Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

2

Well development with acid wool  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a unique method to prevent the lost circulation of drilling fluids in fractured bedrock aquifers. The method utilizes acid wool to bridge fractures and prevent the migration of these fluids in to the reservoir. This wool material collects the mud on its surface and allows it to be removed during development. The wool is produced from melted silic-carbonate rock and is dissolved using hydrochloric acid. The timing and methodology of installation is provided.

Hanna, T.M. (Hydrologic Consultants Inc., Lakewood, CO (USA)); Rothauge, F. (Quality Drilling Fluids Engineering Inc., Longmont, CO (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Well-developed deformation in 42Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excited states in 38,40,42Si nuclei have been studied via in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy with multi-nucleon removal reactions. Intense radioactive beams of 40S and 44S provided at the new facility of the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory enabled gamma-gamma coincidence measurements. A prominent gamma line observed with an energy of 742(8) keV in 42Si confirms the 2+ state reported in an earlier study. Among the gamma lines observed in coincidence with the 2+ -> 0+ transition, the most probable candidate for the transition from the yrast 4+ state was identified, leading to a 4+_1 energy of 2173(14) keV. The energy ratio of 2.93(5) between the 2+_1 and 4+_1 states indicates well-developed deformation in 42Si at N=28 and Z=14. Also for 38,40Si energy ratios with values of 2.09(5) and 2.56(5) were obtained. Together with the ratio for 42Si, the results show a rapid deformation development of Si isotopes from N=24 to N=28.

S. Takeuchi; M. Matsushita; N. Aoi; P. Doornenbal; K. Li; T. Motobayashi; H. Scheit; D. Steppenbeck; H. Wang; H. Baba; D. Bazin; L. Cŕceres; H. Crawford; P. Fallon; R. Gernhäuser; J. Gibelin; S. Go; S. Grévy; C. Hinke; C. R. Hoffman; R. Hughes; E. Ideguchi; D. Jenkins; N. Kobayashi; Y. Kondo; R. Krücken; T. Le Bleis; J. Lee; G. Lee; A. Matta; S. Michimasa; T. Nakamura; S. Ota; M. Petri; T. Sako; H. Sakurai; S. Shimoura; K. Steiger; K. Takahashi; M. Takechi; Y. Togano; R. Winkler; K. Yoneda

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 1985 Usefulness...

6

Development Wells At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Pueblo Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not...

7

Development Wells At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

8

Development Wells At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not...

9

Fluid-temperature logs for selected wells in eastern Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Open-File Report consists of fluid temperature logs compiled during studies of the geohydrology and low temperature geothermal resources of eastern Washington. The fluid temperature logs are divided into two groups. Part A consists of wells which are concentrated in the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell area. Full geophysical log suites for many of these wells are presented in Stoffel and Widness (1983) and discussed in Widness (1983, 1984). Part B consists of wells outside of the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell study area.

Stoffel, K.L.; Widness, S. (comps.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

11

Development Wells At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

12

Development Wells At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

13

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

14

Development Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

15

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

17

Candidate Well Selection for the Test of Degradable Biopolymer as Fracturing Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is a well-established technology of generating highly conductive flow path inside the rock by injecting massive amount of fracturing fluid and proppant with sufficient pressure to break the formation apart. But as the concern for environment and health effects of hydraulic fracturing becomes intense, many efforts are made to replace the conventional fracturing fluid with more environment-friendly materials. The degradable biopolymer is one of the novel materials that is injected in the form of solid pellets containing proppant, degrades in the presence of water to form a viscous gel fluid, leaving no gel residue or harmful material. This work develops a methodology and computer program to determine the best candidate wells for the field test of degradable biopolymer as fracturing fluid. The unique properties of degradable biopolymer is captured in the selection of decision criteria such as bottomhole temperature and treatment volume as well as traditional hydraulic fracturing candidate well selection criteria such as formation permeability, productivity index.

Hwang, Yun Suk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

20

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA...

22

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

File:05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:32, 25 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:32, 25 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (71 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 12:01, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:01, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (105 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 10:58, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:58, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (106 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs)

24

File:05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 77 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:19, 4 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:19, 4 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (77 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 17:22, 3 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:22, 3 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (106 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 18:48, 25 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 18:48, 25 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (104 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs)

25

File:05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:35, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:35, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (72 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 11:23, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:23, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (72 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 11:38, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:38, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (44 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs)

26

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 13, 2000 June 13, 2000 DOE Selects Project to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well Economics By Using Low-Cost Clean Coal Product to Filter Waste Water In its third and final round of competition for projects that can help sustain natural gas production from "stripper" wells, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected a proposal to test a coal-based filtering material that could sharply reduce the costs of disposing of waste water from these low-volume wells. The Western SynCoal Clean Coal Plant The Rosebud SynCoal® demonstration plant near Colstrip, Montana, was built in DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. Its upgraded coal product, originally intended as a high quality fuel for power plants, may also be a low cost filter material for oil and gas well waste water.

27

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

29

Development of geothermal-well-completion systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a three year study concerning the completion of geothermal wells, specifically cementing, are reported. The research involved some specific tasks: (1) determination of properties an adequate geothermal well cement must possess; (2) thorough evaluation of current high temperature oilwell cementing technology in a geothermal context; (3) basic research concerning the chemical and physical behavior of cements in a geothermal environment; (4) recommendation of specific cement systems suitable for use in a geothermal well.

Nelson, E.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -DOI...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

material storage. Off-pad stormwater would be directed away from the well pads. *An emergency response plan would be implemented that includes contingencies for hazardous...

31

A new approach to select multi-lateral well candidates using a fuzzy-logic based computer model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Lateral technology is defined as the drilling and completion of more than one wellbore from a single "mother" hole. The benefits of having multiple boreholes in a single well include increased flow rates, increased reserves, lower production costs, and improved drainage patterns or efficiencies. Candidate selection for multi-lateral technology has not been standardized and few literature references exist that can help individuals plan a multi-lateral well. Multilateral well candidate selection is usually tied to the results of a detailed and complex reservoir analysis. In many cases, small and independent companies are reluctant to apply multi-lateral technology without conducting a detailed economic analysis. In this research, we have developed a new easy, simple and fast, yet technically sound, method to screen candidate wells for possible application of multi-lateral technology. The new screening method is based on the simulation of human thinking by using a fuzzy logic model. This fuzzy logic model was built based on the personal experiences of industry experts in multi-lateral technology, as well as existing case histories of applications of multi-lateral technology found in the literature. The new model determines the best type of primary well configuration, choosing from a vertical well, horizontal well or a multi-lateral well. If the model suggests a multi-lateral well as the most appropriate option, the model then determ-nines the best multi-lateral configuration, choosing from a dual-opposed completion, a planar completion or a stacked completion. The output from the model is the level of confidence that the selected well configuration will be a technical success, based on the knowledge and experience used to build the model. The model was validated with four successful cases of application of multi-lateral technology published in the literature. The multi-lateral fuzzy logic model can be used to analyze the possibilities of applying multi-lateral technology for specific reservoir situations, limited to oil, onshore reservoirs composed of a single type of matrix. The model, however, should not be relied upon as the only screening tool. Numerical reservoir and economic models must also be used to determine expected well performance and to compute detailed economic analysis of all possible options.

Colmenares Diaz, Luis Carlos

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Development of High Erosivity Well Scale Cleaning Tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Build up of scale deposits on the walls of geothermal wells can occur rapidly due to the high dissolved solids content of geothermal fluids. Scale formation is a significant problem for both the well and for surface heat transfer equipment. Geothermal brines contain a wide variety if dissolved salts including carbonates, silicates, sulfates, and metal sulfides. One technology recently proposed for scale removal is the use of an ultrasonic device. In the present effort we apply cavitation in a more direct manner by the use of acoustically enhanced cavitating water jets which can be made to be much more efficient and aggressive than ultrasonic devices. Cavitating and self-resonating jet technologies have been proven to enhance the erosive power of liquid jets in a number of cutting, cleaning, and drilling applications. In this study we investigated two related technologies - one that employs cavitation and one that breaks the jet up into a series of slugs that produce water hammer type pressures upon impact. These technologies enable operation in both submerged and nonsubmerged conditions.

K. M. Kalumuck; G. L. Chahine; G. S. Frederick; P. D. Aley

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The feasibility of developing a borehole sparker for geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was undertaken to determine the practicality of designing a borehole sparker (underwater electric discharge) seismic source for use in an extremely harsh environment (69MPa @ 275{degrees}C = 10,000 psi @ 527{degrees}F). Important electrical and hydrodynamic parameters of underwater spark discharges, component availability, and past accomplishments of others in the field of borehole-to-borehole sparker surveying are discussed. It is concluded that this instrument could be economically developed.

McClung, J.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Petrologic-petrophysical-engineering relationships, selected wells near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska, selected stratigraphic horizons were studied in a number of wells adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeast Alaska. Petrographic analyses were integrated with petrophysical and engineering data, in order to provide a substantive knowledge base from which to infer reservoir potentials elsewhere in the region, using geological and geophysical methods. Of particular interest in the latter regard is the ANWR area. Horizons of concern with regard to reservoir characteristics include Franklinian through Brookian strata. Of particular interest are clastic Ellesmerian 'Break-up/Rift Sequence' sediments such as the Lower Cretaceous Thomson sand, and deeper-water marine clastics, as exemplified by the Brookian Colville Group 'turbidites.' Also of concern are pre-Ellesmerian 'basement' rocks, some of which are hosts to hydrocarbon accumulations in the Point Thomson field. Petrologic-mineralogic characteristics have been keyed to various wireline log responses and related to available engineering data, as feasible, for the wells considered. Synthesis of this information in terms of the regional geological framework, tied in with geophysical data, will facilitate more refined, effective resource assessment and management.

Mowatt, T.C.; Gibson, C.; Seidlitz, A.; Bascle, R.; Dygas, J. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wind Energy Developments: Incentives In Selected Countries  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper discusses developments in wind energy for the countries with significant wind capacity. After a brief overview of world capacity, it examines development trends, beginning with the United States - the number one country in wind electric generation capacity until 1997.

Information Center

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Technological development and innovation : selected policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological development is one of the main drivers in economic progress throughout the world and is strongly linked to the creation of new industries, jobs, and wealth. This thesis attempts to better understand how a ...

Benson, Christopher L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

File:05TXADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TXADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05TXADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

39

GRR/Section 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-NV-a - Drilling Well Development 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf 05NVADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A person may not drill or operate a geothermal well or drill an exploratory well without obtaining a permit from the Administrator of the Nevada

40

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Utah Administrative Code Section R655-1 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Although not regulated under the Administrative Rules for Water Wells,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GRR/Section 5-CO-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-a - Drilling and Well Development CO-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-CO-a - Drilling and Well Development 05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Regulations & Policies Rules and Regulations for Permitting the Development and Appropriation of Geothermal Resources Through the Use of Wells CRS 37-90.5-107 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

42

Thermal Maturity and Organic Facies of Devonian Shales From Selected Wells  

SciTech Connect

An organic geochemical study was performed on core samples of the Devonian shale from wells in Ohio, Kentucky, and Illinois. The thermal maturity of the organic matter (kerogen) contained in the fine-grained sediments was investigated by vitrinite reflectance and kerogen coloration (Thermal Alteration Index). The results indicate that the organic matter has been thermally matured to the early stages of petroleum and associated gas generation. A suite of geochemical analyses designed to evaluate the organic richness, the hydrocarbon potential for gas, condensate, and/or oil, and the type of organic matter was performed on the samples analyzed for thermal maturity. In general, two types of organic facies were encountered. The rich organic facies (A) is characterized by abundant gas, gasoline, and gas-oil hydrocarbons, a high organic carbon content, and organic matter prone to gererate abundant oil and associated gas. Based on the geochemical data, a second type of organic facies (B) interbedded with the rich organic facies (A) was encountered in Kentucy and Ohio wells. Organic facies B consists of sediments relatively lean in organic carbon and gas-oil hydrocarbons, and abundant gas and gasoline hydrocarbons. In most cases, facies B is composed of woody and coaly types of kerogen. The woody-coaly kerogen is presumed to indicate a nonmarine derived depositional source prone to generate predominately gas (methane).

Zielinski, R. E.; Martin, L. J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development Wells At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

44

Development Wells At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Soda Lake Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

45

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies MCA 37-43-104: Monitoring Wells MCA 37-43-302: License Requirements MCA 37-43-306: Bonding Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

46

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative All wells drilled in search or in support of the recovery of geothermal

47

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-WA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-WA-a.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Geothermal Act 78.60 RCW Geothermal Rules 332-17 WAC Triggers None specified In Washington geothermal drilling and well development are regulated by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WSDNR). Geothermal production wells and core holes deeper than 750ft require the developer go through the whole WSDNR permitting process (which requires a public hearing) and require that the developer complete the State Environmental

48

GRR/Section 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-OR-a - Drilling and Well Development 05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Oregon Water Resources Department Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development Oregon Department of State Lands Oregon Department of Energy Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Regulations & Policies ORS 522.005(11) ORS 522.025 ORS 522.115 ORS 522.125 ORS 522.135 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf

49

GRR/Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Drilling and Well Development ID-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-ID-a - Drilling and Well Development 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies IC §42-233: Appropriation of Water, Geothermal IC §42-4003: Permits IC §42-4004: Processing Applications IC §42-4011: Name of Owner Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Best Practices Community outreach Talk to the local county Potential Roadblocks Incomplete applications result in longer approval times by IDWR 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

50

GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-TX-a - Drilling and Well Development 05TXADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.5: Application To Drill, Deepen, Reenter, or Plug Back 16 TAC 3.78: Fees and Financial Security Requirements 16 TAC 3.37: Statewide Spacing Rule 16 TAC 3.38: Well Densities 16 TAC 3.39: Proration and Drilling Units: Contiguity of Acreage and Exception 16 TAC 3.33: Geothermal Resource Production Test Forms Required Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

51

Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

Kennedy, C. E.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc.`s, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc. 's, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. (Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)) [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-HI-a - Drilling and Well Development 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Engineering Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Code §13-183-65 Draft Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05HIADrillingAndModificationOfWellsForInjectionUsePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

55

Developing measurement selection strategy for neural network models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with an application of the theory of optimum experimental design to the problem of selecting the data set for developing neural models. Another objective is to show that neural network trained with the samples obtained according to D-optimum ...

Przemys?aw Pretki; Marcin Witczak

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of a Special Application Coiled Tubing Applied Plug for Geothermal Well Casing Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Casing deformation in producing geothermal wells is a common problem in many geothermal fields, mainly due to the active geologic formations where these wells are typically located. Repairs to deformed well casings are necessary to keep the wells in production and to occasionally enter a well for approved plugging and abandonment procedures. The costly alternative to casing remediation is to drill a new well to maintain production and/or drill a well to intersect the old well casing below the deformation for abandonment purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy and the Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsored research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these casing remediation expenditures. Sandia, in cooperation with Halliburton Energy Services, developed a low cost, bridge-plug-type, packer for use in casing remediation work in geothermal well environments. This report documents the development and testing of this commercially available petal-basket packer called the Special Application Coiled Tubing Applied Plug (SACTAP).

STALLER,GEORGE E.; KNUDSEN,STEVEN D.; SATTLER,ALLAN R.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

GRR/Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas (DOGGR) administers geothermal well drilling activities (permitting, drilling,

59

Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511310"

60

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recently developed well test insrumentation for low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering drawings, assembly instructions, and recommended usage for several of the instruments developed for low and moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal well testing are presented. Included are the drawings for: a downhole pressure and temperature instrument, a multi-conductor cablehead, a line driver to be used with the downhole pressure and temperature instrument, and a fluid-level detector.

Solbau, R.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Industrial pollution prevention programs in selected developing Asian countries  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the information on current activities to promote industrial pollution prevention (P2) in five selected Asian economies including Hong Kong, Republic of Korea, the Philippines, ROC in Taiwan, and Thailand. These activities, generally initiated in the last 5 years, are classified into 6 categories: awareness promotion, education and training, information transfer, technology development an demonstration, technical assistance, and financial incentives. Although participation is voluntary, these programs are all important at the early stages of P2 promotion and should be useful in informing industries of the benefit of P2 and helping them identify specific P2 measures as viable environmental management alternatives.

Chiu, Shen-yann [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Extraction Process Developed by West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 14, 2000 September 14, 2000 DOE Selects Extraction Process Developed by West Virginia University in New Project to Generate Carbon Products from Coal A lot more can be done with coal than just burning it to generate electricity and steam. Its carbon makeup can be chemically transformed into a variety of value-added solid products - for example, the electrodes used in the electrolytic process that produces aluminum. Now, in an program to expand the uses of coal, the Department of Energy will provide federal funding to advance a process developed at West Virginia University (WVU) that extracts the carbon from coal by using a powerful organic solvent. The product is an ash-free, high-quality carbon material. DOE will provide $289,000 for the one-year project, with WVU contributing $120,610.

65

File:05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf 5ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05ORADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:27, 2 April 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:27, 2 April 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (57 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 15:07, 19 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:07, 19 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 14:47, 4 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:47, 4 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (56 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs)

66

File:05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:57, 15 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:57, 15 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (81 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 16:58, 19 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:58, 19 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (82 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file.

67

File:05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:22, 2 April 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:22, 2 April 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (69 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 12:09, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:09, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (49 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

68

File:05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:05COADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 83 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:58, 27 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:58, 27 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (83 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 15:01, 30 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 15:01, 30 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (78 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

69

Development and assessment of electronic manual for well control and blowout containment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEA ?? 63, Floating Vessel Blowout Control is a blowout containment study which was completed in 1990, and it did not include discussions about operations in the water depths we currently operate in. As offshore drilling is continuously moving into deeper and deeper waters, a need to further investigate well control and blowout containment in ultradeep water has arisen. This project describes the development and assessment of an electronic cross-reference tool for well control and blowout containment, with added focus on ultradeep water operations. The approach of this manual is fully electronic, thus being able to serve the needs of the engineer/driller with greater ease in both pre-planning and in a stressful onthe- job setting. The cross-reference is a manual for the state of the art in well control and blowout containment methodology. It provides easy-to-use topical organization by categories and subcategories, and aims at providing clear links between symptoms, causes, and solutions. Clear explanations to complicated issues are provided, and confirmation of applicable blowout intervention procedures, be it conventional or unconventional, are discussed. Human error and equipment failure are the causes of blowouts, and they are bound to happen in an ultradeep water environment. Well control events are harder to detect andhandle in ultradeep water, and quick reaction time is essential. After detection and shutin, the Driller??s method is the preferred circulation method in ultradeep water, due to its responsiveness and simplicity. In case kick handling is unsuccessful, contingency plans should be in place to handle a potential blowout. If a blowout does occur, and the blowing well does not self-kill through bridging, a dynamic kill through relief well intervention is likely to be necessary, as underwater intervention is difficult in ultradeep water. With new ultradeep water drilling technologies providing potential for increased performance, alternative well control methods might be necessary. Along with these new technologies follow new unfamiliar procedures, and proper education and training is essential.

Grottheim, Odd Eirik

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Louisiana Gulf Coast seismicity induced by geopressured-geothermal well development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuous microseismic monitoring networks have been established around three US Department of Energy geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have on subsidence and growth fault activation. The results obtained from this monitoring have shown several unusual characteristics associated with Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases and the other with only surface wave signatures. The latter type comprises over 99% of the reported 1000+ microseismic event locations. The problem with the slow-moving surface-wave signature events is that rainfall and weather-associated frontal passages seem closely related to these periods of seismic activity at all three wells. After relatively short periods and low levels of flow testing at the Parcperdue and Sweet Lake prospects, seismic monitoring has shown little credible correlation to inferred growth fault locations during periods of flow testing. Longer periods and higher volumes of flow testing at the Rockefeller Refuge prospect should provide a truer indication of induced seismicity attributable to geopressured-geothermal development. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Stevenson, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Tool selectivity in left occipitotemporal cortex develops without vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have provided evidence for a tool-selective region in left lateral occipitotemporal cortex LOTC. This region responds selectively to pictures of tools and to characteristic visual tool motion. The present human fMRI study tested whether ...

Marius V. Peelen; Stefania Bracci; Xueming Lu; Chenxi He; Alfonso Caramazza; Yanchao Bi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Recent advances in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the properties of the cured material, the practical use of advanced cementitious materials for geothermal well completions depends primarily upon the ability to predictably extend the thickening times for the precursor slurries at elevated temperatures to times sufficient to permit conventional placement. Ongoing work at Brookhaven National Laboratory being conducted with assistance from the geothermal industry, indicates that lightweight calcium phosphate cement slurries being developed as CO{sub 2{minus}} resistant well completion materials, can be conventional pumped at temperatures > 100{degrees}C without the addition of retarding admixtures. These slurries consist of mullite-shelled hollow microspheres, calcium aluminate cements and polybasic sodium phosphate. When cured in hydrothermal environments, the slurries yield high strength, low permeability cements which bond well to steel casing. Two compositional factors that affect the thickening times were identified. One is the calcium aluminate cement species that serve as the base reagent in the slurry formulation, and the other is the rate of hydrothermal reaction between the microspheres and the polybasic sodium phosphate solution.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tool development and application: pressure, temperature, spectral gamma ray logging of the SB-15 well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia`s involvement with downhole instrumentation dates from the mid 1970s when work was centered on the development of a high-temperature acoustic borehole televiewer, and the establishment of a list of high- temperature component parts such as resistors, integrated circuits, and sensors. This work evolved into the development of memory logging devices for the US Continental Scientific Drilling Program. These tools were of low cost and very easy to use. Their deployment resulted in scientific advancement in understanding geothermal formations, and a thrust of the current program is to move memory tools from the scientific realm to the commercial environment. The tools developed and utilized in the SB-15 well among other field tests are completely self- contained in that power is obtained from batteries and data are stored in an electronic memory system. Three memory tools form the backbone of the initial Sandia tool suite. Pressure/temperature measurements are necessary for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs, and they are relatively simple to make. Thus, the initial Sandia program concentrated on such a tool, and it has been successfully used in SB-15. This tool will form the basis for future tools since many engineering principles were proven in its evolution. This pressure/temperature tool combination is very useful in characterizing the geothermal reservoir. Another tool in the Sandia suite measures the natural gamma rays from the formation. This spectral gamma ray tool is useful in defining lithology, paleoflows, and certain clays. SB-15 well logging history and a preliminary interpretation of the data is presented in this report.

Sattler, A.R.; Norman, R.; Henfling, J.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Chemical and hydrologic data for selected thermal-water wells and nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data collected during January to July 1988 from 37 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho. Included are well and spring locations; well-construction, water-level, and water-use information; hydrographs of water levels in 3 wells; chemical and isotopic analyses of water from 18 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs; and drillers' logs from 23 wells. The purpose of the report is to make these data conveniently available to the public. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells… (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geothermal well completions: an overview of existing methods in four types of developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing practices and capabilities for completing producing and injection wells for geothermal application in each of four categories of geothermal environments are discussed. Included are steam wells in hard, fractured rocks (The Geysers, California), hot water wells in sedimentary formations (Imperial Valley, California), hot, dry impermeable rocks with circulating water systems (Valles Caldera, New Mexico), and geopressured, geothermal water wells with associated hydrocarbon production on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Snyder, R.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Occupational well-being: the development of a theory and a measure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research on occupational well-being, commonly conceptualized as job satisfaction or the opposite of burnout, is criticized for its lack of theoretical basis. Danna and Griffin… (more)

Schultz, Monica L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radiochemical and chemical constituents in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake river Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from nine irrigation wells, three domestic wells, two dairy wells, two springs, one commercial well, one stock well, and one observation well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Additional sampling at six sites was done to complete the third round of sampling. None of the radiochemical or chemical constituents exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels.

Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [Idaho Dept. of Water Resources, Boise, ID (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Footage Drilled" in Glossary. R=Revised. 2 See "Crude Oil Well" in Glossary. Notes: · 2011 data for this table were not available in time for publication.

85

Development of New Geothermal Wellbore Holdup Correlations Using Flowing Well Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal well performances depend primarily on four factors: reservoir pressure, permeability, temperature and wellbore size. The ability to predict both the quantity of fluid that can be produced and its thermodynamic state (pressure, temperature, enthalpy, gas content, salinity, etc.) is essential for estimating the total usable energy of a geothermal resource. Numerical reservoir simulators can be utilized to calculate the thermodynamic state of the fluid in the reservoir when it enters the wellbore. To compute the fluid properties as it travels up the wellbore to the well-head given certain reservoir conditions the use of a wellbore simulator is needed. This report contains new correlations for flowing geothermal wells to accurately estimate produced fluid properties.

Sabodh K. Garg; John W. Pritchett; James H. Alexander; Joel Renner

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Public Disclosure Authorized Manufacturing Firms in Developing Countries How Well Do They Do, and Why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition among manufacturers in developing countries is remarkably vigorous. Nonetheless, markets are imperfect, so the general trend toward trade liberalization has yielded benefits beyond the traditional gains from specialization.

James Tybout

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Developing a GIS-Based MCE Site Selection Tool in ArcGIS Using COM Technology IAJIT First Online Publication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Site selection is a complex process for owners and analysts. This process involves not only technical requirements, but also economical, social, environmental and political demands that may result in conflicting objectives. Site selection is the process of finding locations that meet desired conditions set by the selection criteria. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Multi Criteria Evaluation techniques (MCE) are the two common tools employed to solve these problems. However, each suffers from serious shortcomings and could not be used alone to reach an optimum solution. This poses the challenge of integrating these tools. Developing and using GIS-based MCE tools for site selection is a complex process that needs well trained GIS developers and analysts who are not often available in most organizations. In this paper, a GIS-based Multicriteria Evaluation Site Selection Tool is developed in ArcGIS 9.3 using COM technology to achieve software interoperability. This tool can be used by engineers and planners with different levels of GIS and MCE knowledge to solve site selection problems. A typical case study is presented to demonstrate the application of the proposed tool..In addition, the paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the site selection process and characteristics.

Khalid Eldrandaly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects  

SciTech Connect

A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Well-characterized open pool experiment data and analysis for model validation and development.  

SciTech Connect

Four Well-Characterized Open Pool fires were conducted by Fire Science and Technology Department. The focus of the Well-Characterized Open Pool fire series was to provide environmental information for open pool fires on a physics first principal basis. The experiments measured the burning rate of liquid fuel in an open pool and the resultant heat flux to a weapon-sized object and the surrounding environment with well-characterized boundary and initial conditions. Results presented in this report include a general description of test observation (pre- and post-test), wind measurements, fire plume topology, average fuel recession and heat release rates, and incident heat flux to the pool and to the calorimeters. As expected, results of the experiments show a strong correlation between wind conditions, fuel vaporization (mass loss) rate, and incident heat flux to the fuel and ground surface and calorimeters. Numerical fire simulations using both temporally- and spatially-dependant wind boundary conditions were performed using the Vulcan fire code. Comparisons of data to simulation predictions showed similar trends; however, simulation-predicted incident heat fluxes were lower than measured.

Sundberg, David W.; Brown, Alexander L.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High-temperature explosive development for geothermal well stimulation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-component, temperature-resistant liquid explosive called HITEX has been developed which is capable of withstanding 561/sup 0/K (550/sup 0/F) for 24 hours in a geothermal environment. The explosive is intended for the stimulation of nonproducing or marginally producing geothermal (hot dry rock, vapor-dominated or hydrothermal) reservoirs by fracturing the strata in the vicinity of a borehole. The explosive is inherently safe because it is mixed below ground downhole from two nondetonable liquid components. Development and safety tests included differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability, minerals compatibility, drop-weight sensitivity, adiabatic compression, electrostatic discharge sensitivity, friction sensitivity, detonation arrest capability, cook-off tests, detonability at ambient and elevated pressure, detonation velocity and thin film propagation in a wedge.

Schmidt, E.W.; Mars, J.E.; Wang, C.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is proposed, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio theory and adjusted to obtain agreement with a higher level (HL) ab initio theory. This approach is explored by training such a model on data for ethane and testing the resulting model on methane, propane and butane. The electronic distribution of the molecules is varied by placing them in strong electrostatic environments consisting of random charges placed on the corners of a cube. The results find that parameters embedded in HF/STO-3G theory can be adjusted to obtain agreement, to within about 2 kcal/mol, with results of HF/6-31G theory. Obtaining this level of agreement requires the use of parameters that are functions of the bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders within the molecules. The argument is made that this approach provides a well-controlled means to take advantage of molecular similarity in...

Tanha, Matteus; Cappiello, Alex; Gordon, Geoffrey J; Yaron, David J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is proposed, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio theory and adjusted to obtain agreement with a higher level (HL) ab initio theory. This approach is explored by training such a model on data for ethane and testing the resulting model on methane, propane and butane. The electronic distribution of the molecules is varied by placing them in strong electrostatic environments consisting of random charges placed on the corners of a cube. The results find that parameters embedded in HF/STO-3G theory can be adjusted to obtain agreement, to within about 2 kcal/mol, with results of HF/6-31G theory. Obtaining this level of agreement requires the use of parameters that are functions of the bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders within the molecules. The argument is made that this approach provides a well-controlled means to take advantage of molecular similarity in quantum chemistry.

Matteus Tanha; Shiva Kaul; Alex Cappiello; Geoffrey J. Gordon; David J. Yaron

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Research and development of improved geothermal well logging techniques, tools and components (current projects, goals and status). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is availability of adequate subsurface measurements to aid the reservoir engineer in the development and operation of geothermal wells. Some current projects being sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy pertaining to the development of improved well logging techniques, tools and components are described. An attempt is made to show how these projects contribute to improvement of geothermal logging technology in forming key elements of the overall program goals.

Lamers, M.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines, in detail, the procedures and practices undertaken in the drilling and completion phases of a Gulf of Mexico horizontal well in an unconsolidated sand. In particular, this thesis presents a detailed case history analysis of well planning, completion and cleanup operations. Our objectives are to present a complete examination of the openhole horizontal well construction/completion process using a new drill-in fluid (DIF). Further, we will establish data critical to development of new cleanup correlation techniques (the continuing goal of the CEA-73 industry consortium). Project results are intended to advance the technology progression of cleanup in horizontal welts by using a "Best Completion Practices'' well to establish a baseline analysis for development of rigsite DIF cleanup correlations. Presented in this thesis are: * Completion specifics of subject well * Audit of horizontal well design/well construction process * Documentation (on-location) of lignite practices * Laboratory analyses of DO cleanup * Well performance analysis Well audit results show that prudent DIF selection requires a thorough understanding of formation and reservoir specifics, along with completion and cleanup operations. Adequate pre-planning by lignite personnel for handling, weather problems, storage/mixing requirements and fluid property maintenance are very important for successful operations using DIF. Proper maintenance of solids control systems is essential for quality control of DIF properties. Detailed well planning by the operator (Vastar Resources), coupled with a conscientious mud service company (TBC-Brinadd, Houston), led to smooth execution of well completion/cleanup operations.aboratory analyses of field DIF samples taken during drilling show that entrained drill solids in DIF can greatly impact mudcaps removal during cleanup. However, well performance was roughly three times original expectations, achieving a stabilized gas flow rate of approximately 34 MMCF/D. Horizontal well decline type curve techniques and a proprietary analysis method developed by Conoco were used to estimate formation properties, using only wellhead production rates and pressures. Using these results, we estimated DIF cupcake removal for various reservoir permeability scenarios. Results suggest that a high percentage of DIF filtercake removal was achieved only if reservoir permeability was less than the permeability range (100-500 md) initially estimated by the operator.

Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants August 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has selected seven projects to develop sensors and controls to support the full-scale implementation and operation of highly efficient power generation technologies with near-zero emissions. The total award value of the projects is nearly $7 million, which includes $1.4 million in cost-sharing from the recipients. The projects will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Future power generation facilities are expected to be very complex, requiring a high level of system integration for efficient operation. To

96

Toward Lean Hardware/Software System Development: An Evaluation of Selected Complex Electronic System Development Methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of electronic hardware and software has become a major component of major DoD systems. This report surveys a wide set of new electronic hardware/software development methods and develops a system to evaluate ...

Hou, Alex

97

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants June 11, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The projects, totaling nearly $14.4 million, will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Pre-combustion processes convert fossil fuels into a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and CO2 prior to combustion. The CO2 is then separated and the

99

Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

John J. Kilbane II

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Experimental and statistical requirements for developing a well-defined K/sub IR/ curve. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Further development of a statistically well-defined reference fracture toughness curve to verify and compliment the K/sub IR/ curve presently specified in Appendix G, Section III of the ASME Code was accomplished by performing critical experiments in small specimen fracture mechanics and improving techniques for statistical analysis of the data. Except for cleavage-initiated fracture, crack initiation was observed to occur prior to maximum load for all of the materials investigated. Initiation fracture toughness values (K/sub Jc/) based on R-curve heat-tinting studies were up to 50 percent less than the previously reported equivalent energy values (K*/sub d/). At upper shelf temperatures, the initiation fracture toughness (K/sub Jc/) generally increased with stress intensification rate. Both K/sub Jc/--Charpy V-notch and K/sub Ic/--specimen strength ratio correlations are promising methods for predicting thick-section behavior from small specimens. The previously developed tanh curve fitting procedure was improved to permit estimates of the variances and covariances of the regression coefficients to be computed. The distribution of the fracture toughness data was determined as a function of temperature. Instrumented precracked Charpy results were used to normalize the larger specimen fracture toughness data. The transformed large specimen fracture toughness data are used to generate statistically based lower-bound fracture toughness curves for either static or dynamic test results. A comparison of these lower bound curves with the K/sub IR/ curve shows that the K/sub IR/ curve is more conservative over most of its range. 143 figures, 26 tables.

Server, W.L.; Oldfield, W.; Wullaert, R.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of improved gaskets, sealants and cables for use in geothermal well logging equipment. Final summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The inventigation of materials which could be used for fabricating elastomeric seals for geothermal well logging equipment is described. The seals were to be made either from a methylphenylcarborane-siloxane base gum stock, or from new fluoroelastomer compounds synthesized at Hughes Aircraft Company. A literature search was made to obtain data on carborane-siloxane polymers, synthesis routes for fluorinated elastomers and high temperature hydrolytic stability tests of elastomers. Information was obtained on the first two topics, but very little was available on hydrolysis testing. A number of compounds, based on carborane-siloxane, were formulated and cured. Compression set, hardness and shrinkage tests with postcure variations were made on the most promising formulations. A simple hydrolytic stability test at 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) and 830 psi was developed which indicated that both the carborane and siloxane bonds were easily broken after short exposure periods. Thermodynamic calculatons indicated that this result could be expected. Because of the agreement between empirical and theoretical data, work on the carborane-siloxanes was discontinued after approximately the first year. Synthesis efforts to produce a highly fluorinated elastomer based on perfluorolkylene oxide were continued through the entrie program. None of these routes produced a satisfactory elastomer.

Schwartz, S.; Basiulis, D.; Leyden, R.; Landis, A.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Validation and development of guidelines to select MRR strategies for rigid pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintenance, rehabilitation and reconstruction (MRR) work to rigid pavement roadways requires a great demand of time, effort, and money. The nature of this work not only affects state highway agencies (SHAs) but also, roadway users and local communities and businesses. This study identifies the critical issues SHAs must assess in the design phase of a MRR roadway project with the objective of selecting the preferred cost-effective pavement treatment, while minimizing traffic disruption, easing construction, and improving public acceptance. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to investigate the factors involved in the process for developing MRR strategies. Based on the literature review and assessment of current research, a decision process to develop, evaluate, and select appropriate MRR strategies was developed. This decision process was then presented to SHAs with the purpose of validating its comprehensiveness and practical nature. A guideline document that illustrates the main focus of each step of the decision process was developed. Two on-site interviews were performed with SHAs with the purpose of collecting data of two actual MRR highway projects and developing two case studies. The developed case studies illustrate the applicability of the guideline document and practical nature of the decision process.

Herrera, Edgar Efren

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Developed for Trusted Computing Group, www.trustedcomputinggroup.org Subj: SPC-3 Create well known LUN for trusted commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents a proposal to define a well known logical unit to process trusted commands. This feature is intended for use by array controllers and other multi-LUN devices, but may be implemented by single LUN devices as well. This proposal requires use of trusted commands described in related T10 proposal 05-157. Rev. 1: Change name of the well known LUN from “security ” commands to “trusted ” commands. Page 1 of 2Document T10/05-252 rev. 1 Add changes to table 333 in clause 8.1 as follows: (additions are underlined) 8.1 Model for well known logical units Well known logical units are addressed using the well known logical unit addressing method of extended logical unit addressing (see SAM-3). Each well known logical unit has a well known logical unit number (W-LUN) as shown in table 333. Table 333 – Well known logical unit numbers W-LUN Description Reference 0h Reserved 1h REPORT LUNS well known logical unit 8.2 2h ACCESS CONTROLS well known logical unit 8.3 3h REPORT TARGET PAGES well known logical unit 8.4 4h TRUSTED COMMANDS well known logical unit 8.5 5h- FFh Reserved Add new clause 8.5 as follows: 8.5 TRUSTED COMMANDS well known logical unit The TRUSTED COMMANDS well known logical unit shall only process the commands listed in table xx. If a command is received by the TRUSTED COMMANDS well known logical unit that is not listed in table xx, then the command shall be terminated with CHECK CONDITION status, with the sense key set to ILLEGAL REQUEST, and the additional sense code set to INVALID

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Developed for Trusted Computing Group, www.trustedcomputinggroup.org Subj: SPC-3 Create well known LUN for security commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents a proposal to define a well known logical unit to process security commands. This feature is intended for use by array controllers and other multi-LUN devices, but may be implemented by single LUN devices as well. This proposal requires use of security commands described in related T10 proposal 05-157. Page 1 of 2Document T10/05-252 rev. 0 Add changes to table 333 in clause 8.1 as follows: (additions are underlined) 8.1 Model for well known logical units Well known logical units are addressed using the well known logical unit addressing method of extended logical unit addressing (see SAM-3). Each well known logical unit has a well known logical unit number (W-LUN) as shown in table 333. Table 333 – Well known logical unit numbers W-LUN Description Reference 0h Reserved 1h REPORT LUNS well known logical unit 8.2 2h ACCESS CONTROLS well known logical unit 8.3 3h REPORT TARGET PAGES well known logical unit 8.4 4h SECURITY COMMANDS well known logical unit 8.5 5h- FFh Reserved Add new clause 8.5 as follows: 8.5 SECURITY COMMANDS well known logical unit The SECURITY COMMANDS well known logical unit shall only process the commands listed in table xx. If a command is received by the SECURITY COMMANDS well know logical unit that is not listed in table xx, then the command shall be terminated with CHECK CONDITION status, with the sense key set to ILLEGAL REQUEST, and the additional sense code set to INVALID

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically, the development of a novel biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole was the focus of research in this project. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. Obtaining an enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol was the focus of much of the research in this project, however; no suitable enzyme was found. Project accomplishments included expressing the genes for carbazole dioxygenase in Rhodococcus erythropolis and Escherichia coli, development of gene expression vectors for Rhodococcus, and isolation of a Pseudomonas sp. strain GTIN-G4 that has the novel biochemical ability to replace one of the nitrogen-associated hydrogen atoms in 2-aminobiphenyl with formaldehyde. Rhodococcus cultures are capable of metabolizing a wide range of substrates, including hydrophobic substrates like petroleum, and may find widespread use in the development of biotechnology processes in the future. The results of this project will directly benefit the development of future biotechnology processes/projects employing Rhodococcus hosts. Three manuscripts were prepared and submitted for publication based on the data obtained in this project: (1) ''Formylation of 2-aminobiphenyl by Pseudomonas sp. strain GTIN-G4''; (2) ''Screening and Analysis of DNA Fragments that Show Promoter Activities in Rhodococcus erythropolis''; and (3) ''Microbial Biocatalyst Developments to Upgrade Fossil Fuels''.

John J. Kilbane II

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Developed for Trusted Computing Group, www.trustedcomputinggroup.org Subj: SPC-3 Create well known LUN for trusted commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents a proposal to define a well known logical unit to process trusted commands. This feature is intended for use by array controllers and other multi-LUN devices, but may be implemented by single LUN devices as well. This proposal requires use of trusted commands described in related T10 proposal 05-157. Rev. 1: Change name of the well known LUN from “security ” commands to “trusted ” commands. Rev. 2: Change name of the well known LUN from “trusted ” to “security protocol”. Page 1 of 2Document T10/05-252 rev. 2 Add changes to table 333 in clause 8.1 as follows: (additions are underlined) 8.1 Model for well known logical units Well known logical units are addressed using the well known logical unit addressing method of extended logical unit addressing (see SAM-3). Each well known logical unit has a well known logical unit number (W-LUN) as shown in table 333. Table 333 – Well known logical unit numbers W-LUN Description Reference 0h Reserved

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this paper focuses on developing general FOMs for the IHTL coolant selection and shows some estimation results.

Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

State-Of-The-Art in Permeability Determination From Well Log Data: Part 1-A Comparative Study, Model Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and the independent variables X ,...,X are well log variables. In their paper , Wendt1 p 4 and Sakurai established. Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, (November 1993). 12.Wendt, W.A., Sakurai, S., Nelson, P.H.: "Permeability Predic

Mohaghegh, Shahab

111

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Program WELLNESS POINTS BANK Renew your commitment to health. Start again October 1, 2012 to your family and friends, too. Your health and well-being are also important to the University of Minnesota. As your employer, the University recognizes the value of investing in a comprehensive Wellness

Thomas, David D.

112

Progress Toward Developing a Durable High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing the operating temperature of parabolic trough solar fields from 400 C to >450 C will increase their efficiency and reduce the cost of electricity. Current coatings do not have the stability and performance necessary to move to higher operating temperatures. The objective is to develop new, more efficient selective coatings with both high solar absoprtance ({alpha} > 0.96) and low thermal emittance ({var_epsilon} < 0.07) that are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H. W.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Selection of Model in Developing Information Security Criteria for Smart Grid Security System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the "Smart Grid" has emerged as one of the best advanced energy supply chains. This paper looks into the security system of smart grid via the smart planet system. The scope focused on information security criteria that impact on consumer trust and satisfaction. The importance of information security criteria is perceived as the main aspect to impact on customer trust throughout the entire smart grid system. On one hand, this paper also focuses on the selection of the model for developing information security criteria on a smart grid.

Ling, Amy Poh Ai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Development of Radioactive Ion Beam Purification by Selective Adsorption at the HRIBF  

SciTech Connect

In the past decades many techniques have been developed to reduce isobaric contaminations in ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) beams. Another promising method to achieve improved selectivity is employing surface effects in the transfer line between target container and ion source. Thus adsorption materials with suitable atomic structure and polarity can lead to a high chemical selectivity. The principle of selective adsorption has already been employed successfully in the past. Quartz transfer lines are applied on-line at ISOLDE and have been shown to reduce Rb contaminations by 5 orders of magnitude. Since quartz is the only compound that has been tested yet we plan to conduct a broad on-line study of the adsorption behavior of various elements on a range of materials. For testing at the On-Line Test Facility at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) a special target-ion source unit with a variable-temperature transfer line has been constructed in collaboration with the ISOLDE technical group. Based on the design of the ISOLDE prototype unit it was modified to match the unique capabilities of the OLTF. Preliminary results of on-line tests are presented.

Jost, C. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37833 (United States); Carter, H. K.; Goans, R. E.; Griffith, B. O.; Katakam, R.; Reed, C. A.; Spejewski, E. H. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37833 (United States); Kratz, K.-L. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Stora, T. [CERN-ISOLDE, CH-1211, Geneva (Switzerland); Stracener, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Marcellus Shale Exploration in Greene County, Pennsylvania: A Land Cover Study of the Cumulative Effects of Forest Fragmentation in Well Pad Site Selection and Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale geologic formation has increased greatly over the last decade. Of all the states that share this resource,… (more)

Steiner, Joshua Eugene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 11, 2009 June 11, 2009 DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The projects, totaling nearly $14.4 million, will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Pre-combustion processes convert fossil fuels into a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and CO2 prior to combustion. The CO2 is then separated and the hydrogen-rich gas can be used in power plants. Compared with post-combustion processes, the pressure and concentration of CO2 in pre-combustion processes are relatively high - offering the potential to apply novel CO2 capture technologies such as membranes, solvents and sorbents.

118

Development and validation of a smartphone heart rate acquisition application for health promotion and wellness telehealth applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective. Current generation smartphones' video camera technologies enable photoplethysmographic (PPG) acquisition and heart rate (HR) measurement. The study objective was to develop an Android application and compare HRs derived from a Motorola Droid ...

Mathew J. Gregoski; Martina Mueller; Alexey Vertegel; Aleksey Shaporev; Brenda B. Jackson; Ronja M. Frenzel; Sara M. Sprehn; Frank A. Treiber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Application Of Least Squares And Kriging In Multivariate Optimizations Of Field Development Scheduling And Well Placement Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study applied two multivariate interpolation algorithms, Least Squares and Kriging, to interpolate a limited number of data obtained from simulation in order to predict the optimal strategies in a field development scheduling project and a waterflood project with a significant reduction in the simulation efforts required. The two projects were application examples with known answers. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility and efficiency of multivariate interpolation in solving optimization problems by reducing the simulation effort required. The net present value was used as the objective function in both projects. The field development scheduling simulation was achieved by an economic model taking acount of all the costs and profits during the time period being studied. The waterflooding simulation was achieved by solving the Laplace equation and generating streamlines within the specified pattern. The movements of the waterfrontwere tracked and then the oil a...

A Report; Yan Pan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE-HDBK-1117-99; Guide to Good Practices for Maintenance Supervisor Selection and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-99 7-99 October 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1059-93 February 1993 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR SELECTION AND DEVELOPMENT U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1117-99 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by all DOE

122

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Selected legal and institutional issues related to Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), an attractive alternative to traditional energy sources, is still in the early stages of development. To facilitate OTEC commercialization, it is essential that a legal and institutional framework be designed now so as to resolve uncertainties related to OTEC development, primarily involving jurisdictional, regulatory, and environmental issues. The jurisdictional issues raised by OTEC use are dependent upon the site of an OTEC facility and its configuration; i.e., whether the plant is a semipermanent fixture located offshore or a migrating plant ship that provides a source of energy for industry at sea. These issues primarily involve the division of authority between the Federal Government and the individual coastal states. The regulatory issues raised are largely speculative: they involve the adaptation of existing mechanisms to OTEC operation. Finally, the environmental issues raised center around compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as well as international agreements. 288 references.

Nanda, V. P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiochemical and Chemical Constituents in Water from Selected Wells and Springs from the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled 18 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area. The samples were analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from 2 domestic wells, 12 irrigation wells, 2 stock wells, 1 spring, and 1 public supply well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the reported radiochemical or chemical constituent concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than the respective reporting levels. Most of the organic-constituent concentrations were less than the reporting levels.

R. C. Bartholomay; B. V. Twining (USGS); L. J. Campbell (Idaho Department of Water Resources)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Selective paint and black chrome coatings development. Semiannual report, June 5-December 5, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar selective black chrome and paint coatings were investigated to improve their performance and to develop techniques for large-scale applications. Formulations and processing conditions for thickness sensitive paint coatings were defined which consistently provide solar absorptance (..cap alpha..) of 0.90 and emittance (epsilon) of 0.10 on low emittance substrates. A significant improvement in abrasion resistance was achieved by decreasing the pigment volume concentration. Addition of aluminum flake to these formulations has resulted in a thickness insensitive coating with ..cap alpha.. = 0.90 and epsilon = 0.30. The critical bath components of a commercial black chrome plating process have been identified as hexavalent chromium, trivalent chromium, acetic acid and ferric ion. These components were varied and their effect on coating optical properties and durability at temperatures of 350-400/sup 0/C were studied. Coating thermal stability was significantly improved by reducing the trivalent chromium concentration from the normal 16 g/l to 12 g/l or less. Initial efforts have begun to optimize black chrome systems on aluminum substrates in terms of cost and durability.

Lin, R J.H.; Zimmer, P B

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Task 3 -- System selection; Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated has elected to pursue an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine system to exceed the goals of the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, which are to develop and commercialize an industrial gas turbine system that operates at thermal efficiencies at least 15% higher than 1991 products, and with emissions not exceeding eight ppmv NOx and 20 ppmv CO and UHC. Solar`s goal is to develop a commercially viable industrial system (3--20 MW) driven by a gas turbine engine with a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50), with the flexibility to meet the differing operational requirements of various markets. Dispersed power generation is currently considered to be the primary future target market for the ICR in the 5--15 MW size class. The ICR integrated system approach provides an ideal candidate for the assumed dispersed power market, with its small footprint, easy transportability, and environmental friendliness. In comparison with other systems that use water or toxic chemicals such as ammonia for NOx control, the ICR has no consumables other than fuel and air. The low pressure ratio of the gas turbine engine also is favorable in that less parasitic power is needed to pump the natural gas into the combustor than for simple-cycle machines. Solar has narrowed the ICR configuration to two basic approaches, a 1-spool, and a 2-spool version of the ATS50. The 1-spool engine will have a lower first-cost but lower part-power efficiencies. The 2-spool ATS may not only have better part-power efficiency, its efficiency will also be less sensitive to reduced turbine rotor inlet temperature levels. Thus hot-end parts life can be increased with only small sacrifices in efficiency. The flexibility of the 2-spool arrangement in meeting customer needs is its major advantage over the 1-spool. This Task 3 Topical Report is intended to present Solar`s preliminary system selection based upon the initial trade-off studies performed to date.

White, D.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Development and application of a framework for technology and model selection under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology selection is a complex decision problem that is often faced in process engineering. This has been a particularly important problem recently in the energy field, in which many new technologies have been proposed. ...

Berkelmans, Ingrid (Ingrid M.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies… (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The contribution of mobile telecommunication technology to sustainable development in selected countries in Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While most of the world's population resides in countries that are wealthy or developing, the rest reside in low-income and least developed countries (LDCs), left behind and growing more disconnected. At the same time, ...

Shih, Alexander (Alexander En-Tzu)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Strategic Selection of Sustainable Development of Mineral Resources in China's Mining Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degree of sustainable development of mineral resources (DSDMR) is the basis and security of mining cities’ sustainable development. Thus, how to promote the DSDMR of mining cities has been widespread concerned by people. This paper tries to search ...

Jiye Xiang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market. 4 figs.

Garrison, J.D.

1989-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels  

SciTech Connect

This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or range of values generally associated with better dispersability, is provided in the Appendix. Special attention was given to characterization of several surface-modified carbon blacks produced by Cabot Corporation through proprietary diazonium salts chemistry. As demonstrated in the report, these advanced carbons offer many advantages over traditional dispersions. They disperse very easily, do not require intensive mechanical shearing or sonication, and the particle size of the dispersed carbon black aggregates is in the target range of 0.15-0.20 {micro}m. The dispersions in water and HMTA/urea solutions are stable for at least 30 days; in conditions of simulated broth, the dispersions are stable for at least 6 hours. It is proposed that the optimization of the carbon black dispersing process is possible by replacing traditional carbon blacks and surfactants with surface-modified carbon blacks having suitable chemical groups attached on their surface. It is recognized that the method advanced in this report for optimizing the carbon black dispersion process is based on a limited number of tests made in aqueous and simulated broth conditions. The findings were corroborated by a limited number of tests carried out with ADUN solutions by the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). More work is necessary, however, to confirm the overall recommendation based on the findings discussed in this report: namely, that the use of surface-modified carbon blacks in the uranium-containing broth will not adversely impact the chemistry of the gelation process, and that high quality uranium oxicarbide (UCO) kernels will be produced after calcination.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geothermal Well Technology Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. An overview of the program is presented. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies encountered when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane was investigated. Unpromoted and promoted catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than the other metals (Rh, Li, K, Na, Zn, and Sn) for the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study. The effectiveness of the promoter increased with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. Among the catalysts tested, the Cu1Ce3 catalyst promoted with 1 weight % Mn was found to be the best catalyst for the SCR of NO with methane. This catalyst was subjected to long-term testing at the facilities of our industrial partner TDA Research. TDA report indicated that the performance of this catalyst did not deteriorate during 100 hours of operation and the activity and selectivity of the catalyst was not affected by the presence of SO{sub 2}. The conversions obtained by TDA were significantly lower than those obtained at Hampton University due to the transport limitations on the reaction rate in the TDA reactor, in which 1/8th inch pellets were used while the Hampton University reactor contained 250-425-{micro}m catalyst particles. The selected catalyst was also tested at the TDA facilities with high-sulfur heavy oil as the reducing agent. Depending on the heavy oil flow rate, up to 100% NO conversions were obtained. The temperature programmed desorption studies a strong interaction between manganese and cerium. Presence of manganese not only enhanced the reduction rate of NO by methane, but also significantly improved the N{sub 2} selectivity. To increase the activity of the Mn-promoted catalyst, the manganese content of the catalyst need to be optimized and different methods of catalyst preparation and different reactor types need to be investigated to lower the transport limitations in the reactor.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable factors such as land use, soil condition, and distance to streams to characterize pathogen sources across a watershed. The results support development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) where bacterial contamination is of concern. SELECT calculates potential E. coli loads by distributing the contributing source populations across suitable habitats, applying a fecal production rate, and then aggregating the potential load to the subwatersheds. SELECT provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within ArcGIS 9.X, where project parameters can be adjusted for various pollutant loading scenarios. A new approach for characterizing E. coli loads resulting from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into the SELECT methodology. The pollutant connectivity factor (PCF) module was created to identify areas potentially contributing E. coli loads to waterbodies during runoff events by weighting the influence of potential loading, runoff potential, and travel distance. Simulation results indicate livestock and wildlife are potentially contributing large amounts of E. coli in the Lake Granbury Watershed in areas where these contributing sources are not currently monitored for E. coli. The bacterial water quality violations near Lake Granbury are most likely the result of malfunctioning OWTSs and pet waste in the runoff. The automated SELECT was verified by characterizing the potential E. coli loading in the Plum Creek Watershed and comparing to results from a prior study (Teague, 2007). The E. coli potential load for the watershed was lower than the previous study due to major differences in assumptions. Comparing the average ranked PCF estimated by physical properties of the watershed with the statistical clustering of watershed characteristics provided similar groupings. SELECT supports the need to evaluate each contributing source separately to effectively allocate site specific best management practices (BMPs). This approach can be used as a screening step for determining areas where detailed investigation is merited. SELECT in conjunction with PCF and clustering analysis can assist decision makers develop Watershed Protection Plans (WPPs) and determine TMDLs.

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Engine Selection, Modeling, and Control Development for an Extended Range Electric Vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased pressure for fuel economy improvement in combination with rapid development of battery technology has brought focus to new vehicle architectures like: hybrid electric vehicles… (more)

Cooley, Robert Bradley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Selective paint development. Technical progress report, 5 December 1978-31 July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen hundred square feet of aluminum foil were coated with thickness-sensitive selective paint. The feasibility of a high speed, large-scale roller coating technique was demonstrated. Coating thermal stability, weathering and humidity resistance, and effects of pigment particle size on coating optical properties were studied. Thickness-insensitive paint with urethane binder was evaluated. A medium scale (1 kg) of thickness-insensitive paint solution was prepared which achieved an ..cap alpha../sub s/ of 0.90 and epsilon of 0.35.

McKelvey, W D; Zimmer, P B; Lin, R J.H.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Selection and development of air-injected frit slurry blasting for decontamination of DWPF canisters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canisters of waste glass produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant will be decontaminated by air-injected frit slurry blasting. The byproduct of this operation, contaminated frit slurry, will be used as part of the feed stock for the glass-making process. Therefore, no secondary waste will be created. Scouting tests of four different frit blasting techniques were conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory. The techniques investigated were dry blasting, direct pump slurry blasting, air-aspirated slurry blasting, and air-injected slurry blasting. The air-injected slurry blasting technique was chosen for development, based on results of these scouting tests. A detailed development program was undertaken to optimize the air-injected frit slurry blasting process. 3 references, 28 figures.

Ward, C.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of radionuclide, inorganic constituent, and organic compound data from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1989--1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, evaluated the water quality data collected from 55 wells and springs during 1989 and 1990 through 1992 from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho. Water samples collected in 1989-92 were analyzed for selected radionuclides, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. A statistical comparison between data collected in 1989 and data collected in 1990-92 along with a comparison of replicate pairs was used to evaluate changes in water quality between samples and to assess sampling and analysis precision for individual constituents. The comparisons of radionuclide data showed no pattern of water quality change between samples as concentrations randomly increased or decreased. Tritium concentrations did show a consistent pattern with location in the aquifer. The largest tritium concentrations occurred in water from wells in the Big Wood and Little Wood River drainages and in the southern part of the study area where heavy irrigation occurs. The variability of radionuclide concentrations may be attributed to the change in the contract laboratory used for radiochemical analyses between 1989 and 1990. The replicate data for radionuclides showed better overall reproducibility for data collected in 1990-92 than for 1989, as 70 of 76 replicate pairs were statistically equivalent for 1990-92 data whereas only 55 of 73 replicate pairs were equivalent for 1989 data. The comparisons of most of the inorganic constituent data showed no statistical change between samples. Exceptions include nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and orthophosphate as phosphorus data. Fifteen sample pairs for nitride plus nitrate and 18 sample pairs for orthophosphate were not statistically equivalent and concentrations randomly increased or decreased.

Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.; Campbell, L.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geothermal well stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Development and Validation of Marker-Aided Selection Methods for Wood Property Traits in Loblolly Pine and Hybrid Poplar  

SciTech Connect

Wood properties influence pulp and paper quality. Certainly, overall pulp yields are directly related to the cellulose content, changes in hemicellulose content are associated with changes in pulp cohesiveness, and pulping efficiency is related to lignin content. Despite the importance of wood properties on product quality, little progress has been made in improving such traits because current methods of assessing wood and fiber characteristics are time-consuming, expensive, and often imprecise. Genetic improvement of wood and fiber properties has been further hampered by the large size of trees, delayed reproductive maturity and long harvest cycles. Recent developments in molecular genetics will help overcome the physical, economic and biological constraints in assessing and improving wood properties. Genetic maps consisting of numerous molecular markers are now available for loblolly pine and hybrid poplar. Such markers/maps may be used as part of a marker-aided selection and breeding effort or to expedite the isolation and characterization of genes and/or promoters that directly control wood properties. The objectives of this project are: (1) to apply new and rapid analytical techniques for assessing component wood properties to segregating F2 progeny populations of loblolly pine and hybrid poplar, (2) to map quantitative trait loci and identify molecular markers associated with wood properties in each of the above species and (3) to validate marker-aided selection methods for wood properties in loblolly pine and hybrid poplar.

Tuskan, G.A.

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Selected Developed Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a point in this subset closest to the the point in R in the Power sense. ... If a rectangle in the form of a 2-d rectangular grid can be associated with the ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

149

Geothermal well stimulation program: opening remarks  

SciTech Connect

The history of well stimulation and the development of the geothermal well stimulation program are reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Methodology to Develop and Test an Easy-to-use Procedure for the Preliminary Selection of High-performance Systems for Office Buildings in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A procedure has been developed for the preliminary selection of high-performance systems for office buildings in hot and humid climates. High-performance building systems and components were surveyed for buildings in the U.S., which were applicable for office buildings in hot and humid climates. This research developed a calibrated DOE-2.1e simulation model of a prototypical large office building. In addition, a Simplified Geometry DOE-2.1e (SGDOE-2.1e) model, was also developed, which used a simplified geometry to demonstrate the use of a proposed easy-to-use tool. The calibrated DOE-2.1e simulation model and the SGDOE-2.1e were compared and showed a good match with each. The SGDOE-2.1e model was then further modified based on the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 commercial building energy code. A code-compliant (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999) SGDOE-2.1e simulation model was then used as a baseline for the evaluation of the high-performance measures. A total of 14 high-performance measures were implemented including the energy savings, while the comfort level was maintained based on the ASHRAE comfort zone. In addition to the 14 high-performance measures, solar thermal and solar PV system analysis were integrated with the SGDOE-2.1e simulation model to further reduce the annual energy use. Finally, specifications of the proposed easy-to-use simulation tool were developed. This tool includes options to choose systems from the 14 high-performance measures and solar systems. The proposed easy-to-use systems selection tool can be used for new building practitioners and existing building owners as well to evaluate the performance of their new buildings compared to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 code-compliant building, and to assess the feasibility of implementing high-performance measures to their existing buildings in terms of energy and cost savings.

Cho, Sool Yeon

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Methodology to Develop and Test an Easy-To-Use Procedure for the Preliminary Selection of High-Performance Systems for Office Buildings in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A procedure has been developed for the preliminary selection of high-performance systems for office buildings in hot and humid climates. High-performance building systems and components were surveyed for buildings in the U.S., which were applicable for office buildings in hot and humid climates. This research developed a calibrated DOE-2.1e simulation model of a prototypical large office building. In addition, a Simplified Geometry DOE-2.1e (SGDOE-2.1e) model, was also developed, which used a simplified geometry to demonstrate the use of a proposed easy-to-use tool. The calibrated DOE-2.1e simulation model and the SGDOE-2.1e were compared and showed a good match with each. The SGDOE-2.1e model was then further modified based on the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 commercial building energy code. A code-compliant (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999) SGDOE-2.1e simulation model was then used as a baseline for the evaluation of the high-performance measures. A total of 14 high-performance measures iv were implemented including the energy savings, while the comfort level was maintained based on the ASHRAE comfort zone. In addition to the 14 high-performance measures, solar thermal and solar PV system analysis were integrated with the SGDOE-2.1e simulation model to further reduce the annual energy use. Finally, specifications of the proposed easy-to-use simulation tool were developed. This tool includes options to choose systems from the 14 high-performance measures and solar systems. The proposed easy-to-use systems selection tool can be used for new building practitioners and existing building owners as well to evaluate the performance of their new buildings compared to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 code-compliant building, and to assess the feasibility of implementing high-performance measures to their existing buildings in terms of energy and cost savings.

Cho, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Selective detection of inactivating mutations of the p53 tumour suppressor gene: Development of a new functional assay in yeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alterations of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in human cancer are mainly missense mutations. We have previously described a functional assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on a HIS3 reporter system, which allows the selective detection of mutations which have inactivated the transcriptional activity of p53. We have now developed a simpler reporter system in which yeast change color according to their p53 status. We used an ade2-1 strain which contains an intergrated copy of the ADE2 open reading frame controlled by a p53-sensitive promoter. In the absence of wild-type p53, the strain is red due to the accumulation of an intermediate in adenine metabolism. As in the previous assay, we transform PCR-amplified p53 cDNA directly into the strain and clone them into a p53 expression vector by homologous recombination in vivo. Colonies that contain wild-type p53 overcome the block in adenine synthesis and become white. After two days, the white/red system allows to distinguish very easily wild-type and mutant p53 alleles. This new assay is a simple and rapid method to detect inactivating p53 mutations in clinical samples.

Frebourg, T.; Flaman, J.M. [CHU de Rouen (France); Iggo, R. [ISREC, Epalinges (Switzerland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood.

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

155

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

156

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

157

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

158

What's new in well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillers know that the most important tools used in well control are preparation and knowledge. That fact is reinforced by government agency requirements for certification of responsible people on the rig, particularly in sensitive public areas like offshore waters. And existing problems like shallow gas blowouts and kick control in conventional wells have been complicated by industry's move to horizontal wells and underbalanced drilling. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) in the US and Europe is devoting a major effort to well control technology. It sponsored a comprehensive conference in Houston in November 1993, plus a well control trainer's Roundtable meeting in Houston in March. The IADC Well Control Conference for Europe is scheduled for June 8--10, 1994, in Stavanger, Norway, with an important 22-paper program. In this article, World Oil has selected several presentations from the two US IADC conferences noted above. These selections are noted by the authors as being of wide and current interest to the industry, they include: (1) horizontal well considerations, (2) a proposed new well killing method, (3) underbalanced drilling, (4) a new onsite simulator, and (5) IADC's school accreditation program. Summaries shown here cover only major topics. Original papers should be consulted for important details.

Snyder, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Oil well jar  

SciTech Connect

A jar for use in imparting jarring blows to an object lodged in the bore of a well. The jar includes a mandrel member and outer telescopically related tubular member, the mandrel member and said tubular member being telescopically movable between an extended and a collapsed position of the jar. One of the members is connected to a drill string while the other of the members is connected to the object to be jarred. Telescopically overlapping portions of the members provide an annular chamber for confining an operating fluid. A sleeve and a cylinder extend into the chamber and into an essentially fluid tight fit with each other for a selected portion of the telescopic travel between the extended and collapsed positions. An operating fluid bypass is provided in the first one of the members, the bypass being in fluid communication with the operating fluid above and below the sleeve, the bypass including a channel. An orifice is disposed in the channel. A filter, distinct from said orifice, is provided by controlling the clearences between the sleeve and the first one of the members.

Sutliff, W. N.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of improved gaskets, sealants and cables for use in geothermal well logging equipment. Interim summary report, January 1--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work is presented on materials which could be used for fabricating elastomeric seals for geothermal well logging equipment. A literature search was made to obtain data on carborane--siloxane polymers, synthesis routes for fluorinated elastomers, and high temperature hydrolytic stability tests of elastomers. Information was obtained on the first two topics, but very little was available on hydrolysis testing. A number of compounds, based on carbonane--siloxane, were formulated and cured. Compression set, hardness and shrinkage tests with post-cure variations were made on the most promising formulations. Hydrolytic stability tests at 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) and 830 psi and thermodynamic calculations indicated that the carborane and the siloxane bonds were easily broken after short exposure periods. Work on this polymer was therefore discontinued. Synthetic efforts to produce a perfluorinated elastomer are still continuing. A second elastomer ''Fasil'', not in the original proposal, based on a fluorinated siloxane, was also synthesized. A gum stock was prepared and subjected to the hydrolytic stability test. Extensive deterioration was observed after a short period of time. Work was discontinued on this polymer. Additional hydrolysis tests were run on other promising polymers. These included polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide and pentaphenyl oxide. Good resistance was shown by the phenylene oxides and the polyphenylene sulfide.

Schwartz, S.; Basiulis, D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a 72-hour round the clock production run for each of the three project coals (Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana VII). The parametric testing results confirmed that the Taggart coal ground to a D80 of 30 microns could be cleaned to 1 lb ash/MBtu, whereas the Hiawatha and Indiana Vil coals had to be ground to D80s of 40 and 20 microns, respectively, to be cleaned to 2 lb ash/MBtu. The percent solids, residence time, shear intensity (impeller tip speed and energy input per unit volume), and heptane dosage were the main variables that affected successful operation (phase inversion or microagglomerate formation in the high-shear reactor and their growth to 2-3 mm in size during low shear). Downward inclination of the vibrating screen and adequate spray water helped produce the low ash products. Btu recoveries were consistently greater than 98%. Two-stage steam stripping achieved about 99% heptane recovery for recycle to the process. Residual hydrocarbon concentrations were in the 3000 to 5000 ppm range on a dry solids basis.

Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of an advanced reprocessing system based on use of pyrrolidone derivatives as novel precipitants with high selectivity and control ability - precipitation behavior of plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation behavior of Pu with pyrrolidone derivatives of N-butyl-2-pyrrolidone (NBP) and N-propyl- 2-pyrrolidone (NProP) has been examined to develop a simple reprocessing process of spent nuclear fuel based only on precipitation method. It has been already found that one of the pyrrolidone derivatives, N-cyclohexyl-2- pyrrolidone (NCP), can selectively precipitate UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions in aqueous HNO{sub 3} solutions and a process consisting of two separation processes; selective U precipitation process and U-Pu co-precipitation process, was developed with NCP. In the present study, Pu precipitation from solutions of only Pu and U-Pu mixture with NBP and NProP was examined to evaluate their applicability to the selective U precipitation process. Both NBP and NProP have lower hydrophobicity and donicity than NCP, and are, therefore, expected to make the U precipitation more selective and effective. It was found that the precipitation ability of NBP and NProP for Pu is lower than that of NCP and the lower coprecipitation and faster re-dissolution of Pu(IV) in the mixed solution of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was obtained in the precipitation with NBP and NProP than with NCP. From these results, it is expected that NBP and NProP would make the selective U precipitation process more selective and effective. (authors)

Morita, Yasuji; Kim, Seong-Yun [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa; Nogami, Masanobu [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Nishimura, Kenji [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Submarine oil well production apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A submergible apparatus for producing an oil or gas well beneath the surface of a body of water consists of an oil and gas separator having a pair of elongated horizontal ballast tanks attached thereto and means for selectively filling the ballast tanks with water or air. A pair of movable buoyancy vessels is attached to the separator and means for selectively moving the buoyancy vessels to alternate positions with respect to the separator are provided so that the apparatus has maximum stability while being towed on the surface of the body of water or submerged therein. (16 claims)

McMinn, R.E.; Tournoux, P.M.; Milnes, D.S.

1973-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

168

Development of a Simulation Toolkit for the Selection of High-Performance Systems for Office Buildings in Hot and Humid Climates (Phase I: Calibrated Simulation of the Case Study Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of an easy-to-use tool for the selection of high-performance systems in office buildings in hot and humid climates. In this paper, the preliminary results of a calibrated simulation of a typical large office building are presented for the John Connally building (124,000 sq-ft) in College Station, TX. To calibrate the DOE-2 simulation model, measured data were retrieved from permanently installed data loggers in the building, which measured whole-building electricity use and sub-metered cooling electricity use, lighting and miscellaneous equipment use, as well as thermal energy measurements for chilled water and hot water use. Also used in the calibration process were portable data loggers for comparing the performance of the building’s air-handling units with the simulated performance. For the calibration of the DOE-2 model, several calibration methodologies were used, including manual & iterative calibrations, graphical & statistical analysis, and signature analysis. This calibrated simulation model will be used as a base-case model for the development of a easy-to-use simulation tool for the selection of high-performance systems in office buildings in hot and humid climates. This paper presents the calibrated simulation results of the office building and outlines the additional steps for the development of the high-performance systems selection tool.

Cho, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

170

Well Flix Program Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well Flix's in the Well-U library. These DVD's have been made available so employees may learn about a variety of fitness for a one-week basis at no cost. Contact Well U at well-u-info@rochester.edu for DVD rental. Click the link

Portman, Douglas

171

Perception of principals in the southern, urban U.S. and eastern, urban China regarding the selection, preparation, and professional development of elementary principals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective principal is the catalyst for an effective school. For this reason, it is imperative that education stakeholders all over the world become responsible for addressing the selection, preparation and development of principals. The purpose of this study is to explore the similarities and differences in the selection process, preparation programs and the professional development practices as perceived by elementary school principals in urban public schools in the southern U.S and urban public schools in eastern China. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and acquire and analyze data. The sample consisted of fourteen elementary school principals in a southern, urban area in the U.S. and an eastern, urban area in China selected via a purposive sample. The researcher visited their campuses between September, 2004 and January, 2005. Intensive interviews and observations were used to gather information from principals in American and Chinese urban elementary schools. Data from interviews were unitized into categories. Some of the conclusions included: ?? The American respondents indicated that current admission criteria for entrance into educational leadership programs were not sufficient for identifying a candidate??s aptitude for being a successful principal. ?? The Chinese principals believed that most selected Chinese principals are successful school leaders. ?? The American principals were satisfied with the effectiveness of the university preparation programs. ?? The Chinese principals were not satisfied with the effectiveness of classroom instruction of preparation programs. ?? The American principals felt that their professional development programs were helpful for improving their practice and their schools. ?? The Chinese principals were not satisfied with the effectiveness of the professional development programs. ?? Similarities and differences exist between the American and Chinese respondents?? perceptions of selection, preparation, and professional development.

Lin, Jie

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

Supplier selection using fuzzy AHP and fuzzy multi-objective linear programming for developing low carbon supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental sustainability of a supply chain depends on the purchasing strategy of the supply chain members. Most of the earlier models have focused on cost, quality, lead time, etc. issues but not given enough importance to carbon emission for supplier ... Keywords: Carbon emission, Fuzzy AHP, Fuzzy multi-objective linear programming, Green house gas, Supplier selection, Textile supply chain

Krishnendu Shaw; Ravi Shankar; Surendra S. Yadav; Lakshman S. Thakur

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Novel selective surface flow (SSF{trademark}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogen from waste gas streams. Phase 2: Technology development, final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Phase II of the Selective Surface Flow Membrane program was Technology Development. Issues addressed were: (i) to develop detailed performance characteristics on a 1 ft{sup 2} multi- tube module and develop design data, (ii) to build a field test rig and complete field evaluation with the 1 ft{sup 2} area membrane system, (iii) to implement membrane preparation technology and demonstrate membrane performance in 3.5 ft long tube, (iv) to complete detailed process design and economic analysis.

Anand, M.; Ludwig, K.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

177

Well-centered meshing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well-centered simplex is a simplex whose circumcenter lies in its interior, and a well-centered mesh is a simplicial mesh in which every simplex is… (more)

Vanderzee, Evan B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geothermal well stimulation treatments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of proppants in geothermal environments and two field experiments in well stimulation are discussed. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

182

High temperature spectral gamma well logging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high temperature spectral gamma tool has been designed and built for use in small-diameter geothermal exploration wells. Several engineering judgments are discussed regarding operating parameters, well model selection, and signal processing. An actual well log at elevated temperatures is given with spectral gamma reading showing repeatability.

Normann, R.A.; Henfling, J.A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the period July-September, 1996. Activities included studies of the oxidation of dimethyl ether over vanadyl pyrophosphate and synthesis of all previously acquired kinetic data. This synthesis revealed the need for additional data on methane and methanol oxidation and these experiments were performed. A further series of methanol oxidation/dehydration experiments was conducted on samples with varying surface acidity that have been described in earlier reports. Oxidation of methane over Cr- promoted VPO was also reinvestigated. The kinetic studies performed to date allow us to determine optimum conditions for methanol and formaldehyde production from methane using VPO catalysts, and in particular determine the effect of lean conditions (excess oxygen), oxygen deficient conditions (used in most other methane oxidation studies), and the potential of using the catalyst as a stoichiometric oxidant or oxygen carrier. However, unpromoted VPO yields only CO as the primary oxidation product. Studies of promoters have shown improvements in the formaldehyde selectivity but no methanol has been observed. The best promoters tested have been Fe and Cr (results for Cr are described in this report). We have also examined the use of iron phosphate for the methane conversion reaction. FePO{sub 4}is a more selectivity catalyst than the promoted VPO materials. Support of this iron phosphate on silica results in further improvements in selectivity. Current work is directed at understanding the improved selectivity for promoted VPO and at obtaining a knowledge of the optimum conditions for methane conversion of iron phosphate. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

185

Development of selective peptide- and protein-based reporters of kinase activity utilizing chelation-enhanced fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyzed by kinases, serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation is a vital mechanism of intracellular regulation and is involved in nearly every aspect of normal, as well as aberrant, cell function. With more than 500 ...

Lukovi?, Elvedin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

187

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Selected References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.C. Fowler, Value Analysis in Materials Selection and Design, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

189

Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Demonstration Development Project: Solicitation and Selection of a Site to Test a Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an increasing demand for renewable energy throughout the world, the ability to produce power while minimizing environmental impacts has become a driving force in the continued development of hydropower. A new hydropower turbine that has the potential to contribute to power demands while minimally impacting fish populations is the Alden turbine, which was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program and, more recently, Electric Power Research...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NOX IN OXYGEN RICH ENVIRONMENTS WITH PLASMA-ASSISTED CATALYSIS: CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND MECHANISTIC STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ''lean-burn'' vehicle engines remains a challenge. In recent years, there have been a number of reports that show that a plasma device combined with a catalyst can reduce as high as 90% or more of NOx in simulated diesel and other ''lean-burn'' exhaust. In the case of propylene containing simulated diesel exhaust, the beneficial role of a plasma treatment is now thought to be due to oxidation of NO to NO2, and the formation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons that are more active for the catalytic reduction of NO2 than propylene. Thus, the overall system can be most usefully described as hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) enhanced by 'reforming' the exhaust with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) device. For plasma-enhanced catalysis, both zeolite- and alumina-based materials have shown high activity, albeit in somewhat different temperature ranges, when preceded by an NTP reactor. This paper will briefly describe our research efforts aimed at optimizing the catalyst materials for NTP-catalysis devices based, in part, on our continuing studies of the NTP- and catalytic-reaction mechanisms. Various alkali- and alkaline earth-cation-exchanged Y zeolites have been prepared, their material properties characterized, and they have been tested as catalytic materials for NOx reduction in laboratory NTP-catalysis reactors. Interestingly, NO2 formed in the plasma and not subsequently removed over these catalysts, will back-convert to NO, albeit to varying extents depending upon the nature of the cation. Besides this comparative reactivity, we will also discuss selected synthesis strategies for enhancing the performance of these zeolite-based catalyst materials. A particularly important result from our mechanistic studies is the observation that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, acetaldehyde has been found to be especially effective in the thermal reduction of both NO and NO2 over Ba- and Na-Y zeolite catalysts.

Peden, C; Barlow, S; Hoard, J; Kwak, J; *Balmer-Millar, M; *Panov, A; Schmieg, S; Szanyi, J; Tonkyn, R

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

conducting semiconductor process development. His early work was in the area of silicon defects resulting from ion implantation and isolation stress, as well as process integration issues which led to the development and subsequent production of the first  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the trend of creating flight code with state chart modeling and auto-code generation, NASA ‘s Deep Impact (DI) project uses Stateflow @ for its Fault Protection Flight Software development. In a parallel task, model checking, a powerful and formal verification technique, is being used to partially validate the DI fault protection responses against a set of core behavioral correctness properties. The Hi Vy Toolset described in this work enables model checking for state chart-based designs by providing a formal method-based capability for automated state chart translation from Stateflow@ into Promela, the input language of the Spin model checker. The results of this approach are compared against a traditional test script-based validation using

K. J. Barltrop; P. J. Pingree

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Geothermal Well Stimulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MERCURY MANAGEMENT ON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SITES: THE MER01-MER04 AND MERCURY SPECIATION DEMONSTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA), funded from fiscal year (FY) 1996 though FY 2002, was tasked with finding solutions for the mixed waste treatment problems of the DOE complex. During TMFA's initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal technologies for the treatment of mercury-contaminated mixed waste. The Mercury Working Group (HgWG), a selected group of representatives from DOE sites with significant mercury waste inventories, assisted TMFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. Solicitations and contract awards were made to the private sector to demonstrate both the amalgamation and stabilization processes using both actual mixed wastes and surrogate samples. The goal was to develop separation and removal processes that will meet DOE's needs. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of TMFA through these various activities.

Morris, Michael I.; Hulet, Greg A.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, April 1995--June 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the ninth quarterly technical progress report under Contract No. DE-AC22-92PC92110 {open_quotes}Development of Vanadium-Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane{close_quotes}. Activities were focused on fine tuning of the microreactor system by elimination of transport effects and improvements in the analytical system. Process variable studies were conducted on vanadyl pyrophosphate and screening studies were conducted on several modified catalyst. One additional catalyst was prepared and characterization studies continued. These results are reported.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers. Ground Water. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). 2010. “Well Development by Hydrofracturing.” http://des.nh.gov/o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathways—advective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fractures—could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults.

Tom Myers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of vanidum-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities this past quarter, focused on acquisition of kinetic data for oxidation of formaldehyde and methanol on these catalysts. In the next quarter these results will be used to propose a simple reaction network and kinetic model. To date we have completed Task 1: Laboratory Setup and Task 2: Process Variable Study. Activities in the current quarter focused on finalizing these tasks and on Task 3: Promoters and Supports, this task is approximately 50% completed. Task 4: Advanced Catalysts is to be initiated in the next quarter. Specific accomplishments this quarter include: finalizing and calibrating a new reaction product analytical system with markedly improved precision and accuracy relative to older. approaches; development of procedures for accurately feeding formaldehyde to the reactor; examination of formaldehyde and methanol oxidation kinetics over vanadyl pyrophosphate at a range of temperatures; and preliminary studies of methane oxidation over a silica support.

McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Well completions in the Beta Field, Offshore California  

SciTech Connect

The heavy oil reservoir in the Beta Field, Offshore California is thick (up to 1200 feet gross), unconsolidated, consists of nine distinct sand intervals, and lies at a shallow depth. In order to economically develop the field from two platforms and be able to waterflood, the development wells must be highly deviated with an 'S' shaped profile, have isolated multi-zone completions designed with the capability to selectively inject or produce any combination of zones, and produce virtually sand-free because of the use of electric submersible pumps for artificial lift. To meet these requirements, new completion techniques were developed. This paper reviews the overall completion sequence starting with primary cementing and zonal isolation, through perforating and perforation cleanup, and finishing with the inside casing gravel packing and gravel pack logging. The new techniques have proved expedient and successful, with 40 producing wells containing a total of 152 individual zones completed as of December, 1982.

Bruist, E.H.; Botts, T.M.; Jefferis, R.G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Improved geothermal well logging tools  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal well logging tool has been designed to operate at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi. The logging tool will initially consist of a manometer, a gradiomanometer and a thermometer; the electrical and mechanical design is such that a flowmeter and a caliper can be added as a later development. A unique feature of the logging tool is that it contains no downhole active electronics. The manometer is a standard high temperature pressure gauge. The gradiomanometer consists of a differential pressure gauge which is coupled to ports separated vertically by 2 ft. The differential pressure gauge is a new development; it is designed to measure a differential pressure up to 2 psi at a line pressure of 10,000 psi. The thermometer is a platinum resistance thermometer previously developed for oil well logging. The pressure gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges are both strain gauge types which allows all three gauges to be connected in series and driven from a constant current supply. This arrangement makes it possible to use a standard seven-conductor cable with no downhole switching. The joints in the sonde are electron beam welded, thus eliminating any sealed joints in the sonde wall. The logging tool will be tested first in an autoclave and in a geothermal well later in the program.

Kratz, H.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mechanical well jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a mechanical well jar having inner and outer tubular members movable longitudinally relative to each other a limited distance. Means for connecting one of the members to a pipe string extends above the jar. Means connect the other member to the pipe string below the jar. Annular shoulders on the members engage to limit the relative longitudinal movement of the members. The improvement comprises: laterally spaced, arcuate cam plates each attached to the inner surface of the outer member by threaded members that extend through the wall of the outer member and that can be removed from outside the outer member to allow the cam plates to be removed and repaired or replaced.

Burton, C.A.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Peer Program Volunteer Job Description Wellness Peer Programs: Leave The Pack Behind & Wellness Centre, UTSC Mental Wellness ­ mental health awareness program focusing on mental health, coping on healthy relationships, sexually transmitted infections and birth control Health & Wellness Centre

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

213

AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the potential advantage for more efficient destruction of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) relative to MOX fuel. Greater efficiency in plutonium reduction results in greater flexibility in managing plutonium inventories and in developing strategies for disposition of MA, as well as a potential for fuel cycle cost savings. Because fabrication of plutonium-bearing (and MA-bearing) fuel is expensive relative to UO{sub 2} in terms of both capital and production, cost benefit can be realized through a reduction in the number of plutonium-bearing elements required for a given burn rate. In addition, the choice of matrix material may be manipulated either to facilitate fuel recycling or to make plutonium recovery extremely difficult. In addition to plutonium/actinide management, an inert matrix fuel having high thermal conductivity may have operational and safety benefits; lower fuel temperatures could be used to increase operating and safety margins, uprate reactor power, or a combination of both. The CANDU reactor offers flexibility in plutonium management and MA burning by virtue of online refueling, a simple bundle design, and good neutron economy. A full core of inert matrix fuel containing either plutonium or a plutonium-actinide mix can be utilized, with plutonium destruction efficiencies greater than 90%, and high (>60%) actinide destruction efficiencies. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) could allow additional possibilities in the design of an IMF bundle, since the tighter lattice pitch and light-water coolant reduce or eliminate the need to suppress coolant void reactivity, allowing the center region of the bundle to include additional fissile material and to improve actinide burning. The ACR would provide flexibility for management of plutonium and MA from the existing LWR fleet, and would be complementary to the AFCI program in the U.S. Many of the fundamental principles concerning the use of IMF are nearly identical in LWRs and the ACR, including fuel/coolant compatibility, fuel fabrication, and fuel irradiation behavior. In addition, the U.S. and Canada both

William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report 10, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the tenth quarterly technical progress report under Contract No. DE-AC22-92PC92110 {open_quotes}Development of Vanadium-Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane{close_quotes}. Activities focused on testing of additional modified and promoted catalysts and characterization of these materials. Attempts at improving the sensitivity of our GC based analytical systems were also made with some success. Methanol oxidation studies were initiated. These results are reported. Specific accomplishments include: (1) Methane oxidation testing of a suite of catalysts promoted with most of the first row transition metals was completed. Several of these materials produced low, difficult to quantify yields of formaldehyde. (2) Characterization of these materials by XRD and FTIR was performed with the goal of correlating activity and selectivity with catalyst properties. (3) We began to characterize catalysts prepared via modified synthesis methods designed to enhance acidity using TGA measurements of acetonitrile chemisorption and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether as a test reaction. (4) A catalyst prepared in the presence of naphthalene methanol as a structural disrupter was tested for activity in methane oxidation. It was found that this material produced low yields of formaldehyde which were difficult to quantify. (5) Preparation of catalysts with no Bronsted acid sites. This was accomplished by replacement of exchangeable protons with potassium, and (6) Methanol oxidation studies were initiated to provide an indication of catalyst activity for decomposition of this desired product and as a method of characterizing the catalyst surface.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Significance of Selective Predation and Development of Prey Protection Measures for Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia and Snake River Reservoirs: Annual Progress Report, February 1991-February 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual report of progress for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) research Project conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Our approach was to present the progress achieved during 1991 in a series of separate reports for each major project task. Each report is prepared in the format of a scientific paper and is able to stand alone, whatever the state of progress or completion. This project has two major goals. One is to understand the significance of selective predation and prey vulnerability by determining if substandard juvenile salmonids (dead, injured, stressed, diseased, or naive) are more vulnerable to predation by northern squawfish, than standard or normal juvenile salmonids. The second goal is to develop and test prey protection measures to control predation on juvenile salmonids by reducing predator-smolt encounters or predator capture efficiency.

Poe, Thomas P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Author Select  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Author Select Last Name First Name search Type in a name, or the first few letters of a name, in one or both of appropriate search boxes above and select "Go". An attempt will be...

218

Our Process of Paper Selection - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each of the papers in this volume has been selected because the authors are ` well-known', and their reputation was a significant factor in this selection process.

219

Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. (Baker Sand Control, Houston, TX (US))

1990-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

222

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

223

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

225

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness counseling appointments: To schedule an appointment with a wellness counselor you may call, email, or simply stop by the Center for Student Wellness to leave a note for a wellness counselor-304-5564 (p) 212-304-5560 (p) 212-544-1967 (f) Email: studentwellness@columbia.edu Wellness information

Grishok, Alla

228

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, July--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the eighth quarterly technical progress report. During this quarter the project was initiated, after transfer via a novation agreement, at the Colorado School of Mines. Project initiation activities have included: set up of catalyst synthesis apparatus; training on x-ray diffraction and FTIR apparatus; set up of catalyst testing reactor; set up of reactor product analytical systems; and set up of method development for measuring catalyst acidity via FTIR. At the end of this quarter significant progress had been made towards completion of these initiation activities. Several catalyst syntheses have been performed and the catalysts characterized by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The catalyst testing reactor system is operational. Reactor product analysis system is nearing completion. Initiation of this system was delayed by the unavailability of a Valco valve which has just recently arrived. Set up of the in-situ FTIR cell for catalyst acidity studies has begun. In this report the results of several catalyst syntheses are reported along with characterization results. In particular, impregnation of vanadyl pyrophosphate with potassim nitrate dramatically reduced the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Such groups may be important in the non-selective, total oxidation of hydrocarbons. Also, preliminary experimental results on FTIR spectra of adsorbed pyridine are presented. It is shown that pyridine adsorbed on the catalyst surface can be easily observed by the diffuse reflectance IR technique. We plan to apply this technique to measurement of the acid site strength of surfaces modified with promoters.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Offerings September 17, 2009 Vendor Health Risk Assessment Online Content and Decision (Wellness Partners: American Specialty Health) !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" Blue Shield of CA !" !" !" !" !" !" !" !" CIGNA (Wellness and DM Partner: Healthways) !" !" !" ! HealthNet !" !" !" ! Kaiser

Kay, Mark A.

232

RMOTC - Testing - Openhole Logging Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Openhole Logging Well RMOTC Openhole Logging Well RMOTC has drilled a vertical well that is specifically designated for openhole logging tests. It was drilled to 5,450 feet and has...

233

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

234

Hydraulic-fracture stimulation treatments at East Mesa, Well 58-30. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

East Mesa Well 58-30 was selected for two stimulation treatments: a conventional hydraulic fracture in a deep, low permeability interval, and a dendritic fracture in a shallow, high permeability interval of completion. The well selection, pre-stimulation evaluation, fracture treatment design, and post-stimulation evaluation are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Automated selection of LEDs by luminance and chromaticity coordinate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increased use of LEDs for lighting purposes has led to the development of numerous applications requiring a pre-selection of LEDs by their luminance and / or their chromaticity coordinate. This paper demonstrates how a manual pre-selection process can be realized using a relatively simple configuration. Since a manual selection service can only be commercially viable as long as only small quantities of LEDs need to be sorted, an automated solution suggests itself. This paper introduces such a solution, which has been developed by Harzoptics in close cooperation with Rundfunk Gernrode. The paper also discusses current challenges in measurement technology as well as market trends.

Fischer, Ulrich H P; Reinboth, Christian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Productivity index of multilateral wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the history of petroleum science there are a vast variety of productivity solutions for different well types, well configurations and flow regimes. The main… (more)

Nunsavathu, Upender Naik.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut Wells Jump to: navigation, search Name Connecticut Wells Place Bethlehem, Connecticut Zip 6751 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump...

238

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

239

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

240

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand of oil and gas resources is high and the forecasts show a trend for higher requirements in the future. More unconventional resource exploitation along with an increase in the total recovery in current producing fields is required. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed. The economic impact of smart well technology has been studied thoroughly. Five field cases were used to evaluate the economics of smart well technology in various production environments. Real field data along with best estimate of smart well technology pricings were used in this research. I have used different comparisons between smart well cases and conventional completion to illustrate the economic differences between the different completion scenarios. Based on the research, I have realized that all the smart well cases showed a better economic return than conventional completions. The offshore cases showed a good economic environment for smart well technology. Large onshore developments with smart well technology can also provide a lucrative economic return. These situations can increase the overall economic return and ultimate recovery which will assist in meeting some of the oil demand around the globe.

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. About fifty different cases were created on the basis of information from one North Sea operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, five cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case. Introduction Drilling of oil wells is an expensive operation, costing around 150 000 US $ pr. day, and any loss of time caused...

Paal Skalle; Jostein Sveen; Agnar Aamodt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

243

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

244

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLNESS LIFESTYLE AGREEMENT COMMITMENT FORM The Wellness Lifestyle Program is located in Reynolds will actively participate in the wellness program to make Reynolds Hall a healthy and supportive place or more consequences: conduct referral; administrative removal from the Wellness Program and

Weston, Ken

245

Drift velocity of electrons in quantum wells of selectively doped In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As and In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures in high electric fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field dependence of drift velocity of electrons in quantum wells of selectively doped In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As and In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The influence of varying the molar fraction of Al in the composition of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As and Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As barriers of the quantum well on the mobility and drift velocity of electrons in high electric fields is studied. It is shown that the electron mobility rises as the fraction x of Al in the barrier composition is decreased. The maximum mobility in the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/In{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}As quantum wells exceeds the mobility in a bulk material by a factor of 3. An increase in fraction x of Al in the barrier leads to an increase in the threshold field E{sub th} of intervalley transfer (the Gunn effect). The threshold field is E{sub th} = 16 kV/cm in the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/Al{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}As heterostructures and E{sub th} = 10 kV/cm in the In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures. In the heterostructures with the lowest electron mobility, E{sub th} = 2-3 kV/cm, which is lower than E{sub th} = 4 kV/cm in bulk InGaAs.

Pozela, J., E-mail: pozela@pfi.lt; Pozela, K.; Raguotis, R.; Juciene, V. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Semiconductor Physics Institute (Lithuania)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. Final program summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight field experiments and the associated theoretical and laboratory work performed to develop the stimulation technology are described. A discussion of the pre-stimulation and post-stimulation data and their evaluation is provided for each experiment. Overall results have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formation zones. Seven of the eight stimulation experiments were at least technically successful in stimulating the wells. The two fracture treatments in East Mesa 58-30 more than doubled the producing rate of the previously marginal producer. The two fracture treatments at Raft River and the two at Baca were all successful in obtaining significant production from previously nonproductive intervals. However, these treatments failed to establish commercial production due to deficiencies in either fluid temperature or reservoir transmissivity. The Beowawe chemical stimulation treatment appears to have significantly improved the well's injectivity, but production data were not obtained because of well mechanical problems. The acid etching treatment in the well at the Geysers did not have any material effect on producing rate. Evaluations of the field experiments to date have suggested improvements in treatment design and treatment interval selection which offer substantial encouragement for future stimulation work.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The reservoir simulation model reflects the response of a reservoir system and the relationship among coalbed methane reservoir properties, operation procedures, and gas production. This work presents a procedure to select the optimum well spacing scenario by using a reservoir simulation. This work uses a two-phase compositional simulator with a dual porosity model to investigate well-spacing effects on coalbed methane production performance and methane recovery. Because of reservoir parameters uncertainty, a sensitivity and parametric study are required to investigate the effects of parameter variability on coalbed methane reservoir production performance and methane recovery. This thesis includes a reservoir parameter screening procedures based on a sensitivity and parametric study. Considering the tremendous amounts of simulation runs required, this work uses a regression analysis to replace the numerical simulation model for each wellspacing scenario. A Monte Carlo simulation has been applied to present the probability function. Incorporated with the Monte Carlo simulation approach, this thesis proposes a well-spacing study procedure to determine the optimum coalbed methane development scenario. The study workflow is applied in a North America basin resulting in distinct Net Present Value predictions between each well-spacing design and an optimum range of well-spacing for a particular basin area.

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technical, economic and risk analysis of multilateral wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oil and gas industry, more than at any time in the past, is highly affected by technological advancements, new products, drilling and completion techniques, capital expenditures (CAPEX), operating expenditures (OPEX), risk/uncertainty, and geopolitics. Therefore, to make a decision in the upstream business, projects require a thorough understanding of the factors and conditions affecting them in order to systematically analyze, evaluate and select the best choice among all possible alternatives. The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assist engineers in the decision making process of maximizing access to reserves. The process encompasses technical, economic and risk analysis of various alternatives in the completion of a well (vertical, horizontal or multilateral) by using a well performance model for technical evaluation and a deterministic analysis for economic and risk assessment. In the technical analysis of the decision making process, the flow rate for a defined reservoir is estimated by using a pseudo-steady state flow regime assumption. The economic analysis departs from the utilization of the flow rate data which assumes a certain pressure decline. The financial cash flow (FCF) is generated for the purpose of measuring the economic worth of investment proposals. A deterministic decision tree is then used to represent the risks inherent due to geological uncertainty, reservoir engineering, drilling, and completion for a particular well. The net present value (NPV) is utilized as the base economic indicator. By selecting a type of well that maximizes the expected monetary value (EMV) in a decision tree, we can make the best decision based on a thorough understanding of the prospect. The method introduced in this study emphasizes the importance of a multi-discipline concept in drilling, completion and operation of multilateral wells.

Arcos Rueda, Dulce Maria

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

252

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

253

Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Low to moderate temperature (< 150 0C) geothermal fluids are being developed in the southern Raft River Valley of Idaho. Five deep geothermal wells ranging in depth from 4911 feet to 6543 feet (1490 to 1980 meters) and two intermediate depth (3858 feet or 1170 meters) injection wells have been drilled within the Raft River KGRA. Several shallower (1423-500 feet or 430-150 meters) wells have also been constructed to monitor the environmental effects of geothermal development of the

254

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

256

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Indiana Memorial Union Wells Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Franklin Hall Bryan Hall Law Indiana Memorial Union Jordan Hall Morrison Hall Wells Library Loop (0.5 miles) IMU to Greenhouse (0.3 miles) Business to Law School (0.75 miles) Wells Library to Morrison Hall (0.5 miles) Wells Library to Muisc Library (0.4 miles) #12;

Indiana University

258

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of investigations carried out into the availability and suitability of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of logging tools for geothermal wells are summarized. Design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes for application to the development of high temperature well logs are discussed. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data is presented in the appendix. (MHR)

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Tubular well tool receiving conduit  

SciTech Connect

In combination, a well packer and a tubular well tool receiving conduit are described which consists of: a well packer having an expandable and retractable anchoring teeth and an expandable and retractable seal spaced from the anchoring teeth, a tubular well conduit including, a first plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit for coacting with the anchoring teeth for supporting the well tool in the conduit, a second plurality of circularly extending grooves on the inside of the conduit and positioned for coacting with the expandable seal for providing multiple seal points with the seal.

Durst, D.G.; Morris, A.J.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Select Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dosanjh » Select Dosanjh » Select Publications Select Publications Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux, X. Sharon Hu, Justin Luitjens, Steven G. Parker, John Shalf, Li Tang, "On the Role of Co-design in High Performance Computing", Transition of HPC Towards Exascale Computing, E.H. D'Hollander et. al (Eds.), IOS Press, 2013, ( November 1, 2013) Download File: Codesign-Paper.pdf (pdf: 867 KB) Rolf Riesen, Sudip Dosanjh, Larry Kaplan, "The ExaChallenge Symposium", IBM Research Paper, August 26, 2013, Download File: ExaChallenge2012.pdf (pdf: 1.4 MB) S. Dosanjh, R. Barrett, D. Doerfler, S. Hammond, K. Hemmert, M. Heroux, P. Lin, K. Pedretti, A. Rodrigues, T. Trucano, J.Juitjens, "Exascale Design

264

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

265

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

ÂŤSustainable development of hydropower in third countries: The development of hydropower on a sustainable basis has been an array of humanitarian and economic development, especially for local people as well as an important tool in the fight against glo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF HYDROPOWER INITIATIVE At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers pledged to establish the Sustainable Development of Hydropower Initiative to promote the sustainable use of hydropower in developing countries in regions such as Africa, Asia, and Central America, and to identify potential financial resources from multilateral organizations to advance such projects.

267

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

268

Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

OpenEI - well records  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4320 en Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2911 - 31811) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode469

The Alabama...

271

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Solar Decathlon: Wells Fargo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States and has been widely recognized for sustainability leadership in...

274

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells as a function of production volume, to correlate the production of these compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics, to precisely measure solubilities of cryocondensates components in water and sodium chloride solutions (brines) as a function of ionic strength and temperature and the component's distribution coefficients between these solutions and oil, to develop models of the reservoir which are consistent with the data obtained, to monitor the wells for the production of aliphatic oils and relate any such production with the data obtained, and to develop a harsh environment pH probe for use in well brines. Results are summarized.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Square wells, quantum wells and ultra-thin metallic films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eigenvalue equations for the energy of bound states of a particle in a square well are solved, and the exact solutions are obtained, as power series. Accurate analytical approximate solutions are also given. The application of these results in the physics of quantum wells are discussed,especially for ultra-thin metallic films, but also in the case of resonant cavities, heterojunction lasers, revivals and super-revivals.

Victor Barsan

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well  

SciTech Connect

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geothermal-well design handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for estimating the performance of geothermal wells which are produced by natural, flashing flows. The well diameter and depth, and reservoir conditions must be known; then it is possible to determine the total pressure drop in a flowing well, and therefore to find the fluid pressure, temperature, and steam quality at the wellhead. By applying the handbook process to several input data sets, the user can compile sufficient information to determine the interdependence of input and output parameters. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

Rinehart, Ben N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

284

Well servicing rig market report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article profiles the well servicing industry, focusing on the problems facing the industry under currently depressed market conditions. The problems of rising operating costs, oil price uncertainty, and aging equipment are addressed specifically.

Killalea, M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Geothermal energy well casing seal  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water. The super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop steam generator-turbine-alternator combination for the beneficial generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water regenerated at the surface-located system is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a fluid bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The deep well pump system is supported within the well casing pipe from the earth's surface by the turbine exhaust steam conduit. In view of differential expansion effects on the relative lengths of the casing pipe and the exhaust steam conduit, a novel flexible seal is provided between the suspended turbine-pump system and the well pipe casing. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures.

Matthews, H.B.

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

286

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

Kelly, R.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

Lucian A. Lucia

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important to understand best fracture and stimulation practice to increase productivity of wells. These objectives require that accurate production analysis be performed. For accurate production analysis, it is important to analyze the production behavior of wells, and field production data should be interpreted in such a way that it will identify well parameters. This can be done by performing a detailed analysis on a number of wells over whole reservoirs. This study is an approach that will lead to identifying different flow regions in shale gas wells that include linear and bilinear flow. Important field parameters can be calculated from those observations to help improve future performance. The detailed plots of several wells in this study show some good numbers for linear and bilinear flow, and some unique observations were made. The purpose of this work is to also manage the large amount of data in such a way that they can be used with ease for future studies. A program was developed to automate the analysis and generation of different plots. The program can also be used to perform the simple calculations to calculate different parameters. The goal was to develop a friendly user interface that would facilitate reservoir analysis. Examples were shown for each flow period, i.e. linear and bilinear flow. Different plots were generated (e.g; Bob Plot (square root of time plot) and Fourth Root of Time Plot, that will help in measuring slopes and thus reservoir parameters such as fracture permeability and drainage area. Different unique cases were also observed that show a different behavior of well in one type of plot from another.

Khan, Waqar A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

292

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and...

293

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operators, especially those managing production from deepwater reservoirs, are striving to produce hydrocarbons at higher and higher rates without exposing the wells to completion failure risk. To avoid screen failures, recent studies have favored gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does not stop formation fines migration, and, over time, fines accumulation in the GP will lead to increasing completion skin. Although, and not always, the skin can be removed by acidizing, it is not practical to perform repeated acid treatments on deepwater wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful HPF is not a trivial exercise, and frequently, there is a steep learning curve for such a practice. This work explains the importance to HPF completions of the well trajectory through the interval to be hydraulically fractured, for production, not execution, reasons. A new model quantifies the effect of the well inclination on the connectivity between the fracture and the well via perforations. Guidelines based on the maximum target production rate, including forecasts of multiphase flow, are provided to size the HPF completion to avoid common completion failures that may result from high fluid rate and/or fines movement. Skin model will be developed for both vertical and deviated wells. Once the HPF is properly designed and executed, the operators should end up with a long term low skin good completion quality well. The well will be safely produced at the maximum flow rates, with no need for well surveillance and monitoring.

Tosic, Slavko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report 8, January--March, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities during this quarter focused on fine tuning of catalyst characterization and synthesis techniques. Improvements in catalyst activity test methods were also implemented but more remains to be done. Specific accomplishments include: improved characterization of vanadyl pyrophosphate (VPO) and Si promoted VPO by FTIR and FTIR of chemisorbed bases; several minor improvements in catalyst preparation technique resulting in enhanced catalyst yield, better control of catalyst composition, and generation of less waste; preliminary pulsed reaction data on methane oxidation were also acquired. Preliminary activity measurements for methane conversion (without oxygen) in a pulsed reactor over VPO indicate that the primary reaction product is CO. Carbon dioxide is also formed but selectivity to CO{sub 2} decreases with number of pulses. These results suggest that selectivity to partially oxidized products improves with catalyst reduction and suggest that some surface modification will be required to obtain oxidized hydrocarbon products. Note that catalyst activation (conversion from the precursor to VPO) has been carried out using air. For butane oxidation catalysts VPO is activated in a 1% butane/air mixture which produces a slightly reduced catalyst.

McCormick, R.L.

1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Rotating preventers; Technology for better well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs.

Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R. (Signa Engineering Corp. (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pressure-activated well perforating apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A well perforating technique utilizes a predetermined pressure difference developed at different points in the borehole to actuate the firing mechanism of a tubing conveyed perforating gun. A first embodiment incorporated as part of a well test string includes a packer for isolating a wellbore interval and a perforating gun connected in the string below the packer which is fired in response to development of a greater pressure in the annulus above the packer than in the isolated interval, thereby causing perforation at ''underbalanced'' conditions. A modified ''full-bore'' embodiment has an annular configuration firing mechanism as part of a tubing string and fires the perforating gun in response to development of a predetermined difference between the pressures at a point in the annulus and a point in the central bore of the tubing string.

Upchurch, J. M.

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

Karasaki, K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Definition: Stepout-Deepening Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells Stepout-Deepening Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stepout-Deepening Wells A well drilled at a later time over remote, undeveloped portions of a partially developed continuous reservoir rock. A deepening well is reentering a well and drilling to a deeper reservoir. Often referred to as an "infield exploration well" in the oil and gas industry.[1] Also Known As delayed development well References ↑ http://www.answers.com/topic/step-out-well Ste LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. p-out-well: a well drilled in the expected extent of a reservoir that is being developed but at a significant distance, usually two or more drilling and spacing units, from the nearest producer in that reservoir. A step-out

300

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Well test analysis in fractured media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

Karasaki, K.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

DOE Geothermal well stimulation program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective stimulation treatment requires the interaction of four separate items: frac fluids, proppants, equipment, and planned and properly engineered schedules. While there are good fluid systems and proppants, only judicious combinations and a well thought out schedule which uses all of these materials and available equipment to best advantage is an optimum stimulation treatment. Generally, high flow rates and convective cooling can be used either with conventional (planar) fracturing or with a dendritic fracturing technique. Many of todays fluid systems have been tested to above 400/sup 0/F. Some fluids have survived quite well. Current tests on proppants have shown temperature sensitivities in sand; however, there are resin coated materials and sintered bauxite which are not temperature sensitive. (MHR)

Hanold, R.J.; Campbell, D.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

1980-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the first stage of planning field development, the simulation model is calibrated to dynamic data (history matching). One of the aims of the research is to extend the streamline based generalized travel time inversion method for full field models with multimillion cells through the use of grid coarsening. This makes the streamline based inversion suitable for high resolution simulation models with decades long production history and numerous wells by significantly reducing the computational effort. In addition, a novel workflow is proposed to integrate well bottom-hole pressure data during model calibration and the approach is illustrated via application to the CO2 sequestration. In the second stage, field development strategies are optimized. The strategies are primarily focused on rate optimization followed by infill well drilling. A method is proposed to modify the streamline-based rate optimization approach which previously focused on maximizing sweep efficiency by equalizing arrival time of the waterfront to producers, to account for accelerated production for improving the net present value (NPV). Optimum compromise between maximizing sweep efficiency and maximizing NPV can be selected based on a 'trade-off curve.' The proposed method is demonstrated on field scale application considering geological uncertainty. Finally, a novel method for well placement optimization is proposed that relies on streamlines and time of flight to first locate the potential regions of poorly swept and drained oil. Specifically, the proposed approach utilizes a dynamic measure based on the total streamline time of flight combined with static and dynamic parameters to identify "Sweet-Spots" for infill drilling. The "Sweet-Spots" can be either used directly as potential well-placement locations or as starting points during application of a formal optimization technique. The main advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency in calculating dynamic measure map. The complete workflow was also demonstrated on a multimillion cell reservoir model of a mature carbonate field with notable success. The infill locations based on dynamic measure map have been verified by subsequent drilling.

Taware, Satyajit Vijay

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Foundation and Application of Horizontal Well Deliverability Type Curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a development technique to improve oil and gas deliverability, horizontal wells have recently become an important technical support to develop low permeability or extra-low permeability and unconventional oil and gas fields. Therefore, it is quite ... Keywords: Horizontal well, Impermeable and circular boundary reservoir, Stehfest numerical inversion, Blasingame decline curves, Single well dynamic reserves

Rong Wang; Yonggang Duan; Quantang Fang; Cao Tingkuan; Mingqiang Wei

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current configuration. Assuming that remediation efforts increased production from the 168 marginal wells to the average of their respective offsets, approximately 6.4 Bscf of gross incremental gas with a NPV approximating $4.9 million after investment, would be made available to the domestic market. Seventeen wells have successfully been restimulated to date and have already obtained significant production increases. At the time of this report, eight of these wells had enough post-rework production data available to forecast the incremental gas and verify the project's success. This incremental gas is estimated at 615 MMscf. The outcome of the other ten wells will be determined after more post-refrac production data becomes available. Plans are currently underway for future restimulations. The success of this project has shown the value of this methodology to recognize underperforming wells quickly and efficiently in fields containing hundreds or thousands of wells. This contributes considerably to corporate net income and domestic natural gas and/or oil reserves.

Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Modular Skylight Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Departments, JimVan Dame of My-Lite Daylighting Systems and Products, Doug Gehring of Celotex, Ivan Johnson-designed and site-built systems. Designers used a variety of systems to guide the daylight through the plenum systems. It provides guidelines for manufacturers, designers and contractors in the development and design

308

Dual valve well pump installation  

SciTech Connect

A reciprocating electric motor-pump assembly for lifting well fluid on downstroke of the motor pump assembly, the pump including a barrel below the motor having dual combined inlet and outlet valve means at the lower end thereof, the pump piston moving in the barrel having annular grooves therearound to prevent differential pressure sticking, the electric cable supplying the electric motor being tubular to vent the pump and prevent vacuum or gas lock, there being a packer about the valve barrel separating the outlet valve means thereabove from the inlet valve means therebelow and a packer above the motor about a production tubing including an upper standing valve.

Holm, D. R.

1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Review and selection of unsaturated flow models  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Geographic coverage ...

311

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Geographic coverage is ...

312

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Well simulation using Refrigerant 114  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple method for the investigation of thermodynamic (substance) similarity in the two-phase domain is introduced based on the assumptions of a simplified model fluid. According to this method, the investigation of the conditions for thermodynamic similarity between substances in the two-phase region reveals the important role the latent heat of evaporation (h/sub fg/) plays in the definition of the property scales. These greatly influence the dynamic and geometric similarity of the process under investigation. The introduction of the thermodynamic similarity property scales into the energy conservation equations for a certain process (e.g., flow up a geothermal well) brings forth a thermodynamic length scale and kinetic energy scale. Refrigerant 114 has been examined for similarity with water substance according to this method and found to be adequate for geothermal well simulation in the laboratory. Low pressures and temperatures and a substantial reduction of mass flow rates and geometric scales are a few of the advantages of using R114 for such experiments.

Nikitopoulos, D.E.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Maeder, P.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

317

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report 13, April--June, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific objectives of this project are: to determine optimum conditions for methanol and formaldehyde production from methane using VPO catalysts, in particular to determine the effect of lean conditions (excess oxygen), oxygen deficient conditions (used in most other methane oxidation studies), and the potential of using the catalyst as a stoichiometric oxidant or oxygen carrier; to utilize promoters and catalyst supports to improve oxygenate yield relative to the base case catalysts; to provide a preliminary understanding of how these promoters and supports actually effect catalyst properties; and use the information obtained to prepare advanced catalysts which will be tested for activity, selectivity, and stability. Activities this quarter included analysis of all previously acquired data for methane, methanol, and formaldehyde oxidation over vanadyl pyrophosphate and testing of supported, promoted, and iron phosphate catalysts. Some experiments have been conducted with a small percentage of butane in the feed gas to help retain the catalyst in a reduced state and these results are reported. Iron phosphate, and iron phosphate supported on silica have also been tested in a preliminary way.

McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are a very important element in oil and gas industry due to their distinguished advantages. Horizontal wells are not technically horizontal. This is because of the structural nature of reservoir formations and drilling procedures. In response to the reservoir rock’s strength, the horizontal well deviates upward and downward while being drilled forming an undulating path instead of a horizontal. In this study, horizontal wells with an undulating trajectory within a gas reservoir have been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from different sources like an aquifer or a water flood job. In low permeability horizontal wells, hydraulic fracturing introduces water to gas wells. Water distribution is an important issue in gas wells production. In order to achieve the goal of this study, a model has been developed to simulate different situations for a horizontal well with an undulating trajectory in gas reservoirs. This study is a step forward to understand well performance in low permeability gas reservoirs.

Aldousari, Mohammad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

Roth, B.A.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Derisking Renewable Energy Investment. A Framework to Support Policymakers in Selecting Public Instruments to Promote Renewable Energy Investment in Developing Countries  

SciTech Connect

This report introduces an innovative framework to assist policymakers to quantitatively compare the impact of different public instruments to promote renewable energy. The report identifies the need to reduce the high financing costs for renewable energy in developing countries as an important task for policymakers acting today. The framework is structured in four stages: (i) risk environment, (ii) public instruments, (iii) levelised cost and (iv) evaluation. To illustrate how the framework can support decision-making in practice, the report presents findings from illustrative case studies in four developing countries. It then draws on these results to discuss possible directions for enhancing public interventions to scale-up renewable energy investment. UNDP is also releasing a financial tool for policymakers to accompany the framework. The financial tool is available for download on the UNDP website.

Waissbein, Oliver; Glemarec, Yannick; Bayraktar, Hande; Schmidt, Tobias S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

324

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

325

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

326

Microsoft Word - Site Selection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection Selection One of the very first tasks of General Leslie Groves and the Manhattan Project in early 1943 was to locate and acquire sites in the United States where uranium and plutonium could be produced, as well as a site where the atomic bomb actually would be constructed. Production of uranium and plutonium required vast amounts of power. Thus, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, were chosen because of proximity to major rivers. Oak Ridge could draw on the power of the hydroelectric plants on the Tennessee River. Hanford could use the power from the Columbia River. The cold waters of the Columbia also could be used to cool the plutonium production reactors at Hanford. A third site, with

327

/select/modify/life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, /select/modify/life, OOF home. Prev, ... select/modify/life. /select ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method for gravel packing wells  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

Jones, L.G.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of selected energy security issues related to US crude oil and natural gas exploration, development, production, transportation and processing. Final report, Task 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1989, President Bush directed the Secretary of Energy to initiate the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES) built upon a national consensus. The overall principle for the NES, as defined by the President and articulated by the Economic Policy Council (EPC), is the continuation of the successful policy of market reliance, consistent with the following goals: Balancing of energy, economic, and environmental concerns; and reduced dependence by the US and its friends and allies on potentially unreliable energy suppliers. The analyses presented in this report draw upon a large body of work previously conducted for DOE/Office of Fossil Energy, the US Department of Interior/Minerals Management Service (DOI/MMS), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), referenced throughout the text of this report. This work includes assessments in the following areas: the potential of advanced oil and gas extraction technologies as improved through R&D, along with the successful transfer of these technologies to the domestic petroleum industry; the economic and energy impacts of environmental regulations on domestic oil and gas exploration, production, and transportation; the potential of tax incentives to stimulate domestic oil and gas development and production; the potential environmental costs associated with various options for leasing for US oil and gas resources in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); and the economic impacts of environmental regulations affecting domestic crude oil refining.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully coupled processes consisting of: thermoporoelastic deformation, hydraulic conduction, thermal osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has

331

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal stimulation can be utilized to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and...

332

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This...

333

Geothermal Well Maintenance and Repair in Cerro Prieto  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When the first well is drilled at a geothermal field, procedures for the cleaning, repair, and control of wells should be established. This aspect will be increasingly important as more wells are drilled. Equipment, tools and techniques need to be improved to achieve economic and safe results. Different systems have been developed and applied in maintenance of wells, in problems of casing incrustations, repairs, plugging, and well control. These systems should be improved, even though they have been reasonably satisfactory to date.

Aguirre, B. D.; Blanco, F. V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-proven solutions already exist to reduce the loss of gas production when liquid loading begins to occur. However, the choice of remedial technique, its feasibility, and its cost, vary considerably depending on a field's location, size export route, and the individual operator's experience. The selection of the best remedial technique and the timeframe within which the remedial action is undertaken are critical to a project's profitability. Although there are literature reviews available regarding solutions to liquid loading problems in gas wells, a tool capable of helping an operator select the best remedial option for a specific field case still does not exist. This thesis proposes a newly developed decision matrix to screen the possible remedial options available to the operator. The matrix can not only provide a critical evaluation of potential solutions to the problem of liquid loading in gas wells vis-a?-vis the existing technical and economic constraints, but can also serve as a reference to operators for investment decisions and as a quick screening tool for the selection of production optimisation strategies. Under its current status of development, this new tool consists of a decision algorithm built around a decision tree. Unlike other data mining techniques, decision trees quickly allow for subdividing large initial datasets into successively smaller sets by a series of decision rules. The rules are based on information available in the public domain. The effectiveness of the matrix is now ready to be tested against real field datasets.

Park, Han-Young

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report 11, October--December 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities during this report period focused on testing of additional modified and promoted catalysts and characterization of these materials. Methanol oxidation studies were performed as a method of acid site characterization. Improvements to the product gas analysis system continued to be developed. These results are reported. Specific accomplishments include: (1) Obtaining and interpreting infrared spectra of modified catalysts prepared to enhance surface acidity. (2) Testing of these catalysts in methanol oxidation as a method of acid site characterization and to determine catalytic activity for conversion of this desired product. Catalysts were quite active for methanol conversion to dimethyl ether. Two of the modified catalysts prepared in this work exhibited the highest activity for this reaction, presumably because of their higher surface areas. (3) Determination that acidity modifications had no effect on activity for methane conversion.

McCormick, R.L.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm Facility Lalamilo Wells Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hawaiian Electric Light Co. Developer Lalamilo Ventures Energy Purchaser Hawaii Electric Light Co. Location Big Island HI Coordinates 19.9875°, -155.765556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.9875,"lon":-155.765556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections Solid-State Lighting Recovery Act Award Selections A chart highlighting core technology research projects and product development...

339

Geothermal well log interpretation. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is presented on the following tasks: review of the state-of-the-art, classification of geothermal reservoir types, data acquisition, problem definition and directions for solution, and refinement of existing interpretation techniques and development of new ones. Computerized literature searches were conducted. The classification system defines five major characteristics which will qualify a potential reservoir. A catalog lists well logs currently available for study. Rock and fluid parameters needed for reservoir studies are listed. A list of matrix characteristics for rocks and minerals is given. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Definition: Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Observation Wells An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Definition: Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Exploratory Well An exploratory well is...

342

Definition: Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Well Deepening Reentering an existing well and...

343

Definition: Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Production Wells A well drilled with the...

344

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: A Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: A Decomposition Approach M.G. Ierapetritou and C.A. Floudas 1 correspondence should be addressed 1 #12; Abstract The generation of a reservoir development plan with well the optimal vertical well locations is formulated as a MILP problem where the binary variables correspond

345

Valley splitting in strained silicon quantum wells Timothy B. Boykin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Valley splitting in strained silicon quantum wells Timothy B. Boykin Department of Electrical on localized-orbital approaches is developed to describe the valley splitting observed in silicon quantum wells in the absence of electric field in contrast to previous works. The splitting in a square well oscillates

Sheridan, Jennifer

346

Horizontal flow drilling requires focus on well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells drilled underbalanced or while flowing must have surface equipment and a blow-out preventer stack specially designed for circulating operations. Functional well control methods for drilling horizontal wells have been developed in specific regions worldwide. Special safety equipment and procedures, however, are still required in most horizontal development applications. The challenge for horizontal drilling development and underbalanced drilling is to overcome the obstacles of government regulation, reduce pollution dangers, and improve personnel and equipment safety. Well control techniques tailored to the demands of each field can help overcome these challenges. Several well control elements must be addressed carefully on each horizontal well: drilling fluid requirements, well control procedures and equipment, and surface equipment and special considerations for handling hydrocarbons produced while drilling. The paper discusses each of these elements for underbalanced horizontal drilling.

Tangedahl, M.J. (RBOP Oil Tools International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Space age telemetry for geothermal well logging: the wireline transmission link  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of aerospace telemetry has opened new communication data links for making measurements in deep boreholes in the earth's crust. However, now a transmission line must be used since high-frequency signals will not propagate through this medium. Further restrictions are imposed upon well-logging transmission lines in high-temperature boreholes. It is possible to extend the bandwidth and number of data channels to enhance measurements in geothermal boreholes by combining aerospace telemetry techniques with thermal protection systems and careful selection of wireline data transmission configurations. 5 refs., 2 figs.

Kolar, J.D.; Dennis, B.R.; Stephani, E.L.; Gutierrez, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fact Sheet: ES-Select - A Decision Support Tool (October 2012) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-Select - A Decision Support Tool (October 2012) ES-Select - A Decision Support Tool (October 2012) Fact Sheet: ES-Select - A Decision Support Tool (October 2012) DNV KEMA developed the Energy Storage Select (ES-Select) decision-support tool to help users identify feasible energy storage technology options as well as provide the probability of reaching a payback point and the statistical distribution of the payback year. It is a sophisticated, highly interactive model that offers a means to conduct careful analysis of the many interrelated factors that influence energy storage performance. Fact Sheet: ES-Select - A Decision Support Tool (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1

349

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility and success of petroleum development projects depend to a large degree on well construction costs. Well construction cost estimates often contain high levels of uncertainty. In many cases, these costs have been estimated using deterministic methods that do not reliably account for uncertainty, leading to biased estimates. The primary objective of this work was to improve the reliability of deterministic well construction cost estimates by incorporating probabilistic methods into the estimation process. The method uses historical well cost estimates and actual well costs to develop probabilistic correction factors that can be applied to future well cost estimates. These factors can be applied to the entire well cost or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated well cost using this methodology was significantly more accurate than average estimated well cost using deterministic methods. Systematic use of this methodology can provide for more accurate and efficient allocation of capital for drilling campaigns, which should have significant impacts on reservoir development and profitability.

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Potential Emissions of Tritium in Air from Wells on the Nevada National Security Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide-show discusses the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and tritium in the groundwater. It describes the wells and boreholes and potential airflow from these sources. Monitoring of selected wells is discussed and preliminary results are presented.

Warren, R.

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of processing TiAl by additive manufacturing by using the selective electron beam melting (SEBM) provides a new approach to reach near

353

Solar Selective Absorption Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

Sandia has developed a new class of solar selective absorber coatings that significantly improve the thermal conversion efficiency of solar units by reducing ...

354

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attention Wells Fargo and Wachovia customers Are you a Wells Fargo or Wachovia mortgage customer Angeles, CA March , & : am to : pm You'll personally meet with a Wells Fargo representative who-inswelcomebutregistrationisrecommended. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights

Southern California, University of

355

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic

356

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ARPA-E Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Selections Project Selections September 23, 2010 These projects have been selected for negotiation of awards; final award amounts may vary. Lead Research Organization (Partner Organizations) Amount Lead Organization Location (City, State) Technology Focus - Application: Project Title Project Description 1) Innovative Cybersecurity Solutions Grid Protection Alliance (University of Illinois, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PJM Interconnection, AREVA T&D) $3,215,000 Chattanooga, TN SIEGate: Secure Information Exchange for Electric Grid Operations The Grid Protection Alliance will research, develop, and commercialize a Secure Information Exchange Gateway (SIEGate) that provides secure communication of data between control centers.

358

Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of an appropriate reservoir management plan. The selection of plan will be based on the detailed reservoir description using an integrated approach. The authors expect that 2 to 5% of the original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. The project is divided into two stages. In Stage 1 of the project, they selected part of the Glenn Pool Field-Self Unit. They conducted cross borehole tomography surveys and formation micro scanner logs through a newly drilled well. By combining the state-of-the-art data with conventional core and log data, they developed a detailed reservoir description based on an integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, they evaluated alternate reservoir management strategies to improve the reservoir performance including drilling of a horizontal injection well. They observed that selective completion of many wells followed by an increase in the injection rate was the most feasible option to improve the performance of the Self Unit. This management plan is current being implemented and the performance is being monitored. Stage 2 of the project will involve selection of part of the same reservoir (Berryhill Unit-Tract 7), development of reservoir description using only conventional data, simulation of flow performance using developed reservoir description, selection of an appropriate reservoir management plan, and implementation of the plan followed by monitoring of reservoir performance.

Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

DEVELOPING FUTURE SUBSTATION AUTOMATION STRATEGIES: SELECTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Repairable Components," Power Learn Electric Power Engineering Education, Module PE.PAS.U15.5, 2005. #12;SubstationSubstation Configuration Reliability 1 Reliability of Substation Configurations Daniel Nack, Iowa substation, it still contains what could be described as weak points or points of failure that would lead

Kezunovic, Mladen

360

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Modeling performance of horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells are relatively new alternatives in field development because they can increase the productivity per well and reduce the cost of field development. Because the feasibility of these wells may not be valid in some reservoirs, well performance should be verified before making decisions. Undulation is usually associated to horizontal wells with some degrees. Existing inflow performance models do not account for the undulation of the well, which can cause significant error and economic loss. Moreover, some of the inflow models ignore pressure drop along the lateral, which is definitely not true in high production and long lateral wells. The inflow performance models of horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells are developed in this study. The models can be divided into two main categories: the closed form model and the line source model. The closed form model applies for relatively low vertical permeability formations for the single-phase system and twophase system. The model is flexible and easy to apply with reasonable accuracy. The line source model does not have any restrictions with permeability. The model applies for single-phase system. The model is very accurate and easy to use. Both models can be applied to various well trajectories with realizable accuracy. As a result of this study, the well performance of unconventional well trajectories can be predicted and optimized.

Kamkom, Rungtip

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Estimating Well Costs for Enhanced Geothermal System Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work reported was to investigate the costs of drilling and completing wells and to relate those costs to the economic viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This is part of a larger parametric study of major cost components in an EGS. The possibility of improving the economics of EGS can be determined by analyzing the major cost components of the system, which include well drilling and completion. Determining what costs in developing an EGS are most sensitive will determine the areas of research to reduce those costs. The results of the well cost analysis will help determine the cost of a well for EGS development.

K. K. Bloomfield; P. T. Laney

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schlumberger Tube: For Oil-Well Logging", Nucleonics, No.W. E. : "An Investigation of Oil Well Cementing," Drill. andon Pressure Buildup in Oil Wells," Trans. , AIME (1958),213,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Source Selection Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide More Documents & Publications Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection...

365

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Well-Being, Authority, and Worth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theories of well-being give an account of what it is for persons to fare well or to live prudentially valuable lives. I divide the theoretical… (more)

Hebert, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Production Facilities Wells Pumpjack at RMOTC Partners may test in RMOTC's large inventory of cased, uncased, vertical, high-angle, and horizontal wells. Cased and open-hole...

368

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Randomized selection on the GPU  

SciTech Connect

We implement here a fast and memory-sparing probabilistic top N selection algorithm on the GPU. To our knowledge, this is the first direct selection in the literature for the GPU. The algorithm proceeds via a probabilistic-guess-and-chcck process searching for the Nth element. It always gives a correct result and always terminates. The use of randomization reduces the amount of data that needs heavy processing, and so reduces the average time required for the algorithm. Probabilistic Las Vegas algorithms of this kind are a form of stochastic optimization and can be well suited to more general parallel processors with limited amounts of fast memory.

Monroe, Laura Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wendelberger, Joanne R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

371

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a well safely and securely.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

373

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

374

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

375

Drilling and operating geothermal wells in California  

SciTech Connect

The following procedural points for geothermal well drilling and operation are presented: geothermal operators, definitions, geothermal unit, agent, notice of intention, fees, report on proposed operations, bonds, well name and number, well and property sale on transfer, well records, and other agencies. (MHR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

377

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

378

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Oil Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Oil Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

379

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

380

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A New Parameter Identification Method for Hydraulic Fractured Gas Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relaxation search algorithm to identify the parameters of hydraulic fractured gas wells is developed in this paper based on the inductive matrix. According to the optimization theory and parallel computation method, the parameters to be identified ... Keywords: Gas Wells, hydraulic fracturing, formation parameters, parameter identification, historic fitting

Li Tiejun; Guo Dali; Min Chao

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

On the Computation of the Disjunctive Well-Founded Semantics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A characterization of the disjunctive well-founded semantics (DWFS) is given in terms of the Gelfond–Lifschitz transformation. This characterization is used to develop a top-down method of testing DWFS membership, employing a hyperresolution-like ... Keywords: bottom-up computation, disjunctive deductive databases, disjunctive logic programs, disjunctive well-founded semantics, top-down computation

C. A. Johnson

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Intelligent System for Petroleum Well Drilling Cutting Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cutting analysis is a important and crucial task task to detect and prevent problems during the petroleum well drilling process. Several studies have been developed for drilling inspection, but none of them takes care about analysing the generated cutting ... Keywords: Cutting analysis, petroleum well drilling monitoring, optimum-path forest

Aparecido N. Marana; Giovani Chiachia; Ivan R. Guilherme; Joăo P. Papa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Department Announces Selections for U.S.-India Joint Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selections for U.S.-India Joint Clean Energy Research and Development Center Energy Department Announces Selections for U.S.-India Joint Clean Energy Research and Development...

385

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step in the reservoir development process. Determining the optimal well location is a complex problem involving many factors including geological considerations, reservoir and fluid properties, economic costs, lateral direction, and technical ability. The most thorough approach to this problem is that of an exhaustive search, in which a simulation is run for every conceivable well position in the reservoir. Although thorough and accurate, this approach is typically not used in real world applications due to the time constraints from the excessive number of simulations. This project suggests the use of a genetic algorithm applied to the horizontal well placement problem in a gas reservoir to reduce the required number of simulations. This research aims to first determine if well placement optimization is even necessary in a gas reservoir, and if so, to determine the benefit of optimization. Performance of the genetic algorithm was analyzed through five different case scenarios, one involving a vertical well and four involving horizontal wells. The genetic algorithm approach is used to evaluate the effect of well placement in heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs on reservoir recovery. The wells are constrained by surface gas rate and bottom-hole pressure for each case. This project's main new contribution is its application of using genetic algorithms to study the effect of well placement optimization in gas reservoirs. Two fundamental questions have been answered in this research. First, does well placement in a gas reservoir affect the reservoir performance? If so, what is an efficient method to find the optimal well location based on reservoir performance? The research provides evidence that well placement optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely efficient and robust tool to find the optimal location.

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Source Selection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Source SelectionSource Selection Boards Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Monthly Status Reporting Requirement (pdf) Source Evaluation Board (SEB)...

387

Integrated approach towards the application of horizontal wells to improve waterflooding performance. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the proposed project is to improve secondary recovery performance of a marginal oil field through the use of a horizontal injection well. The location and direction of the well will be selected based on the detailed reservoir description using integrated approach. The authors expect that 2 to 5 % of original oil in place will be recovered using this method. This should extend the life of the reservoir by at least 10 years. To accomplish the goals of the project, it is divided into two stages. In Stage 1, they will select part of the Glenn Pool field (William B. Self Unit), and collect additional reservoir data by conducting cross bore hole tomography surveys and formation micro scanner logs through newly drilled well. In addition, they will also utilize analogous outcrop data. By combining the state of the art data with conventional core and log data, they will develop a detailed reservoir description based on integrated approach. After conducting extensive reservoir simulation studies, they will select a location and direction of a horizontal injection well. The well will be drilled based on optimized design, and the field performance will be monitored for at least six months. If the performance is encouraging, they will enter into second budget period of the project. This progress report is divided into three sections. In the first section, they discuss the preliminary results based on the cross bore hole seismic surveys. In the second section, they discuss the geological description of the Self Unit. In the last section, they present petrophysical properties description of the reservoir followed by the flow simulation results. Based on a thorough evaluation of the geological and flow simulation results, they finalized the initial test well location followed by drilling of the well in late Dec.

Kelkar, B.G.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

50) 50) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1950 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Agricultural Wells Notes The geothermal resource at Raft River was discovered sometime prior to 1950 when two shallow agricultural wells, the Bridge and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1950)&oldid=473844

390

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

391

Simple variational approaches to quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss two simple variational approaches to quantum wells. The trial harmonic functions analyzed in an earlier paper give reasonable results for all well depths and are particularly suitable for deep wells. On the other hand, the exponential functions proposed here are preferable for shallow wells. We compare the shallow-well expansions for both kind of functions and show that they do not exhibit the cubic term appearing in the exact series. It is also shown that the deep-well expansion for the harmonic functions agree with the first terms of perturbation theory.

Francisco M. Fernández

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

392

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well temperature and pressure distributions can be measured by production logging or downhole permanent sensors, such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensors (DTS). Correct interpretation of temperature and pressure data can be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very difficult. In addition, the continuous measurement provides transient temperature behavior which increases the complexity of the problem. To interpret these measured data correctly, a comprehensive model is required. In this study, an interpretation model is developed to predict flow profile of a horizontal well from downhole temperature and pressure measurement. The model consists of a wellbore model and a reservoir model. The reservoir model can handle transient, multiphase flow and it includes a flow model and a thermal model. The calculation of the reservoir flow model is based on the streamline simulation and the calculation of reservoir thermal model is based on the finite difference method. The reservoir thermal model includes thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating which can reflect small temperature changes caused by pressure difference. We combine the reservoir model with a horizontal well flow and temperature model as the forward model. Based on this forward model, by making the forward calculated temperature and pressure match the observed data, we can inverse temperature and pressure data to downhole flow rate profiles. Two commonly used inversion methods, Levenberg- Marquardt method and Marcov chain Monte Carlo method, are discussed in the study. Field applications illustrate the feasibility of using this model to interpret the field measured data and assist production optimization. The reservoir model also reveals the relationship between temperature behavior and reservoir permeability characteristic. The measured temperature information can help us to characterize a reservoir when the reservoir modeling is done only with limited information. The transient temperature information can be used in horizontal well optimization by controlling the flow rate until favorite temperature distribution is achieved. With temperature feedback and inflow control valves (ICVs), we developed a procedure of using DTS data to optimize horizontal well performance. The synthetic examples show that this method is useful at a certain level of temperature resolution and data noise.

Li, Zhuoyi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Well Models for Mimetic Finite Difference Methods and Improved Representation of Wells inMultiscale Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In reservoir simulation, the modeling and the representation of wells are critical factors. The standard approach for well modeling is to couple the well to… (more)

Ligaarden, Ingeborg Skjelkvĺle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

396

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Ozkocak, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location...

399

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly Department of Physics, University of Delhi well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force wells on the one hand and establishing the relationship between the operative forces and the potential

Zollman, Dean

403

Solar selective coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The definition, fabrication, and specification of solar selective absorber surfaces are discussed. Also, the nature of solar radiation and thermal radiation in relation to selective surfaces is considered. (WHK)

Mattox, D. M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

405

Hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts to determine the concentration of the cryocondensates in fluids of the various USDOE Geopressured wells a function of production volume. The wells are visited monthly as they are operating and samples are reported taken cryogenically during each visit. A gas scrubbing system continuously sample the gas streams of the wells in the intergas scrubbing system continuously sample the gas streams of the wells in the intervals between visit. Results obtained are to correlated the production of the collected compounds with reservoir and well production characteristics.

Not Available

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

407

Pulsed optically detected NMR of single GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed optically detected NMR of single GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells Marcus Eickhoff* and Dieter Suter, nanometer-sized quantum wells possible with excellent sensitivity and selectivity while avoiding.60.-k; 78.55.Cr; 78.67.De Keywords: ODNMR; Pulsed excitation; Quantum well; GaAs 1. Introduction Nuclear

Suter, Dieter

408

Well-logging activities in Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a brief survey of the current state of well-logging service in Russia (number and types of crews, structure of well-logging jobs, types of techniques used, well-logging equipment, auxiliary downhole jobs, etc.). Types and peculiarities of well data acquisition and processing hardware and software are discussed (petrophysics included). New well-logging technologies used in Russia (new methods of electric logging data processing, electromagnetic logging, pulse neutron logging, nuclear magnetic resonance logging, acoustic tomography, logging-testing-logging technique, etc.) are surveyed. Comparison of the Tengiz field (Kazakhstan) well data obtained by Schlumberger and Neftegazgeofizika Association crews is given. Several problems and drawbacks in equipment and technology used by well-logging crews in Russia are discussed.

Savostyanov, N.A. (Neftegazgeofizika, Moscow (Russian Federation))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

Last, George V. (Richland, WA); Lanigan, David C. (Kennewick, WA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 4 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Mccoy_Geothermal_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402599" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

411

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selection of Seed Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25, 2011 Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, Greg Mertz, Andrew Maham CJCAssociates Introduction * Recently, CJC&A has performed several studies regarding seed record selection used in the development of acceleration time histories for input into seismic analyses. - Primary issue - how does the seed record affect computed structural response. * This presentation is the result of two publications, as well as insights developed from the following DOE projects: - SSI analysis of the Uranium Processing Facility (Y12) - Probabilistic SSI analysis of PF4 (LANL) - Preliminary SSI analysis of CMRR (LANL) 2 CJCAssociates Background * Current design procedures used to develop synthetic time histories for the

413

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 10, July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Experimental work has been completed at the Colorado School of Mines. Samples of ..beta..-dicalcium silicate-silica cement developed in this program have been submitted for additional evaluation. The initial screening portion of this work has identified several promising systems that will undergo more rigorous testing. Dynamic brine exposure testing of several systems has been initiated at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Facility. Testing at the Niland test site is scheduled to start soon. Property verification tests on cements produced in the materials development phase of the program were initiated at the Bureau of Standards. Preliminary data are available for five cements exposed for 176 h to water at a temperature of 195/sup 0/C. Three of the cements exhibited strength losses during the test. An aluminum hydroxide cement and a polymer cement showed slight increases in strength after the exposure. These and longer-term data will be utilized in the selection of a material for use in the remedial cementing of a hot dry rock well at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

415

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

416

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

How to avoid well kicks in weakzones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1981 there has been a significant increase in well programs that drill long hole sections between casing strings, particularly below surface casing. In many instances this practice leaves one or more weak zones. In addition to the standard well control methods, another procedure cautiously recommend is pumping the influx from the well with a slug of heavier mud ahead of the kill mud. In this article the author discusses this procedure.

Merryman, J.C. (Parker Drilling Co. (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

423

Ida B. Wells: A Voice Against Lynching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on the campaign that the African American journalist Ida B. Wells fought against lynching in the United States between the 19th and… (more)

MUNTEANU, DANIELA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

425

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

426

Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

Patrick Longmire

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas well deliquification. 2nd. ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Recognizing Symptoms of Liquid Loading in Gas Wells; Chapter 3: Critical Velocity; Chapter 4: Systems Nodal Analysis; Chapter 5: Sizing Tubing; Chapter 6: Compression; Chapter 7: Plunger Lift; Chapter 8: Use of Foam to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 9: Hydraulic Pumping; Chapter 10: Use of Beam Pumps to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 11: Gas Lift; Chapter 12: Electric Submersible Pumps; Chapter 13: Progressing Cavity Pumps; Chapter 14: Coal Bed Methane; Chapter 15: Production Automation. Chapter 14, by David Simpson, based in the San Juan Basin, addresses issues in coal bed methane, low pressure operations, gas compression, gas measurement, oil field construction, gas well deliquification and project management.

James Lea; Henry Nickens; Mike Wells [Texas Technical University, TX (United States). Petroleum Engineering Department

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 P. A. Witherspoon Petroleum Engineering Well TestActivation Analysis in Petroleum Exploration Research",Monograph Series, Society of Petroleum Engineers of AlME,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998 ... gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating . ...

430

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

431

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the well bore by drilling fluid, or by turbulent flowdrilled into. Although the drilling fluid normally providesthe hole filled with drilling fluid of appropriate density

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

On selecting Gabor features for biometric authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a Gabor feature selection technique that allows us to develop a fast and robust Gabor-feature based biometric system. Existing Gabor based methods use a huge number of Gabor features to represent the patterns. Our experiments on different ... Keywords: Gabor features, automated identification, biometrics, ear authentication, equal error rate, feature selection, finger authentication

Loris Nanni; Alessandra Lumini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Well Productivity in Gas-Condensate and Volatile Oil Reservoirs:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wells in gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex behaviours due to condensate deposit as the bottomhole pressure drops below the dew point. The formation of this liquid saturation can lead to a severe loss of well productivity and therefore lower gas recovery. A similar behaviour is observed in volatile oil reservoirs below the bubble point. Understanding these behaviours and extracting values of controlling parameters is necessary to evaluate well potential and design effective programmes to improve productivity. The Centre of Petroleum Studies at Imperial College London has been involved in research in these areas since 1997, sponsored mainly by consortia of oil companies. Results from this work have already greatly improved the understanding of well behaviour in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs and the ability to interpret well tests in such reservoirs. Work to-date has focused on vertical and horizontal wells in sandstone reservoirs. Much work remains to understand the behaviours of fractured wells and wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. The objective of this proposal is to complete the work performed to-date in sandstone reservoirs and to extend it to new well and reservoir characteristics, in order to develop a better understanding of near-wellbore effects in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs from well testing, and to use this understanding to develop new methods for predicting and improving well productivity in such reservoirs. The work will be performed by staff, MSc and PhD students from the Centre for Petroleum Studies at Imperial College, with input and guidance from industry partners.

Prof A. C. Gringarten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Subsea well control involves special considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the increased length of kill and choke lines, greater care must be taken in subsea operations to establish the parameters employed to kill an underbalanced well. This study provides a straightforward, step-by-step approach for round-the-clock preparedness when well control equipment is located on the seafloor.

Fulton, D.K.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Subsea well control involves special considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the increased length of kill and choke lines, greater care must be taken in subsea operations to establish the parameters employed to kill an underbalanced well. This article provides a straightforward, step-by-step approach for round-the-clock preparedness when well control equipment is located on the seafloor.

Fulton, D.K.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water to individual homes or farms. The maximum rate in gallons per minute (GPM) that a well can be pumped without lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells

Keinan, Alon

438

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

440

High order well-balanced schemes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors review some recent work on high-order well-balanced schemes. A characteristic feature of hyperbolic systems of balance laws is the existence of non-trivial equilibrium solutions, where the effects of convective fluxes and source terms cancel each other. Well-balanced schemes satisfy a discrete analogue of this balance and are therefore able to maintain an equilibrium state. They discuss two classes of schemes, one based on high-order accurate, non-oscillatory finite difference operators which are well-balanced for a general class of equilibria, and the other one based on well-balanced quadratures, which can - in principle - be applied to all equilibria. Applications include equilibria at rest, where the flow velocity vanishes, and also the more challenging moving flow equilibria. Numerical experiments show excellent resolution of unperturbed as well as slightly perturbed equilibria.

Noelle, Sebastian [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH; Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development wells selected" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Underbalanced completions improve well safety and productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in completion technology, especially the use of and advances in coiled tubing technology, have presented the petroleum industry with methods that were previously unknown or considered too risky. Specifically, coiled tubing drilling and underbalanced drilling have both proven to be effective and acceptable methods in industry today. Several methods have been presented that will allow for the well to be completed underbalanced. By utilizing these methods, the completion process can be carried out while experiencing the same benefits offered by underbalanced drilling. the well can be completed with minimal fluid loss, which will result in reduced formation damage and improved well productivity. This new approach to the completion process provides additional opportunities both for completing new wells and for reentering existing wells.

Walker, T.; Hopmann, M. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Optimal selection of robots by using distance based approach method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deterministic quantitative model based on Distance Based Approach (DBA) method has been developed for evaluation, selection and ranking of robots, which is a concept hitherto not employed in selection problem of this kind. As a significant development ... Keywords: Distance based approach, Optimized selection, Ranking, Robots

Rishi Kumar; R. K. Garg

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Explosively actuated well tool having improved disarmed configuration  

SciTech Connect

There is disclosed a single wire multiple shot selective fire perforating gun for piercing oil field tubular goods, typically during the process of completing an oil or gas well. A switch in the gun electrically isolates an associated blasting cap and short circuits the terminals thereof until the associated blasting cap and perforating element are armed. A plurality of blasting cap-perforating element assemblages are vertically disposed on the tool with the detonation of one perforating element arming the next adjacent blasting cap. 12 claims, 5 figures.

Boop, G.T.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Salt Selected (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive

445