scale of temperatures is discussed. Some motivation in favor of the molecular chain is suggested. A class of materials, which can be used for producing this device is discussed.

  1. X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance no features on the length scale of 50 nm or greater. Additionally, the performance of photovoltaic devices evaluated and compared to the performance of chloroform blends with varied weight ratio. By studying

  2. Method Of Packaging And Assembling Electro-Microfluidic Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Giunta, Rachel K. (Albuquerque, NM); Zamora, David Lee (Albuquerque, NM); Watson, Robert D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new architecture for packaging surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices is presented. This architecture relies on two scales of packaging to bring fluid to the device scale (picoliters) from the macro-scale (microliters). The architecture emulates and utilizes electronics packaging technology. The larger package consists of a circuit board with embedded fluidic channels and standard fluidic connectors (e.g. Fluidic Printed Wiring Board). The embedded channels connect to the smaller package, an Electro-Microfluidic Dual-Inline-Package (EMDIP) that takes fluid to the microfluidic integrated circuit (MIC). The fluidic connection is made to the back of the MIC through Bosch-etched holes that take fluid to surface micromachined channels on the front of the MIC. Electrical connection is made to bond pads on the front of the MIC.

  3. Multi-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process is extensively employed. During the CMP process, undesirable scratches are produced on Cu ...

  4. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  5. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  6. Chemical cytometry on a picoliter-scale integrated microfluidic chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Chemical cytometry on a picoliter-scale integrated microfluidic chip Hongkai Wu, Aaron Wheeler by Richard N. Zare, July 23, 2004 An integrated microfluidic device has been fabricated for analyzing microfluidic device, electro- pherograms of amino acids from individual Jurkat T cells are recorded

  7. Myths, misconceptions & mistakes of bias testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bias testing philosophy is outlined. The following topics are discussed: statistics - its only tool; testing once; experimental design; sample size; batch-mode testing; outliers; scale bias; and multivariate statistical analysis.

  8. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    deBoer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM); Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry A. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  9. Lateral flow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Debapriya (Urbana, IL); Liu, Juewen (Urbana, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical test for an analyte comprises (a) a base, having a reaction area and a visualization area, (b) a capture species, on the base in the visualization area, comprising nucleic acid, and (c) analysis chemistry reagents, on the base in the reaction area. The analysis chemistry reagents comprise (i) a substrate comprising nucleic acid and a first label, and (ii) a reactor comprising nucleic acid. The analysis chemistry reagents can react with a sample comprising the analyte and water, to produce a visualization species comprising nucleic acid and the first label, and the capture species can bind the visualization species.

  10. Thermally-induced voltage alteration for analysis of microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walraven, Jeremy A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device with or without on-board integrated circuitry. One embodiment of the TIVA apparatus uses constant-current biasing of the MEM device while scanning a focused laser beam over electrically-active members therein to produce localized heating which alters the power demand of the MEM device and thereby changes the voltage of the constant-current source. This changing voltage of the constant-current source can be measured and used in combination with the position of the focused and scanned laser beam to generate an image of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device (e.g. due to stiction or fabrication defects). In another embodiment of the TIVA apparatus, an image can be generated directly from a thermoelectric potential produced by localized laser heating at the location of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device, without any need for supplying power to the MEM device. The TIVA apparatus can be formed, in part, from a scanning optical microscope, and has applications for qualification testing or failure analysis of MEM devices.

  11. Diamonds are an Electronic Device’s Best Friend

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at Argonne National Lab recently devised a way to use diamonds to brighten the performance of electronic devices, which could put a bit more sparkle in everyone’s day.

  12. Superconducting-semiconductor quantum devices: from qubits to particle detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Pil Shim; Charles Tahan

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent improvements in materials growth and fabrication techniques may finally allow for superconducting semiconductors to realize their potential. Here we build on a recent proposal to construct superconducting devices such as wires, Josephson junctions, and qubits inside and out-of single crystal silicon or germanium. Using atomistic fabrication techniques such as STM hydrogen lithography, heavily-doped superconducting regions within a single crystal could be constructed. We describe the characteristic parameters of basic superconducting elements---a 1D wire and a tunneling Josephson junction---and estimate the values for boron-doped silicon. The epitaxial, single-crystal nature of these devices, along with the extreme flexibility in device design down to the single-atom scale, may enable lower-noise or new types of devices and physics. We consider applications for such super-silicon devices, showing that the state-of-the-art transmon qubit and the sought-after phase-slip qubit can both be realized. The latter qubit leverages the natural high kinetic inductance of these materials. Building on this, we explore how kinetic inductance based particle detectors (e.g., photon or phonon) could be realized with potential application in astronomy or nanomechanics. We discuss super-semi devices (such as in silicon, germanium, or diamond) which would not require atomistic fabrication approaches and could be realized today.

  13. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES 1 Performance Characteristics of Scaled Bilayer Graphene Pseudospin Devices M. J. Gilbert, Member, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, we examine the performance character- istics of bilayer graphene pseudospin devices as we scale

  14. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  15. Design of a laparoscopic simulation device for testing and training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Susan Caroline

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development by Caroline Flowers of two prototypes of a benchtop laparoscopy simulator that mechanically simulates access ports using outer 'tissue' samples for port insertion and an inner cavity ...

  16. First Thermonuclear Device Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartment ofr EEONuclearNuclear

  17. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Us TedJ.L Wetland

  18. Polymer electronic devices and materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, William Kent; Baca, Paul Martin; Dirk, Shawn M.; Anderson, G. Ronald; Wheeler, David Roger

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electronic devices and materials have vast potential for future microsystems and could have many advantages over conventional inorganic semiconductor based systems, including ease of manufacturing, cost, weight, flexibility, and the ability to integrate a wide variety of functions on a single platform. Starting materials and substrates are relatively inexpensive and amenable to mass manufacturing methods. This project attempted to plant the seeds for a new core competency in polymer electronics at Sandia National Laboratories. As part of this effort a wide variety of polymer components and devices, ranging from simple resistors to infrared sensitive devices, were fabricated and characterized. Ink jet printing capabilities were established. In addition to promising results on prototype devices the project highlighted the directions where future investments must be made to establish a viable polymer electronics competency.

  19. Personal cooling air filtering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Conway, Bret (Denver, NC)

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature modification system for modifying the temperature of fluids includes at least one thermally conductive carbon foam element, the carbon foam element having at least one flow channel for the passage of fluids. At least one temperature modification device is provided, the temperature modification device thermally connected to the carbon foam element and adapted to modify the temperature of the carbon foam to modify the temperature of fluids flowing through the flow channels. Thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements can preferably be used as the temperature modification device. A method for the reversible temperature modification of fluids includes the steps of providing a temperature modification system including at least one thermally conductive carbon foam element having flow channels and at least one temperature modification device, and flowing a fluid through the flow channels.

  20. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  1. Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

  2. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  3. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  4. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  5. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  6. Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC), verified the functionality of the Wave Energy Technology - New Zealand (WET-NZ) device through wave tank testing and...

  7. Transition physics and scaling overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, T.N.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of recent experimental progress towards understanding H-mode transition physics and scaling. Terminology and techniques for studying H-mode are reviewed and discussed. The model of shear E x B flow stabilization of edge fluctuations at the L-H transition is gaining wide acceptance and is further supported by observations of edge rotation on a number of new devices. Observations of poloidal asymmetries of edge fluctuations and dephasing of density and potential fluctuations after the transition pose interesting challenges for understanding H-mode physics. Dedicated scans to determine the scaling of the power threshold have now been performed on many machines. A dear B{sub t} dependence is universally observed but dependence on the line averaged density is complicated. Other dependencies are also reported. Studies of the effect of neutrals and error fields on the power threshold are under investigation. The ITER threshold database has matured and offers guidance to the power threshold scaling issues relevant to next-step devices.

  8. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  9. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  10. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  11. Assistive Devices for the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , contact a physical therapist or occupational therapist through a home health agency or your local hospital. The following Web sites have information about devices that can make your home safer and more functional: http...Assistive Devices for the Home Janie Harris Extension Specialist, Housing and Environment The Texas A&M University System If you were to become impaired or disabled from an accident or illness, how ?user-friendly? would your home be? There are many...

  12. Piezo-phototronic effect devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.; Yang, Qing

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconducting device includes a piezoelectric structure that has a first end and an opposite second end. A first conductor is in electrical communication with the first end and a second conductor is in electrical communication with the second end so as to form an interface therebetween. A force applying structure is configured to maintain an amount of strain in the piezoelectric member sufficient to generate a desired electrical characteristic in the semiconducting device.

  13. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  14. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Haase, Andy

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  15. Fast amplitude and delay measurement for characterization of optical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael Thomas

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the chromatic dispersion in the device under test by taking the derivative of the group delay with respect to optical wavelength. The measurement setup allows both step-tunable and sweeping laser sources. A modulation frequency of up to 2.7 GHz...

  16. Manufacturers of light sensitive devices need to measure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    and calibrating simultaneously Compared to a traditional solar simulator this new system is in control of output of light sensitive devices. The Solar cells testing system has won the Dutch Cleantech Challenge 2014 in the process of production, as it is time consuming to check each produced cell. A team of TU Delft scientists

  17. DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Submitted by Russell M Reserved #12;ABSTRACT DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Thin-film photovoltaics

  18. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Reviews work in engineered...

  19. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

  20. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.