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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Conventional Wet Chemistry ICP-AES Development for RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 Melter Feed Slurry Simulants - A Statistical Review of the Results from the Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project (RPP)--Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to prepare and process High Level Waste (HLW) streams into glass waste forms that will meet HLW disposal requirements. Samples of HLW sludge and samples of this sludge mixed with glass-forming chemicals are to be taken and analyzed for process control. Glass characterization from the melter is not included in the scope. The development of viable analytical protocols to provide the required elemental analyses of these samples with rapid turnaround times (before and after addition of the glass-forming chemicals) has been defined as an RPP statement of work for the Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Wet chemistry is serving as the baseline comparison to laser ablation for method development. One of the simulants used in this study by ADS was AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant, a simulant used to represent HLW samples after the addition of glass-forming chemicals. Several different dissolution methods were used by ADS in preparing samples of this simulant for elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The measurements generated by this process were provided to SRNL's Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) for analysis. The measurement data generated for samples of the RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant are presented in this report and the different approaches used to prepare the samples are statistically compared. Comparisons among three of the dissolution methods are highlighted in this analysis. The methods are: sodium peroxide fusion in nickel crucibles, acidification with HNO{sub 3}/HCL at room temperature, and cesium carbonate fusion in zirconium crucibles. A summary table of the measurement averages generated by the three methods is presented. The cesium carbonate fusion method yielded measurements with significantly different mean values from the other two preparation methods for several of the elements.

Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument of the sensors are compact and rugged and are not subject to radiation damage. Actuator Assembly. The actuator

Kounaves, Samuel P.

3

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Rye Patch geothermal development, hydro-chemistry of thermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development, hydro-chemistry of thermal water applied to resource definition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Rye Patch geothermal...

6

Analysis Of Post-Wet-Chemistry Heat Treatment Effects On Nb SRF Surface Resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the current research in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is focused on ways to reduce the construction and operating cost of SRF-based accelerators as well as on the development of new or improved cavity processing techniques. The increase in quality factors is the result of the reduction of the surface resistance of the materials. A recent test on a 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from ingot niobium of medium purity and heat treated at 1400 deg C in a ultra-high vacuum induction furnace resulted in a residual resistance of ~ 1n{Omega} and a quality factor at 2.0 K increasing with field up to ~ 5◊10{sup 10} at a peak magnetic field of 90 mT. In this contribution, we present some results on the investigation of the origin of the extended Q{sub 0}-increase, obtained by multiple HF rinses, oxypolishing and heat treatment of ?all Nb? cavities.

Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Scalable Computational Chemistry: New Developments and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computational part of the thesis is the investigation of titanium chloride (II) as a potential catalyst for the bis-silylation reaction of ethylene with hexaclorodisilane at different levels of theory. Bis-silylation is an important reaction for producing bis(silyl) compounds and new C-Si bonds, which can serve as monomers for silicon containing polymers and silicon carbides. Ab initio calculations on the steps involved in a proposed mechanism are presented. This choice of reactants allows them to study this reaction at reliable levels of theory without compromising accuracy. The calculations indicate that this is a highly exothermic barrierless reaction. The TiCl{sub 2} catalyst removes a 50 kcal/mol activation energy barrier required for the reaction without the catalyst. The first step is interaction of TiCl{sub 2} with ethylene to form an intermediate that is 60 kcal/mol below the energy of the reactants. This is the driving force for the entire reaction. Dynamic correlation plays a significant role because RHF calculations indicate that the net barrier for the catalyzed reaction is 50 kcal/mol. They conclude that divalent Ti has the potential to become an important industrial catalyst for silylation reactions. In the programming part of the thesis, parallelization of different quantum chemistry methods is presented. The parallelization of code is becoming important aspects of quantum chemistry code development. Two trends contribute to it: the overall desire to study large chemical systems and the desire to employ highly correlated methods which are usually computationally and memory expensive. In the presented distributed data algorithms computation is parallelized and the largest arrays are evenly distributed among CPUs. First, the parallelization of the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (SCF) method is considered. SCF method is the most common starting point for more accurate calculations. The Fock build (sub step of SCF) from AO integrals is also often used to avoid MO integral computation. The presented distributed data SCF increases the size of chemical systems that can be calculated by using RHF and DFT. The important ab initio method to study bond formation and breaking as well as excited molecules is CASSCF. The presented distributed data CASSCF algorithm can significantly decrease computational time and memory requirements per node. Therefore, large CASSCF computations can be performed. The most time consuming operation to study potential energy surfaces of reactions and chemical systems is Hessian calculations. The distributed data parallelization of CPHF will alloy scientists carry out large analytic Hessian calculations.

Yuri Alexeev

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew...

9

Calcination/dissolution chemistry development Fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The task {open_quotes}IPC Liaison and Chemistry of Thermal Reconstitution{close_quotes} is a $300,000 program that was conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Research and Development (EM-53) Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program supported under technical task plan (TTP) RL4-3-20-04. The principal investigator was Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The task encompassed the following two subtasks related to the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste: (1) Technical Liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) and its research into the chemistry of transuranic elements (TRU) and technetium (Tc) in alkaline media. (2) Laboratory investigation of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution (C/D) (or thermal reconstitution) as an alternative to the present reference Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment flowsheet, Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW). This report fulfills the milestone for the C/D subtask to {open_quotes}Provide End-of-Year Report on C/D Laboratory Test Results{close_quotes} due 30 September 1995. A companion report, fulfilling the milestone to provide an end-of-year report on the IPC/RAS liaison, also has been prepared.

Delegard, C.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry

11

Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

Newkirk, L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Interfacial Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interfacial Chemistry The organization's research focus, among other things, is to develop new analytical methods that advance the science of surface chemistry and contribute to...

13

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems of con- tinuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8

14

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

≠ the UBC LCA Project ≠ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Running head: Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block CIVL 498 ≠ Life Cycle Assess Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block Minge Weng November 18

16

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In the pressurized-water environment (20 MPa) near-total conversion of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been accomplished in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high-levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. Biomass trace components cause processing difficulties using the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. Results are described for both bench-scale and scaled-up reactor systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Butner, Scott S.; Zacher, Alan H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Young, James S.; McCready, David E.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem) Bayly Foundation PROFESSORS FRANCE, PLEVA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS ALty A student may complete only one of the majors listed in the Department of Chemistry. The major in chemistry leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 44 credits as follows: 1. Chemistry 111, 112

Dresden, Gregory

18

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science ...........................................................................................................................................4 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office..............................................................................................6 Majors in Chemistry & Biochemistry

Levine, Alex J.

19

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

20

Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

Bedi, Harpreet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation of Acridine Country: United States #12;Amit Gangar Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Design and Development Wagner Home Country: India #12;Dan Wang Medicinal Chemistry M.S. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation

Thomas, David D.

22

Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

Dresden, Gregory

24

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY The Department of Chemistry invites applications for a probationary (tenure-track) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, externally funded research program, and to develop and teach innovative courses in chemistry

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

25

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY 2:30 p.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 and porous. Its cohesiveness changes when separated from the ground, most probable due to sublimation of its Aqueous Carbonate Chemistry of the Martian Soil at the Phoenix Landing Site [#2489] The Wet Chemistry Labs

Rathbun, Julie A.

26

WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

Unknown

2001-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in our understanding of important chemistry and highlightedin our knowledge. In summary, the chemistry occurring in theBJ, Pitts JN, Jr (2000) Chemistry of the Upper and Lower

Finlayson-Pitts, B. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CLUSTER CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

Dibble, Theodore

31

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Chemistry research and development. Progress report, December 1978-May 1979. [Component, pilot plant, instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems. Specific items studied include processing of pond sludge, transport of radioactive materials and wastes, corrosion, decontamination and cleaning, fluidized-bed incineration, Pu contamination of soils, chemical analysis, radiometric analysis, security. (DLC)

Miner, F. J.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

35

Combustion chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3AóConversion Technologies III: Energy from Our WasteóWill we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

37

Organophosphorus chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2087 Organophosphorus chemistry Paul R. Hanson Editorial Open Access Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA Email: Paul R. Hanson - phanson@ku.edu. Keywords: organophosphorus... Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2014, 10, 2087Ė2088. doi:10.3762/bjoc.10.217 Received: 28 July 2014 Accepted: 06 August 2014 Published: 04 September 2014 This article is part of the Thematic Series "Organophosphorus chemistry" Guest Editor: P. R. Hanson © 2014...

Hanson, Paul R.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

39

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry‚??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth‚??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thinWetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical of partially wetting threads in planar microchannels of height h=100 or 250 m fluids: ethanol, mineral oils

Cubaud, Thomas

43

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert With Application to Penetrometer Insertion #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert CoffeeSand Gravel Oops! #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert

Anlage, Steven

44

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

45

The microrheology of wet forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kelvin cell is the only known topology for stable, perfectly ordered, dry foams. During topological transitions (T1s) associated with large elastic-plastic deformations, these cells switch neighbors and some faces gain or lose two sides, but the resulting bubbles with different shape are still Kelvin cells. The bubbles in a stable, perfectly ordered. wet foam are not limited to one topology (or even the two described here). The topological transitions considered here result in gain or loss of two dry films per bubble. The transition from Kelvin to RD topology is triggered by films shrinking in area, as in the dry case. However, the reverse transition from RD to Kelvin topology involves a different mechanism--opposite interfaces of an eight-way vertex touch and a new film grows from the point of contact as the foam is compressed. Microrheological analysis based on 2D models of foam structure has been useful preparation for 3D, despite obvious differences between 2D and 3D. Linear elastic behavior is anisotropic for perfectly ordered 3D foams--nonlinear elastic behavior is isotropic for 2D foams with polydisperse hexagonal structure. The shear moduli of a wet Kelvin foam decrease with increasing {phi}--the shear modulus of a wet 2D foam (with three-way Plateau borders) does not depend on {phi} at all. The effective isotropic shear moduli G of perfectly ordered wet foams tend to decrease with increasing {phi} but do not exhibit linear dependence, which may stem from the disorder of real systems.

Kraynik, A.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinelt, D.A. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Grey Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Email: jkgrey@unm.edu Phone: 505.277.1658; Fax: 505.277.2609 Office: Clark Hall B70 Homepage: http://chemistry.unm.edu/faculty_web/jgrey Education B.S. in Chemistry, 1999, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Ph.D. in Chemistry

48

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of green chemistry and green engineering and by consideringResearch, Green Chemistry and Green Engineering Center, YaleOF GREEN CHEMISTRY AND GREEN ENGINEERING Julie Zimmerman By

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012-2013 #12;Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................2 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office ..................................................................................................3 Majors in Chemistry

Levine, Alex J.

50

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry** George M. Whitesides* Keywords: · chemistry · devices · nanoscience · nanotechnology What is Nanoscience? "Nanoscience and electrical en- gineering, nanoscience is most often associated with quan- tum behavior, and the behavior

Prentiss, Mara

52

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Marketing, Consulting, Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Education, Chemical Engineering, ChemicalHANDBOOK for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Fall 2010 #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Career in Chemistry - What It Means ___________________________________________ 4 What do

Stuart, Steven J.

54

Coal combustion by wet oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Avoided Critical Behavior in Dynamically Forced Wetting Jacco H. Snoeijer,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited the Landau-Levich film. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.174504 PACS numbers: 47.10.√Ņg, 68.08.Bc Wetting speed beyond which the interface gives way to liquid deposition. Drops sliding down a window develop

57

Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

Mather, Patrick T.

58

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry Fall Semester 2011 Professor James Hougland675 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course that can be continued in the Spring semester as CHE685. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure

Mather, Patrick T.

59

Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

Wagner, Diane

60

Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) · TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

Wagner, Diane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2013/14 Name Programme Tutor Ahmed, Zacher Medicinal Chemistry Arif, Saboor Chemistry Bagnall, Samuel Chemistry Barbara, David Chemistry Beaumont, Nicholas Chemistry Quinn, Michael J Chemistry Bennett, Matthew Chemistry Booth, Natalie

Rzepa, Henry S.

63

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER ­ I Chemistry-I: Physical principles (2:1) Atomic structure-state approximation, Arrhenius equation and collision theory and catalysis. SEMESTER ­ II Chemistry-II: Structure orbital theory: polyatomic molecules - Walsh diagram; Main group chemistry: periodic properties, chemistry

Srinivasan, N.

64

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

van Swol, Frank B.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

68

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II for Prehealth Professionals Unique number: 52365 Spring 2013 M students can access the information. #12;Required Text: Brown, Foote, Iverson, & Anslyn Organic Chemistry have the 6th Edition book, as many homework and exam questions will come directly from the 6th Edition

69

Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2100 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA stuart

Mark, James E.

70

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

Doyle, Robert

71

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree gives you the understanding to contribute to our future in very topical areas) in Chemistry BSc (Hons) in Chemistry MChem (Hons) in Chemistry (with an industrial placement year) MChem (Hons

Sussex, University of

74

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013 Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2555--2567 2555 Cite this: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and industrial manufacturing processes.1­9 Sonochemistry originates from the extreme transient conditions induced are distinct from other conventional synthetic techniques such as photochemistry, wet chemistry, hydrothermal interests including sonocrystallization, ultrasonic processing of molecular crystals, and time

Suslick, Kenneth S.

75

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Computational Chemistry Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Chemistry Robots ACS Sep 2005 Computational Chemistry Robots J. A. Townsend, P. Murray-Rust, S. M. Tyrrell, Y. Zhang jat45@cam.ac.uk Can high-throughput computation provide a reliable ďexperimentalĒ resource for molecular...

Townsend, Joseph A; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tyrrell, Simon M; Zhang, Yong

79

surface chemistry | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface chemistry surface chemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMŲssbauer Spectroscopic Study....

80

Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree allows you to understand and to contribute to our future. Chemistry is challenging: understanding the very fabric of matter is both stimulating and rewarding. Studying chemistry

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chemistry Division Department of Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

Heller, Barbara

82

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research@chem.sc.edu Hiram and Lawanda Allen Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry This award is given to a graduating

Almor, Amit

83

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/or the purchase of supplies. Yes w/recommendation s from faculty Call goes out in February to all chemistry

Almor, Amit

84

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS Millersville University Millersville, Pennsylvania in the ChemistryDepartment. It brings together material not collected in other places and is not meant Resources 2 Programs in Chemistry and The General Education Curriculum Record Form 3 The Major Requirements

Hardy, Christopher R.

85

"EVERY WET YEAR IS A MIRACLE"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute 80% of the usable water supply usually in a few heavy downpours. · Thus, the presence or lack"EVERY WET YEAR IS A MIRACLE" Drought, Climate, and Water Use in Colorado Cat Shrier Colorado State University/Colorado Climate Center Little Thompson Water District Water Forum March 15, 2003 #12;Presentation

86

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

ATMI is a global leader in the development of process solutions for the semiconductor and life science industries. Whether it's a green chemistry used in flash memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

science industries. Whether it's a green chemistry used in flash memory manufacturing, game for the manufacturing of pharmaceutical compounds, ATMI is leading the way. We combine broad expertise in science methods, provide support to the Manufacturing, Engineering, and Quality groups via QC analysis, and serve

88

Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced chemistry laboratory I CHM 335 3 Advanced chemistry laboratory II Mat 33 3 Engineering materialsChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

Napier, Terrence

89

Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

Rose, Michael R.

90

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

TRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: General rules and guidelines for wet chemical processing in TRL. Author: KFlo hood and when transporting or handling chemicals. An acid-proof apron, sleeveTRL Acid and Solvent Wet Processing Rules and Guidelines Purpose

Reif, Rafael

92

Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solid-like behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled-out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: the capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains confirming our model.

Gautier Lefebvre; Pierre Jop

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

O'Mahony, Donal E.

94

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in WETS? Year-round data collection in a wide range of wave conditions is possible. #12;4 Daily Wave Power

95

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. (2011), doi: 10 formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa,b, , Roberto F. Ausasa,b a

Frey, Pascal

96

www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

Kostic, Milivoje M.

97

B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 36 credits in chemistry core courses, 32 of which are taken in specific courses. Each student's course of study includes the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses CHE 106: General Chemistry Lecture I (3) CHE 116: General

Doyle, Robert

98

EMSL - surface chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface-chemistry en FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMŲssbauer Spectroscopic Study. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

99

Advances in Physical Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Physical Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 907129, 18 pages doi:10.11552011907129 Review Article Contrast and Synergy between...

100

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture Management

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Chemistry @ Imperial College 2007 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry @ Imperial College 2007 #12;2 Introduction Imperial College is a world leading University. As the central science Chemistry has been a major contributor to this success. The Chemistry Department is at the forefront of modern Chemistry research, both in our core discipline and at the interfaces of Chemistry

102

Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

160 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences in arts subjects as partner subjects within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA

Brierley, Andrew

103

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

Stuart, Steven J.

105

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY - STUDY GUIDE - H Rb Sr K Ca ...Mn Fe... ONC He P S Br Kr .................................................................................................22 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: JUN.-Prof. Dr. M. Esselen...............................................................................24 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: Prof. Dr. E. Richling

Madlener, Klaus

106

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

day to add classes, select C/NC option or to audit a class is Jan. 23. 3. The last day to withdraw. The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services and activities for people: Chemistry 1010 aims to promote understanding of the basic environmental ingredients, energy, atoms

Simons, Jack

108

Elastocapillary deformations on partially-wetting substrates: rival contact-line models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A partially-wetting liquid can deform the underlying elastic substrate upon which it rests. This situation requires the development of theoretical models to describe the wetting forces imparted by the drop onto the solid substrate, particularly those at the contact-line. We construct a general solution using a displacement potential function for the elastic deformations within a finite elastic substrate associated with these wetting forces, and compare the results for several different contact-line models. Our work incorporates internal contributions to the surface stress from both liquid/solid $\\Sigma_{ls}$ and solid/gas $\\Sigma_{sg}$ solid surface tensions (surface stress), which results in a non-standard boundary-value problem that we solve using a dual integral equation. We compare our results to relevant experiments and conclude that the generalization of solid surface tension $\\Sigma_{ls} \

Joshua B. Bostwick; Michael Shearer; Karen E. Daniels

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?s target of 50 √?¬?√?¬Ķg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?new√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ě selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

Searcy, K.; Richardson, M.; Blythe, G.; Wallschlaeger, D.; Chu, P.; Dene, C.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding wet granulation in the kneading block of twin screw extruders H. Li a,1 , M done in a 27 mm twin screw extruder with different powder formulations consisting of lactose H I G H L I G H T S In situ examination of granule development inside extruder. Granule based

Thompson, Michael

111

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction ­ speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

E. Thomas

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemistry in Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F R O N T M A T T E R Chemistry in Bioinformatics Peter Murray?Rust,1 John B. O. Mitchell,1 and Henry S. Rzepa2 1 Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge. CB2... 1EW, UK. 2 Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, SW7 2AY, UK. Abstract Chemical information is now seen as critical for most areas of life sciences. But unlike Bioinformatics, where data is Openly available and freely re...

Murray-Rust, Peter; Mitchell, John B O; Rzepa, Henry S

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistryChemistry

115

I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advisor: Advisee: I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry CH 111 PY 211 _____ PY 212 _____ (or PY 242 _____ or PY 252 ______) II. Chemistry Options (one required) 1905 (Concentration in Chemistry) Option A (2 advanced CH courses, 401 or higher, only one may

116

National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry" Super Science Saturday Saturday-on chemistry and science demonstrations! All students & families are welcome! Fun & educational for all ages! Sponsored by: American Chemical Society LSU Department of Chemistry LSU Athletic Department Free admission

Stephens, Jacqueline

117

Optimizing wettability of externally wetted microfabricated silicon electrospray thrusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrospray propulsion devices with externally wetted architectures have shown favorable performance. The design of microfabricated silicon thrusters and their feed systems requires an understanding of propellant flow ...

Garza, Tanya Cruz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2013...

120

Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Y. Li, S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar

Guo, John Zhanhu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: suying.wei@lamar.edu; zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Q. He, Prof. S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA

Guo, John Zhanhu

122

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

123

Green Chemistry COMMUNICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Chemistry COMMUNICATION Cite this: Green Chem., 2013, 15, 2060 Received 8th April 2013 5042, Australia. E-mail: colin.raston@flinders.edu.au; Tel: +08 8021 7958 2060 | Green Chem., 2013, 15

124

A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

characteristics of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure sufficient...

129

Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

130

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secondary imbibition in NAPL-invaded mixed-wet sediments Ahmed Al-Futaisia,b , Tad W. Patzekb to study the spontaneous and forced secondary imbibition of a NAPL-invaded sediment, as in the displacement-wet sediment, i.e., the receding contact angles are very small. However, depending on the surface mineralogy

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

131

Potential Effects of Wet Conditions on Signalized Intersection LOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Effects of Wet Conditions on Signalized Intersection LOS Panos D. Prevedouros, Ph rain and other precipitation is common, analyses of signalized intersections based on the Highway Capacity Manual require clear weather and dry pavement conditions. Three factors may be affected by wet

Prevedouros, Panos D.

132

Introduction High-shear wet granulation by twin screw extrusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and compaction16,17 . Wet granulation in a twin screw extruder is particularly useful with many investigates foam granulation in a twin screw extruder as a new continuous wet granulation technique drop or spray liquid addition in batch granulation. This work demonstrates a twin screw extruder

Thompson, Michael

133

Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science React. Science #12;Contents 2 Welcome to the Department of Chemistry 2 Course Advice 3 What is Chemistry? 4 Career Profiles in Chemistry 5 An Undergraduate Degree in Chemistry 6 Chemistry Streams 13 Chemistry Honours Programme 14 Research

Hickman, Mark

134

Chemistry at the Dirac Point of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haddon, R. C. Covalent Chemistry for Graphene Electronics.P. K. ; Yang, J. X. The Chemistry of Graphene. J. Mater.R. C. Organometallic Chemistry of Extended Periodic ?-

Sarkar, Santanu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ďGreening UpĒ Cross-Coupling Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boökovi?, éarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

137

Reaction chemistry of cerium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistantChemistry andChemistry of Metal

139

Wet scrubbers: Choose the best chemical reagent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than a century, facilities in the chemical process industries have had to contend with a variety of regulated pollutants -- SOx, NOx, heavy metals and flyash -- in their flue-gases. Historically, operators of fossil-fuel-combustion processes have dealt with flue-gas pollution by operating a separate treatment facility for each pollutant. In recent years, however, an integrated, flue-gas-treatment system has emerged as a viable alternative to the traditional approach. By eliminating the use of an electrostatic precipitator in favor of several wet scrubbers and a downstream catalytic-reduction system for NOx, the new system shows operational and cost advantages over the conventional techniques. In this new method that uses three-stage flue-gas treatment, lime (calcium hydroxide, or Ca(OH){sub 2}) shows cost and operational advantages, and could displace limestone (calcium carbonate, or CaCO{sub 3}), the traditional favorite. For flue-gas treatment in the electric utility market, limestone currently dominates the scene. However, this may change as utility and industrial operators become more familiar with the potential advantages of using lime-based scrubbing solutions.

Rinaldi, N.U. [Tecnochim s.r.l., Milano (Italy)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cardiff School of Chemistry Undergraduate Degree Programmes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems that face the world today. Pharmaceuticals, oil production, climate change, food technology, energy and materials development, teaching and scientific management are some of the many areas in which chemistry graduates find employment. Chemists' roles include investigating the optimisation of processes

Davies, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

Das, Suman

142

MAC 560 --Tropospheric Chemistry I Spring, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemistry · to learn the atmospheric chemistry behind well-known phenomena such as smog, acid rain.3. Sulfur chemistry and acid rain 5.4. Nitrogen chemistry 5.5. Organic acids 5.6. Ecological and structural

Miami, University of

143

Curriculum Vitae Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 EDUCATION University of California Los Angeles, CA Ph.D. in Chemistry 1987 - 1992 Peking University Peking

Braun, Paul

144

Curriculum Vitae Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Yi Lu Depfartment of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 EDUCATION University of California Los Angeles, CA Ph.D. in Chemistry 1987 - 1992 Peking University Peking

Braun, Paul

145

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

Sheridan, Jennifer

146

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result 7 ' 30 u 31 in metal carbide cluster chemistry willin metal chemistry. Oxidation of the iron carbide cluster

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encountered when operating under conditions with high gas volume fractions (GVF). Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency when operating under wet-gas conditions, GVF over 95%. Field operations have revealed severe vibration...

Chan, Evan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nanocrystal/J-aggregate constructs : chemistry, energy transfer, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interaction of light with matter is one of the most central subjects to modern chemistry. Two types of materials, semiconductor nanocrystals and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, have been developed chiefly due to their ...

Walker, Brian J. (Brian Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

152

New MV cable design for wet environments in underground distribution systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of new wet design MV power cables, up to 35 kV, using EPDM compound as insulation and longitudinal water tightness. The combination of the cable design and the type of insulation compound allow for reduction of the insulation thickness in such a way, as to have an electrical stress at the conductor of 4 kV/mm which is significantly greater than used in MV distribution cables. Following a methodology established, at the author's company, the reliability of this design, cable and EPDM's formulation, in wet location, without metallic water barriers, was well demonstrated. Mini-installation of model cables in service-like conditions, to estimate the ageing rate, are presented and discussed.

Teixeira, M.D.R. Jr. (Ficap Fios e Cabos Plasticos do Brasil SA, Rio De Janeiro (BR))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

154

Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Althoug...

Chang, Q; Herbst, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ANL) Research Objectives: To develop fundamental understanding of surface chemistry and bulk cation distributions on cycling performance and rate capability To...

157

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

158

Black Hole Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass of a black hole has traditionally been identified with its energy. We describe a new perspective on black hole thermodynamics, one that identifies the mass of a black hole with chemical enthalpy, and the cosmological constant as thermodynamic pressure. This leads to an understanding of black holes from the viewpoint of chemistry, in terms of concepts such as Van der Waals fluids, reentrant phase transitions, and triple points. Both charged and rotating black holes exhibit novel chemical-type phase behaviour, hitherto unseen.

David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman, E-mail: karine.masenelli-varlot@insa-lyon.fr [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621, France and Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masenelli-Varlot, Karine [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 (France); Iskandar, Ferry [Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General Chemistry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General Chemistry, Laboratory Practice (Precourse) Physical Chemistry (4 CP) Introductory Engineering (5 CP) Organic & Inorganic Materials Chemistry (4 CP) Energy Science and Technology I (5 CP) Surfaces/Interfaces/ Heterogen

Pfeifer, Holger

162

Chemistry and materials science research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

Not Available

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

Schmitt, William R.

164

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2015 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

165

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2013 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

166

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2014 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

167

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

168

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Summer 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Summer 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

169

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Scholarship Rises. Freshman Year/ Fall Semester Cr) Honors Chemistry I 3 84.136 (H) Honors Chemistry II 3 84.123 (H) Honors Chemistry I Lab 1 84.124 (H) Honors Chemistry II Lab 1 92.131 Calculus I 4 92.132 Honors Calculus II 4 Hon 110 Honors FYSH (AH) 3 Gen

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

170

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2012 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

171

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1991 (October 1990 through September 1991). This is the eighth annual report for the ACL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Boparai, A.S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Exploiting locality in quantum computation for quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route towards highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost, however this solution still carries a large overhead. In this perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provide numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

Jarrod R. McClean; Ryan Babbush; Peter J. Love; AlŠn Aspuru-Guzik

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Surface Characterization of a Paper Web at the Wet End  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for the detection and representation of structures and non-uniformities on the surface of a paper web at the wet end (slurry). This image processing/analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system. Images of the slurry, carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. The images have very poor contrast and contain noise from a variety of sources. Those sources include the acquisition system itself, the lighting, the vibrations of the moving table being imaged, and the scattering water from the same table's movement. After many steps of enhancement, conventional edge detection methods were still inconclusive and were discarded. The facet model algorithm, is applied to the images and is found successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image is computed based on the general appearance and characteristics of the structures in question. Morphological operators are applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then filtered according to their size, elongation, and orientation.Their bounding rectangles are computed and superimposed on the original image. Real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use is also addressed in this paper. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to detect nonuniformities on all 500 images. Locating and characterizing all different size structures is also achieved on all 500 images of the web.

Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken for graduation. Complete the following: Chem 111* Honors Principles of Chemistry Chem 112 Principles of Chemistry

Seamons, Kent E.

178

http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry Chemistry NanoscienceChemical BiologyBiochemistryResearch Five Majors, One Vision #12;Department of Chemistry, Undergraduate Programs Information about the programs B.S. degree in Chemistry: The B.S. degree in Chemistry

Rohs, Remo

179

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry - ACS Certified Major of the following courses Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug Action 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4120 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug

180

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4610 Intro to Polymer Science 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4620 Polymer Chemistry 3 CH1153 University Chemistry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The chemistry of high-mass star formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

Floris F. S. van der Tak

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

183

Development of Novel Front Contract Pastes for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to improve the efficiencies of silicon solar cells, paste to silicon contact formation mechanisms must be more thoroughly understood as a function of paste chemistry, wafer properties and firing conditions. Ferro Corporation has been involved in paste development for over 30 years and has extensive expertise in glass and paste formulations. This project has focused on the characterization of the interface between the top contact material (silver paste) and the underlying silicon wafer. It is believed that the interface between the front contact silver and the silicon wafer plays a dominant role in the electrical performance of the solar cell. Development of an improved front contact microstructure depends on the paste chemistry, paste interaction with the SiNx, and silicon (ďSiĒ) substrate, silicon sheet resistivity, and the firing profile. Typical front contact ink contains silver metal powders and flakes, glass powder and other inorganic additives suspended in an organic medium of resin and solvent. During fast firing cycles glass melts, wets, corrodes the SiNx layer, and then interacts with underlying Si. Glass chemistry is also a critical factor in the development of an optimum front contact microstructure. Over the course of this project, several fundamental characteristics of the Ag/Si interface were documented, including a higher-than-expected distribution of voids along the interface, which could significantly impact electrical conductivity. Several techniques were also investigated for the interfacial analysis, including STEM, EDS, FIB, EBSD, and ellipsometry.

Duty, C.; Jellison, D. G.E. P.; Joshi, P.

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa of flows with significant surface tension effects has grown significantly in recent years. This has been, since at small length scales surface phenomena are dominant. In this article, surface tension

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

185

Interference evaluation between manifold and wet Christmas tree CP systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore production wells are controlled by valves installed in the marine soil, called wet Christmas trees (WCTs). A manifold receives the production of several wells and transports it to the platform. The manifold is cathodically protected by Al anodes and the WCT by Zn anodes. A computer simulation was carried out to evaluate the interference between the equipment cathodic protection systems.

Brasil, S.L.D.C.; Baptista, W.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermo-Wetting and Friction Reduction Characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such surfaces include frost prevention on aircraft flight surfaces to self-cleaning features on solar energy panels [1,5]. One way to achieve superhydrophobicity is through the micro- geometry modification of low energy surfaces. Two models repre- sent the wetting behavior of such microtextured surfaces: the Wenzel

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

187

Directional Wetting in Anisotropic Inverse Opals Katherine R. Phillips,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nano- to microscale voids. Here, we investigate how liquid wetting in highly ordered inverse opals template of colloidal particles. This highly ordered structure acts as a photonic crystal, strongly or not a given liquid will fill the structure spontaneously upon contact. Using alkylchlorosi- lanes,18 silica

Aizenberg, Joanna

188

Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P the potential pollutant release from common building materials both when the materials are new and after aging often used to increase the operating range of asphalts and to prevent stripping of asphalt from binders

Clark, Shirley E.

189

Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

190

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical...

191

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

192

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the...

193

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

194

Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance. Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance....

195

Water chemistry of breeder reactor steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water quality requirements will be described for breeder reactor steam generators, as well as specifications for balance of plant protection. Water chemistry details will be discussed for the following power plant conditions: feedwater and recirculation water at above and below 5% plant power, refueling or standby, makeup water, and wet layup. Experimental data will be presented from tests which included a departure from nucleate boiling experiment, the Few Tube Test, with a seven tube evaporator and three tube superheater, and a verification of control and on-line measurement of sodium ion in the ppB range. Sampling and instrumentation requirements to insure adherence to the specified water quality will be described. Evaporator cleaning criteria and data from laboratory testing of chemical cleaning solutions with emphasis on flow, chemical composition, and temperature will be discussed.

Simpson, J.L.; Robles, M.N.; Spalaris, C.N.; Moss, S.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different Reactants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD Technique for Microwave Chemistry Reactors with Energy Efficiency Optimized for Different in experimental development of large- scale and highly-productive reactors. This paper proposes to address this issue by developing microwave chemistry reactors as microwave systems, rather than as black

Yakovlev, Vadim

197

Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Forsterite [Mg2SiO4)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic wet etching Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ZnO thin films using wet-chemical etching processes on application for organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices Summary: Fabrication of the ZnO thin films using wet-chemical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Jeremy Frey School of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Making Tea Jeremy Frey School of Chemistry University of Southampton, UK A human centred approach that will enable it.' `e-Science will change the dynamic of the way science is undertaken.' John Taylor, DG of UK

203

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy.

204

September 10, 2007 Annotated Bibliography of Urban Wet Weather Flow Literature from 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Wet-Weather Flow Program Urban Watershed Management Branch Water Supply & Water Resources Division........................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Heavy metals

Pitt, Robert E.

205

Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA School of Chemistry, University. This article traces the evolution of supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering starting from the early of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India. e-mail: ashwini.nangia@gmail.com Advances in supramolecular chemistry

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

206

Environmental Chemistry 2.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I CHAPTER 2 Environmental Chemistry 2.1 INTRODUCTION 2.2 STOICHIOMETRY 2.3 ENTHALPY IN CHEMICAL SYSTEMS 2.4 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIA 2.S ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2.6 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY PROBLEMS REFERENCES It often #12;40 Chapter 2 Environmental Chemistry TABLE 2.1 Atomic Numbers andAtomic Weights Atomic Atomic

Kammen, Daniel M.

207

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo,1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo Received 31 August 1998 We use the grand canonical Monte Carlo method to study the nature of wetting the grand canonical Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics to compute the nature of wetting transitions

Curtarolo, Stefano

209

Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Faculty Position in Theoretical/Computational Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Faculty Position in Theoretical/Computational Chemistry The Department of Chemistry announces a tenure-track opening in the area of Theoretical/Computational Chemistry have a Ph.D. in chemistry or a related field by time of appointment and 1 year of postdoctoral

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

210

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

Weber, Rodney

211

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 271Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 271Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM) CheM 102 CheMiStry And SOCiety (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. An introductory course in chemistry for non- majors. Covers the basics of chemistry in an effort to better understand current

Ravikumar, B.

212

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL4820 Biochem Techniques I 2 CH1153 University Chemistry

213

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

214

CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011 1. Framework) in Chemistry. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry students a basic introduction to the Chemistry disciplines. In addition, the Bachelor's degree programme

215

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wet electroscrubbers for state of the art gas cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrostatic scrubber (electroscrubber) discussed combines advantages of electrostatic precipitators and inertial wet scrubbers, and removes many shortcomings inherent to both of these systems operating independently. The electroscrubber is a device in which Coulomb attraction or repulsion forces between electrically charged scrubbing droplets (collector) and dust particles are utilized for the removal of particles from a gas. Unlike wet electrostatic precipitators in which particles are precipitated only on the collection electrode, in electroscrubbers, the collection of dust particles takes place in the entire precipitator chamber. Compared to inertial scrubbers, the electroscrubbers can operate at lower droplet velocities, but the collection efficiency for a single droplet can be larger than 1. The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of wet electrostatic scrubbing (electroscrubbing) technique used for gas cleaning from dust or smoke particles. Three groups of problems are discussed: (1) The fundamental problems concerning the charged dust particle deposition on a charged collector, usually a drop, with a focus on different models describing the process. (2) The experimental works of fundamental importance referring to the scrubbing process, which can be used for validating the theory. (3) The laboratory demonstrations and industrial tests of different constructions of electroscrubbers designed for effective gas cleaning. It was shown in the paper that a higher collection efficiency of an electroscrubber could be obtained for higher values of Coulomb number and for a Stokes number lower than 5. 103 refs., 4 figs.

Anatol Jaworek; Wamadeva Balachandran; Andrzej Krupa; Janusz Kulon; Marcin Lackowski [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk (Poland). Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can apply them to clean technology innovations for both themultibillion dollar ďclean and greenĒ technology sector is arapid development of clean-energy technologiesóof the green

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

Lu, Gui [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hu, Han; Sun, Ying, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Duan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Photocatalytic oxidation and reduction chemistry and a new process for treatment of pink water and related contaminated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop new photocatalytic or other innovative process chemistry for the treatment of pink water and related contaminated water.

Blake, D.M.; Wolfrum E.; Boulter, J. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy and environment: A majors-level general chemistry course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new introductory chemistry course has been designed and implemented, complete with weekly laboratory, based on a theme of {open_quotes}Energy and the Environment{close_quotes}. The course provides a rigorous introduction to chemical concepts, systems, and practices, and prepares students for further study in chemistry and other natural sciences. In formulating the course, we have correlated important contemporary issues on energy production and utilization including environmental impact with traditional topics of introductory chemistry and have developed a syllabus in which the latter follow the former. We have employed questions like {open_quotes}What makes a good fuel?{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}How efficiently can energy be produced?{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}What is the chemical basis of ozone depletion?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What chemistry underlies global warming?{close_quotes} to motivate the science taught. After a three year trial period in which the course was offered as pan of the multidisciplinary Rochester Ventures series together with a writing course based on {open_quotes}Reason and Argument{close_quotes} and a history course focusing on the development of scientific thought from the preindustrial age to the rise of environmentalism, we have presented the new curriculum in the regular introductory chemistry course. Results of this curricular experiment in both small and large course formats will be discussed.

Eisenberg, R.; Farrar, J.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pharmaceutical Chemistry B.S. 1. General description and characteristics of the program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D. degrees in chemistry work in the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmaceutical companies need employees to work productively in the pharmaceutical industry, especially in the areas of research and developmentPharmaceutical Chemistry B.S. 1. General description and characteristics of the program

225

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models Kalen Braman, Todd Oliver and Venkat Raman, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 Syngas chemistry modeling is an integral step toward the development of safe and ef- ficient syngas combustors. Although substantial effort

Raman, Venkat

226

Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

Gerald P. Huffman

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical...

228

Chemistry & Biology Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry & Biology Article Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Adm University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4The Chemistry of Life Processes

Zhao, Huimin

229

Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

T. Singh; R. Chaubey

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

Singh, T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Analysis of wet deposition at an urban location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet deposition data collected at the Detroit Edison urban site provided a clear chemical profile at this location for the period studied. Correlations of major anions with acidity indicate that decreases in pH are associated with increases in sulfates and nitrates. However, other components not measured may have a bearing on pH reductions. The differences between two locations 70 km apart were quite small on the average. Strong local source influences at the urban location were not evident in the limited data set available for study. Wind direction can help determine the ultimate origins of pollutants.

Foltman, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

233

Chemistry and ONE WORD To Drive Discovery --RENSSELAER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on todays most pressing problems such as developing new clean systems for solar energy generation opportunities in a number of traditional and interdisciplinary areas, including biochemical solar energy, environmentally sustainable chemistry, working on critical problems in biotechnology related health as well

Linhardt, Robert J.

234

HARNESSING THE CHEMISTRY OF CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research presents several strategies for addressing the challenges of activating CO2. In addition, our cycloaddition chemistry addresses several fundamental issues pertaining to catalysis as it applies to energy conservation. Topics addressed include: DEVELOPMENT OF A CYCLOADDITION CATALYST; INCREASING THE UTILITY OF THE NI CYCLOADDITION CATALYST; UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISM OF NI-CATALYZED CYCLOADDITION; and METAL-FREE CO{sub 2} ACTIVATION.

Louie, Janis

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Molecule-Mimetic Chemistry and Mesoscale Self-Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecule-Mimetic Chemistry and Mesoscale Self-Assembly NED B. BOWDEN, MARCUS WECK, INSUNG S. CHOI systems. We suggest that it will be possible to develop complex structures composed of "objects" that self-assemble, shape recognition, and size exclusion can be used to guide the self-assembly of these objects

Prentiss, Mara

236

Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Abstract: The ultraviolet...

237

Capturing Chemistry in XML/CML  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Markup Language (CML) is an XML-conformant Schema that describes molecules, spectra, reactions, and computational chemistry. It is capable of capturing the chemistry in a variety of current publications and is becoming adopted by many...

Townsend, Joseph A; Adams, Sam; Goodman, Jonathan M; Murray-Rust, Peter; Waudby, Chris A

238

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

239

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

Grate, Jay W.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum Freshman Chemistry CHE 133/133L, 134/134L; ENG 131, 132, BIO elective Sophomore Chemistry CHE 231/231L, 241/241L, 331/331L, 332/332L; MTH 233, 234; PHY 241 elective Junior Chemistry CHE 337/337L, 338/338L, 452/452L; CSC 101 or 201, ENG 273, Eng. Lit; Core

Long, Nicholas

244

Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

HARNESSING THE CHEMISTRY OF CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research program is broadly focused on activating CO{sub 2} through the use of organic and organometallic based catalysts. Some of our methods have centered on annulation reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons (and carbonyl substrates) to provide a diverse array of carbocycles and heterocycles. We use a combination of catalyst discovery and optimization in conjunction with classical physical organic chemistry to elucidate the key mechanistic features of the cycloaddition reactions such that the next big advances in catalyst development can be made. Key to all of our cycloaddition reactions is the use of a sterically hindered, electron donating N heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, namely IPr (or SIPr), in conjunction with a low valent nickel pre-catalyst. The efficacy of this ligand is two-fold: (1) the high {delta}-donating ability of the NHC increases the nucleophilicity of the metal center which thereby facilitates interaction with the electrophilic carbonyl and (2) the steric hindrance prevents an otherwise competitive side reaction involving only the alkyne substrate. Such a system has allowed for the facile cycloaddition to prepare highly functionalized pyrones, pyridones, pyrans, as well as novel carbocycles. Importantly, all reactions proceed under extremely mild conditions (room temperature, atmospheric pressures, and short reaction times), require only catalytic amounts of Ni/NHC and readily available starting materials, and afford annulated products in excellent yields. Our current focus revolves around understanding the fundamental processes that govern these cycloadditions such that the next big advance in the cyclization chemistry of CO{sub 2} can be made. Concurrent to our annulation chemistry is our investigation of the potential for imidazolylidenes to function as thermally-actuated CO{sub 2} sequestering and delivery agents.

Louie, Janis

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

Chemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the book are available at the University Bookstore. Corequisite: CHE 129 ­ Honors General Chemistry introduce you to all areas of chemistry: physical, organic, inorganic, quantum, biophysical, and analyticalChemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014 Instructor

Doyle, Robert

247

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemie 07 Inorganic chemistry 11.14 - 08 Organische chemie 08 Organic chemistry 12.11 - 10 Didactics and priciples of chemistry 14.03 - 16 Vervolgwerken - Annuals 16 Book series and annuals 14Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken

Galis, Frietson

248

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry analytical chemistry and metallurgy. In 1952, the first LANL CMR facility was completed. At that time chemistry and metallurgy. Upgrades to the original CMR were completed in 2002. In 2012, the CMR facility

249

Roadmap: Chemistry Materials Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Materials Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 17 Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM

Sheridan, Scott

250

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students a cumulative 2.85 GPA in teaching major/minor courses to qualify for student teaching. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken in residence

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

251

Roadmap: Chemistry Materials Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Materials Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 30 Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM

Sheridan, Scott

252

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU

Seamons, Kent E.

253

Why Study Chemistry at ESF A Rigorous Education: Chemistry faculty bring their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why Study Chemistry at ESF A Rigorous Education: Chemistry faculty bring their expertise in cutting and real-world examples. Also, in addition to the usual chemistry courses, undergraduates take three our students receive: 95% of our students are employed in chemistry or accepted into graduate

Chatterjee, Avik P.

254

Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Student Academic.fleming@ucr.edu Minor in Chemistry Procedure: It is assumed that you have completed the requirements listed in section to Declare a Minor to Chemistry. Include the following: full name, student identification number, and email

Reed, Christopher A.

255

Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

Sheridan, Scott

256

CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry Bachelor's degree programme provides graduates with the title Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Chemistry and Technology. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry

257

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL3310 Environmental Microbiology 3 CH1153 University

258

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students is allowed in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also

Seamons, Kent E.

259

Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 17-May-12/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

Sheridan, Scott

260

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education University of New Hampshire below), or candidate can obtain MS at UNH on the way to the PhD with Option in Chemistry Education Cumulative exams are split between education and chemistry cores Professional presentation allowed in place

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Safety Statement Virginia Tech Chemistry Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Statement Virginia Tech Chemistry Department This safety statement was prepared by the Chemistry Department Safety Committee and approved by the Department Chairperson on October 24, 2006. 1. Laboratory safety, chemical hygiene, and environmental responsibility are central objectives of the Chemistry

Crawford, T. Daniel

262

The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate Research Students 2013/14 School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES #12;2 Welcome The School of Chemistry welcomes new postgraduate that is relevant for your time spent in the School, including information about facilities to support your research

Rzepa, Henry S.

263

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

264

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

265

4, 419470, 2004 HOx chemistry in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 4, 419­470, 2004 HOx chemistry in clean marine air R. Sommariva et al. Title Page Abstract-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2004-4-419 © European Geosciences Union 2004 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions OH and HO2 chemistry in clean marine air during SOAPEX-2 R. Sommariva 1 , A.-L. Haggerstone 2 , L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

267

Chemistry Department Assessment Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Chemistry Department Assessment May, 2006 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary 1 Prelude 1 Mission Statement and Learning Goals 1 Facilities 2 Staffing 3 Students: Chemistry Majors and Student Taking Service Courses Table: 1997-2005 graduates profile Table: GRE Score for Chemistry Majors, 1993

Bogaerts, Steven

268

College of Arts and Sciences CHE Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Arts and Sciences CHE Chemistry KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped will be discussed in terms of their properties and impact on our everyday real world experience. CHE 103 CHEMISTRY, or completion of MA 108R. CHE 104 INTRODUCTORY GENERAL CHEMISTRY. (3

MacAdam, Keith

269

2010 Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interdisciplinary meeting will gather together scientists - structural biologists, chemists, geneticists, chemical and biological oceanographers, geochemists, and other specialist - who study the flows of essential and toxic elements through the environment and living systems, on timescales ranging from femptoseconds to eons. Of particular interest are the molecular mechanisms that govern element acquisition and use in organisms, and the tools and techniques used to study these phenomena. The aim of this community is to use these molecular-scale insights to understand the interconnected biotic and abiotic processes that shape the macroscopic environment and its development and change over a range of time scales.

Rachael Austin

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 277Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 277Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM) CHeM nC SeLeCted topiCS (0) CHeM 102 CHeMiStry And SoCiety (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. An introductory course in chemistry for non-majors. Covers the basics of chemistry related to everyday life

Ravikumar, B.

271

Revised 4/18/12 Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 4/18/12 Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Handbook #12;2 #12;3 Table of Contents THE CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 7 CAREER PATHS IN CHEMISTRY AND MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 8 CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS AT UB 11 ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 14 CHANGING YOUR MAJOR TO CHEMISTRY/ MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 14 ADVISEMENT 15 UB HUB

Colón, Luis A.

272

Revised 8/01/12 Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 8/01/12 Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Handbook #12;2 #12;3 Table of Contents THE CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 7 CAREER PATHS IN CHEMISTRY AND MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 7 CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS AT UB 11 ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 14 CHANGING YOUR MAJOR TO CHEMISTRY/ MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 14 ADVISEMENT 15 UB HUB

Colón, Luis A.

273

Wet-process dust-collecting apparatus especially for converter exhaust gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallurgical converter gas is scrubbed in a wet-process electrostatic precipitator utilizing a cylindrical housing and axially separated collecting fields which themselves are vertically subdivided.

Baab, H.

1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian wet tropics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE WET ... Source: James Cook University, Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 3...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - ames wet oxidation process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25 run 32 ICL wet photo oxEtch-BOE ... Source: Culpepper, Martin L. - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection:...

276

Photomicrography for the measurement of steam wetness fraction in low pressure turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The measurement of steam wetness fraction at the exit of a low-pressure (LP) turbine stage is important if the highest turbine performance is to beÖ (more)

Veeder, Tricia Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Technique Gives a Deeper Look into the Chemistry of Interfaces Print A new technique developed at the ALS offers sub-nanometer depth resolution of every chemical element to be...

278

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wet electrostatic precipitator eliminates over 90% of previous emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After ten years of searching for an effective air pollution control device, engineers at Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) found that zirconium was the best metal in withstanding the gases generated in the manufacturing process of zirconium and hafnium. The best equipment was a two-stage, modular wet electrostatic precipitator to collect the submicron-size particulates in the form of metal oxides, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite and ammonium bisulfite. All nonmetal components of the precipitator were fabricated entirely from industrial grade reinforced thermoset plastics. All metal components, including process water spray components, pipe fittings, and emitting electrodes - to be charged at 45,000 V - were fabricated from zirconium. Stack emission tests indicate the precipitator has eliminated over 90% of previous particulate emissions. Operation has been virtually maintenance free. The zirconium components show no signs of corrosion to date. (DP)

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

UCLA PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.), PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION: This concentration is designed primarily for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCLA PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.), PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION: This concentration is designed primarily for Chemistry majors who are interested in attending graduate school in Physical Chemistry/Physics or related areas. It may also satisfy some of the needs

Levine, Alex J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. RESULTS: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2x10^5 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

Q. Chang; H. M. Cuppen; E. Herbst

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER P. Gajan , Q, 64018 Pau cedex, France pierre.gajan@onera.fr Abstract This work deals with the flow metering of wet gas on the CEESI facilities are presented. They are performed at 75 bars with 0.6 beta ratio Venturi meter

283

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

Palmer, Paul

284

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the regression line for log transformed values for carbon vs. dry weight and wet weight vs. displacement volumeRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI PETER H are identical. We have employed this type of analysis in determinations on samples from diverse sea areas

285

Experimental Study of Wettability Alteration to Preferential Gas-Wetting in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Critical- Condensate Saturation and Relative Permeabilities in Gas- Condensate Systems,'' paper SPE 56014 from preferential liquid-wetting to preferen- tial gas-wetting, then gas-well deliverability in gas-condensate and liquid relative permeabilities for gas-condensate systems in a simple network. The results imply

Firoozabadi, Abbas

286

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping a

287

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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288

Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing quantum chemistry programs on the coming generation of exascale computers will be a difficult task. The programs will need to be fault-tolerant and minimize the use of global operations. This work explores the use a task-based model that uses a data-centric approach to allocate work to different processes as it applies to quantum chemistry. After introducing the key problems that appear when trying to parallelize a complicated quantum chemistry method such as coupled-cluster theory, we discuss the implications of that model as it pertains to the computational kernel of a coupled-cluster program - matrix multiplication. Also, we discuss the extensions that would required to build a full coupled-cluster program using the task-based model. Current programming models for high-performance computing are fault-intolerant and use global operations. Those properties are unsustainable as computers scale to millions of CPUs; instead one must recognize that these systems will be hierarchical in structure, prone to constant faults, and global operations will be infeasible. The FAST-OS HARE project is introducing a scale-free computing model to address these issues. This model is hierarchical and fault-tolerant by design, allows for the clean overlap of computation and communication, reducing the network load, does not require checkpointing, and avoids the complexity of many HPC runtimes. Development of an algorithm within this model requires a change in focus from imperative programming to a data-centric approach. Quantum chemistry (QC) algorithms, in particular electronic structure methods, are an ideal test bed for this computing model. These methods describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, which determine the properties of the molecule. The computational cost of these methods is high, scaling quartically or higher in the size of the molecule, which is why QC applications are major users of HPC resources. The complexity of these algorithms means that MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

Taube, Andrew Garvin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Final report for Project No. 65003, February 10, 1976-January 3, 1983. [Contains list of 15 interim reports and brief summaries of each  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the program have demonstrated that, on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent feedstock for the production of SNG and other gaseous and liquid fuels. Peat gasifies at a much faster rate than does lignite or other coals, and high carbon conversions can be achieved with peat at relatively low severity conditions. In hydrogasification, the product mix (gases and liquids) can be varied over a much greater range than that of lignite or other coals, to satisfy seasonally changing consumer demands. Over 200 tests were conducted in laboratory- and PDU-scale equipment with different peats to determine the effects of temperature, pressure, feedstock, feed gas composition, residence time, and other operating parameters on the gasification of peat. A mathematical model was developed that closely describes the effects of operating conditions on peat gasification. These results formed the data base for the PEATGAS process development at the pilot-plant scale. Tests with peats from different geographic locations showed the effect of feedstock source on gasification. The effect of peat dewatering methodologies (including harvesting techniques and mechanical and thermal dewatering methods) on gasification was also studied. Wet carbonization tests were conducted. Wet carbonization is a thermochemical beneficiation process that improves the heating value and dewaterability of peat. The laboratory test program was the first systemic study of the effects of wet carbonization on the carbon and oxygen conversions and heating value enhancements of peat to appear in the open literature. The PDU-test program included the design, construction, and operation of an integrated computer-controlled wet carbonization unit.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Chemistry  

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293

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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294

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

Britten, J.A.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Last updated 6/13/2011 Chemistry Major III: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last updated 6/13/2011 Chemistry Major III: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY Suggested Program of Study FIRST and 3 of the arts. ***Three additional Forensic Sciences courses must be taken: FORS 6238-6239 plus FORS

Vertes, Akos

297

Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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298

Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchivesNuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

299

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sťbastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

Sherrill, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2014-06-02 08:56:54...

302

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce...

303

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

304

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

305

2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

Carter, Emily A

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improved Wetting of Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductors Used in Electrochemical Devices with Ternary Reactive Air Braze Filler Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the wetting behavior, reactivity, and long-term electrical conductance of a series of ternary filler metals being considered for brazing lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) based oxygen separation membranes. Mixed ionic/electronic conducting perovskite oxides such as LSCF and various doped barium cerates are currently being considered for use in high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen concentrators and solid oxide fuel cells. However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. Furthermore, if the proposed joining technique were to yield a hermetic ceramic-to-metal junction that was also electrically conductive, it would additionally benefit the device by allowing current to be drawn from or carried to the electrochemically active mixed conducting oxide component without requiring an separate current collector. A newly developed brazing technique known as air brazing is one such method of joining. In its present form, air brazing uses a silver-copper oxide based filler metal that can be melted directly in air to form a compliant joint that is electrically conductive. Recently, it has been shown that the addition of titania can enhance the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO filler metals on alumina. Here the effect of this wetting agent on the surface wettability, long-term electrical resistance at 750įC, and reactivity with La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428 or LSCF) substrates is discussed.

Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Thomsen, Ed C.; Weil, K. Scott

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wetting problem for multi-component fluid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we propose an extension of the Cahn method to binary mixtures and study the problem of wetting near a two-phase critical point without any assumption on the form of intermolecular potentials. A comparison between Cahn's method and later works by Sullivan, Evans et al is made. By using an expression of the energy of interaction between solid surface and liquids proposed recently by Gouin, we obtain the equations of density profiles and the boundary conditions on a solid surface. In the case of a convex free energy, a one-dimensional solution of a linear problem is proposed for the density profiles between a bulk and on a solid wall. A non-linear model of binary mixtures extending Cahn's results for simple fluids is also studied. For the case of a purely attractive wall we have established a criterion of a first order transition in terms of the structure of the level set of the homogeneous part of the free energy. Additively, explicit expressions of density profiles near the wall are proposed. They allow one to consider the adsorption of mixture components by a solid wall.

Henri Gouin; Sergey Gavrilyuk

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles as compared with the other two types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.

Q. Li; K. H. Luo; Q. J. Kang; Q. Chen

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 4 different water-in-ethanol fuel blends at a variety ofmotivation for using wet ethanol fuel is that significantengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2014 (Updated 12/05/2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2014 (Updated 12/05/2013) CHEM 0001-01 - CHEMICAL FUNDAMENTALS and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

312

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 3 June 2014 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry I #12;Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi chemistry ¬ß Convergent quantum chemistry ¬∑ Basis sets ¬∑ Methods √?Part II ¬ß A case

Tchumper, Gregory S.

313

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 4 June 2014 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry II #12;Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi chemistry ¬ß Convergent quantum chemistry ¬∑ Basis sets ¬∑ Methods √?Part II ¬ß A case

Tchumper, Gregory S.

314

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2015 (updated Oct.28, 2014 )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2015 (updated Oct.28, 2014 ) CHEM 0001 - CHEMICAL FUNDAMENTALS and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

315

Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in chemistry to students who wish to enhance their degrees with a strong concentration in this area. The Chemistry minor and enhances the records of students. The Chemistry minor provides a broad and general exposure

Chatterjee, Avik P.

316

CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of --Chemistry This publication refers.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus. Chemistry Interests in chemistry at Imperial College cover physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, polymer and biological chemistry and chemical crystallography, as well as intersectional and medical topics

317

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, FALL, 2013 (Updated 8/1/13)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, FALL, 2013 (Updated 8/1/13) CHEM 0001-01 & 0001-02 - CHEMICAL and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

318

Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry Newsletter First mobile app for green chemistry fosters sustainable manufacturing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry Newsletter First mobile app for green chemistry fosters sustainable manufacturing of medicines Mention mobile applications, or mobile apps, and people think of games of the environmentally friendly and sustainable principles of green chemistry -- is the topic of a report in the American

Silver, Whendee

319

Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

Raja, Anita

322

User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry 1 User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry 1 User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry Chemistry is the science during chemical reactions. Chemistry is the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy. Chemistry (from Egyptian kme (chem), meaning "earth" [1] ) is the science concerned

Ferreira, M√°rcia M. C.

323

Minor in Chemistry 1. A Chemistry Minor is achieved by taking courses with a "CHEM" label. Biochemistry ("BCHM")  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Chemistry 1. A Chemistry Minor is achieved by taking courses with a "CHEM" label. Biochemistry ("BCHM") courses do not count toward a Chemistry Minor. The following CHEM courses in Chemistry unless you have completed Physical Chemistry 1 (Chem 683) and the accompanying laboratory course

New Hampshire, University of

324

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education - 40 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH3020 Laboratory Teaching Internship 2 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4810 Design/Oper of High School Chemistry

325

Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

Raja, Anita

326

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics - 49 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4560 Computational Chemistry 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 PH2300 Univ Physics III - Fluids & Thermo 2 CH1153

327

Radiation chemistry in solvent etxraction: FY2011 research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2011. The tasks assigned during FY 2011 included: (1) Continue measurements free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase; (2) Continue development of an alpha-radiolysis program and compare alpha and gamma radiolysis for CMPO; (3) Initiate an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry; and (4) Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry, including the examination of metal complexed ligand kinetics. Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, the method developed to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution during FY10 was extended here to a number of compounds to better understand the differences between radical reactions in the organic versus aqueous phases. The alpha-radiolysis program in FY11 included irradiations of CMPO solutions with 244Cm, 211At and the He ion beam, for comparison to gamma irradiations, and a comparison of the gamma irradiation results for CMPO at three different gamma dose rates. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the latest in an effort to understand how metal complexation to ligands affects their reaction kinetics with free radicals.

Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Leigh R. Martin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

David Rencher

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY Lecture: ...................Monday and Friday 2 book for over 10,000 important organic substances. It has a handy cross index and molecular formula.) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure by March (McGraw-Hill) is particularly

Wagner, Diane

332

Summer 2009 Chemistry Olympiad in Cambridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, then head of organic chemistry at the University of Cape Town, but it was at the time of the first electionsSummer 2009 Chemistry Olympiad in Cambridge Protein folding ­ and misfolding about the academic staff in the department, but I looked through the book- let they sent me and I

Keeler, James

333

PHILOSOPHY OF CHEMISTRY Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHILOSOPHY OF CHEMISTRY Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent in A. Brenner, J. Gayon eds, French Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Springer, 2009, 165-185. The notion of "philosophy of chemistry" challenges the singular in the phrase "philosophy of science", which is the standard

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

WoodChemistry Wood Degradation & Preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 WoodChemistry Wood Degradation & Preservation Chemical Utilization of Wood Pulp & Paper and carbohydrates is of considerable interest in connection with a number of issues in wood chemistry, such as the reactions taking place during the formation of wood, the natural molecular weight distribution of lignin

Geldenhuys, Jaco

335

Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

Humphrys, Mark

336

Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Chemistry Add-In for Word  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chemistry Add-In for Word is an Open Source program that allows chemists to create, edit and manipulate chemistry (labels and 2D structures) in the Word environment. the on-screen representation is backed by semantic data in Chemical Markup...

Townsend, Joseph A

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

New trends in cometary chemistry Jacques Crovisier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New trends in cometary chemistry Jacques Crovisier Received 29th November 2005, Accepted 19th some of the implications of new comet observations for cometary chemistry: recent observations in the coma by the sublimation of nucleus ices. This technique has been in use since the beginnings

Demoulin, Pascal

339

Computer automation for chemistry instruments. Final report, February 1, 1980-January 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed consisted of the following: (1) development of computer aided design software for polynomial filters and Butterworth-Chebychev filter design; (2) development of algorithms for resolving peaks in spectroscopic data; and (3) interaction with LLL personnel to develop a structure for automation of surface chemistry spectroscopy. Each work phase is discussed in detail.

Brubaker, T.A.

1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9165-3 ORIGINAL PAPER Chemistry courses as the turningnegative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factorTo determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a

Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst Department of Physics and Their Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Gas-Phase Chemical Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.2.4 Organic Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.5 Negative

Millar, Tom

342

ONE FACULTY POSITIONS IN ANALYTICAL, FORENSIC CHEMISTRY OR TOXICOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONE FACULTY POSITIONS IN ANALYTICAL, FORENSIC CHEMISTRY OR TOXICOLOGY The Department of Chemistry, we seek one outstanding individual to join our recently established Forensic Technology Institute and our FEPAC- accredited Forensics Chemistry Program. A primary focus on forensics research should

Linsley, Braddock K.

343

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C agin, Adri van Duin, and William A. Goddard III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion and nonwetting-wetting transition in the Al√? -Al2O3 interface Qing Zhang, Tahir C¬ł agin properties, of both solid and liquid Al/ -Al2O3 interfaces. The ReaxFF was developed solely with ab initio calculations on various phases of Al and Al2O3 and Al-O-H clusters. Our computed lattice constants, elastic

344

Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

346

Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency, even the breakdown of pumping function, when operating under wet gas conditions. Additionally, field operations have revealed significant vibration and thermal issues which can...

Xu, Jian

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wettability toward water-wet may increase spontaneous imbibition of water. This change in rock wettability leads to positive capillary pressure and results in higher brine counter-current imbibition and therefore a higher oil production rate. A three...

Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

349

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

Curtarolo, Stefano

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

351

A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

705Ė708. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK 4. F. G. Avkhadiev andWET ROCK DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK Lawrence Berkeleypermeability. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK a generic network

Silin, Dmitriy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

353

NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

354

MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAY 14, 2008 Chemistry and environmental science professor receives Carroll College faculty award WAUKESHA, WIS.-- An associate professor of chemistry and environmental science has received an annual

Reid, Scott A.

355

Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon. Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon....

356

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

357

New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric Heterogeneous Processes. New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric...

358

Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

359

Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion, and Emissions Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing...

360

Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry during LNT Regeneration for a Lean Gasoline Engine Poster presented at the 16th...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for...

362

Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to Substantially Improve Combustion Engine Simulation Software Private Company Uses EERE-Supported Chemistry Model to...

363

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

364

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues surrounding nuclear power production and waste...

365

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

366

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt...

367

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the...

368

applied inorganic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bus.Admin.Public Admin. Chemical Engineering Chem. Eng.Comp. Sci. Chemistry Civil Engineering Heller, Barbara 6 Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined...

369

Permeability and wet-out characterization of SRIM automotive bumper beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Morse, Christopher Todd

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Interrelationships between air velocity and natural wet-bulb thermometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VFLOCITY ANO NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas ASM University i n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE AUGUST 1983 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VELOCITY AND NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Approved as to style an content by: airman o ommittee er Member ~~' A~ Member...

Jones, Nathan Glenn

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN C1 CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities (Kentucky, West Virginia, Utah, Pittsburgh and Auburn) are collaborating on a basic research program to develop novel C1 chemistry processes for the production of clean, high quality transportation fuel. An Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) with members from Chevron, Eastman Chemical, Energy International, Teir Associates, and the Department of Defense has been formed to provide practical guidance to the program. The program has two principal objectives. (1) Develop technology for conversion of C1 source materials (natural gas, synthesis gas, carbon dioxide and monoxide, and methanol) into clean, high efficiency transportation fuel. (2) Develop novel processes for producing hydrogen from natural gas and other hydrocarbons. Some of the principal accomplishments of the program in its first two years are: (1) The addition of acetylenic compounds in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is found to produce significant amounts of oxygenated products in FT diesel fuels. Such oxygenated products should decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. (2) Nanoscale, binary, Fe-based catalysts supported on alumina have been shown to have significant activity for the decomposition of methane into pure hydrogen and potentially valuable multi-walled carbon nanotubes. (3) Catalytic synthesis processes have been developed for synthesis of diethyl carbonate, higher ethers, and higher alcohols from C1 source materials. Testing of the effect of adding these oxygenates to diesel fuel on PM emissions has begun using a well-equipped small diesel engine test facility. (4) Supercritical fluid (SCF) FT synthesis has been conducted under SCF hexane using both Fe and Co catalysts. There is a marked effect on the hydrocarbon product distribution, with a shift to higher carbon number products. These and other results are summarized.

Gerald P. Huffman

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the conventional water phase electrodes, installed both in the reservoir and in the external condensing coil, provided useful data showing the adverse impact of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the REDOX potential and high temperature pH, respectively.

Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The mechano-chemistry of cytoskeletal force generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this communication, we propose a model to study the non-equilibrium process by which actin stress fibers develop force in contractile cells. The emphasis here is on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which is necessary to address the mechanics as well as the chemistry of dynamic cell contractility. In this setting we are able to develop a framework that relates (a) the dynamics of force generation within the cell and (b) the cell response to external stimuli to the chemical processes occurring within the cell, as well as to the mechanics of linkage between the stress fibers, focal adhesions and extra-cellular matrix.

Mirko Maraldi; Krishna Garikipati

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistryChemistry

378

In-Situ X-ray Spectroscopic Studies of the Fundamental Chemistry of Pb and Pb-Bi Corrosion Processes at High Temperatures: Development and Assessment of Composite Corrosion Resistant Materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this project, we have a number of accomplishments. The following list is presented as a summary statement for the project. Specific details from previous Quarterly Reports are given. (1) We established that it is possible to use EXAFS to study the interface layer between a material and the liquid Pb overlayer. We have discovered that molybdenum grows a selflimiting oxide layer which does not spall even at the highest temperatures studied. There have been 2 publications resulting from these studies. (2) We have fabricated a high temperature environmental chamber capable of extending the Pb overlayer studies by varying the incident x-ray beam angle to perform depth profiling of the Pb layer. This chamber will continue to be available to nuclear materials program researchers who wish to use the MRCAT beam line. (3) We have developed a collaboration with researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute to study corrosion layers on zircalloy. One publication has resulted from this collaboration and another is in progress. (4) We have developed a collaboration with Prof. G.R. Odette of UCSB in which we studied the local structure of Ti and Y in nanoclusters found in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels. There are two publications in progress form this collaboration and we have extended the project to anomalous small angle x-ray scattering as well as EXAFS. (5) We have promoted the use of EXAFS for the study of nuclear materials to the community over the past 4 years and we have begun to see an increase in demand for EXAFS from the community at the MRCAT beam line. (6) This grant was instrumental in nucleating interest in establishing a new Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, the Nuclear and Radiological Research CAT (NRR-CAT). The co-PI (Jeff Terry) is the lead investigator on this project and it has been approved by the APS Scientific Advisory Committee for further planning. The status of the NRR-CAT project is being discussed in a series of workshops in 2009-2010 and has received exploratory funding from INL. This funding is being used to provide beam time and support at MRCAT for NRR-CAT related experiments. This will continue through 2010 as the development of a full NRR-CAT proposal develops. We believe that this has been a very successful project whose impact will continue to be felt for a number of years. Not only will there be additional publications coming from the work supported directly by this grant but the establishment of NRR-CAT will have a significant impact on the field of nuclear materials research for decades to come.

Carlo Segre

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hiking the valleys of quatum chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with both the application and the extension of quantum chemical methods. Each chapter of the thesis represents a paper that has been published in or will be submitted to a scientific journal. The first three chapters of this thesis describe contributions made to chemistry through the use of quantum chemical methods, while the final two chapters illustrate the development of new methods. Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 characterize a study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of homodinuclear titanium(III) complexes, in order to determine trends related to their potential use as molecular magnets. Chapter 2 focuses on hydride and halide bridging and terminal ligands, while Chapter 3 explores bridging ligands from other groups in the periodic table. Chapter 4 portrays a study of the solvation of glycine. Microsolvation and continuum solvation approaches are investigated in order to study the structures of small glycine-water clusters and determine the energy difference between the zwitterionic and nonionized forms of glycine, the simplest amino acid. Chapters 5 and 6 describe the implementation of analytic gradients, which are required for efficient molecular geometry optimizations, for two open-shell second-order perturbation theory methods. Chapter 5 discusses gradients for unrestricted Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Chapter 6 describes gradients for Z-averaged perturbation theory.

Aikens, Christine Marie

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

274 CEREAL CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES AND INSTRUMENTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

274 CEREAL CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES AND INSTRUMENTATION Evaluation of the Displacement Value). Production of fuel-grade ethanol, initiated in the late 1970's as a result of rising gasoline prices

384

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic to analyze MSW-derived ashes by use of CCSEM. Representative samples of 2nd -3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ashes

385

Pollution of Natural Waters 1. Redox chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Eutrophication 4. Water treatment 1. Redox chemistry #15; Principle of equilibration of chemical system R Keq;sh and other aquatic life { Shift to anaerobic metabolic mechanisms #15; Eutrophication: agin

Schofield, Jeremy

386

Physics 3, 10 (2010) Ultracold controlled chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 3, 10 (2010) Viewpoint Ultracold controlled chemistry Roman V. Krems Department) molecules with the same temperature as that of the pre- cursor atoms. The atoms and the molecules

Krems, Roman

387

CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors physics and electronics or a chemical instrumentation course. The topics covered will include general theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J

Sherrill, David

388

February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 26 Number 3 February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry 0 Copyright 1987 by the American uranium phthalocyanine derivatives have been crystallographically (I) (a) Kasuga, K.; Tsutsui, M. Coord

Girolami, Gregory S.

389

Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major and Minor www.chem.pitt.edu Revised: 10/2012 Chemistry is the most central disease, and processes to provide energy for societal needs. Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role design and ceramics. The bachelor's degree in chemistry consists of core courses in four primary areas

Jiang, Huiqiang

390

What can I do with a degree in Chemistry?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What can I do with a degree in Chemistry? Science Planning your career Choosing a career involves.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Chemistry? Chemistry is the central science. It deals with the composition, structure level is essential to all areas of science. Chemistry interlinks and contributes to medicine, geology

Hickman, Mark

391

Updated 9/30/14 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated 9/30/14 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY SAFETY MANUAL COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY BUILDING - DEPARTMENT NUMBER 1872 SAFETY OFFICE: ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE ROOM: B101 CHEMISTRY PHONE: (970) 491/30/14 #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I - CHEMISTRY BUILDING SAFETY PLAN (EHS APPENDIX E-1

392

Chemistry 100 Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 100 ­ Fall 2011 Page 1 of 5 The World of Chemistry ­ Course Syllabus Instructor Kirkwood Hall 212 Texts: Required: Chemistry in Context (CC) Course information is online through OnCourse. Course Objective(s): The primary goal of this course is to teach you about the chemistry that surrounds

Indiana University

393

Roadmap: Chemistry Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 24-May-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [15 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I or CHEM 10960 Honors General Chemistry 4

Sheridan, Scott

394

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.A. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Chemistry Career

Walker, Lawrence R.

395

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising Chemistry Career Options

Walker, Lawrence R.

396

Chemistry in Higher What's available and where is the info?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry in Higher Education What's available and where is the info? What does studying chemistry? Where does it lead and what might a chemistry career look like? Dr. David Read, Director of Outreach 2013 #12;310 (294) HE courses with chemistry offered as a single subject hosted at 53 universities 699

Anderson, Jim

397

Roadmap: Chemistry Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Bachelor of Arts [AS-BA-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap One: [15 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General Chemistry I

Sheridan, Scott

398

Benchmarking spin-state chemistry in starless core models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We aim to present simulated chemical abundance profiles for a variety of important species, with special attention given to spin-state chemistry, in order to provide reference results against which present and future models can be compared. Methods. We employ gas-phase and gas-grain models to investigate chemical abundances in physical conditions corresponding to starless cores. To this end, we have developed new chemical reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry, including the deuterated forms of species with up to six atoms and the spin-state chemistry of light ions and of the species involved in the ammonia and water formation networks. The physical model is kept simple in order to facilitate straightforward benchmarking of other models against the results of this paper. Results. We find that the ortho/para ratios of ammonia and water are similar in both gas-phase and gas-grain models, at late times in particular, implying that the ratios are determined by gas-phase processes. We d...

Sipilš, O; Harju, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Making Lasting Bonds Through Synthetic Chemistry Tim Hubin and William Kelly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Making Lasting Bonds Through Synthetic Chemistry Tim Hubin and William Kelly Southwestern 73096 580-774-3026 tim.hubin@swosu.edu William J. Kelly, Ph. D. Professor and Chair Department-774-3026 william.kelly@swosu.edu 3. Development Staff Proposed: a. Full curriculum development and initial testing

Hubin, Tim

400

At Wichita State University you may pursue a program in chemistry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to moderate environmental chemicals and develop new energy sources for the future. Wichita State's BA degree of living cells to cure diseases and produce better crops, plants, medicines, and other useful biotechnological products. Medicinal chemists continue to develop new drugs for disease control. Chemistry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ISSN 1473-0197 Micro-& nano-fluidic research for chemistry, physics, biology, & bioengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSN 1473-0197 Micro- & nano- fluidic research for chemistry, physics, biology, & bioengineering will facilitate the development of organized neural networks for investigating the development and function of nervous system networks. Producing ordered networks of neurons with defined connectivity in vitro presents

Gillette, Martha U.

402

Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"that is "similar to gasoline in flammability," said Rick L. Danheiser, professor of chemistry and chairStephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry The University of South Carolina USC Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety

Morgan, Stephen L.

404

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks."Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research 43(9):1999-2004. Authors: DC...

405

CX-005869: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03082011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina...

406

CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06162010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina...

407

Filling and wetting transitions on sinusoidal substrates: a mean-field study of the Landau-Ginzburg model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interfacial phenomenology of a fluid in contact with a microstructured substrate within the mean-field approximation. The sculpted substrate is a one-dimensional array of infinitely long grooves of sinusoidal section of periodicity length L and amplitude A. The system is modelled using the Landau-Ginzburg functional, with fluid-substrate couplings which correspond to either first-order or critical wetting for a flat substrate. We investigate the effect of the roughness of the substrate in the interfacial phenomenology, paying special attention to filling and wetting phenomena, and compare the results with the predictions of the macroscopic and interfacial Hamiltonian theories. At bulk coexistence, for values of L much larger than the bulk correlation, we observe first-order filling transitions between dry and partially filled interfacial states, which extend off-coexistence, ending at a critical point; and wetting transitions between partially filled and completely wet interfacial states with the same order as for the flat substrate (if first-order, wetting extends off-coexistence in a prewetting line). On the other hand, if the groove height is of order of the correlation length, only wetting transitions between dry and complete wet states are observed. However, their characteristics depend on the order of the wetting transition for the flat substrate. So, if it is first-order, the wetting transition temperature for the rough substrate is reduced with respect to the wetting transition temperature for a flat substrate, and coincides with the Wenzel law prediction for very shallow substrates. On the contrary, if the flat substrate wetting transition is continuous, the roughness does not change the wetting temperature.

Alvaro Rodriguez-Rivas; Jose Antonio Galvan Moreno; Jose M. Romero-Enrique

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

Design and test of a wet type helium turbo-expander with an alternator as a brake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet type helium turbo-expander with expected adiabatic efficiency of 70% at inlet pressure, temperature, and outlet pressure of 1.3 MPa, 6.0 K, and 0.2 MPa, respectively, has been developed. An alternator is adopted as a brake where a permanent magnet is held in the turbine shaft. And a self-acting gas bearing is used at thrust and journal bearings. An electromagnet supports thrust bearing to lift up the thrust disk when initiating operation. Design mass flow rate of the turbine is determined to be 60 g/s, corresponding to the JT mass flow rate in the existing helium liquefier/refrigerator. In the cryogenic performance test, the turbine had increased helium liquefaction rate by four times larger than the liquefaction rate without turbine operation.

Kato, T.; Miyake, A.; Kawano, K.; Hamada, K.; Hiyama, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Ebisu, H.; Tsuji, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Saji, N.; Kaneko, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec. During the first quarter of 2003 final design and start of fabrication of the membrane wet ESP was undertaken.

James Reynolds

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned.

Greulich, K.A.; Gray, C.E. (comp.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chemistry itself is concerned with the understanding and control of all aspects of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry itself is concerned with the understanding and control of all aspects of molecules and Biological Chemistry', `Chemistry with Materials Chemistry', and `Chemistry with Environmental & Sustainable Chemistry' degrees are based on a solid core knowledge of Chemistry. In addition, the flexibility to study

Schnaufer, Achim

413

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Effects of vapor-liquid equilibrium on wetting efficiency in hydrodesulfurization trickle-bed reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the hydrogen was allowed to flow through the reactor tube. The liquid pump was started and the flow rate measured by monitoring the level in the feed tank. The gas flow rate was measured using a wet test meter installed downstream of the gas/liquid separator...EFFECTS OF VAPOR-LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM ON WETTING EFFICIENCY IN HYDRODESULFURIZATION TRICKLE-BED REACTORS A Thesis by ANNA LISA MILLS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Mills, Anna Lisa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Transient nature of salt movement with wetting front in an unsaturated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis bY VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M UniversitY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair...

Soman, Vishwas Vinayak

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion CubicPrice SoldPriceGas, Wet AfterShaleVolumeGas, Wet After Lease

417

Approved Module Information for CE1102, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Organic Chemistry for Engineers Module Code: CE1102  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approved Module Information for CE1102, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Organic Chemistry for Engineers Module Code: CE1102 School: Engineering and Applied Science Module Type: Standard Module New Module chemistry. Part 2: Introduction to Laboratory Skills To enable the student to develop good practical skills

Neirotti, Juan Pablo

418

This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Chem. Commun., 2010, 46, 91679169 9167 Cubic and rhombohedral heterobimetallic networks constructed from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The synthetic and materials chemistry of uranium is the best developed in the actinide series, and has expandedThis journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2010 Chem. Commun., 2010, 46, 9167­9169 9167 Cubic and rhombohedral heterobimetallic networks constructed from uranium, transition metals, and phosphonoacetate: new

419

SAFETY STUDIES TO MEASURE EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS OF SPENT PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION CHEMICALS USING WET AND DRY DECONTAMINATION METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford site in Eastern Washington is currently being decommissioned by Fluor Hanford. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids and sequestering agents. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal of the equipment as low level waste. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of chemical solutions as a spray on the contaminated surfaces, followed by a wipe-down with rags. Alternatively, a process of applying oxidizing Ce IV ions contained in a gel matrix and vacuuming a dry gel material is being evaluated. These processes effectively transfer the transuranic materials to rags or a gel matrix which is then packaged as TRU waste and disposed. Fluor is investigating plutonium decontamination chemicals as a result of concerns regarding the safety of chemical procedures following a fire at Rocky Flats in 2003. The fire at Rocky Flats occurred in a glovebox that had been treated with cerium nitrate, which is one of the decontamination chemicals that Fluor Hanford has proposed to use. Although the investigation of the fire was not conclusive as to cause, the reviewers noted that rags were found in the glovebox, suggesting that the combination of rags and chemicals may have contributed to the fire. Because of this underlying uncertainty, Fluor began an investigation into the potential for fire when using the chemicals and materials using wet disposition and dry disposition of the waste generated in the decontamination process and the storage conditions to which the waste drum would be exposed. The focus of this work has been to develop a disposal strategy that will provide a chemically stable waste form at expected Hanford waste storage temperatures. Hanford waste storage conditions are such that there is added heat to the containers from ambient conditions during storage especially during the summer months. Treatability tests under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) were used to assess the use of certain chemicals and wipes (wet method) and chemical-gel matrices (dry method) during the decontamination process. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes at PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial decontamination agents such as RadPro? , Glygel? and ASPIGEL 100?. As part of the treatability study, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) personnel have evaluated the potential for self-heating and exothermic reactions in the residual decontamination materials. From these wet and dry method treatability studies, certain limiting conditions have been defined that will aid in assuring safe operations and waste packaging during the decommissioning and waste disposition process.

Hopkins, Andrea M.; Jackson, George W.; Minette, Michael J.; Ewalt, John R.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Scott, Paul A.; Jones, Susan A.; Scheele, Randall D.; Charboneau, Stacy L.

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tropospheric chemistry: A global perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a global Openshaw, K. , Wood fuels the developing world, Newbetween 6 and 40% of wood fuel is converted to charcoalsimilar to that for wood fuel. The source for CO given in

Logan, Jennifer A; Prather, Michael J; Wofsy, Steven C; McElroy, Michael B

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced organic chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced organic chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry Three Year...

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - auger-induced chemistry derived Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

induced chemistry derived Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: auger-induced chemistry derived Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chemistry...

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted soft chemistry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soft chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assisted soft chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry...

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation chemistry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activation chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCHUG)...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced physical chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced physical chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry Three...

427

Developments in the chemistry and nanodelivery of platinum anticancer agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately half of all patients receiving cancer chemotherapy are treated with a platinum-containing drug. Despite this intense clinical use, only three platinum complexes, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, are ...

Johnstone, Timothy Charles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Temperature Modeling for Reaction Development in Microwave-Assisted Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made to evaluate and classify the effects of microwave irradiation. While it is commonly acknowledged energy, such as materials processing and food technologies, one can observe an expanding use

Yakovlev, Vadim

429

Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistantChemistry and TransportChemistry

433

Chemistry: Theory - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistantChemistry andChemistry ofTheory

434

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide Interfaces ChemicalChemistry

435

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistry of

436

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistry

437

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscaglia Keywords: Surface tension Marangoni force Capillarity Virtual-work principle Surface gradient Laplace-Beltrami operator a b s t r a c t The interest in the simulation of flows with significant surface tension effects

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

438

Entropy of H2O Wetting Layers Peter J. Feibelman*, and Ali Alavi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, configurational entropy favors wetting by deposited H2O over formation of 3-D crystalline mounds. A Pauling periodic adlayers on metals are observed, residual entropy reduces their free energies relative to a 3-D 1 and 2. The residual entropy of a real, two-dimensional layer of water molecules is therefore

Alavi, Ali

439

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wet Granulation in a Twin-Screw Extruder: Implications of Screw Design M.R. THOMPSON, J. SUN MMRI of auxiliary units like feeders and pumps. In comparison, single-screw variants of an extruder have received granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive tech- nology for the continuous processing

Thompson, Michael

440

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern K. D. Young1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant spatial use in wet and dry savannas of southern Africa K. D. Young1 , S. M. Ferreira1 Keywords elephants; home range; Loxodonta africana; NDVI; spatial use intensity; vegetation productivity; accepted 16 February 2009 doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00568.x Abstract The influence of elephants on woody

Pretoria, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 of the main pollutants to facilitate their safe reuse or treatment. Portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) is9 operations and produces sample pellets with 30 to 50% water contents. The relationship between17 pXRF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

FLUID DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF THE POROUS WETTED WALL PROTECTION SCHEME FOR IFE REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF THE POROUS WETTED WALL PROTECTION SCHEME FOR IFE REACTORS S. Shin, F of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 USA Number of Pages: 18 Number. Abdel-Khalik School of Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 771 Ferst Drive Atlanta

443

Rheology of weakly wetted granular materials - a comparison of experimental and numerical data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shear cell simulations and experiments of weakly wetted particles (a few volume percent liquid binders) are compared, with the goal to understand their flow rheology. Application examples are cores for metal casting by core shooting made of sand and liquid binding materials. The experiments are carried out with a Couette-like rotating viscometer. The weakly wetted granular materials are made of quartz sand and small amounts of Newtonian liquids. For comparison, experiments on dry sand are also performed with a modified configuration of the viscometer. The numerical model involves spherical, monodisperse particles with contact forces and a simple liquid bridge model for individual capillary bridges between two particles. Different liquid content and properties lead to different flow rheology when measuring the shear stress-strain relations. In the experiments of the weakly wetted granular material, the apparent shear viscosity $\\eta_g$ scales inversely proportional to the inertial number $I$, for all shear rates. On the contrary, in the dry case, an intermediate scaling regime inversely quadratic in $I$ is observed for moderate shear rates. In the simulations, both scaling regimes are found for dry and wet granular material as well.

Ruediger Schwarze; Anton Gladkyy; Fabian Uhlig; Stefan Luding

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

Mohaghegh, Shahab

445

Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica H). #12;1. Introduction The energy balance of tropical forests is complex due to feedback mechanisms among.W. Loeschera, *, H.L. Gholza,b , J.M. Jacobsc , S.F. Oberbauerd,e a School of Forest Resources and Conservation

446

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

Stockie, John

447

Reuse of textile powder remainders for acoustic applications using the Wet-Laid technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are like a powder with difficult recycling, but it can be recycled by means of Wet-Laid Technology study about the acoustic behaviour of nonwoven materials combined with recycled polyester. The recycled polyester used in these combinations has been manufactured from remains of plastic bottles (PET

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

448

MODEL OF AGGREGATION OF SOLID PARTICLES IN NON-WETTING LIQUID MEDIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL OF AGGREGATION OF SOLID PARTICLES IN NON- WETTING LIQUID MEDIUM M. Cournil, F.Gruy, P 30320, 57283 Maizières lès Metz, France Problem of modelling solid particles aggregation in non physical situations were little studied and deserve further works. This is the case of aggregation in non

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

449

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI decreases the spreading of a non-wetting liquid on low energy solids (1≠4). Similar work with high energy ratio (r a/A (da/dA) 1), a is the apparent contact angle, a is the actual area of surface

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

450

Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets can play an important role in regulating the rate of ice stream flow in Antarctica, particularly over short time scales. Indeed, the discharge of subglacial lakes has been linked to an increase in ice velocity of Byrd Glacier

Priscu, John C.

451

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 65% of total available ethanol yield (based on the cellulose content in 100 g untreated corn stover resource for renewable fuel-ethanol production. Cellulose and hemicellulose, which are the principal, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

452

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen flames and lifted turbulent V-flames for various preheating temperatures, equivalence ratios and steam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to crude oil in the presence of an initial brine saturation can render rocks mixed-wet. Subsequent exposure to components of synthetic oil-based drilling fluids can alter the wetting toward less water-wet or more oil-wet conditions. Mixing of the non-aromatic base oils used in synthetic oil-based muds (SBM) with an asphaltic crude oil can destabilize asphaltenes and make cores less water-wet. Wetting changes can also occur due to contact with the surfactants used in SBM formulations to emulsify water and make the rock cuttings oil-wet. Reservoir cores drilled with SBMs, therefore, show wetting properties much different from the reservoir wetting conditions, invalidating laboratory core analysis using SBM contaminated cores. Core cleaning is required in order to remove all the drilling mud contaminants. In theory, core wettability can then be restored to reservoir wetting conditions by exposure to brine and crude oil. The efficiency of core cleaning of SBM contaminated cores has been explored in this study. A new core cleaning procedure was developed aimed to remove the adsorbed asphaltenes and emulsifiers from the contaminated Berea sandstone cores. Sodium hydroxide was introduced into the cleaning process in order to create a strongly alkaline condition. The high pH environment in the pore spaces changed the electrical charges of both basic and acidic functional groups, reducing the attractive interactions between adsorbing materials and the rock surface. In cores, flow-through and extraction methods were investigated. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was assessed by spontaneous imbibition tests and Amott wettability measurements. Test results indicating that introduction of sodium hydroxide played a key role in removing adsorbed materials were confirmed by contact angle measurements on similarly treated mica surfaces. Cleaning of the contaminated cores reversed their wettability from oil-wet to strongly water-wet as demonstrated by spontaneous imbibition rates and Amott wettability indices.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Novel Kind of Dye Dr. Rainer Glaser, Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- 1 -- A Novel Kind of Dye Dr. Rainer Glaser, Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri a little bit about light to develop a conceptual understanding of dyes. A "photon" is the smallest amount state while emitting a photon of light (fluorescence & phosphorescence). Normal dyes are materials

Glaser, Rainer

455

Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department August 2008 Ris National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department August 2008 Ris√ł National Laboratory 2008 2 Summary This project aimed at development and optimization of Danish SOFC stack technology and by optimization of the spacer components. Decoupling between end plates and the outermost interconnects has been

456

Twenty-ninth ORNL/DOE conference on analytical chemistry in energy technology. Abstracts of papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet contains separate abstracts of 55 individual papers presented at this conference. Different sections in the book are titled as follows: laser techniques; resonance ionization spectroscopy; laser applications; new developments in mass spectrometry; analytical chemistry of hazardous waste; and automation and data management. (PLG)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Panel 2: Systems Approach to Greener Design Marty Mulvihill, Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Products, Research, & Collaboration Sharing experience and approaches to collaborative research projects the impacts of chemical products on the environment College of Engineering Developing more efficient processes 2500 students/year · Increases interest in chemistry on campus · Helps fund new equipment and lab space

Lee, Seung-Wuk

458

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a preliminary study of wetting effects of synthetic oil-based mud components on the wetting of mica surfaces using drilling mud fractions obtained from two wells drilled with synthetic oil-based muds (SBM). We have used these SBM fractions, one a filtrate and the other a centrifugate, to develop testing protocols for studies on smooth mica surfaces. Both SBM fractions changed the wetting of clean, dry mica surfaces, making them preferentially oil-wet. Solvents were tested to clean the mica with varying degrees of success. In tests designed to simulate contact between SBM fractions and reservoir pore surface, changes of wetting of mica that had previously been exposed to brine and crude oil were examined using six different crude oils in combination with several different brine formulations. Four of the six oils produced preferentially water-wet surfaces whereas two produced fairly oil-wet conditions on mica. Exposure to the SBM fractions tended to increase decane/water advancing contact angles on the more water-wet surfaces and to decrease those on the more oil-wet surfaces. Cleaning solvents were compared for their efficacy and the possibility of wettability restoration was examined for some of the cleaned surfaces.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 2011 R. BRYAN MILLER SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and co-author of over 550 publications, 60 patents, and four books (Enzymes in Synthetic Organic in Synthetic Organic Chemistry (2005), andDEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Presents 2011 R. BRYAN MILLER SYMPOSIUM established in remembrance of R

Guo, Ting

460

5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students ...

Tabacco, Sarah

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

462

ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC- ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER-SCIENCE GEOGRAPHY MATHEMATICS PHYSICS STATISTICS HEALTHCARE BIOMEDICAL-ENGINEERING ELECTRONIC-ENGINEERING ASTRONOMY BIOLOGY C H

Bernstein, Phil

463

Forrest S. Schultz, PhD Professor of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to support programs in Nanoscience, Biotechnology, Computer and Electrical Engineering and Plastics with the Chemistry Department to most effectively meet the challenge of a growing demand for chemistry courses

Wu, Mingshen

464

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to July 26, 2013 9:15PM EDT University of Missouri he Division of Nuclear...

465

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemistry Institutes Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes June 17, 2013 7:15PM EDT to June 21, 2013 9:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200...

466

CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1997 Professor Walba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name: -1- CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1997 Professor Walba Third Hour Exam November 20, 1997 scores: 1) 2 This is a closed-book "open model" exam. You may use models, but no notes or books. Please put all your answers: -3- 2) (25 pts) Give the single major organic product (or two products if more than one major product

Walba, David

467

1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Fractions and Chemistry Because molecules and atoms come in 'integer' packages, the ratios of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7 molecules of oxygen you get 4 molecules of carbon dioxide and 6;1 Answer Key Problem 1 - What makes your car go: When 2 molecules of gasoline (ethane) are combined with 7

468

Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Training Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department Approved by the Executive Committee on 06 those working in laboratories of prudent and legally required laboratory safety practices, attendance research are exempt, as their safety training is incorporated into their laboratory courses. The first step

Crawford, T. Daniel

469

Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation J. F. Ogilvie @ 2013 February 8 The software to explain their purposes and effects, but particularly to introduce mathematical concepts and principles and to implement the mathematical operations. These assignments and commands are generally intended to be executed

470

Conservation of Mass: Chemistry, Biology, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Conservation of Mass: Chemistry, Biology, and Thermodynamics 5.1 An Environmental ex1 (where e has dimensions of inverse time). Likewise the remaining 37 #12;38 Conservation of Mass x time. A useful model is derived from the law of conservation of mass: the rate of change of the amount

Chicone, Carmen

471

Conservation of Mass: Chemistry, Biology, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Conservation of Mass: Chemistry, Biology, and Thermodynamics 5.1 An Environmental ex1 (where e has dimensions of inverse time). Likewise the remaining 37 #12;38 Conservation of Mass x time. The scenario just described is typical. We will derive a model from the law of conservation

Chicone, Carmen

472

Air Chemistry and Pollution Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATOC 3500 Air Chemistry and Pollution Spring 2014 Meeting: T/Th, 12:30 ­ 1:45 am; Duane G1B25 in the news; for example, the quality of the air we breathe directly affects our health. In addition to mitigate the effects of air pollution. Finally, we examine some recent examples of atmospheric chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

473

JEFFREY R. LONG Address: Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of inorganic materials; single-molecule magnets; metal-organic frameworks; hydrogen storage; carbon dioxide-present); Deputy Director, DoE Energy Frontier Research Center for Gas Separations for Clean Energy Technologies (2009-present); Advisory Boards: Energy & Environmental Science (2008- present), Chemistry

474

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SAFETY RULES FOR TEACHING LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SAFETY RULES FOR TEACHING LABORATORIES Important Phone Numbers: Duncan Hall to the laboratory. There should be minimum skin exposure. Shorts, swim suites, tank tops, etc. leave large amounts injury, and a faculty or staff member is not available, call 4-4921 or 4-5000 in Duncan Hall or 4

Su, Xiao

475

Chemical Transport Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Transport Policy Virginia Tech Chemistry Department This policy was enacted. The purpose of this policy is to ensure the safety of personnel transporting chemicals and anyone who might from undue liability. No exceptions to this policy will be tolerated. 2. All chemicals transported

Crawford, T. Daniel

476

1999 Gordon Research Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atmospheric Chemistry was held at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island, June 13-18, 1999. The conference was well attended with 151 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

Storm, C.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Environmental Analytical Chemistry (ENERGY, POWER AND ENVIRONMENT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, radioanalytical chemistry, environmental transport of radionuclides and biological effects of radiation will be examined and the options for nuclear waste disposal will be discussed. The material will be presented - Environmental Impact of the Cold War Howard Hu, et al., Plutonium, Deadly Gold of the Nuclear Age, IPP, 1992 #12

Sherrill, David

478

D-CHABMaster's programs Department of Chemistry  

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Interdisciplinary Sciences #12; ETH Zurich The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) was opened mission statement ETH Zurich professes the following principles: advancement and support of high quality by the Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences (D-CHAB) of the ETH Zurich, and gives an insight

Sandoghdar, Vahid

479

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Department of Chemistry  

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, William Durham, Eds.; ACS: Washington DC, 1987. 5) The Heavy Metals: Chemistry, Environmental Impact. Graded Material Assignments 30% Midterm Examination 30% Final Examination 40% The grade substance based upon these assignments on the midterm and final. While the resulting workload for 09

Kurnikova, Maria

480

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

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Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury Noelle Eckley Selin *Reprinted from Mercury in the Environment: Pattern and Process (Chapter 5) pp. 73-80 Copyright © 2012 with kind, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury NOELLE ECKLEY SELIN and their distribution in the atmosphere. This includes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wet chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri  

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CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri Computer Graphics Visualization of Proteins "pockets" or "clefts" on the surface of their macromolecular targets. A favorable free energy of binding the best way to visualize these structures is using computer graphics. In this assignment, we will use

Gates, Kent. S.

482

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

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in Chemistry or a related field and at least one year of additional research training such as postdoctoral

California at Santa Cruz, University of

484

Department of Chemistry | Center for Catalytic HydrocarbonFunctionali...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Faculty & Research Outreach Programs Graduate Studies Events & Seminars Undergraduate Studies Contact Us Faculty & Research > Research Centers & Programs > Center for...

485

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Computational chemistry in Argonne`s Reactor Analysis Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roughly 3 years ago work on Argonne`s Integral Fast Reactor ({open_quotes}IFR{close_quotes}) was terminated and at that time, ANL funding was redirected to a number of alternative programs. One such alternative was waste management and, since disposal of spent fuel from ANL`s EBR-II reactor presents some special problems, this seemed an appropriate area for ANL work. Methods for the treatment and disposal of spent fuel (particularly from EBR-II but also from other sources) are now under very active investigation at ANL. The very large waste form development program is mainly experimental at this point, but within the Reactor Analysis ({open_quotes}RA{close_quotes}) Division a small computational chemistry program is underway, designed to supplement the experimental program. One of the most popular proposals for the treatment of much of our high-level wastes is vitrification. As noted below, this approach has serious drawbacks for EBR-II spent fuel. ANL has proposed, instead, that spent fuel first be pretreated by a special metallurgical process which produces, as waste, chloride salts of the various fission products; these salts would then be adsorbed in zeolite A, which is subsequently bonded with glass to produce a waste form suitable for disposal. So far it has been the main mission of RA`s computational chemistry program to study the process by which leaching occurs when the glass-bonded zeolite waste form is exposed to water. It is the purpose of this paper to describe RA`s computational chemistry program, to discuss the computational techniques involved in such a program, and in general to familiarize the M. and C. Division with a computational area which is probably unfamiliar to most of its member. 11 refs., 2 figs.

Gelbard, E.; Agrawal, R.; Fanning, T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Sarah E. Reisman Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology  

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Sarah E. Reisman Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering · California Institute of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA. 2008-2014 Assistant Professor of Chemistry Division of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology

Stoltz, Brian M.

488

Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Chemistry Textbooks ISBN TEXT EDITION AUTHOR PUBLISHER INSTRUCTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Required I-clicker2 remote #12;25600 Required Organic Chemistry (e-book) 6th Brown, Foote, Iverson, Anslyn 9781285155104 Required Organic Chemistry package- includes 3- hole drilled version of Brown/Foote Organic Required Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Binder Ready Version (BRV) 4th William H. Brown & Thomas Poon

Ginzel, Matthew

490

School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES  

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School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES CHEMISTRYPOSTGRADUATE MASTERS DEGREES #12;WWW.CHEM.LEEDS.AC.UK 02 School of Chemistry // MASTERS PROGRAMMES contents 03 Welcome 04 Study and Accommodation 19 Visit Us #12;SCHOOLOFCHEMISTRY 03 Welcome to the School of Chemistry The School warmly welcomes

Rzepa, Henry S.

491

Course Syllabus: Chem W1A General Chemistry Course Information  

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Course Syllabus: Chem W1A General Chemistry Course Information Course Number Chemistry W1A Course) Themed Problems.3. Participation in the discussion forums.4. Chem W1A General Chemistry Syllabus https Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 2 of 10 5/28/13 10:13 AM #12;We

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

492

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined July 31, 2013 The journal Inorganic Chemistry published a special Forum issue on the role of inorganic chemistry in nuclear energy. John Gordon and Argonne National Laboratory collaborated on the work. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office

493

Chemistry and Physics Professor Howard Georgi, Director of Undergraduate Studies  

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Chemistry and Physics Professor Howard Georgi, Director of Undergraduate Studies The concentration in Chemistry and Physics is supervised by a committee comprised of members of the Departments of Physics and of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and is administered through the office of the director of undergraduate

Heller, Eric

494

What do you do? I was a professor of chemistry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What do you do? I was a professor of chemistry. Why is it important? I prepare students's chips. What got you into the field of science? Doing chemistry experiments with my home set when I? No, but probably would have headed in to mathematics if I had not been fascinated by chemistry. What

Pedersen, Tom

495

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors SPRING 2013  

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Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors SPRING 2013 (All arrangements are solely between.arroyo@gmail.com Analytical and Electrochemistry Gayle Burstein gburstei@gmail.com Biochemistry and General Chemistry Jenn.dykstra@gmail.com Biochemistry lecture and lab Kristin Fathe kfathe@alum.trinity.edu General Chemistry and Biochemistry Alex Gade

496

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

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Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

497

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

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TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY EXTERNAL REVIEW APRIL 24-27, 2005 #12;i TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY EXTERNAL REVIEW APRIL 24-27, 2005 External Review Committee Members: Dr. George L. McLendon Professor of Chemistry & Dean of Arts and Sciences Duke University george

498

Chemistry Program F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award Nominee Information  

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Danny Eddy Chemistry Program F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award Nominee Information Enrollment and Retention Quarter Courses Taught Enrollment % Retention Fall 2009 General Chemistry 100 (003) 70 96% General Chemistry 100 (004) 69 99% University Seminar 100 (019) 29 100% Winter 2009

Selmic, Sandra

499

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors SUMMER 2013  

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Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors SUMMER 2013 (All arrangements are solely between.arroyo@gmail.com Analytical and Electrochemistry Gayle Burstein gburstei@gmail.com Biochemistry and General Chemistry Jenn Chemistry I and II lecture and lab Ken Clevenger kdclevenger@gmail.com Biochemistry lecture and lab

500

Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year  

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Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year · CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* · CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar · CHEM 222 Intro to Quant Analysis · CHEM 245 Sophomore Seminar · CHEM 329 Organic Chemistry I · MATH 264 Calculus III · LSP coursework Fall--Third Year · CHEM 345 Junior Seminar · CHEM 323/324 Physical Chemistry

Gering, Jon C.