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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

2

A wet chemistry approach to sub-micron, removable flip chip interconnects.  

SciTech Connect

Higher performance is the main driver in the integrated circuit (IC) market, but along with added function comes the cost of increased input/output connections and larger die sizes. Space saving approaches aimed at solving these challenges includes two technologies; 3D stacking (3D-ICs) and flip chip assemblies. Emerging ICs require sub-micron scale interconnects which include vias for 3D-ICs and bump bonds for flip chips. Photolithographic techniques are commonly used to prepare templates followed by metal vapor deposition to create flip chip bump bonds. Both the lithography step and the metal properties required for bump bonding contribute to limiting this approach to a minimum bump size of -10 ?m. Here, we present a wet chemistry approach to fabricating uniform bump bonds of tunable size and height down to the nanoscale. Nanosphere lithography (NSL), a soft lithographic technique, is used to create a bump bond template or mask for nanoscale bumps. Electrochemical deposition is also used through photoresist templates to create uniform bump bonds across large area wafers or dies. This template approach affords bumps with tunable diameters from 100s of nanometers to microns (allowing for tunable interconnect pitch and via diameters) while the use of constant current electroplating gives uniform bump height over large areas (>1 cm{sup 2}).

Rowen, Adam M.; Barker, Joy M.; Gillen, J. Rusty; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Arrington, Christian L.; Yelton, William Graham

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development of a catalytic system for gasification of wet biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification system is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory that can be used with high-moisture biomass feedstocks. The system operates at 350 C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet biomass can be fed as a slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. This paper includes assessment of processing test results of different catalysts. Reactor system results including batch, bench-scale continuous, and engineering-scale processing results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this catalytic gasification system to biomass. The system has utility both for direct conversion of biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for treatment of unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system high conversion of biomass to fuel gas can be achieved. Medium-Btu is the primary product. Potential exists for recovery/recycle of some of the unreacted inorganic components from the biomass in the aqueous byproduct stream.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J.; Phelps, M.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Print Chemical science at the ALS encompasses a broad range of approaches and specializations, including surfaces/interfaces, catalysis, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, and physical chemistry. By one estimate, nearly 80% of all chemical reactions in nature and in human technology take place at boundaries between phases, i.e., at surfaces or interfaces. Atomic- and molecular-scale studies are needed to develop a thorough understanding of the relationships between surface properties and parameters relevant to potential applications and devices. Catalysts play a central role in processes relevant to energy, the environment, and biology. Researchers are working to develop cheaper and smarter catalysts that are fine tuned to accelerate reactions that, for example, drive fuel-refinement, sweep toxins from emissions, or convert starch to sugar.

5

Research and ecology semiannual progress report, January--June 1972. Chemistry research and development  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: chemistry research and development, chemistry instrumentation, process chemistry, chemical technology, and environmental research. (DHM)

Thompson, M.A.

1973-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Availability Technology Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Express Licensing Metal aminoboranes Express Licensing Nanocrystalsol-gel...

7

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process  

SciTech Connect

A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing Fabrication Of Multilayered Thin Films Via Spin-Assembly Express Licensing...

9

Development of Mercury Oxidation Catalyst for Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on a mercury control technology development program co-funded by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), and several EPRI-member companies. The mercury control process under development uses catalysts installed downstream of the air heater and particulate control device to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Source Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Catalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum...

11

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Chemistry Top Journals Journal of the American Chemical Society Angewandte Chemie & Angewandte Chemie, international edition in English Chemical Communications Chemical...

12

Wet Stacks Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expense of fluegas reheat has led to increased application of less expensive wet stacks downstream of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems. Good data is necessary to properly design the wet stack system or serious problems can occur. This design guide summarizes all the latest information and provides guidance on developing detailed design specifications.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96  

SciTech Connect

This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

Chase, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Zipping Wetting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water droplets can completely wet micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The {\\it dynamics} of this rapid process is analyzed by ultra-high-speed imaging. Depending on the scales of the micro-structure, the wetting fronts propagate smoothly and circularly or -- more interestingly -- in a {\\it stepwise} manner, leading to a growing {\\it square-shaped} wetted area: entering a new row perpendicular to the direction of front propagation takes milliseconds, whereas once this has happened, the row itself fills in microseconds ({\\it ``zipping''}). Numerical simulations confirm this view and are in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pirat, Christophe; Borkent, Bram M; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been achieved in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst

16

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

17

Favorable Conditions for the Development of a Heavy Rainfall Event over Oahu during the 2006 Wet Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 2006 wet period, as eastward-moving transient disturbances passed through a semipermanent low pressure system west of Hawaii, southerly winds east of the low strengthened bringing in higher than usual amounts of moisture from the deep ...

Chuan-Chi Tu; Yi-Leng Chen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Operations Manual for the Wet Chemistry Benches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The DR tank will drain (1), fill/spray (1), drain (2), fill/spray (2). At the end of this cycle, the sprays and fill will be off and the dump door will be closed. ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiotracer Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer chemistry is focused on the short lived positron emitters. New radiotracer chemistry and molecular targeting strategies are being developed to increase the complexity and diversity of molecular probes (small molecules and plant hormones) for imaging applications. We emphasize C-11 chemistry because the substitution of stable carbon with carbon-11 provides the opportunity to measure and quantify the distribution and kinetics of physiologically relevant substrates and signaling molecules without altering the biological properties of the parent molecule. Recent accomplishments include the development of miniaturized automated systems for the production of C-11 precursor molecules, the synthesis of C-11 labeled azaleic acid and the radiolabeling of auxin for studies of their movement and metabolism in the whole plant in vivo.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Water Treatment For Wet Electrostatic Precipitators: Conceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot testing has shown that replacement of the last field of a small dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with a single wet field can significantly reduce outlet particulate emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes a pilot wet ESP performance test, cost projections from an economic study, and results from a study of the water use and chemistry issues that need to be resolved to make the wet ESP technology an attractive option for electric utilities.

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"  

SciTech Connect

In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

25

Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional properties on HMA during its service life. Aggregate consensus and source properties influence frictional properties at the surface as well as aggregate matrix properties that affect overall skid performance. Thus, it is important to identify and control these properties through an effective testing and monitoring program. Research studies have indicated that current testing protocol for pre-qualification of aggregates being used by DOT's is tenuous and needs definitive evaluation. The validity of some tests currently being used for pre-qualification of aggregates is being questioned due to poor field correlation. Thus, there is a need for upgrading current testing criteria and aggregate classification system in view of new techniques that can be used either as replacements and/or supplements to current tests. This study, a part of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) current research program to evaluate inadequacies of current tests to skid performance, focuses on tests evaluating aggregate shape and distribution parameters. In this study, a wet weather test selection criteria was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of current and new testing techniques to monitor aggregate shape, texture, and distribution characteristics. Extensive tests were conducted on forty aggregates selected from TxDOT Quality Material Catalogue covering various parts of U.S.A. Fine aggregates tests including the Uncompacted Void Content, the Compacted Aggregate Resistance, the Methylene Blue, and the Particle Size Analysis were performed to evaluate angularity, texture, and distribution characteristics within fine aggregates. Flat and elongated tests on coarse aggregates were also performed using both conventional and automated techniques to analyze shape and size distribution characteristics. A statistical analysis was performed to select tests that would enable monitoring of aggregate shape and distribution properties enhancing skid performance. The evaluation criteria were based upon a sensitivity and correlation analysis to evaluate consistency, reproducibility, and ability of tests to effectively discern aggregates with good and marginal performance.

Bedi, Harpreet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cermic Chemistry.qrk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science and Technology Center develops both aque- ous and non-aqueous chemical synthesis routes to generate highly controlled...

27

CLUSTER CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Gallimore Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Rebecca Chamberlin Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email Along with the lanthanides, they are often called "the f-elements" because they have valence electrons in the f shell. Actinide chemistry serves a critical role in addressing global threats Project Description At Los Alamos, scientists are using actinide analytical chemistry to identify and quantify the chemical and isotopic composition of materials. Since the Manhattan Project, such work has supported the Laboratory's

29

Effects of Surface Wetness on the Evolution and Vertical Transport of Submicron Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations have been carried out with a numerical model describing air chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and turbulent mixing, in order to study the behavior of fine sulfate particles in the atmospheric surface layer over wet surfaces. ...

I. Y. Lee; M. L. Wesely

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Spray type wet scrubber  

SciTech Connect

A spray type wet scrubber includes a plurality of spray nozzles installed in parallel banks across the path of gas stream within the scrubber body, and partition walls held upright in grating fashion to divide the path of gas stream into a plurality of passages, each of which accommodates one of the spray nozzles.

Atsukawa, M.; Tatani, A.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Medicinal chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal chemistry Name: Jason A Stamm Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am a senior chemistry major interested in going to grad school, specifically for...

34

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Park, Physical Chemistry Chemical Y.B. He, et al. , JournalChemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru ProtectiveBerkeley, California 94720 Chemical Sciences Division,

Belau, Leonid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Relative Importance of Scavenging, Oxidation, and Ice-Phase Processes in the Production and Wet Deposition of Sulfate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative importance of various processes to sulfate production and wet deposition is examined by using a cloud-resolving model coupled with a sulfate chemistry submodel. Results using different versions of the model are then compared and ...

Vlado Spiridonov; Mladjen Curic

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wet-limestone scrubbing fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines important concepts of wet-limestone scrubbing. It also addresses the topic of by-product disposal. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

NWChem and Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION Capturing how contaminants migrate across groundwater-surface water inter- faces is a challenge that researchers at the Department of Energy's EMSL-the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory-are rising to. This challenge, a top priority for waste cleanup efforts at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, and other parts of the DOE weapons complex, is being addressed using NWChem, a computational chemistry package developed at EMSL that is designed to run on high-performance parallel supercomputers, such as EMSL's Chinook. NWChem is enabling breakthrough discoveries in actinide behavior and chemistry, in part because it allows researchers to accurately model the dynamical formation, speciation, and redox chemistry of actinide complexes in realistic complex mo-

40

Exoplanet Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characteristic chemistry of terrestrial planets and, in particular, of giant planets rich and poor in He and H2 are described.

Lodders, Katharina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Computational Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and numerical tools to quantify uncertainties for computational quantum chemistry. ... Results appear in the issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

General chemistry technical note no. 61--new developments in plastic bonded explosives  

SciTech Connect

Two new explosives are under development at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) which show considerable promise as replacements for PBX 9404 (and also PBX 9010). Three primary considerations have guided us in the development of these explosives. Compared to PBX 9404 we have sought a significant decrease it sensitivity, a substantial gain in mechanical properties and as little loss in energy and detonation velocity as possible. While testing is not complete on these materials and probably won`t be for quite some time sufficient information is available to warrant a complete status report at this time. An index of the topics covered herein is: Formulations and Raw Materials; Molding Powder; Explosive Performance; Sensitivity; Thermal Stability; Compatibility; Mechanical Properties; Machinability; Pressability; and Comparison of the Two Materials.

Scribner, K.; James, E.

1961-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

FGD Chemistry and Analytical Methods Handbook, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designers and operators of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems need information about the chemistry of the SO2 removal process to evaluate process performance. This authoritative handbook of FGD chemistry can assist utilities in selecting, designing, starting up, and operating SO2 wet scrubbing systems.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of New Optical Sensors for Measurements of Mercury Concentrations, Speciation, and Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for elemental mercury was developed and applied for measurements in a high-temperature flow reactor and in the exhaust stream of a coal-fired combustor. The final version of the sensor incorporates a 375-nm single-mode laser and a 784-nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The output of these lasers is sum-frequency mixed in a non-linear beta-barium borate crystal to generate a 254-nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency is tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7-nm. The tuning range is large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. Because of this large tuning range, the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Broadband absorption is a major concern for lamp-based mercury sensor, and the sample to be monitored must be chemically treated prior to analysis to remove species such as SO{sub 2} that absorb near 253.7 nm. No pretreatment is required when our diode-laser-based sensor is used for elemental mercury measurements. Our laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA), and were generally in good agreement except that the insitu diode-laser-based sensor measurements tended to give somewhat higher concentrations than the CMA measurements, presumably due to absorption of elemental mercury in the sampling lines needed for the CMA measurements. At Texas A&M University, the homogeneous oxidation of elemental mercury was studied using a high-temperature flow reactor.

Robert Lucht

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Revised Wet Stack Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 14 years, the design of wet stacks around the world has been guided by the original EPRI Wet Stacks Design Guide (1996). Since that time, the number of wet stack installations has grown considerably, and a wealth of practical real-world operating and maintenance experience has been obtained. The laws of physics have not changed, and most of the information presented in 1996 is just as valid today as it was when originally published. What has changed is the power-generation ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial chemistry and chemoecology are linked together to realize a modern and sustainable chemistry

Peter Saling; Peter Saling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Survey of Wet Electrostatic Precipitators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have found application since they were first installed for sulfuric acid collection on a smelter and patented by Dr. Frederick Cottrell in 1907–1908. Power generation applications typically use dry ESPs for collection of coal fly ash in nonsaturated flue gas streams. This report summarizes the physical installations, specifications, operating environments, and operational experience of wet ESPs currently operating in the United States on power generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

50

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.

Authors, Various

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Key Challenges: Rational development of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs). Fundamental scientific...

54

NEWTON's Chemistry Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Videos Do you have a great chemistry videos? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources The Periodic Table of Videos The University...

55

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NEWTON's Chemistry References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry References Do you have a great chemistry reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources Steve Marsden's...

57

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Educational Chemistry Games  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Games Do you have a great chemistry game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org,...

60

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

Performance evaluation of wet-cooling tower fills with computational fluid dynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: A wet-cooling tower fill performance evaluation model developed by Reuter is derived in Cartesian coordinates for a rectangular cooling tower and compared to… (more)

Gudmundsson, Yngvi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

67

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

68

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

69

Chemistry Applications at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Applications Gaussian 09 Gaussian 09 is a connected series of programs for performing semi-empirical, density functional theory and ab initio molecular orbital...

70

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 This page shows future Chemistry Department seminars and those that have taken place within the past six...

71

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIELD OF THORIUM CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. VOLUME I. PREPARATION OF ELECTROLYTIC CELL FEED FOR PRODUCTION OF THORIUM METAL. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A research and development program in the field of thorium chemistry and metallurgy was conducted. Most of this activity was directed toward the development of techniques for the production of metal by fused salt electrolytic approaches, little effort being proportioned to the preparation of an electrolyte for the process. An aqueous method for the preparation of an anhydrous cell feed was set up and operated for several months. Relatively high operating expense and difficulties with materials of construction prompted the development of a more direct approach for the production of electrolytic cell feed. The system established for cell feed preparation converts thoriumn nitrate to a basic carbonate via the reaction between the nitrate and sodium carbonate, this precipitation being quantitative. Following a suitable filtration and drying operation, the thorium oxycarbonate is converted directly to the chloride by reaction with carbon and chlorine, forming a cell feed containing between 40 and 45% thorium in a molten matrix of sodium and potassium chlorides. The preparation of cell feed by the descrihed process was carried out on a small- tonnage basis, in 1,000-pound batches. The entire process is capable of heing operated on a continuous or semi-continuous basis and presents a commercially feasible approach for the preparation of high quality anhydrous electrolytes suitable for conversion to A.E.C. grade thorium metal by eleetrolytic techniques. A brief description of small-scale research and development experiments leading to the established system also is included. (auth)

Fisher, C.E.; Wyatt, J.L.

1956-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

76

,"California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

77

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

78

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Unique QA/QC requirements for analytical chemistry at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the missions of group NMT-1 (Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Analytical Chemistry) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide analysis of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials to address the stockpile stewardship needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Trace to high levels of various constituents are measured using traditional analytical methods and state-of-the-art instrumental methods. The capabilities include Pu and U assay, wet chemistry, plasma spectroscopy, mass spectrometry radiochemistry, X-ray fluorescence, anion and cation analysis, special standards preparation, surface analysis, and gas analysis. The authors are currently developing and implementing a plan to independently assess the quality of the analytical data produced by NMT-1. Nuclear materials of a matrix similar to the client`s samples but having different concentration levels of analytes that are representative of the client`s samples will be used. Well-characterized, stable, homogeneous materials have been identified as possible candidates for single-blind quality control (QC) samples. These materials include Pu metal, Pu oxide, U metal, U oxide, and U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) with varying degrees of purity. These single-blind samples will be periodically distributed along with regular client samples to be analyzed by the aforementioned analytical methods.

Tandon, L.; Gautier, M.A.; Hammond, C.F.; Porterfield, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Unique QA/QC requirements for analytical chemistry at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the missions of group NMT-1 (Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Analytical Chemistry) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide analysis of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials to address the stockpile stewardship needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Trace to high levels of various constituents are measured using traditional analytical methods and state-of-the-art instrumental methods. Capabilities include Pu and U assay, wet chemistry, plasma spectroscopy, mass spectrometry radiochemistry, x-ray fluorescence, anion and cation analysis, special standards preparation, surface analysis, and gas analysis. The authors are currently developing and implementing a plan to independently assess the quality of the analytical data produced by NMT-1. Nuclear materials of a matrix similar to the client`s samples but having different concentration levels of analytes that are representative of the client`s samples will be used. Well-characterized, stable, homogeneous materials have been identified as possible candidates for single-blind quality control (QC) samples. These materials include Pu metal, Pu oxide, uranium metal, uranium oxide, and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide with varying degrees of purity. These single-blind samples will be periodically distributed along with regular client samples to be analyzed by the above mentioned analytical methods.

Tandon, L.; Gautier, M.A.; Hammond, C.F.; Porterfield, D.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet-Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet-bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at elevations up to 4500 m above MSL was developed. This methodology was ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The International Year of Chemistry 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry our life our future The International Year of Chemistry 2011 Analytical Chemistry Related associations Marketing ...

84

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Development of advanced in situ techniques for chemistry monitoring and corrosion mitigation in SCWO environments. 1997 annual progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'This report evaluates the first year''s results of the research on the development of advanced electrochemical sensors for use in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous environments. The work has emphasized the designing of an advanced reference electrode, and the development of high-temperature pH and redox sensors for characterizing the fundamental properties of supercritical aqueous solutions. Also, electrochemical noise sensors have been designed for characterizing metal/water interactions, including corrosion processes. A test loop has been designed and constructed to meet the expected operation conditions. The authors have also developed an approach to define a practical pH scale for use with supercritical aqueous systems and an operational electrochemical thermocell was tested for pH measurements in HCl + NaCl aqueous solutions. The potentials of the thermocell for several HCl(aq) solutions of different concentrations have been measured over wide ranges of temperature from 25 to 400 C and for flow rates from 0.1 to 1.5 cm min{sup -1} . The corresponding pH differences ({Delta}pH) for two HCl(aq) concentrations in 0.1 NaCl(aq) solution have been experimentally derived and thermodynamically analyzed. Their first experimental measurements, and subsequent theoretical analysis, clearly demonstrate the viability of pH measurements in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions with a high accuracy of \\2610.02 to 0.05 units.'

Meng, Z.; Zhou, X.Y.; Lvov, S.N.; Macdonald, D.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.  

SciTech Connect

The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

van Swol, Frank B.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites. * Modeling actinide transport in subsurface environments. Enhancing the nuclear fuel cycle. Developing new separation processes to recycle waste. Better understanding...

88

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Computational Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE Computational Chemistry Computational Chemistry at ORNL uses principles of computer science and mathematics and the results of theoretical physics and chemistry to...

90

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public/private investment in green chemistry research andinvestment in cleaner chemical technologies, known collectively as greenGREEN CHEMISTRY AND WORKERS / most hazardous chemicals on the market (closing the safety gap) will spur investment

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

95

Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic...

96

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

97

Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

98

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

99

Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

100

Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

102

Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

103

Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

104

Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

105

Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

106

New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

107

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

108

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

109

Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

110

Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

111

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at any desired elevation. This methodology was based on the fact that the ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

112

Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical chemistry websites, humor, Material Safety Data Sheets,Patent Information, and references. Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDiffer

113

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd Reduction of WateR use in Wet fGd systems Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

117

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

118

Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine [Ohio University, Athens, OH (US). Ohio Coal Research Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

120

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, L.G.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

125

Silane discharge ion chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Silane dc, rf, and dc proximity discharges have been studied using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. Qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges have been developed from experimental measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane have been measured and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He , Ne , and Ar with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane have been measured as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. A detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge has been developed by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that have been gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

Chatham, R.H. III

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Methods Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISO committee and more information on standardization effects pertaining to AOCS. Methods Development Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemi

127

Enhanced Mercury Removal by Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from testing conducted in 2005 as part of three EPRI co-funded projects that are aimed at enhancing the capture of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers when scrubbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD," as well as by two...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fate of Mercury in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a bench-scale, laboratory investigation of the fate of flue gas mercury species in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers that are used for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in coal-fired power plants. Data collected in the EPA mercury Information Collection Request (ICR), and in research projects sponsored by EPRI show that most wet scrubbers used for SO2 control achieve high removals of oxidized mercury and little or no elemental mercury removal. However, some scru...

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

131

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Academy of Arts and Sciences In Memoriam: Carol Creutz Women @ Energy: Joanna Fowler Electrocatalysis Pays Tribute to BNL Scientist Radoslav Adzic All Chemistry...

132

Forensic Database Chemistry & Toxicology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A free online commercial chemistry and biology reference tool that searches ... Rashida Weathers DEA Mid-Atlantic Laboratory Director 301.583.3200. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs in the Chemistry Department Artificial Photosynthesis Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics Electron- and Photo-Induced Processes for...

134

Chemistry Department Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures (c). Laser Safety Information: (d). Chemistry Department Laser Safety Guidelines Operational Work Planning (a). Training waiver (b). Staff Shop Posting Local...

135

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.govnewsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

136

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Update of Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on three mercury control technology research and development projects. One project is co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), the second is funded solely by EPRI, and the third is co-funded by EPRI, DOE-NETL, and several EPRI-member companies. All three projects are focused on understanding and/or enhancing mercury capture (co-removal) by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project, c...

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

140

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place Chennai, India Zip 601 302 Sector Wind energy...

142

NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

Piro, Markus [Royal Military College of Canada; Lewis, Brent [Royal Military College of Canada; Thompson, Dr. William T. [Royal Military College of Canada; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

144

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)

145

IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

E. Thomas

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

Strategic thinking in chemistry and materials  

SciTech Connect

Science and technology challenges facing the Chemistry and Materials program relate to the fundamental problem of addressing the critical needs to improve our understanding of how nuclear weapons function and age, while experiencing increased pressures to compensate for a decreasing technology base. Chemistry and materials expertise is an enabling capability embedded within every aspect of nuclear weapons design, testing, production, surveillance and dismantlement. Requirements to capture an enduring chemistry and materials technology base from throughout the integrated contractor complex have promoted a highly visible obligation on the weapons research and development program. The only successful response to this challenge must come from direct improvements in effectiveness and efficiency accomplished through improved understanding. Strategic thinking has generated the following three overarching focus areas for the chemistry and materials competency: As-built Materials Characterization and Performance; Materials Aging; and, Materials Synthesis and Processing.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Entire Chemistry Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives, Since November 1991 Table of Contents: When entropy = 0, does atomic motion stop? When H2O and methanol mix Heavy element names Radon Bee's wax CFC's and ozone depletion Solar cells and Phosphorous vs Chlorophyll B Aromaticity Hypercolor t-shirt Bonds for tie dye Soda POP General chemistry questions Tyndall Effect Silicon chips Molecules and cancer Acetylene safety Picric acid Buckyballs Piezoelectric Weak pennies Extracting fats Anti-oxidants Batteries & chemicals Hydrogen, can it be an isotope? Can soda conduct electricity? pH What is the biggest molecule? Smallest molecule Metallic zinc as catalyst Bond order in carbon bonds Packing of crystal structure Advantages, disadvantages of chloroform Coloring oil Free-radicals Acid-Base reaction

148

Chemistry Department Seminar Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars See also: recent Department seminars Friday, July 27, 2012 "Precise Design of Donor-Acceptor Interface based on Microphase Segregated Nanostructure" Sadayuki Asaoka, Kyoto Institute of Technology Hosted by Dr. John Miller 11:00 AM, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555 Thursday, April 26, 2012 ""NOx Catalysis from the Bottom Up"" Dr. William F. Schneider, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame Hosted by Ping Liu 11:00 AM, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 Friday, April 13, 2012 "High-energy resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy for catalysis and materials chemistry" Olga Safonova, Swiss Light Source & Energy Dept. at Paul Scherrer Institute Hosted by Dario Stacchiola

149

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Dept. Bldg. 555A Brookhaven National Lab P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Ph: (631)344-4301 Fax: (631)344-5815 Radoslav Adzic, Vyacheslov Volcov, Lijun Wu, Wei An, Jia...

150

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.gov newsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

152

SC e-journals, Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Accounts of Chemical Research Accreditation and Quality Assurance ACS Chemical Biology ACS Nano Acta Biotheoretica Acta Materialia Acta Neuropathologica Adsorption Advanced Engineering Materials Advances in Physical Chemistry - OAJ AlChE Journal Amino Acids Analyst Analytica Chimica Acta Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Analytical Chemistry Analytical Sciences - OAJ Angewandte Chemie - International Edition Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Materials Research Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Applied Surface Science Applied Thermal Engineering Aquatic Geochemistry

153

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Murison, Julie; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schröter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Julie Murison; Benoît Semin; Jean-Christophe Baret; Stephan Herminghaus; Matthias Schröter; Martin Brinkmann

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Crude Oil Chemistry Effects on Corrosion Inhibition and Phase Wetting in Oil-Water Flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of water, even in small amounts, is often the cause of internal corrosion problems in crude oil transportation. Understanding the factors influencing steel… (more)

Ayello, Francois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

D21: An Ultrasonically Induced Wet Chemistry Route to Gd2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A18: Effect of Local Alendronate Delivery on In Vivo Osteogenesis From PCL ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

157

Induced-Draft Cooling Towers and Parallel Wet/Dry Cooling for Combined-Cycle Plants: Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifica tions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information and examples of best practices for the design and specification of wet and parallel (hybrid) cooling towers for combined-cycle applications. Two reference (template) specifications are includedone for totally wet cooling systems and one for parallel cooling systems with a wet cooling tower and air-cooled condensers (ACC) in parallel. These template specifications are intended to be the starting point from which the utility or developer can "customize" as needed to fit its...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Method for the wet quenching of coke  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the wet quenching of coke is disclosed wherein hot coke is sprayed from above with quenching water, the steam generated by the heat of the coke is condensed by a spray of condensation water from the top of the quenching tower, and the hot condensate-water mixture is collected at the bottom of the quenching tower and recirculated to the top of the tower where it is sprayed between quenching operations to be cooled by a counterflowing stream of air. The cooled condensate water mixture is suitable for reuse as the condensation spray water.

Blase, M.; Flockenhaus, C.; Wagener, D.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Scaling of the normal coefficient of restitution for wet impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thorough understanding of the energy dissipation in the dynamics of wet granular matter is essential for a continuum description of natural phenomena such as debris flow, and the development of various industrial applications such as the granulation process. The coefficient of restitution (COR), defined as the ratio between the relative rebound and impact velocities of a binary impact, is frequently used to characterize the amount of energy dissipation associated. We measure the COR by tracing a freely falling sphere bouncing on a wet surface with the liquid film thickness monitored optically. For fixed ratio between the film thickness and the particle size, the dependence of the COR on the impact velocity and various properties of the liquid film can be characterized with the Stokes number, defined as the ratio between the inertia of the particle and the viscosity of the liquid. Moreover, the COR for infinitely large impact velocities derived from the scaling can be analyzed by a model considering the energy dissipation from the inertia of the liquid film.

Thomas Mueller; Frank Gollwitzer; Christof Kruelle; Ingo Rehberg; Kai Huang

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

In-Package Chemistry Abstraction  

SciTech Connect

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been breached but the drip shield remains intact, so all of the seepage flow is diverted from the waste package. The chemistry from the vapor influx case is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion, and to determine the degradation rates for the waste forms. TSPA-LA uses the water influx case for the seismic scenario, where the waste package has been breached and the drip shield has been damaged such that seepage flow is actually directed into the waste package. The chemistry from the water influx case that is a function of the flow rate is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion and advection, and to determine the degradation rates for the CSNF and HLW glass. TSPA-LA does not use this model for the igneous scenario. Outputs from the in-package chemistry model implemented inside TSPA-LA include pH, ionic strength, and total carbonate concentration. These inputs to TSPA-LA will be linked to the following principle factors: dissolution rates of the CSNF and HLWG, dissolved concentrations of radionuclides, and colloid generation.

E. Thomas

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Guide to Chemistry Dept  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to the Chemistry Building Guide to the Chemistry Building The main Chemistry building (Building 555) has been designed to make adequate facilities available for research and to provide an informal atmosphere for free exchange among Department members. There are public areas, shared laboratories, shared office space, and privately assigned places. A newcomer to the building should become familiar with locations of the key areas. Stairs and Elevators - Building 555 The central main staircase and a passenger elevator are for personnel traffic only. Each wing has a staircase. There is a rear staircase for traffic directly to service areas. The building has a freight elevator at the rear core. Flammable material, chemicals, solvents, gas cylinders, etc. can be transported in the freight elevator but not in the passenger elevator. Do not ride with gas cylinders or dewars charged with cryogens as the presence of these in a confined space introduces a suffocation hazard.

162

“Greening Up” Cross-Coupling Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boškovi?, Žarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 and the cluster chemistry by the The nickel and platinumL. Muetterties Department of Chemistry, Lawrence Berkeleyphenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuw:n

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear Chemistry at BNL 1947-66  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry in the Chemistry Department. The National Laboratories were spawned from the Manhattan Project. Not coincidentally, nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics burgeoned...

165

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNALS Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition See Also: Angewandte Chemie Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim View all previous titles

Jo, Moon-Ho

167

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 2 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installation...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS F. NAJMABADI* University the trade- offs, to develop operational windows for chamber con- cepts, and to identify high the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets ( 250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas

California at San Diego, University of

169

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, . - - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1 DE89 009559 W. D. Shults Analytical Chemistry Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory* Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6129 ABSTRACT Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or wcce brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

170

Keeping up with detergent chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detergent industry is highly competitive, mostly recession proof, and, thanks to chemistry, always changing ever so slightly. It has been years, however, since cleaning chemistry has been the driving force in detergent innovation. Instead, the environm

171

Steam Generator Management Program: Generic Plant Qualification and Application Plan for Dispersant Use During Steam Generator Wet L ayup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) effort to develop dispersant application during steam generator (SG) wet layup as an additional deposit management strategy. Based on the results of this study, the addition of dispersant during wet layup is likely to modestly increase the amount of iron removed from the SGs of nuclear PWRs prior to power ascension, benefitting the utilities by reducing the corrosion product inventory within the SGs upon startup. The inform...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Integrated Solutions in Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paths best traveled Choose from a portfolio of comprehensive, interlinked, intuitive and accessible chemistry resources Paths best traveled Choose from a comprehensive portfolio of interlinked, intuitive and accessible resources www.info.sciencedirect.com/solutions www.elsevier.com/chemistrysolutions ELSEVIER’S

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mercury Emissions Control in Wet FGD Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) and McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) have had a continuing program over the past decade for characterizing and optimizing mercury control in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These efforts have led to the characterization of mercury emissions control at two utility installations and full-scale demonstration (55 MW and 1300 MW) of the effect of a mercury control performance enhancement additive for wet FGD systems. This paper presents the results of the mercury emissions control testing conducted at these two sites. The performance is related to EPA Information Collection Request (ICR) data from an FGD system supplier’s perspective, highlighting the need to consider the effects of system design and operation when evaluating mercury emissions control performance.

Paul S. Nolan; Babcock Wilcox; Kevin E. Redinger; Babcock Wilcox; Gerald T. Amrhein; Gregory A. Kudlac

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Self-oscillations on a partially wetted catalyst pellet in ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the vapor–gas phases on wetted and dry catalyst pellets, respectively. ... perature and flooding states of the catalyst pellet was first observed, which were ...

176

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

177

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

178

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

179

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

180

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

182

,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

183

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

184

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

185

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

186

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

187

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annua...

188

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

189

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

190

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

191

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

192

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)...

193

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

194

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2011...

195

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

196

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

197

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

199

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

200

NETL: Control Technology - Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Mercury Control URS Corporation will demonstrate the use of an additive in wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to prevent oxidized mercury that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

202

,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

203

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

204

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

205

,"California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

206

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

207

,"California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

208

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

209

,"California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

210

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

211

,"California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

212

,"California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

213

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

214

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

215

,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

216

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

217

Wetting Properties of Molten Silicon with Graphite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The wetting behavior of molten-silicon/refractory-materials system is important in ... Electrorefining of Metallurgical Grade Silicon in Molten Salts.

218

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

219

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

220

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

222

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

223

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

224

,"Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

225

,"Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

226

,"Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

227

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

228

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

229

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic...

230

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

231

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

232

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

233

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

234

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

235

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

236

,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

237

,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

238

,"Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

239

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

240

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

242

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

243

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

244

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

245

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

246

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

247

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

248

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

249

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

250

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

251

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

252

,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

253

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

254

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

255

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

256

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

257

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

258

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

259

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

260

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

262

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

263

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

264

A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements  

SciTech Connect

The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

Storms, E.K.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stokes' Cradle: Normal Three-Body Collisions between Wetted Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a combination of experiments and theory is used to investigate three-body, normal collisions between solid particles with a liquid coating (i.e., "wetted" particles). Experiments are carried out using a Stokes' cradle, an apparatus inspired by the Newton's cradle desktop toy except with wetted particles. Unlike previous work on two-body systems, which may either agglomerate or rebound upon collision, four outcomes are possible in three-body systems: fully agglomerated, Newton's cradle (striker and target particle it strikes agglomerate), reverse Newton's cradle (targets agglomerate while striker separates), and fully separated. Post-collisional velocities are measured over a range of parameters. For all experiments, as the impact velocity increases, the progression of outcomes observed is fully agglomerated, reverse Newton's cradle, and fully separated. Notably, as the viscosity of the oil increases, experiments reveal a decrease in the critical Stokes number (the Stokes number that demarcates a transition from agglomeration to separation) for both sets of adjacent particles. A scaling theory is developed based on lubrication forces and particle deformation and elasticity. Unlike previous work for two-particle systems, two pieces of physics are found to be critical in the prediction of a regime map that is consistent with experiments: (i) an additional resistance upon rebound of the target particles due to the pre-existing liquid bridge between them (which has no counterpart in two-particle collisions), and (ii) the addition of a rebound criterion due to glass transition of the liquid layer at high pressure between colliding particles.

C. M. Donahue; C. M. Hrenya; R. H. Davis; K. J. Nakagawa; A. P. Zelinskaya; G. G. Joseph

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Chemistry Department Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Staff Directory Chemistry Staff Directory Last Name, First Phone E-mail Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Adzic, Radoslav 4522 adzic@bnl.gov Akimov, Alexey No Entry akimov@bnl.gov An, Wei 4317 weian@bnl.gov Anselmini, James 4399 anselmini@bnl.gov Baber, Ashleigh 4317 ababer@bnl.gov Badiei, Yosra 4360 ybadiei@bnl.gov Bak, Seong Min BAK 3663 smbak@bnl.gov Bakalis, Jin No Entry jbakalis@bnl.gov Bird, Matthew 4331 mbird@bnl.gov Cabelli, Diane 4361 cabelli@bnl.gov Camillone III, Nicholas 4412 nicholas@bnl.gov Chen, Jingguang 2655 jgchen@bnl.gov Chen, Wei-Fu 4360 wfchen@bnl.gov Concepcion, Javier 4369 jconcepc@bnl.gov Cook, Andrew 4782 acook@bnl.gov Cumming, James 4338 cumming@bnl.gov Duan, Lele 4357 lduan@bnl.gov Ertem, Mehmed No Entry mzertem@bnl.gov

270

Facilitating the Deposit of Experimental Chemistry Data in Institutional Repositories: Project SPECTRa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

restrictions. One conspicuous component of the OA movement has been the development of repositories as a means of managing the deposit, dissemination and preservation of research outputs in digital form. The Directory of Open Access Repositories, Open... the needs of the chemistry research community The project selected three distinct areas of chemistry research – synthetic organic chemistry, crystallography and computational chemistry - for investigation. Each of these proved to have specific...

Morgan, Peter

271

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

272

California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

273

Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

274

California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

275

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

276

Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,820 1,100 1,218 1,002 1,042 1990's 812 875 691 789 820 714 626 613 473 541 2000's 592 627 428 448 333 370 386 327 248 215 2010's 279 468 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

277

California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 6 12 22 22 29 1990's 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 2 5 19 2000's 5 5 6 7 2 1 5 4 3 4 2010's 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

278

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

279

Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

280

Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global Chemistry Simulations in the AMMA Multimodel Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present results obtained during the chemistry-transport modeling (CTM) component of the African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis Multimodel Intercomparison Project (AMMA-MIP) using the recently developed L3JRCv2 emission dataset ...

Jason Edward Williams; Rinus Scheele; Peter van Velthoven; Idir Bouarar; Kathy Law; Béatrice Josse; Vincent-Henri Peuch; Xin Yang; John Pyle; Valérie Thouret; Brice Barret; Cathy Liousse; Frédéric Hourdin; Sophie Szopa; Anne Cozic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nanocrystal/J-aggregate constructs : chemistry, energy transfer, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction of light with matter is one of the most central subjects to modern chemistry. Two types of materials, semiconductor nanocrystals and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, have been developed chiefly due to their ...

Walker, Brian J. (Brian Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

284

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Additional Information Henry Taube Chuck Painter/Stanford News Service Henry Taube, a Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes" Taube 'received a doctorate from the University of California-Berkeley in 1940 and was an instructor there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley," Taube recalled. ... He joined the Cornell University faculty in 1941, becoming a naturalized United States citizen in 1942, and then moved in 1946 to the University of Chicago where he remained until 1961. A year later he joined the Stanford faculty as professor of chemistry, a position he held until 1986, when he became professor emeritus. ...

285

VIDEOS: History of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2007 ... Topic Summary: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry, ACS. Collection of brief videos on the discoveries of several heavy elements

286

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIELD OF THORIUM CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. Monthly Progress Report for April 16 to May 15, 1955  

SciTech Connect

A continuous belt drier capable of handling 1000 lbs of oxycarbonate per day was completed, installed, and operated to produce a satisfactory product for chlorination. An experimental chlorinator was also completed. All necessary pants were completed for the fabrication of Horizons' Mark VI continuous electrolytic cell. Evaluations of oxycarbonate materials for chlorination wiih varying chlorinating agents were made, and many of the variables such as water content and CO/sub 2/ values were established. Extremely ductile rods were obtained from the direct extrusion of Th metal powder. Plans were completed for the Mark VI electrolytic cell. Work was continued toward the development of a semi-continuous operating electrolytic cell of 7500-a rated capacity. (D.E.B.)

Wyatt, J.L.

1955-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

288

Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

290

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

291

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,269 1,351 1,478 1,209 1,273 1990's 1,019 1,082 845 946 988 862 783 743 571 661 2000's 721 772 512 527 394 433 442 392 934 728 2010's 386 519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

292

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

293

North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 485 1980's 594 654 696 673 643 650 610 578 593 625 1990's 650 533 567 585 568 518 512 531 501 475 2000's 487 495 524 497 465 508 539 572 603 1,213 2010's 1,869 2,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

294

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

295

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

296

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

297

Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

298

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

299

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

300

New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 262 226 295 387 367 457 410 351 364 1990's 354 331 329 264 240 195 229 223 217 212 2000's 320 311 315 365 324 346 361 365 360 196 2010's 271 245 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

302

Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

303

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

304

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

305

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

306

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

307

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

308

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

309

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

310

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

311

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

312

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

313

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

314

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

315

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

316

Results of WetNet PIP-2 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second WetNet Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-2) evaluates the performance of 20 satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms, implemented for application with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave (PMW) ...

E. A. Smith; J. E. Lamm; R. Adler; J. Alishouse; K. Aonashi; E. Barrett; P. Bauer; W. Berg; A. Chang; R. Ferraro; J. Ferriday; S. Goodman; N. Grody; C. Kidd; D. Kniveton; C. Kummerow; G. Liu; F. Marzano; A. Mugnai; W. Olson; G. Petty; A. Shibata; R. Spencer; F. Wentz; T. Wilheit; E. Zipser

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

318

Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

Fay, James A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impact of Initial Soil Wetness on Seasonal Atmospheric Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the importance of initial soil wetness in seasonal predictions with dynamical models. Two experiments are performed, each consisting of two ensembles of global climate model integrations initialized from early June ...

M. J. Fennessy; J. Shukla

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Spatial Coherence and Predictability of Indonesian Wet Season Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall from 63 stations across Indonesia is examined for the period 1950–98 to determine the spatial coherence of wet season anomalies. An example of almost unrelated anomalies at two neighboring stations is presented. Principal component ...

Malcolm Haylock; John McBride

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 284 1980's 355 401 448 416 376 319 317 302 327 312 1990's 316 290 301 311 293 255 257 274 240 225 2000's 223 225 209 181 145 165 182 155 119 143 2010's 152 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

322

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

323

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

324

California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 73 1980's 107 227 217 258 267 1990's 240 179 149 147 110 94 115 58 52 48 2000's 76 50 56 55 47 49 55 53 3 9 2010's 3 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

325

Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

326

Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

327

Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

328

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

329

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demonstration of a Last Field Wet ESP Conversion -- Installation Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conversion of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) on Unit 3 at Mirant's (formerly Potomac Electric Power Company's) Dickerson Generating Station to hybrid, dry-wet operation. This Tailored Collaboration project was undertaken to determine, at full scale, if the conversion of a single field of a conventional dry ESP to wet operation could significantly reduce particulate emissions and provide reliable operation with an acceptable level of maintenance. Specifically, the performan...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Harshini Mukundan, Hongzhi Xie, Aaron S. Anderson, W. Kevin Grace, John E. Shively, and Basil I. Swanson, "Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: Evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces," Bioconjugate Chemistry 20(2), 222-230 (2009).

334

Chemistry Department Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Administration A. Harris, Chair (631) 344-4301 alexh@bnl.gov G. Hall, Deputy Chair (631) 344-4376 gehall@bnl.gov S. McAlary, Deputy BES Manager (631) 344-4305 mcalary2@bnl.gov J. Petterson, Senior Administrative Assistant (631) 344-4302 jpetter@bnl.gov Administrative Support Includes budgeting, procurement activities, foreign/domestic travel, seminars and general administrative concerns. Guest Appointments and Personnel matters should be referred to the Department's Senior Administrative Assistant. L. Sallustio (631) 344-4303 lsallust@bnl.gov Building and Stockroom Maintain the Chemistry Department stockroom and provide technical and building support to the staff. Information on the BNL Chemical Management Inventory system is available through the stockroom. Click here to view

335

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The chemistry of high-mass star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

Floris F. S. van der Tak

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Materials, Chemistry and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials, Chemistry and Energy Sciences Two people holding a solar cell outdoors Materials, chemistry and energy sciences are central to many of today's most critical technical...

338

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC April 6, 2011 & ast edited: 2012-02-24 15:12:59...

339

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

340

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Chemistry & Chemical Engineerin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Chemistry research photo Sandia's Combustion Research Facility pioneered the use of chemical-imaging tools, such as laser diagnostics, for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

342

Nuclear chemistry. Annual report, 1974  

SciTech Connect

The 1974 Nuclear Chemistry Annual Report contains information on research in the following areas: nuclear science (nuclear spectroscopy and radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering, nuclear theory); chemical and atomic physics (heavy ion-induced atomic reactions, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy and hyperfine interactions); physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry (x-ray crystallography, physical and inorganic chemistry, geochemistry); and instrumentation. Thesis abstracts, 1974 publication titles, and an author index are also included. Papers having a significant amount of information are listed separately by title. (RWR)

Conzett, H.E.; Edelstein, N.M.; Tsang, C.F. (eds.)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

344

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

345

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel Laureates Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel Laureates October 11, 2012 - 11:08am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Washington - Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today congratulated Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka for winning the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors" and Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland for winning the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics for "ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems." Drs. Haroche and Wineland, good friends since the 1980s, have developed methods for manipulating the quantum states of ions and photons that lie at

348

MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NZ NZ < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WET NZ device is planned to have a modular generation capability of up to 500 kW with onboard controls that will be able to accurately forecast incoming waves and adjust the response to changing wave patterns The device will be largely sub surface so that as much of the device as possible interacts directly with the wave energy Technology Dimensions

349

AVIRIS Canopy Chemistry Data (ACCP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canopy Chemistry Data Canopy Chemistry Data The ORNL DAAC has added a data set to its holdings from the Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP). The new data set is entitled "Site AVIRIS Images, 1992 (ACCP)." ACCP was an investigation to determine the theoretical and empirical basis for remote sensing of nitrogen and lignin concentrations in vegetation canopies of various ecosystems in the United States. Ten AVIRIS image scenes over selected ACCP sites were acquired in 1992. Pixels that coincided with ACCP field sites were extracted, and surface reflectance values were calculated. The purpose of the data set was to measure spectra of naturally occurring canopies where the chemical constituents were measured. The ORNL DAAC also holds ACCP data related to leaf chemistry, seedling

350

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

An Improved Raindrop Chemistry Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer allowing size-fractional chemical analysis of raindrops has been described previously by the authors. Modifications to this raindrop chemistry spectrometer now allow improved performance in windy conditions. Instrument ...

Stuart G. Bradley; Stephen J. Adams; C. David Stow; Stephen J. de Mora

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water chemistry of breeder reactor steam generators. [LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water quality requirements will be described for breeder reactor steam generators, as well as specifications for balance of plant protection. Water chemistry details will be discussed for the following power plant conditions: feedwater and recirculation water at above and below 5% plant power, refueling or standby, makeup water, and wet layup. Experimental data will be presented from tests which included a departure from nucleate boiling experiment, the Few Tube Test, with a seven tube evaporator and three tube superheater, and a verification of control and on-line measurement of sodium ion in the ppB range. Sampling and instrumentation requirements to insure adherence to the specified water quality will be described. Evaporator cleaning criteria and data from laboratory testing of chemical cleaning solutions with emphasis on flow, chemical composition, and temperature will be discussed.

Simpson, J.L.; Robles, M.N.; Spalaris, C.N.; Moss, S.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary Molecular biology: Self-sustaining chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Molecular biology is an established interdisciplinary field within biology that deals fundamentally with the function of any nucleic acid in the cellular context. The molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal focusses on the genetically determined chemistry and biochemistry occuring in the cell. How can thousands of chemical reactions interact smoothly to maintain the life of cells, even in a variable environment? How is this self-sustaining system achieved? These are questions that should be answered in the light of molecular biology and evolution, but with the application of biophysical, physico-chemical, analytical and preparative technologies. As the Section Editor for the molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal, I hope to receive manuscripts that present new approaches aimed at better answering and shedding light upon these fascinating questions related to the chemistry of livings cells. Molecular biology in Chemistry Central Journal At the outset, let me pose two important questions: Why

Paul Wrede

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: U.S. EPR™  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the AREVA US EPR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first US EPR plant begins operation.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry in Advanced Light Water Reactors: US-APWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Mitsubishi US-APWR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: APR1400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) APR1400 design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary (Volume 1) and Secondary (Volume 2) Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. The timely identification of any inconsistencies and technical gaps will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 633 1980's 502 796 965 845 786 753 761 717 686 617 1990's 703 674 613 636 715 730 749 785 665 1,180 2000's 1,645 2,428 3,070 3,514 4,445 4,608 6,660 7,846 9,390 11,100 2010's 12,587 9,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

362

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,411 6,191 6,956 6,739 6,745 6,504 1990's 6,884 6,305 6,353 6,138 5,739 5,674 5,240 4,799 4,452 4,507 2000's 5,030 5,404 4,967 4,235 3,258 2,807 2,360 2,173 1,937 1,822 2010's 1,456 1,015 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

363

West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553 4,638 4,865 5,243 6,066 2010's 7,134 10,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

364

Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,334 1980's 1,551 1,252 1,200 1,353 1,193 1,064 1,242 1,571 1,434 1,443 1990's 1,330 1,404 1,290 1,218 1,379 1,344 2,125 2,256 2,386 2,313 2000's 2,772 3,032 3,311 3,488 3,154 2,961 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2010's 2,975 2,549 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

365

California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

366

Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

367

Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

368

Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,657 1980's 2,970 2,969 3,345 3,200 2,932 2,928 3,008 2,912 3,572 4,290 1990's 4,249 5,329 5,701 5,817 5,948 6,520 7,009 6,627 7,436 8,591 2000's 9,877 11,924 13,251 14,707 13,956 15,796 16,141 20,642 22,159 22,199 2010's 23,001 23,633 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

369

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010 1,882 2010's 2,371 2,518 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

370

Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's 36,526 36,930 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

371

Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,559 1980's 1,602 1,637 1,800 1,887 2,051 1,875 1,861 1,873 1,843 1,637 1990's 1,672 1,536 1,619 1,462 1,525 1,462 1,383 1,423 1,294 1,505 2000's 1,545 1,589 1,616 1,629 1,797 1,921 2,227 3,269 5,616 10,852 2010's 14,152 16,328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

372

Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

373

Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

374

Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,971 35,867 34,584 32,852 32,309 32,349 1990's 32,412 30,729 29,474 29,967 31,071 31,949 33,432 33,322 33,429 35,470 2000's 38,585 40,376 41,104 42,280 46,728 53,175 58,736 68,827 74,284 76,272 2010's 84,157 90,947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

375

California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2010's 2,282 2,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

376

Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

377

Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

378

Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's 2,674 2,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

379

Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,316 10,943 10,724 10,826 11,171 1990's 10,597 9,969 9,060 8,615 9,165 8,890 9,038 9,020 8,569 8,667 2000's 8,704 9,245 8,520 8,952 9,235 10,091 10,149 9,651 10,581 19,898 2010's 28,838 29,906 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

380

California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 732 1980's 683 870 708 960 714 754 716 639 1,002 1,037 1990's 744 660 606 540 586 498 523 950 1,101 1,165 2000's 1,037 1,024 1,047 1,047 1,184 1,148 1,048 1,029 987 1,456 2010's 2,332 5,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

382

Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 680 1980's 659 658 1990's 4,159 5,437 5,840 5,166 4,842 4,886 5,062 4,983 4,615 4,338 2000's 4,241 3,931 3,891 4,313 4,127 3,977 3,945 4,016 3,360 2,919 2010's 2,686 2,522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

383

Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,058 1980's 4,828 4,373 4,188 3,883 4,120 3,131 2,462 2,983 2,910 2,821 1990's 2,466 2,924 3,002 3,492 3,326 3,310 3,216 2,957 2,768 2,646 2000's 2,564 2,309 2,157 2,081 2,004 1,875 1,447 1,270 1,139 1,090 2010's 1,021 976 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

384

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306 2,831 2,470 2,430 2,249 2,609 2010's 2,447 2,685 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

385

Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

386

Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

387

GPS Meteorology: Mapping Zenith Wet Delays onto Precipitable Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging networks of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers can be used in the remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The time-varying zenith wet delay observed at each GPS receiver in a network can be transformed into an estimate of the ...

Michael Bevis; Steven Businger; Steven Chiswell; Thomas A. Herring; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wet-Bulb Temperature from Relative Humidity and Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation is presented for wet-bulb temperature as a function of air temperature and relative humidity at standard sea level pressure. It was found as an empirical fit using gene-expression programming. This equation is valid for relative ...

Roland Stull

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Preliminary Study of California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used in both short-range (days) and long-range (years) simulations to explore the California wintertime model wet bias. California is divided into four regions (the coast, central ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Peter M. Caldwell; David C. Bader

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

391

Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 601 1980's 668 494 481 529 419 375 665 1,002 943 1,011 1990's 922 967 938 890 1,022 1,018 1,778 1,975 2,158 2,086 2000's 2,558 2,873 3,097 3,219 2,961 2,808 2,925 3,512 3,105 2,728 2010's 2,903 2,472 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

392

Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 1,923 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

393

Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

394

West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

395

Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916 2,969 2010's 2,995 2,615 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

396

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

399

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

Muetterties, E.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pyrochemical separations chemistry of plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recovery and purification of plutonium involves interesting chemistry. Currently in use are several high temperature processes based on redox reactions. These processes include direct oxide reduction which uses calcium to reduce the oxide to the free metal and electrorefining which is used as a final purification step. The chemical research group at Rocky Flats is currently investigating the use of an aluminum/magnesium alloy to remove the ionic plutonium from the salts used in the above named processes. The results of this study along with an overview of pyrochemical plutonium processing chemistry will be presented.

Bynum, R.V.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CHEMISTRY 213B: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. General Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and applications 9.4 Lecture 21. Chemical equilibrium 11 February 25 - March 1: STUDY BREAK Lecture 22. Chemical Chemistry. Supplementary Texts 1. P. A. Rock, Chemical Thermodynamics. 2. Gordon M. Barrow, Physical of gases 2 Lecture 3. Empirical properties of liquids and solids 5 Lecture 4. Molecular basis: Kinetic

Ronis, David M.

402

Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

Gerald P. Huffman

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Chemistry in sport: context-based e-learning in chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper details the design and use of a learning resource for independent learning in chemistry. The course presents chemistry in the context of sport and draws upon a number of models of teaching and learning, including the Perry scheme of intellectual development, multiple intelligences (MI) theory, problem/context-based learning (P/CBL), mind mapping, case studies and web-based independent learning. The resource was produced as a website containing the context, content, and the tasks to be completed as part of the assessment. Hyperlinks to additional content and external web-pages were also included. The students ’ response to the learning resource was positive; they enjoyed the course, found the context interesting and the presentation helpful. The assessment marks compared well with those from other modules taken by the same students in the same academic year. [Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 2006, 7 (3), 195-202

Nicholas M. Potter; Tina L. Overton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Comparison of Soil Wetness Indices for Inducing Functional Similarity of Hydrologic Response across Sites in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparative ability of four soil wetness indices to normalize soil moisture dependence of rootzone fluxes across a range of sites in Illinois is investigated. The soil wetness indices examined are various transformations of the water stored ...

Jennifer A. Saleem; Guido D. Salvucci

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Impact of Wet Soil and Canopy Temperatures on Daytime Boundary–Layer Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of very wet soil and canopy temperatures on the surface sensible heat flux, and on related daytime boundary-layer properties is evaluated. For very wet soils, two winter situations are considered, related to significant changes in soil ...

M. Segal; J. R. Garratt; G. Kallos; R. A. Pielke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cycle chemistry in combined cycle plants influences about 70 of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failure mechanisms. These guidelines have been assembled to assist operators and chemists in developing an effective overall cycle chemistry program which will prevent HRSG tube failures (HTF).

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Cycling, Startup, Shutdown, and Layup Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Operators and Chemists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. Complete optimization of cycle chemistry requires protection of the steam-water cycle during the shutdown, layup, and startup phases of operation. These guidelines will assist utilities in developing cycle chemistry guidelines for all transient operations and shutdowns.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models Kalen Braman, Todd Oliver and Venkat Raman, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 Syngas chemistry modeling is an integral step toward the development of safe and ef- ficient syngas combustors. Although substantial effort

Raman, Venkat

409

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I). Johannes Ull~.ich, in Bio-Organic Chc! mistry Qiinrtcr-sodium E. A. Shneour, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly2, Edwige Tyszkiewicz, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Qnarterly

Various

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

412

Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

813chemistry 03282013 Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly A ball-and-stick structural model of...

413

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

0-brane Quantum Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply two different numerical methods to solve for the boundstate of two 0-branes in three dimensions. One method is developed by us in this work and we compare it to a method existing in the literature. In spite of considering only three dimensional Minkowski space we obtain interesting results which should give some basic understanding of the behaviour of 0-branes.

Vaclav Kares

2004-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry Michigan Technological University This document describes the rules and regulations concerning the acquisition, provision, maintenance, and use of the computing established by: · Michigan Internet Provider, MERIT: (http://www.merit.edu/) · MTU Computer Advisory Committee

Honrath, Richard E.

417

Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,276 1980's 11,273 11,178 10,364 9,971 9,162 8,328 7,843 7,644 7,631 7,661 1990's 7,386 6,851 6,166 5,570 5,880 5,446 5,478 5,538 5,336 5,259 2000's 4,954 4,859 3,968 3,506 3,168 3,051 3,058 2,960 2,445 2,463 2010's 2,496 2,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

418

Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,127 1980's 1,117 1,265 1,322 1,477 1,911 2,100 2,169 2,106 1,989 1,789 1990's 1,835 1,841 1,692 1,790 1,926 1,876 2,088 1,681 1,906 2,301 2000's 3,089 4,206 4,588 5,398 6,525 9,560 12,591 17,224 20,420 22,602 2010's 24,686 28,147 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

419

Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8,073 1980's 7,216 6,620 6,084 6,064 5,362 5,246 5,254 4,973 4,738 4,403 1990's 4,323 4,023 3,792 3,569 3,267 3,218 3,069 2,886 2,727 2,947 2000's 3,345 3,405 3,284 3,032 3,266 3,829 3,891 4,267 4,506 3,950 2010's 3,777 3,006 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

420

Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6,796 1980's 8,039 8,431 9,095 9,769 10,147 10,519 9,702 9,881 10,287 10,695 1990's 9,860 9,861 10,681 10,885 10,740 11,833 12,260 13,471 13,577 14,096 2000's 16,559 18,911 20,970 22,266 23,278 24,338 24,116 30,531 32,176 36,386 2010's 36,192 36,612 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,299 1980's 11,656 13,066 14,714 14,992 14,858 14,929 15,588 15,686 15,556 14,948 1990's 15,147 14,112 13,249 12,549 12,981 13,067 12,929 13,296 13,321 12,252 2000's 13,430 13,256 14,576 15,176 16,301 17,337 17,735 19,225 21,155 23,115 2010's 26,873 27,683 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

422

New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,634 1980's 2,266 2,377 2,331 2,214 2,117 2,001 1,750 1,901 2,030 2,131 1990's 2,290 2,073 1,948 1,860 1,791 1,648 1,612 1,694 1,694 1,880 2000's 2,526 2,571 2,632 2,205 2,477 2,569 2,605 2,633 2,737 2,658 2010's 2,612 2,475 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

423

New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 12,568 1980's 12,267 12,913 11,562 10,868 10,458 9,948 11,094 11,176 17,030 15,219 1990's 17,094 18,204 18,802 18,354 16,947 17,069 16,232 15,280 14,816 15,172 2000's 16,922 17,112 16,971 16,681 18,109 17,683 17,332 16,556 15,592 14,662 2010's 14,316 13,586 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

424

Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,710 1980's 3,622 3,653 3,749 4,279 4,087 4,274 4,324 4,151 4,506 5,201 1990's 5,345 4,856 4,987 5,170 5,131 5,425 5,690 5,616 5,691 5,562 2000's 5,901 6,016 6,161 6,572 7,564 8,999 9,205 11,468 12,207 12,806 2010's 14,958 15,524 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

425

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

WETTING BEHAVIOR OF SELECTED CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of aging and displacement temperatures, and brine and oil composition on wettability and the recovery of crude oil by spontaneous imbibition and waterflooding has been investigated. This study is based on displacement tests in Berea Sandstone using three distinctly different crude oils and three reservoir brines. Brine concentration was varied by changing the concentration of total dissolved solids of the synthetic brine in proportion to give brine of twice, one tenth, and one hundredth of the reservoir brine concentration. Aging and displacement temperatures were varied independently. For all crude oils, water-wetness and oil recovery increased with increase in displacement temperature. Tests on the effect of brine concentration showed that salinity of the connate and invading brines can have a major influence on wettability and oil recovery at reservoir temperature. Oil recovery increased over that for the reservoir brine with dilution of both the initial (connate) and invading brine or dilution of either. Removal of light components from the crude oil resulted in increased water-wetness. Addition of alkanes to the crude oil reduced the water-wetness, and increased oil recovery. Relationships between waterflood recovery and wettability are summarized.

G.Q. Tang; N.R. Morrow

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9,934 1980's 10,001 10,536 9,231 8,654 8,341 7,947 9,344 9,275 15,000 13,088 1990's 14,804 16,131 16,854 16,494 15,156 15,421 14,620 13,586 13,122 13,292 2000's 14,396 14,541 14,339 14,476 15,632 15,114 14,727 13,923 12,855 12,004 2010's 11,704 11,111 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

429

Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 143,852 1980's 139,421 143,515 142,984 143,469 141,226 138,464 139,070 135,256 141,211 139,798 1990's 141,941 140,584 138,883 136,953 138,213 139,369 141,136 140,382 139,015 142,098 2000's 154,113 159,612 163,863 166,512 171,547 183,197 189,329 213,851 224,873 249,406 2010's 280,880 305,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013

430

Chemistry Monitoring and Control for Fuel Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water chemistry has been identified as a known or potential contributing cause in recent corrosion-induced fuel failures and anomalies such as fuel crud spallation and enhanced nodular corrosion. The 2004 revision of the BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines (EPRI report 1008192) addressed these concerns by recommending tighter chemistry control limits and additional monitoring for contaminants and additives that can have an adverse effect on fuel cladding corrosion. The revision focused on chemistry control fo...

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

Grate, Jay W.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200143-0. Address and Contact Information: Highway 17 ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Modeling biochemical pathways using an artificial chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial chemistries are candidates for methodologies that model and design biochemical systems. If artificial chemistries can deal with such systems in beneficial ways, they may facilitate activities in the new area of biomolecular engineering. In ... Keywords: Artificial chemistry, biochemical pathways, biomolecular engineering, modularity, reasoning, scalability

Kazuto Tominaga; Yoshikazu Suzuki; Keiji Kobayashi; Tooru Watanabe; Kazumasa Koizumi; Koji Kishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxide Interfaces Chemical Imaging Grain Boundaries Related Research Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and physical phenomena at gas, liquid and solid interfaces lie at the heart of today's energy technologies. They underpin ORNL's research strategies to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure, transport and reactivity at interfaces will lead to advances in

437

Integrated Boiler Tube Failure Reduction/Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler tube failures (BTF) and cycle chemistry corrosion and deposition problems remain the leading causes of availability losses in fossil-fired steam plants worldwide. This report describes techniques developed during a 20-year EPRI project to assist utilities in substantially reducing availability and performance losses due to these problems.

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

2010 Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interdisciplinary meeting will gather together scientists - structural biologists, chemists, geneticists, chemical and biological oceanographers, geochemists, and other specialist - who study the flows of essential and toxic elements through the environment and living systems, on timescales ranging from femptoseconds to eons. Of particular interest are the molecular mechanisms that govern element acquisition and use in organisms, and the tools and techniques used to study these phenomena. The aim of this community is to use these molecular-scale insights to understand the interconnected biotic and abiotic processes that shape the macroscopic environment and its development and change over a range of time scales.

Rachael Austin

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbonaceous Chemistry for Computational Modeling Licensing and Partnership Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Computational Modeling Chemistry for Computational Modeling Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed a software platform entitled Carbonaceous Chemistry for Computational Modeling (C3M) that is used to access a variety of kinetic processes and reaction mechanisms typically found in coal gasification, gas clean-up, and carbon capture processes. This unique software provides the user the ability to conduct virtual kinetic experiments using leading kinetic packages and available experimental data to evaluate kinetic predictions as a function of fuel and sorbent type and/or operating conditions. A Patent Cooperation Treaty application was filed in June 2008. NETL is seeking non-exclusive licensing partners interested in implementing

440

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemistry Institutes Chemistry Institutes Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to June 21, 2013 5:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

M. -H. Yung; J. Casanova; A. Mezzacapo; J. McClean; L. Lamata; A. Aspuru-Guzik; E. Solano

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

448

Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

Wise, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cold Controlled Chemistry Roman Krems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Possible applications of cold controlled chemistry #12; #¢¡ ©£¡ ! # %¢ ¥¤6#¢¡§¦ # ¤¨¤§! # ¤§¦ Centrifugal processes remains a significant challenge..." Paul Brumer, DAMOP 2007, Bulletin of the APS #12;Thermal gas is difficult to control #12;Low temperature gas under external fieldE #12;E BLow temperature gas

Krems, Roman

450

Chemistry and Materials Science Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's mission is as clear today as it was in 1952 when the Laboratory was founded--to ensure our country's national security and the safety and reliability of its nuclear deterrent. As a laboratory pursuing applied science in the national interest, we strive to accomplish our mission through excellence in science and technology. We do this while developing and implementing sound and robust business practices in an environment that emphasizes security and ensures our safety and the safety of the community around us. Our mission as a directorate derives directly from the Laboratory's charter. When I accepted the assignment of Associate Director for Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS), I talked to you about the need for strategic balance and excellence in all our endeavors. We also discussed how to take the directorate to the next level. The long-range CMS strategic plan presented here was developed with this purpose in mind. It also aligns with the Lab's institutional long-range science and technology plan and its 10-year facilities and infrastructure site plan. The plan is aimed at ensuring that we fulfill our directorate's two governing principles: (1) delivering on our commitments to Laboratory programs and sponsors, and (2) anticipating change and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. This will require us to attain a new level of creativity, agility, and flexibility as we move forward. Moreover, a new level of engagement in partnerships with other directorates across the Laboratory as well as with universities and other national labs will also be required. The group of managers and staff that I chartered to build a strategic plan identified four organizing themes that define our directorate's work and unite our staff with a set of common goals. The plan presented here explains how we will proceed in each of these four theme areas: (1) Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions--Fundamental investigations of the properties and performance of states of matter under extreme dynamic, environmental, and nanoscale conditions, with an emphasis on materials of interest to Laboratory programs and mission needs. (2) Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering to support national security programs--Insights into the chemical reactions of energetic materials in the nuclear stockpile through models of molecular response to extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, advancing a new technique for processing energetic materials by using sol-gel chemistry, providing materials for NIF optics, and furthering developments to enhance other high-power lasers. (3) Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology--Multidisciplinary research for developing new technologies to combat chemical and biological terrorism, to monitor changes in the nation's nuclear stockpile, and to enable the development and application of new physical-science-based methodologies and tools for fundamental biology studies and human health applications. (4) Applied nuclear science for human health and national security: Nuclear science research that is used to develop new methods and technologies for detecting and attributing nuclear materials, assisting Laboratory programs that require nuclear and radiochemical expertise in carrying out their missions, discovering new elements in the periodic table, and finding ways of detecting and understanding cellular response to radiation.

Rhodie, K B; Mailhiot, C; Eaglesham, D; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Turpin, L S; Allen, P G

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

451

Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding  

SciTech Connect

Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

Olsen, A.R.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. RESULTS: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2x10^5 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

Q. Chang; H. M. Cuppen; E. Herbst

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ultrafast lasers have been used to enable multiplex CARS spectroscopy with a clear sensitivity advantages over conventional Raman spectroscopy ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supported experiments to examine the repeatability of pre-flashover fire patterns generated by short-duration fires from natural gas, gasoline, and ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

459

Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Chemistry Data This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Analytical Data for Deleted Contaminants of Concern ............................................................. C1.O Mol~tezuma Creek Hardness Dat Surface Water Copper Data Summa ................ CI-9 Surface Water Radium-228 Dat Surface Water Radon-222 Data Summary ....................... ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . C l - I 2 Alluvial Ground Water Aln~noniuu~ as Nitrogen Data Summary ....................... . . . ................................ Cl-15 Alluvial Ground Water Cobalt Data Summary ........... Alluvial Ground Water Copper Data Sumrl Alluvial Ground Water Lead Data Su~nmary ................................. C1-19 Alluvial Ground Water Lead-210 Data Sutl~rnary

460

Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.  

SciTech Connect

Developing quantum chemistry programs on the coming generation of exascale computers will be a difficult task. The programs will need to be fault-tolerant and minimize the use of global operations. This work explores the use a task-based model that uses a data-centric approach to allocate work to different processes as it applies to quantum chemistry. After introducing the key problems that appear when trying to parallelize a complicated quantum chemistry method such as coupled-cluster theory, we discuss the implications of that model as it pertains to the computational kernel of a coupled-cluster program - matrix multiplication. Also, we discuss the extensions that would required to build a full coupled-cluster program using the task-based model. Current programming models for high-performance computing are fault-intolerant and use global operations. Those properties are unsustainable as computers scale to millions of CPUs; instead one must recognize that these systems will be hierarchical in structure, prone to constant faults, and global operations will be infeasible. The FAST-OS HARE project is introducing a scale-free computing model to address these issues. This model is hierarchical and fault-tolerant by design, allows for the clean overlap of computation and communication, reducing the network load, does not require checkpointing, and avoids the complexity of many HPC runtimes. Development of an algorithm within this model requires a change in focus from imperative programming to a data-centric approach. Quantum chemistry (QC) algorithms, in particular electronic structure methods, are an ideal test bed for this computing model. These methods describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, which determine the properties of the molecule. The computational cost of these methods is high, scaling quartically or higher in the size of the molecule, which is why QC applications are major users of HPC resources. The complexity of these algorithms means that MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

Taube, Andrew Garvin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

Carter, Emily A

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2007 ... In 17 chapters, The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia covers a wide variety of topics that range from history to economic geology, mining, ...

464

Chemistry of Addition-Type Polyimides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...of polyimides are shown in 6and Fig. 5The basic chemistry of the PE series of imide oligomers is illustrated

465

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce...

466

Charge Carrier Chemistry in Nanoscopic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Defect chemistry is explored in space charge zones with emphasis on mesoscopic situations. After a general overview two representative

467

Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2013-05-28 15:53:12...

468

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemistry, and photophysics; energy transduction by electron-transfer reactions; and energy storage through chemical transformations. Theoretical and experimental efforts are...

469

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national...

470

Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

473

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF SEIS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

474

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery Speaker(s): Anubhav Jain Date: December 18, 2012 - 12:00pm...

475

WEB: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The American Chemical Society's website "The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry" provides 12 videos related to the history of nuclear ...

476

The impact of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubbing on mercury emissions from coal-fired power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article introduces a predictive capability for mercury (Hg) retention in any Ca-based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, given Hg speciation at the FGD inlet, the flue gas composition, and the sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) capture efficiency. A preliminary statistical analysis of data from 17 full-scale wet FGDs connects flue gas compositions, the extents of Hg oxidation at FGD inlets, and Hg retention efficiencies. These connections show that solution chemistry within the FGD determines Hg retention. A more thorough analysis based on thermochemical equilibrium yields highly accurate predictions for total Hg retention with no parameter adjustments. For the most reliable data, the predictions were within measurement uncertainties for both limestone and Mg/lime systems operating in both forced and natural oxidation mode. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) database, the quantitative performance was almost as good for the most modern FGDs, which probably conform to the very high SO{sub 2} absorption efficiencies assumed in the calculations. The large discrepancies for older FGDs are tentatively attributed to the unspecified SO{sub 2} capture efficiencies and operating temperatures and to the possible elimination of HCl in prescrubbers. The equilibrium calculations suggest that Hg retention is most sensitive to inlet HCl and O{sub 2} levels and the FGD temperature; weakly dependent on SO{sub 2} capture efficiency; and insensitive to HgCl{sub 2}, NO, CA:S ratio, slurry dilution level in limestone FGDs, and MgSO{sub 3} levels in Mg/lime systems. Consequently, systems with prescrubbers to eliminate HCl probably retain less Hg than fully integrated FGDs. The analysis also predicts re-emission of Hg{sub 0} but only for inlet O{sub 2} levels that are much lower than those in full-scale FGDs. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Stephen Niksa; Naoki Fujiwara [Niksa Energy Associates, Belmont, CA (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles which preclude applying standard methods to such valuable specimens; destructive sampling is not an option and most non-destructive methods cannot handle large specimens. Furthermore, mapping using conventional methods is far too slow to enable chemical zonation to be reasonably determined. Mapping of trace element chemistry is of tremendous interest, however, because it opens a window into understanding several critical questions about Archaeopteryx in particular, and about fossil specimens in general. Preserved trace chemistry in bones and soft tissue may be remnants of the living organism, and therefore may give insight into life processes of extinct organisms. When mapping includes the embedding rock matrix, mass transfer between the fossil and the matrix can be constrained, hence giving information about mode of preservation. Chemical analysis can also resolve artefacts of the curation process. Finally, accurate chemical maps can also be useful for directing future work by highlighting regions that may be promising for other types of analysis including structural methods (CT, diffraction) or techniques that use other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (infra-red).

478

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie - Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy Gang . kast - Aisle . bookcase 01 Algemeen 01 chemie 05 Physical chemistry 10.08 - 06 Chemische binding 06 Chemical bonding 10.13 - 07 Anorganische

Galis, Frietson

479

Coupled chemistry/climate issues  

SciTech Connect

Driven by both natural and anthropogenic causes, the distributions of trace chemical species in the atmosphere has altered the natural state of the chemical distribution and, the authors believe, the climate system. A clear example of this change and its effect on climate is through tropospheric ozone. Evidence shows that over the last decade tropospheric ozone has increased, probably caused by increasing concentrations and emissions of CH{sub 4}, CO, NO{sub x}, and NMHCs (nonmethane hydrocarbons). Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced when nitrogen oxides react in the presence of carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and sunlight. The chemistry of ozone and NO{sub x} is also closely associated with the hydroxyl radical (OH), which governs the atmospheric lifetime of a number of species, including CH{sub 4} and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are major greenhouse gases and which affect the chemical balance of the stratosphere. Increases in the concentrations of CO and CH{sub 4} can lead to decreased concentrations of OH and a positive feedback on the atmospheric lifetimes of CO and methane. The same would occur for other greenhouse gases and for some of the important reactions which form aerosols in the troposphere. This would further enhance the concentrations of the gases and accelerate the radiative effects from these greenhouse species, strongly affecting climate and the accurate prediction of climate. It is believed that warmer climates will also increase the amount of water in the atmosphere, thereby providing another chemistry feedback on OH.

Rotman, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Global Climate Research Div.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnGen EnGen < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET EnGen.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technologies Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Sandy Cove Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The EnGen point absorber, which features 'Smart Float' technology that allows the device to travel along a rigid spar at an incline of 45 degrees. The spar is moored at a single point of contact which allows the device to be fully compliant on all three axes (pitch, roll and yaw). Mooring Configuration Proprietary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments… (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

483

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

484

Dynamic wetting and heat transfer behaviour of aluminium droplets impinging and solidifying on copper substrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present work describes an experimental set-up built to simulate dynamic wetting and heat transfer occurring in many rapid solidification processes. Tests were performed with… (more)

Leboeuf, Sébastien

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

486

,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

487

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

488

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer and optimisation of a natural draft wet cooling tower.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main contribution of this work is to answer several important questions relating to natural draft wet cooling tower (NDWCT) modelling, design and optimisation. Specifically,… (more)

Williamson, Nicholas J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

492

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

493

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

494

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

495

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

496

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

497

Wet oxidation of stainless steels: New insights into hydrogen ingress  

SciTech Connect

detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia-forming steels correlated with the local oxidemetal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapor effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [University of Manitoba, Canada; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Maintenance of a rural precipitation chemistry center at Whiteface Mountain  

SciTech Connect

For the Past 11 years, Whiteface Mountain (WFM) has been successfully collecting data according to the MAP3S (Multistate Power Production Pollution Study) protocols. These protocols include field sampling, laboratory procedures, sample handling and shipment, and supporting measurements at the summit or lodge including meteorological and air quality parameters. All blind tests and audits have been successfully passed. Since the beginning of the MAP3S program it was recognized that, because of its remoteness, WFM needed some additional support to process the samples and to obtain site specific supporting data. The primary purpose of this funding was to insure the technical support to maintain the availability of WFM so that the necessary high quality research monitoring could continue. In addition, during the past year, we were able to: (1) perform all operations required by the National Trends Network (NTN) precipitation monitoring network: (2) begin the comparison of MAP3S data with similar data taken at WFM; (3) begin a series of ion chromatography measurements on MAP3S duplicate samples (when sufficient volume was available) to study the effect of time delays between sample collection and chemical analysis: (4) provide wet deposition data to the EPA Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program (MCCP); (5) assess the precipitation data quality of the ENSR measurements collocated with MAP3S. Selected results are presents. 6 refs., 1 fig.

Mohnen, V.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Advances in the chemistry of catalytic reforming of naphtha  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic reforming of naphtha remains the key process for production of high octane gasoline and aromatics (BTX) which are used as petrochemicals feedstocks. The increased demand for these products has led refiners to investigate ways for improving the performance of the reforming process and its catalysts. Moreover, in order to comply with environmental restrictions, the reduction in lead content would require further increase in the reformate octane number. In response to these requirements, refiners and catalyst manufacturers are examining the role of the catalysts in improving the selectivity to aromatics and in octane enhancement. By understanding the chemistry and the mechanism of the reforming process, higher performance catalysts with longer life on stream and lower cost can be developed. This review covers recent developments in reforming catalysts, process reaction chemistry and mechanism. It also highlights prospective areas of research.

Anabtawi, J.A.; Redwan, D.S.; Al-Jarallah, A.M.; Aitani, A.M. (Petroleum and Gas Technology Div., Research Inst., King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (SA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment  

SciTech Connect

The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z