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1

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

2

In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability. October 3, 2011. ... That further limits the growth of the graphene, we think. ...

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

Williams, S.M. [Bechtel Nevada, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Byrd, E.R. [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (United States); Decker, M.W. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, PA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities The process development and integration approach used within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) provides numerous capabilities for scientific...

9

Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

12

EMSL: Capabilities: Instrument Development Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrument Development Laboratory Instrument Development Laboratory The mission of the Instrument Development Laboratory (IDL) is to design, develop, and deploy advanced state-of-the-art instrument systems and custom application software in support of the ongoing experimental research efforts within EMSL. IDL staff design and develop much of the custom hardware and software used at EMSL, and provide the critical support necessary to rapidly modify or adapt a user's system to help the user achieve the world-class results they expect at EMSL. Additional Information IDL Home Meet the IDL Experts IDL Innovations IDL Brochure IDL staff provide electrical engineering expertise in high-voltage, radiofrequency, and high-speed analog and digital systems; digital signaling processing and FPGA technology; and rapid prototyping. In

13

NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testingthrough large-scale, integrated testscan be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INLs High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The Atlas of Neutron Resonances by Mughabghab is used as a primary source of information on uncertainties at low energies. Care is taken to ensure consistency among the resonance parameter uncertainties and those for thermal cross sections. The resulting resonance parameter covariances are formatted in the ENDF-6 File 32. In the fast neutron range our methodology is based on model calculations with the code EMPIRE combined with experimental data through several available approaches. The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures yield comparable results. The Kalman filter and/or the generalized least square fitting procedures are employed to incorporate experimental information. We compare the two approaches analyzing results for the major reaction channels on {sup 89}Y. We also discuss a long-standing issue of unreasonably low uncertainties and link it to the rigidity of the model.

Herman,M.; Pigni, M.T.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Mattoon, C.M.; Capote, R.; Cho, Young-Sik; Trkov, A.

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing calculation methods to precisely measure proteome proteins and their post- Developing calculation methods to precisely measure proteome proteins and their post- translational modifications Project timeline: Spring 2007-Fall 2009 EMSL Lead Investigator: Nikola Tolić Instrument Development Laboratory, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Yufeng Shen, FCSD, PNNL Kim Hixson, Mass Spectrometry Facility, EMSL, PNNL Samuel Purvine, Instrument Development Laboratory, EMSL, PNNL Unique sequence tags-UStags-are a new method for protein identifications from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. It assumes high resolution on fragment ion species and relies on precise mass measurements. Thus, it is targeted toward data analysis of datasets produced on hybrid linear trap quadrupole-Fourier transform (LTQ-FT), LTQ-Orbitrap, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)

20

Capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test System at the Outdoor Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We illustrate the capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test (HVST) which operates continuously in the array field east of the Outdoor Test Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Because we know that photovoltaic (PV) modules generating electrical power in both residential and utility-scale array installations will develop high-voltage biases approaching 600 VDC and 1,000 VDC, respectively, we expect such high voltages will result in current leakage between cells and ground, typically through the frames or mounts. We know that inevitably such leakage currents are capable of producing electrochemical corrosion that adversely impacts long-term module performance. With the HVST, we stress or operate PV modules under high-voltage bias, to characterize their leakage currents under all prevailing ambient conditions and assess performance changes emanating from high-voltage stress. We perform this test both on single modules and an active array.

del Cueto, J. A.; Trudell, D.; Sekulic, W.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Embedded-Cluster Modeling of Insulators: Applications to Metal Oxide Surface Accurate Embedded-Cluster Modeling of Insulators: Applications to Metal Oxide Surface Chemistry and Surface Excitation Processes Project Duration: May 2008 - Sept 2010 Principal Investigator: Niri Govind, Senior Research Scientist II, High Performance Software Development, EMSL Co-Investigator: Karol Kowalski, Senior Research Scientist II, High Performance Software Development, EMSL Collaborators: Ken Beck (EMSL); Wayne Hess, Alan Joly, Roger Rousseau, Scott Chambers (FCSD); Peter Sushko, Alex Shluger (University College London) The accurate characterization of adsorbate reactivity and surface excitation processes at surfaces such as metal oxide interfaces is key to understanding, controlling, and designing molecular interactions and transformations for new energy sources. Electronic structure of defects and localized states and surface

22

Study of Hanford capability for solar energy research and development  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site provides unique capability for solar energy research and development. The basic attributes include large available land areas; consistent sunshine during much of the year (although not comparable to Arizona and the southwest U. S.); ex- treme temperatures for test purposes (--27 to 115 F); cooling water availability; ecology approximating ecology in some other solar areas; RgD facilities applicable to most solar technology; equipment immediately useful for solar energy programs; technology background in most areas of solar energy; experience with large energy systems, and background in systems analysis. From the solar energy production standpoint, the energy that falls on the 600 square miles at the Hanford site would produce 100,000 megawatts if 33 1/3% efficiency can be achieved. (MCW)n

Drumheller, K.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: ? Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments ? Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments ? Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics ? Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature ? Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: ? FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields ? Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) ? Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher temperature operation ? Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/?m. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200C and non-hermetic packages at 250C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

None

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Results and conclusions test capabilities task group summary report  

SciTech Connect

This annotated briefing documents an economic analysis of Sandia`s system-level test facilities maintained and operated by the Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Center 9700. The study was divided into four primary sub-tasks: (1) Estimation of the future system-level test workload, (2) Development of a consistent economic model to estimate the cost of maintaining and operating the test facilities, (3) Determination of the availability of viable alternative test sites, and (4) Assessment of the potential savings through reduction of excess capacity under various facility-closure scenarios. The analysis indicated that potential savings from closing all facilities could approach $6 million per year. However, large uncertainties in these savings remove any sound economic arguments for such closure: it is possible that testing at alternative sites could cost more than maintaining the current set of system-level test facilities. Finally, a number of programmatic risks incurred by facility closure were identified. Consideration of facility closure requires a careful weighing of any projected economic benefit against these programmatic risks. This summary report covers the briefing given to upper management. A more detailed discussion of the data and analyses is given in the full report, available for internal use from the technical library.

Bomber, T.; Pierce, K.; Easterling, R.; Rogers, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NETL Publications: Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for Advanced Fossil Energy Power Systems Computational Capabilities to Develop Materials for Advanced Fossil Energy Power Systems February 23, 2011 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations PRESENTATIONS Overview of FOA000260 awards Patricia Rawls, NETL Presentation [PDF-153KB] Computational Design of Creep Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Alloys Peter Liaw, U. Tennessee Presentation [PDF-5.19MB] Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundaries of Refractory Alloys Alex Vasenkov, CFD Research Corp Presentation [PDF-7.03MB] Large Scale Simulations of the Mechanical Properties of Layered Transition Metal Ternary Compounds for Fossil Energy Power System Applications Wai-Yim Ching, U. Missouri - Kansas City Presentation [PDF-1.14MB] Modeling Creep-Fatigue- Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

27

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Title Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1022E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Gustavsen, Arlid, Dariush K. Arasteh, Bjørn Petter Jelle, Dragan C. Curcija, and Christian Kohler Journal Journal of Building Physics Volume 32 Pagination 131-153 Call Number LBNL-1022E Abstract While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames.

28

Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNL's mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the capabilities of a jurisdiction to protect itself from, mitigate, respond to, and recover from a potential incident. On the basis of this metric, an interactive tool - the ESSCI Dashboard - can identify scenarios for enhancement that can be implemented, and it can identify the repercussions of these scenarios on the jurisdiction. It can assess the capabilities of law enforcement, fire fighting, search and rescue, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, dispatch/911, and emergency management services in a given jurisdiction and it can help guide those who need to prioritize what limited resources should be used to improve these capabilities. Furthermore, this tool can be used to compare the level of capabilities of various jurisdictions that have similar socioeconomic characteristics. It can thus help DHS define how it can support risk reduction and community preparedness at a national level. This tool aligns directly with Presidential Policy Directive 8 by giving a jurisdiction a metric of its ESS's capabilities and by promoting an interactive approach for defining options to improve preparedness and to effectively respond to a disruptive event. It can be used in combination with other CI performance metrics developed at Argonne National Laboratory, such as the vulnerability index and the resilience index for assessing regional resilience.

Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Scan Test Response Compaction Combined with Diagnosis Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As today's process technologies are combined with ever increasing design sizes, the result is a dramatic increase in the number of scan test vectors that must be applied during manufacturing test. The increased chip complexities, in combination with ... Keywords: ATE, ATPG, Design for test, Diagnosis, Scan compression, Yield

Sverre Wichlund; Frank Berntsen; Einar Johan Aas

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

An Overview of Facilities and Capabilities to Support the Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstract. The future of American space exploration depends on the ability to rapidly and economically access locations of interest throughout the solar system. There is a large body of work (both in the US and the Former Soviet Union) that show that Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is the most technically mature, advanced propulsion system that can enable this rapid and economical access by its ability to provide a step increase above what is a feasible using a traditional chemical rocket system. For an NTP system to be deployed, the earlier measurements and recent predictions of the performance of the fuel and the reactor system need to be confirmed experimentally prior to launch. Major fuel and reactor system issues to be addressed include fuel performance at temperature, hydrogen compatibility, fission product retention, and restart capability. The prime issue to be addressed for reactor system performance testing involves finding an affordable and environmentally acceptable method to test a range of engine sizes using a combination of nuclear and non-nuclear test facilities. This paper provides an assessment of some of the capabilities and facilities that are available or will be needed to develop and test the nuclear fuel, and reactor components. It will also address briefly options to take advantage of the greatly improvement in computation/simulation and materials processing capabilities that would contribute to making the development of an NTP system more affordable. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Fuel fabrication, nuclear testing, test facilities.

James Werner; Sam Bhattacharyya; Mike Houts

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature dependence of the on-resonance portion Temperature dependence of the on-resonance portion of the 55 Mn-NMR spectrum of a Mn(IV,IV) dimer acquired at 9.4 T. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability for Complex Systems: Application to the Photosynthetic Energy Conversion Systems Project start date: April 1, 2010 EMSL Lead Investigator: Ping Yang Molecular Science Computing Group, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigator: Andrew S. Lipton Cell Biology & Biochemistry, FCSD, PNNL Collaborator: K.V. Lakshmi Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate a unique capability to be enabled at EMSL-the integration of leading-edge cryogenic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements and advanced electronic

33

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

Daniel M. Ginosar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Post Combustion Test Bed Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assessment methodology and slip-stream testing platform enables the comprehensive early-stage evaluation of carbon capture solvents and sorbents utilizing a breadth of laboratory experimental capability as well as a testing platform at a nearby 600 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant.

Cabe, James E.; King, Dale A.; Freeman, Charles J.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

A software design review meeting was held May 2-3 in Lebanon, NH. The work on integrating a reformer model based on CFD with a fuel cell flow sheet was completed (Task 2.0). The CFD database design was completed and the database API's finalized. A file -based CFD database was implemented and tested (Task 2.8). The task COM-CORBA Bridge-I was completed. The bridge now has CO interfaces for transferring reaction kinetics information from Aspen Plus to Fluent (Task 2.11). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was implemented (Task 2.12). Work on ''Model Selection'' GUI was completed. This GUI allows the process analyst to select models from the CFD database. Work on ''Model Edit'' GUI was started (Task 2.13). A version of Aspen Plus with the capability for using CO parameters in ''design spec'' analysis has become available. With this version being available, work on adding CO wrapper to INDVU code has been started (Task 2.15). A preliminary design for the Solution Strategy class was developed (Task 2.16). The requirements for transferring pressure data between Aspen Plus and Fluent were defined. The ability to include two CFD models in a flow sheet was successfully tested. The capability to handle multiple inlets and outlets in a CO block was tested (Task 2.17). A preliminary version of the Configuration Wizard, which helps a user to make any Fluent model readable from a process simulator, was developed and tested (Task 2.18). Work on constructing a flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was started. The work on documenting Demo Case 2 is nearing completion (Task 3.2). A Fluent heat exchanger model was installed and tested. Work on calibrating the heat exchanger model was started (Task 4.1). An advisory board meeting was held in conjunction with the Fluent Users Group Meeting on Monday, June 10, 2002. The meeting minutes and presentations for the advisory board meeting have been posted on the project website (Task 5.0). A paper entitled ''Integrated Process Simulation and CFD for Improved Process Engineering'' was presented at the European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering-12, May 26-29, 2002, The Hague, The Netherlands (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A software design review meeting was held May 2-3 in Lebanon, NH. The work on integrating a reformer model based on CFD with a fuel cell flow sheet was completed (Task 2.0). The CFD database design was completed and the database API's finalized. A file -based CFD database was implemented and tested (Task 2.8). The task COM-CORBA Bridge-I was completed. The bridge now has CO interfaces for transferring reaction kinetics information from Aspen Plus to Fluent (Task 2.11). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was implemented (Task 2.12). Work on ''Model Selection'' GUI was completed. This GUI allows the process analyst to select models from the CFD database. Work on ''Model Edit'' GUI was started (Task 2.13). A version of Aspen Plus with the capability for using CO parameters in ''design spec'' analysis has become available. With this version being available, work on adding CO wrapper to INDVU code has been started (Task 2.15). A preliminary design for the Solution Strategy class was developed (Task 2.16). The requirements for transferring pressure data between Aspen Plus and Fluent were defined. The ability to include two CFD models in a flow sheet was successfully tested. The capability to handle multiple inlets and outlets in a CO block was tested (Task 2.17). A preliminary version of the Configuration Wizard, which helps a user to make any Fluent model readable from a process simulator, was developed and tested (Task 2.18). Work on constructing a flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was started. The work on documenting Demo Case 2 is nearing completion (Task 3.2). A Fluent heat exchanger model was installed and tested. Work on calibrating the heat exchanger model was started (Task 4.1). An advisory board meeting was held in conjunction with the Fluent Users Group Meeting on Monday, June 10, 2002. The meeting minutes and presentations for the advisory board meeting have been posted on the project website (Task 5.0). A paper entitled ''Integrated Process Simulation and CFD for Improved Process Engineering'' was presented at the European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering-12, May 26-29, 2002, The Hague, The Netherlands (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Final Environmental Assessment for the Test Capabilities Revitalization at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Final Environmental Assessment for the Test Capabilities Revitalization at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A January 2003 Department of Energy, Office of Kirtland Site Operations Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque New Mexico Test Capabilities Revitalization Environmental Assessment January 2003 Department of Energy Office of Kirtland Site Operations i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION ........................................................... 1 2.0 NO ACTION AND PROPOSED ACTION ALTERNATIVES........................................ 2 2.1 EXISTING FACILITIES ...........................................................................................................

39

ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

KM capability for software development: a case study of the Indian software firms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organisational knowledge management (KM) capability is developed to allow companies to share, create and disseminate their organisational knowledge resources. The paradigm shift from traditional business to information communication technology (ICT) ...

Abdullah Kammani; Sultan Aljahdali; Hema Date

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NNWSI waste form performance test development  

SciTech Connect

A test method has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated NNWSI repository conditions, and to provide information concerning materials interactions that may occur in the repository. Data from 13 weeks of unsaturated testing are discussed and compared to that from a 13-week analog test. The data indicate that the waste form test is capable of producing consistent, reproducible results that will be useful in evaluating the role of the waste in the long-term performance of the repository. 6 references, 3 figures.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Exercise to Test Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). "This is an excellent opportunity for emergency responders to test the skills they've learned," said Dale Childers, assistant chief of the Odessa Fire Department and emergency management coordinator for Ector County. "It will also help us determine what improvements,

43

IN-SITU XRD OF OPERATING LSFC CATHODES: DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research capability has been developed that facilitates measuring the electrochemical performance of an operating SOFC while simultaneously performing x-ray diffraction on its cathode. The evolution of this research tools development is discussed together with a description of the instrumentation used for in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of operating SOFC cathodes. The challenges that were overcome in the process of developing this capability, which included seals and cathode current collectors, are described together with the solutions that are presently being applied to mitigate them.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

NWChem Meeting on Science Driven Petascale Computing and Capability Development at EMSL  

SciTech Connect

On January 25, and 26, 2007, an NWChem meeting was held that was attended by 65 scientists from 29 institutions including 22 universities and 5 national laboratories. The goals of the meeting were to look at major scientific challenges that could be addressed by computational modeling in environmental molecular sciences, and to identify the associated capability development needs. In addition, insights were sought into petascale computing developments in computational chemistry. During the meeting common themes were identified that will drive the need for the development of new or improved capabilities in NWChem. Crucial areas of development that the developer's team will be focusing on are (1) modeling of dynamics and kinetics in chemical transformations, (2) modeling of chemistry at interfaces and in the condensed phase, and (3) spanning longer time scales in biological processes modeled with molecular dynamics. Various computational chemistry methodologies were discussed during the meeting, which will provide the basis for the capability developments in the near or long term future of NWChem.

De Jong, Wibe A.

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this DOE Vision-21 project work scope is to develop an integrated suite of software tools that can be used to simulate and visualize advanced plant concepts. Existing process simulation software does not meet the DOE's objective of ''virtual simulation'' which is needed to evaluate complex cycles. The overall intent of the DOE is to improve predictive tools for cycle analysis, and to improve the component models that are used in turn to simulate the cycle. Advanced component models are available; however, a generic coupling capability that will link the advanced component models to the cycle simulation software remains to be developed. In the current project, the coupling of the cycle analysis and cycle component simulation software will be based on an existing suite of programs. The challenge is to develop a general-purpose software and communications link between the cycle analysis software Aspen Plus{reg_sign} (marketed by Aspen Technology, Inc.), and specialized component modeling packages, as exemplified by industrial proprietary codes (utilized by ALSTOM Power Inc.) and the FLUENT{trademark} CFD code (provided by Fluent Inc). ALSTOM Power has a task responsibility to select and run a combined cycle test case (designated as Demonstration Case 2) to demonstrate the feasibility of the linkage concept. This report summarizes and documents the unit selected to represent Case 2, a 250 MW, natural gas-fired, combined cycle power plant. An analogous document for Demonstration Case 1 was previously submitted on April 30, 2001. Sufficient information is available from the plant to adequately benchmark the model. Hence, the proposed unit is deemed to be well suited as a demonstration case. However, as the combined cycle plant selected for this study contains recent technology, sensitivity to the commercial implications of this study prevents the release of the plant name and limits the quantity of operating/design information that can be presented. These limitations will not prevent the goal of this task, demonstration of the feasibility of software integration for ''virtual simulation'', from being accomplished.

Galen Richards, Ph.D.; David Sloan, Ph.D.; Woodrow Fiveland, Ph.D.

2002-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Development of New User REsearch Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0654 0654 PNNL-16054 1 The Development of New User Research Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science: Workshop Report Held August 1-2, 2006 W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Richland, WA Executive Summary On August 1, and 2, 2006, 104 scientists representing 40 institutions including 24 Universities and 5 National Laboratories gathered at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a National scientific user facility, to outline important science challenges for the next decade and identify major capabilities needed to pursue advanced research in the environmental molecular sciences. EMSL's four science themes served as the framework for the workshop. The four science themes are 1) Biological Interactions and Interfaces, 2) Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Surface

48

Development of a Fiber Laser Welding Capability for the W76, MC4702 Firing Set  

SciTech Connect

Development work to implement a new welding system for a Firing Set is presented. The new system is significant because it represents the first use of fiber laser welding technology at the KCP. The work used Six-Sigma tools for weld characterization and to define process performance. Determinations of workable weld parameters and comparison to existing equipment were completed. Replication of existing waveforms was done utilizing an Arbitrary Pulse Generator (APG), which was used to modulate the fiber lasers exclusive continuous wave (CW) output. Fiber laser weld process capability for a Firing Set is demonstrated.

Samayoa, Jose

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accelerate the development of advanced power plants, DOE's Vision 21 program identified the need for an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize new plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet this objective of virtual-plant simulation. Sophisticated models of many individual equipment items are available; however, a seamless coupling capability that would integrate the advanced equipment (component) models to the process (system) simulation software remained to be developed. The inability to use models in an integrated manner causes knowledge loss (e.g., knowledge captured in detailed equipment models is usually not available in process simulation) and modeling inconsistencies (e.g., physical properties and reaction kinetics data in different models are not the same). A team consisting of Fluent Inc., ALSTOM Power Inc., Aspen Technology Inc., Intergraph Corporation, and West Virginia University, in collaboration with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), addressed this challenge in a project performed over the period from October 2000 through December 2004. In this project the integration of the cycle analysis software was based on widely used commercial software: Aspen Plus{reg_sign} for process simulation and FLUENT{reg_sign} for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of equipment items. The integration software was designed to also include custom (in-house, proprietary, legacy) equipment models that often encapsulate the experience from the many years of designing and operating the equipment. The team adopted CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces, the de facto international standard for communication among process models, for exchanging information between software. The software developed in this project is the first demonstration of the use of CO interfaces to link CFD and custom equipment models with process simulators. New interface requirements identified during this project were communicated to the CO standard developers. The new software capability was designed to make the construction of integrated models fast and integrated simulations robust and user-friendly. Configuration wizards were developed to make CFD and custom models CO-compliant. An Integration Controller and CFD Model Database were developed to facilitate the exchange of information between equipment and process models. A reduced order model (ROM) framework and a solution strategy capability were incorporated in the Integration Controller to enable a flexible trade-off between simulation speed and complexity. A CFD viewer was developed so that process engineers can view CFD results from the process simulator interface.

Madhava Syamlal; Maxwell Osawe; Stephen Zitney; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Frank Joop; Philip Simon; K. Joseph Cleetus

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

Jeffrey Bryan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The "Z" Pulsed Radiation Source: Recent Developments in Equation of State Measurement Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Z machine is a source of intense radiation which can be used to drive ablative shocks for equation of state studies. In developing the capability to diagnose these types of studies on Z, techniques commonly used in conventional impact generated experiments were leveraged. The primary diagnostic transferred was velocity interferome~, VLSAR, [1] which not only provides Hugoniot particle velocity measurements, but also indications of shock stability and wave attenuation. In addition to a VISAR capability on the Z machine, methods for measuring shock velocity have been developed. When these measured parameters are used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions, [2] material response at high temperatures and pressures can be inferred. With sample sizes used on Z being much smaller than those fielded in typical impact experiments, temporal resolution and methods of interfacing the diagnostics with the targets had to be improved. In this paper, a "standard" equation of state experiment, associated diagnostics, and some recent results in aluminum and beryllium will be discussed.

Asay, J.R.; Chandler, G.; Clark, B.; Fleming, K.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.; Trott, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light output (L) of CsI:Tl to He + ions. The inset is an example where L=263 is determined for particles with certainty energy (TOF=840). The energy resolution can be determined by ∆L/L = 45/263. The light-energy dependence and energy resolution can be observed as the difference in curvature and dispersive of the data. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials Project start date: Spring 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Yanwen Zhang Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Scintillation response has wide applications in the field of astronomy, medical physics, high-energy

54

Test Development for Voting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a set of public test suites to ... US Election Assistance Commission's (EAC) Testing and Certification ... The tests correspond to Voluntary Voting System ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Building Technologies Office: Test Procedure Development and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Procedure Development and Revision to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Test Procedure Development and Revision on Facebook Tweet about Building...

56

Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results  

SciTech Connect

During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

Hartwell William T.,Daniels Jeffrey,Nikolich George,Shadel Craig,Giles Ken,Karr Lynn,Kluesner Tammy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of a Neutron Diffraction Based Experiemental Capability for Investigating Hydraulic Fracturing for EGS-like Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing to enhance formation permeability is an established practice in the Oil & Gas (O&G) industry and is expected to be an enabler for EGS. However, it is rarely employed in conventional geothermal systems and there are significant questions regarding the translation of practice from O&G to both conventional geothermal and EGS applications. Lithological differences(sedimentary versus crystalline rocks, significantly greater formation temperatures and different desired fracture characteristics are among a number of factors that are likely to result in a gap of understanding of how to manage hydraulic fracturing practice for geothermal. Whereas the O&G community has had both the capital and the opportunity to develop its understanding of hydraulic fracturing operations empirically in the field as well through extensive R&D efforts, field testing opportunities for EGS are likely to be minimal due to the high expense of hydraulic fracturing field trials. A significant portion of the knowledge needed to guide the management of geothermal/EGS hydraulic fracturing operations will therefore likely have to come from experimental efforts and simulation. This paper describes ongoing efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop an experimental capability to map the internal stresses/strains in core samples subjected to triaxial stress states and temperatures representative of EGS-like conditions using neutron diffraction based strain mapping techniques. This capability is being developed at ORNL\\'s Spallation Neutron Source, the world\\'s most powerful pulsed neutron source and is still in a proof of concept phase. A specialized pressure cell has been developed that permits independent radial and axial fluid pressurization of core samples, with axial flow through capability and a temperature rating up to 300 degrees C. This cell will ultimately be used to hydraulically pressurize EGS-representative core samples to conditions of imminent fracture and map the associated internal strain states of the sample. This will hopefully enable a more precise mapping of the rock material failure envelope, facilitate a more refined understanding of the mechanism of hydraulically induced rock fracture, particularly in crystalline rocks, and serve as a platform for validating and improving fracture simulation codes. The elements of the research program and preliminary strain mapping results of a Sierra White granite sample subjected only to compressive loading will be discussed in this paper.

Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A software review meeting was held at Fluent Inc. in Lebanon, NH on January 31-February 1, 2002. The team reviewed the current status of the software and its compliance with the software requirements (Task 2). Work on a fuel cell based power-plant flow sheet that incorporates a reformer CFD model was started. This test case includes more features (multiple ports, temperature dependent properties) than the mixing tank test case developed earlier and will be used for the further testing of the software (Task 2). The software development plan was finalized (Task 2.7). The design and implementation of a CFD database was commenced. The CFD database would store various models that a process analyst can use in the flowsheet model (Task 2.8). The COM-CORBA Bridge was upgraded to use the recently published version 0.9.3 CAPE-OPEN specifications. Work on transferring reaction kinetics data from Aspen Plus to Fluent was started (Task 2.11). The requirements for extending CAPE-OPEN interfaces in Aspen Plus to transfer temperature dependent properties to Fluent was written and communicated to the Aspen Tech developer of CAPE-OPEN interfaces (Task 2.12). A prototype of low-order model based on the Multiple Regression technique was written. A low-order model is required to speed up the calculations with the integrated model (Task 2.19). The Berkshire Power (Agawam, MA) combined-cycle power plant was selected as the Demonstration Case 2 (Task 3.2). A CFD model of the furnace in Demonstration Case 1 was developed. The furnace model will be incorporated into the flowsheet model already developed for this case (Task 4.1). A new hire joined the Fluent development team for this project. The project management plan was revised based on the software development plan. A presentation on the project status was made at the Clearwater Conference, March 4-7, 2002. The final manuscript for ESCAPE-12 conference was submitted (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NSTec Overview and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the history of the Nevada National Security Site (Nevada Test Site) Contract as well as current capabilities.

Meidinger, A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation Capabilities Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems Background Staged combustion is a method of reducing nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions in boilers by controlling the combustion mixture of air and fuel. Its process conditions are particularly corrosive to lower furnace walls. Superheaters and/or reheaters are often employed in the upper furnace to reuse hot combustion gasses to further raise the

62

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

A software design review meeting was conducted (Task 2.0). A CFD Viewer was developed, to allow the process analyst to view CFD results from the process simulator (Task 2.14). Work on developing a CO wrapper for the INDVU code was continued (Task 2.15). The model-edit GUI was modified to allow the user to specify a solution strategy. Enhancements were made to the solution strategy implementation (Task 2.16). Testing of the integrated software was continued and several bug fixes and enhancements were made: ability to expose CFD parameters to the process analyst and support for velocity and pressure inlet boundary conditions (Task 2.21). Work on preparing the release version progressed: Version 0.3 of V21 Controller was released, a global configuration dialog was implemented, and a code review process was initiated (Task 2.24). The calibration of the tube bank CFD model for the RP&L case was completed. While integrating the tube bank CFD model into the flow sheet model, several development requirements were identified and communicated to the developers. The requirements of porting V21 Controller and Configuration Wizard to FLUENT 6.1, turning off the transfer of temperature dependent properties, exposing CFD parameters in Aspen Plus and supporting velocity boundary conditions have been implemented (Task 4.1). An initial grid for the HRSG component has been prepared (Task 4.2). A web-based advisory board meeting was conducted on December 18, 2003 (Task 5.0). Project personnel attended and gave presentations at the Aspen World Conference, October 28-30, 2002; AIChE Annual Meeting, November 8, 2002; and the Vision 21 Simulation meeting at Iowa State University, November 19-20, 2002 (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development of Standard Test Methods for Emergency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of Standard Test Methods for Emergency Response Robots for Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations  

SciTech Connect

California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Chena Hot Springs geothermal field was intensively explored, tested, and developed without a wireline unit between October 2005 and August 2006. Due to the remote location of the project and its small size of 0.4 MW, it was necessary to perform the work without the geothermal industry infrastructure typically utilized in the 48 contiguous states. This could largely be done because some of the wells were capable of artesian flow at below boiling temperatures. The geology, consisting of

67

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The training of a new project team member was completed (Task 2.1). The Software Requirements Document was written (Task 2.3). It was determined that the CAPE-OPEN interfaces are sufficient for the communication between Fluent and V21 Controller (Task 2.4). The AspenPlus-Fluent prototype on allyl/triacetone alcohol production was further developed to assist the GUI and software design tasks. The prototype was also used to analyze the sensitivity of a process simulation result with respect to a parameter in a CFD model embedded in the process simulation. Thus the integration of process simulation and CFD provides additional process insights and enables the engineer to optimize overall process performance (e.g., product purity and yield) with respect to important CFD design and operation parameters (e.g., CSTR shaft speed). A top-level design of the V21 Controller was developed and discussed. A draft version of the Software Design Document was written (Task 2.5/2.6). A preliminary software development plan was outlined. At first the V21 Controller will be developed and tested in two parts--a part that communicates with Fluent and a part that communicates with Aspen Plus. Then the two parts will be combined and tested with the allyl/triacetone alcohol flow sheet simulation. Much progress was made in writing the code for the two parts (Task 2.7). A requirement for pre-configured models was identified and added to the software requirements document (Task 2.9). Alstom Power's INDVU code was ported to the PC platform and calibrated. Aspen Plus model of the RP&L unit was improved to reflect the latest information received on the unit. Thus the preparation for linking INDVU code with the Aspen Plus model of RP&L unit is complete (Task 2.14). A report describing Demo Case 1 was written and submitted to DOE for review and approval (Task 3.1). The first Advisory Board meeting was held at the Fluent Users Group Meeting on June 6th. At the Advisory Board meeting, the project was reviewed, a demonstration was made, and verbal feedback was received. Meeting minutes have been issued (Task 5.0). Global-CAPE-OPEN organization was contacted for obtaining draft specifications in CORBA that are needed for writing the interfaces between V21 Controller and Fluent. Efforts are underway to establish collaboration with Norsk Hydro, who is leading a Global CAPE-OPEN project on linking CFD and process simulation models. Because of the similarity between that project and the present project, the two project teams can learn much from each other (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Capabilities Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Series Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.gov Scientific Innovation Through Integration WHY USE EMSL'S MOLECULAR SCIENCE COMPUTING CAPABILITY? Ì Molecular Science Computing provides users with an integrated suite of computing hardware and software capabilities optimized for achieving the fastest time-to-solution for complex systems-level environmental molecular science simulations. Ì Expert staff members have extensive knowledge and experience in high-performance computing, as well as the operations, domain expertise, and scientific knowledge to support EMSL's users. Ì Substantial integration of transformational high-end computing simulations with experimental resources at EMSL provides a unique multidisciplinary research environment. The Molecular Science Computing capability at EMSL

69

Development and Testing of the MIT Acoustic Levitation Test Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two acoustic levitation test facilities have been developed for cloud physics experimentation. These facilities utilize acoustic standing wave energy to suspend both solid and liquid objects in a contact-free environment. In the still-air ...

Victor D. Lupi; R. John Hansman

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Progress on the development of a three-dimensional capability for simulating large-scale complex geologic processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in developing a three-dimensional capability for predicting the mechanical response of rock over spatial and time scales of geologic interest to the Oil and Gas industry. An Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI) initiated three years ago to achieve such a computational technology breakthrough has made significant progress towards its goal by adapting and improving the unique advanced quasistatic finite element technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories to the mechanics applications important to exploration and production (E and P). This capability now gives the industry a powerful tool to help reduce risk on prospects, improve pre-project initial reserve estimates, and lower operating costs. Progress to date on this program is reported herein by presenting and discussing the enhancements and adaptations that have been made to the technology, with specific examples to illustrate their use on large E and P geomechanics problems.

Argueello, J.G.; Stone, C.M.; Fossum, A.F.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"  

SciTech Connect

In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Preliminary design capability enhancement via development of rotorcraft operating economics model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to develop a means of predicting direct operating cost (DOC) for new commercial rotorcraft early in the design process. This project leverages historical efforts to model operating costs in ...

Giansiracusa, Michael P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS: An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability  

SciTech Connect

This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone #3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3?year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

NSTec Mission and Projects Division

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Prigmore, Andre L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of manufacturing capability for high-concentration, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the major results from a program to develop a manufacturable, high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cell and a cost-effective manufacturing facility. The program was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories through the Concentrator Initiative, and SunPower Corporation. The key achievements of the program include the demonstration of 26%-efficient silicon concentrator solar cells with design-point (20 W/cm{sup 2}) efficiencies over 25%. High-performance front-surface passivations; that were developed to achieve this result were verified to be absolutely stable against degradation by 475 days of field exposure at twice the design concentration. SunPower demonstrated pilot production of more than 1500 of these cells. This cell technology was also applied to pilot production to supply 7000 17.7-cm{sup 2} one-sun cells (3500 yielded wafers) that demonstrated exceptional quality control. The average efficiency of 21.3% for these cells approaches the peak efficiency ever demonstrated for a single small laboratory cell within 2% (absolute). Extensive cost models were developed through this program and calibrated by the pilot-production project. The production levels achieved indicate that SunPower could produce 7-10 MW of concentrator cells per year in the current facility based upon the cell performance demonstrated during the program.

Sinton, R.A.; Verlinden, P.J.; Crane, R.A.; Swanson, R.N. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project management plan was finalized during a project kick off meeting held on January 16, 2001 in Lebanon, NH, which was attended by all project participants. The project management plan was submitted to DOE and was revised based on comments from DOE (Task 1.0). A survey of the potential users of the integrated software was conducted. A web-based survey form was developed and was announced in the ProcessCity discussion forum and in AspenTech's e-mail digest Aspen e-Flash. Several Fluent clients were individually contacted. A user requirements document was written (Task 2.2). As a prototype of AspenPlus-Fluent integration, the flowsheet for allyl alcohol production via the isomerization of propylene oxide was developed. A stirred tank reactor in the flowsheet for converting the byproduct acetone into n-propyl propionate was modeled with Fluent, version 5.4. The convergence of the AspenPlus-Fluent integrated model was demonstrated, and a list of data exchanges required between AspenPlus and Fluent was developed (Task 2.6). As the first demonstration case, the RP and L power plant was selected. A planning meeting was held on February 13, 2001 in Cambridge, MA to discuss this demonstration case. It was decided that the steam-side of the power plant would be modeled with AspenPlus and the gas-side, with the ALSTOM Power in-house code INDVU. A flowsheet model of the power plant was developed (Task 3.1). Three positive responses were received for the invitation to join the project Advisory Board. It was decided to expand the membership on the Advisory Board to include other industrial users interested in integrating AspenPlus and Fluent. Additional invitations were sent out (Task 5.0). Integraph's role in the project was restructured based on discussions among the project participants. Fluent hired Dr. Maxwell Osawe to work on the project. Dr. Osawe brings to the project a unique combination of skills (expertise in CFD and object-oriented design and programming) required for the software integration task (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.`

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement in Predictive Capability: Sequential Bayesian Inference, Hypothesis Testing, and Power Analysis  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian statistical methodology for identifying improvement in predictive simulations, including an analysis of the number of (presumably expensive) simulations that will need to be made in order to establish with a given level of confidence that an improvement has been observed. Our analysis assumes the ability to predict (or postdict) the same experiments with legacy and new simulation codes and uses a simple binomial model for the probability, {theta}, that, in an experiment chosen at random, the new code will provide a better prediction than the old. This model makes it possible to do statistical analysis with an absolute minimum of assumptions about the statistics of the quantities involved, at the price of discarding some potentially important information in the data. In particular, the analysis depends only on whether or not the new code predicts better than the old in any given experiment, and not on the magnitude of the improvement. We show how the posterior distribution for {theta} may be used, in a kind of Bayesian hypothesis testing, both to decide if an improvement has been observed and to quantify our confidence in that decision. We quantify the predictive probability that should be assigned, prior to taking any data, to the possibility of achieving a given level of confidence, as a function of sample size. We show how this predictive probability depends on the true value of {theta} and, in particular, how there will always be a region around {theta} = 1/2 where it is highly improbable that we will be able to identify an improvement in predictive capability, although the width of this region will shrink to zero as the sample size goes to infinity. We show how the posterior standard deviation may be used, as a kind of 'plan B metric' in the case that the analysis shows that {theta} is close to 1/2 and argue that such a plan B should generally be part of hypothesis testing. All the analysis presented in the paper is done with a general beta-function prior for {theta}, enabling sequential analysis in which a small number of new simulations may be done and the resulting posterior for {theta} used as a prior to inform the next stage of power analysis.

Sigeti, David E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pelak, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences: Design principles of photosynthetic biofuel production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current fossil fuel-based energy infrastructure is not sustainable. Solar radiation is a plausible alternative, but realizing it as such will require significant technological advances in the ability to harvest light energy and convert it into suitable fuels. The biological system of photosynthesis can carry out these reactions, and in principle could be engineered using the tools of synthetic biology. One desirable implementation would be to rewire the reactions of a photosynthetic bacterium to direct the energy harvested from solar radiation into the synthesis of the biofuel H2. Proposed here is a series of experiments to lay the basic science groundwork for such an attempt. The goal is to elucidate the transcriptional network of photosynthesis using a novel driver-reporter screen, evolve more robust hydrogenases for improved catalysis, and to test the ability of the photosynthetic machinery to directly produce H2 in vivo. The results of these experiments will have broad implications for the understanding of photosynthesis, enzyme function, and the engineering of biological systems for sustainable energy production. The ultimate impact could be a fundamental transformation of the world's energy economy.

Donald D. Brown; David Savage

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data Project Start Date: Summer 2008 EMSL Lead Investigator Ken Auberry Instrumentation Development Laboratory, EMSL, PNNL As greater numbers of collaborators, journals, and funding agencies require data retention associated with a given project, preservation of experimentally generated results has become an increasingly important challenge in science. In many small- to medium-scale laboratory environments, this task has traditionally been carried out using offline optical media (recordable CDs and DVDs) or externally connected commercial hard drive units. Along with the raw storage issues that must be addressed, additional challenges await in the correlation of stored data to contextual information about the experiments and

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81

Improved energy sealing capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to the need for tapping national energy resources, an improved high temperature sealing material has been developed through the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. Parker Seal was selected as one of the technology transferees from L'Garde Inc. and has optimized this transferred technology for further improved performance capabilities and acceptable plant processing. This paper summarizes Parker Seal's testing and evaluation efforts on L'Garde's Y267 transferred technology for a new geothermal and stream service material. This new product, Parker's E962-85 is described in this paper.

Barsoumian, Jerry L.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE Vision 21 project requirements for the support of Global CAPE-OPEN Reaction Kinetics interfaces in Aspen Plus 12 was written (Task 2.4). The software design document was written and posted on the project web site. Intergraph started work on a proof of concept demo of the physical domain software (Task 2.6). The COM-side (Aspen Plus) and CORBA-side (Fluent) pieces of the Vision 21 controller code were written and independently verified. The two pieces of the code were then combined. Debugging of the combined code is underway (Task 2.7). Papers on fuel cell processes were read in preparation for developing an example based on a fuel cell process (Task 2.8). The INDVU code has been used to replace the boiler component in the Aspen Plus flowsheet of the RP&L power plant. The INDVU code receives information from Aspen Plus and iterates on the split backpass LTSH bypass and excess air quantities until the stipulated superheat outlet temperature is satisfied. The combined INDVU-Aspen Plus model has been run for several load conditions (Task 2.14). Work on identifying a second demonstration case involving an advanced power cycle has been started (Task 3.2). Plans for the second Advisory Board meeting in November were made (Task 5.0). Intergraph subcontract was signed and work on a physical domain software demo was started. A second teleconference with Norsk Hydro was conducted to discuss Global CAPE-OPEN standards and issues related to COM-CORBA Bridge (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2001-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is dependent on the production of oil and gas, and every day the demand increases. Technologies have to keep up with the demand of this resource to keep the world running. Since hydrocarbons are finite and will eventually run out, the increasing demand of oil and gas is the impetus to search for oil in more difficult and challenging areas. One challenging area is offshore in ultradeep water, with water depths greater than 5000 ft. This is the new arena for drilling technology. Unfortunately with greater challenges there are greater risks of losing control and blowing out a well. A dynamic kill simulator was developed in late 2004 to model initial conditions of a blowout in ultradeep water and to calculate the minimum kill rate required to kill a blowing well using the dynamic kill method. The simulator was simple and efficient, but had limitations; only vertical wells could be simulated. To keep up with technology, modifications were made to the simulator to model directional wells. COMASim (Cherokee, Offshore Technology Research Center, Minerals Management Service, Texas A&M Simulator) is the name of the dynamic kill simulator. The new version, COMASim1.0, has the ability to model almost any type of wellbore geometry when provided the measured and vertical depths of the well. Eighteen models with varying wellbore geometry were simulated to examine the effects of wellbore geometry on the minimum kill rate requirement. The main observation was that lower kill rate requirement was needed in wells with larger measured depth. COMASim 1.0 cannot determine whether the inputs provided by the user are practical; COMASim 1.0 can only determine if the inputs are incorrect, inconsistent or cannot be computed. If unreasonable drilling scenarios are input, unreasonable outputs will result. COMASim1.0 adds greater functionality to the previous version while maintaining the original framework and simplicity of calculations and usage.

Meier, Hector Ulysses

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Diagnostic development and support of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for HRSR support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with MHD Energy Center computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. MSU personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for MHD power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 25 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

PNNL: ASGC - Research Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) The PRIMA Initiative is developing a modeling framework to address regional human-environmental...

88

PNNL: Capability Replacement Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

history. But it is much more than bricks, mortar, and scientific instrumentation. These facilities are essential to retaining capabilities and expertise developed and nurtured...

89

The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine

90

Transport Test Problems for Hybrid Methods Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents 9 test problems to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations for the ADVANTG code at ORNL. These test cases can be used for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, as well as for guiding the development of variance reduction methods. Cases are drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for cases which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22.

Shaver, Mark W.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

Geisz, J. F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Small Wind Turbine Testing and Applications Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small wind turbines offer a promising alternative for many remote electrical uses where there is a good wind resource. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory helps further the role that small turbines can play in supplying remote power needs. The NWTC tests and develops new applications for small turbines. The NWTC also develops components used in conjunction with wind turbines for various applications. This paper describes wind energy research at the NWTC for applications including battery charging stations, water desalination/purification, and health clinics. Development of data acquisition systems and tests on small turbines are also described.

Corbus, D.; Baring-Gould, I.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.; Jimenez, T.; Newcomb, C.; Flowers, L.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Correlations Tests in Nuclear Mass Model Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlation testing provides a quick method of discriminating amongst potential terms to include in a nuclear mass formula or functional; however a firm mathematical foundation of the method has not been previously set forth. Here, the necessary justification for correlation testing is developed and more detail of the motivation behind its use is given. We provide a quantitative demonstration of the method's performance and short-comings, highlighting also potential issues a user may encounter. In concluding we suggestion some possible future developments to improve the limitations of the method.

Bertolli, M G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development and Testing of Solar Reflectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make concentrating solar power technologies more cost competitive, it is necessary to develop advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The Advanced Materials Team performs durability testing of candidate solar reflectors at outdoor test sites and in accelerated weathering chambers. Several materials being developed by industry have been submitted for evaluation. These include silvered glass mirrors, aluminized reflectors, and front-surface mirrors. In addition to industry-supplied materials, NREL is funding the development of new, innovative reflectors, including a new commercial laminate reflector and an advanced solar reflective mirror (ASRM). To help commercialize the ASRM, a cost analysis was performed; it shows the total production cost could meet the goal. The development, performance, and durability of these candidate solar reflectors and cost analysis results will be described.

Kennedy, C.; Terwilliger, K.; Milbourne, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Development and testing of insulated drillpipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with Drill Cool Systems, Inc., has worked to develop and test insulated drillpipe (IDP). IDP will allow much cooler drilling fluid to reach the bottom of the hole, making possible the use of downhole motors, electronics, and steering tools that are now unusable in high-temperature formations. Other advantages of cooler fluid include reduced degradation of drilling fluid, longer bit life, and reduced corrosion rates. The paper describes the theoretical background, laboratory testing, and field testing of IDP. Structural and thermal laboratory testing procedures and results are described. Results are given for a field test in a geothermal well, in which circulating temperatures in IDP are compared with those in conventional drillpipe (CDP) at different flow rates. A brief description of the software used to model wellbore temperature and to calculate sensitivity to IDP design differences is included, along with a comparison of calculated and measured wellbore temperatures in the field test. Analysis of mixed (IDP and CDP) drill strings and discussion of where IDP should be placed in a mixed string are presented.

FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.; CHAMPNESS,A.T.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for almost 9,150 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and coarse and fine ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and mode...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of Real-Time Fuel Management Capability at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center reactor a fuel depletion code was created to develop real-time fuel management capability. This code package links MCNP8 and ORIGEN26 and is interfaced through a Visual Basic code. Microsoft Visual Basic was used to create a user interface and for pre-and post-processing of MCNP and ORIGEN2 output. MCNP was used to determine the flux for all fuel and control rods within the core while ORIGEN2 used this flux along with the power history to calculate buildup and depletion for tracking the fuel isotopic evolution through time. A comparison of MCNP calculated fluxes and measured flux values were used to confirm the validity of the MCNP model. A comparison to Monteburns was used to add confidence to the correctness of the calculated fuel isotopics. All material isotopics were stored in a Microsoft Access database for integration with the Visual Basic code to allow for isotopics report generation for the Nuclear Science Center staff. This fuel management code performs its function with reasonable accuracy. It gathers minimal information from the user and burns the core over daily operation. After execution it stores all material data to the database for further use within NSCRFM or for isotopic report generation.

Parham, Neil A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optional capability, the ACM allows an air economizer to beEnergy Commission Air Economizer ACM For systems withCooling Towers Types Air Economizers ACM has an optional

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

Michael Podowski

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Federal Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities MCKINSTRY'S CYCLE OF SERVICES PROGRAM SERVICES McKinstry is dedicated to excellence in design, construction, and facilities operation. We strive to develop innovative, cost effective facility solutions for you. Below are the services we can deliver under our energy services program: * Design-Build MEDP contracting * Energy savings performance contracting * Smart Building System integration * Demand response * Smart metering to Smart Grid solutions * Advanced metering services * Renewable energy systems * Cogeneration/combined heat power * Creative tax credit and green tags/white tags * ESCO preventative maintenance APPROACH * No premium for the energy services delivery * Open book pricing and guaranteed

103

The Cooperative Engagement Capability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

picture as well as the ability to engage targets that may not be seen locally, a new level of capability may be attained. This ability is precisely what the Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) provides for a network of combatants. Recent tests demonstrated that from older, short-range systems such as NATO Sea Sparrow through the latest Aegis baselines, CEC can provide greater defensive capabilities and even provide new types of capabilities to a battle force. However, CEC does not obviate the need for advances in sensors, fire control, and interceptors. Rather, CEC allows the INTRODUCTION Operation in the littoral theater is a principal Navy 1990s scenario with complexities never considered in the Cold War era. For theater air defense, the complexities include the natural environment and its effects on sensor range. For example, desensitization by clutter from propagation ducting and rough terrain, as well as blockage by coastal mountains and clif

Apl

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

Kostin, Mikhail [FRIB, MSU] [FRIB, MSU; Mokhov, Nikolai [FNAL] [FNAL; Niita, Koji [RIST, Japan] [RIST, Japan

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

106

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-Temperature Interlaminar Tension Test Method Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, standard test methods only address the characterization of interlaminar tensile ... This work addresses the development of a new test technique for the...

108

Development and Performance Testing of a New Ceramic Recuperator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal heat exchangers have been used in industrial heat recovery applications for many years. Ceramic heat exchangers are relatively new, but are gaining acceptance as more field experience becomes available. The advantage of the ceramic units over metal units is the higher temperature capabilities of the ceramic which eliminate the need for costly over-temperature controls and dilution air systems. The problems encountered with ceramic heat exchangers to date have been variable leakage and lack of durability. These problems are associated with the high thermal stresses in the compact designs and with the seals required to connect the ceramic to the metal ductwork. Coors Porcelain Company has been engaged in the development of ceramic heat exchangers for heat engine and industrial applications for several years. Durability problems were encountered from thermal stresses in these applications with recuperators made from conventional ceramics. This resulted in development' of a new ceramic mixed oxide material specifically for heat exchangers. Changes in geometry of the ceramic matrices were also made to further reduce the stresses in order to increase product durability. A housing was designed and a ceramic gasket was selected to minimize the chances of significant leakage from the seal area of the recuperator. The performance of different recuperator designs and the durability results attained to date will be presented as well as results on field testing.

Kleiner, R. N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

Howden, G.F.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

M-C Power Corp. will design, fabricate, install, test, and evaluate a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept MCFC Power Plant. The plant will be located at Kaiser Permanente`s San Diego Medical Center; it will be designed and built by Bechtel Corp. Two 250 keV MCFC stacks will be assembled and tested at M-C Power; one stack will be used to support the San Diego field demonstration. This report outlines 6 tasks: project management/permitting, demonstration design, stack manufacturing, BOP fabrication, site work, and testing.

Scroppo, J.A.; Camara, E.H.; Figueroa, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development...

112

Test driven: practical tdd and acceptance tdd for java developers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In test driven development, you first write an executable test of what your application code must do. Only then do you write the code itself and, with the test spurring you on, you improve your design. In acceptance test driven development (ATDD), you ...

Lasse Koskela

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of cryogenic instruments and equipment for SSC magnet cryogenic tests at the MTL  

SciTech Connect

The Magnet Test Laboratory (MTL) will test a considerable portion of the total SSC superconducting magnet production in order to control the manufacturing process and verify magnet performance requirements. With ten cryogenic test stands, MTL is capable of housing tests of 30 dipoles and 5 quadrupoles per month. For further understanding and improving the performance of the SSC magnets, there will be two R&D test stands for extensively instruments were allocated and installed inside the prototype and first production magnets, as well as in the feed and end cans. A data acquisition and control system is developed. A comprehensive cryogenic system (including refrigerator, cryogenic distribution box and, feed/end cans), vapor-cooled power leads, anti-cryostats (warm bore), and other associated systems, have been designed, developed and tested. This paper will briefly discuss the progress to date.

Shu, Q.S.; Coles, M.; Dorman, R.; Franclin, C.; Fuzesy, R.; Gabert, G.; Hatfield, D.; Syromyatnikov, I.; Tompkins, J.; Trekell, R.; Weisend, J.; Zolotov, A.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup and, thereb...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Guide to good practices for the development of test items  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the methodology used in developing test items can vary significantly, to ensure quality examinations, test items should be developed systematically. Test design and development is discussed in the DOE Guide to Good Practices for Design, Development, and Implementation of Examinations. This guide is intended to be a supplement by providing more detailed guidance on the development of specific test items. This guide addresses the development of written examination test items primarily. However, many of the concepts also apply to oral examinations, both in the classroom and on the job. This guide is intended to be used as guidance for the classroom and laboratory instructor or curriculum developer responsible for the construction of individual test items. This document focuses on written test items, but includes information relative to open-reference (open book) examination test items, as well. These test items have been categorized as short-answer, multiple-choice, or essay. Each test item format is described, examples are provided, and a procedure for development is included. The appendices provide examples for writing test items, a test item development form, and examples of various test item formats.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

US10 Capable Prototype Volvo MG11 Natural Gas Engine Development: Final Report, December 16, 2003 - July 31, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses a project to develop a low-emissions natural gas engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and a three-way catalyst (TWC).

Tai, C.; Reppert, T.; Chiu, J.; Christensen, L.; Knoll, K.; Stewart, J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of Modeling Capabilities for the Analysis of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop an experimental and theoretical data base for heat transfer in tubes and channels cooled by water and CO2 at supercritical pressures.

Dr. Michael Z. Podowski

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems through a developedDOE-2 user function. VRF systems have multiple indoor DXthe outdoor condensing units. VRF systems can run either in

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Function Test Framework for Testing IO-Blocks in a Model-Based Rapid Prototyping Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Function Test Framework for Testing IO-Blocks in a Model-Based Rapid Prototyping Development -- Testing and verification are important methods for gaining confidence in the reliability of a software changing development cycles or that is tar- geted at many platforms. In this paper we present a test

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

122

Sandia SAR Capabilities -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Sandia National Laboratories offers state-of-the-art capability in the design and development of Synthetic Aperture Radars, from system design through system...

123

California Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Phase 2: 12-Month Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results from the second phase of the California Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project.

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Standard Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Developing a Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Developing a

125

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program

Abdou, Mohamed

126

Toward Global Drought Early Warning Capability: Expanding International Cooperation for the Development of a Framework for Monitoring and Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drought is a global problem that has far-reaching impacts, especially on vulnerable populations in developing regions. This paper highlights the need for a Global Drought Early Warning System (GDEWS), the elements that constitute its underlying framework (...

Will Pozzi; Justin Sheffield; Robert Stefanski; Douglas Cripe; Roger Pulwarty; Jrgen V. Vogt; Richard R. Heim Jr.; Michael J. Brewer; Mark Svoboda; Rogier Westerhoff; Albert I. J. M. van Dijk; Benjamin Lloyd-Hughes; Florian Pappenberger; Micha Werner; Emanuel Dutra; Fredrik Wetterhall; Wolfgang Wagner; Siegfried Schubert; Kingtse Mo; Margaret Nicholson; Lynette Bettio; Liliana Nunez; Rens van Beek; Marc Bierkens; Luis Gustavo Goncalves de Goncalves; Joo Gerd Zell de Mattos; Richard Lawford

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

Cal Ozaki

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Test Procedure Development and Revision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Procedure Development and Revision Test Procedure Development and Revision Test Procedure Development and Revision Most energy conservation standards rulemakings are accompanied by a concurrent test procedure rulemaking. Test procedures detail the protocols that manufacturers must follow when testing their products for compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) standards. DOE also uses the test procedures to determine compliance with the applicable standards in any verification or enforcement testing. The procedures specify how to measure and calculate the energy efficiency and/or energy use of each appliance. Test procedures also specify how to calculate an estimate of an appliance's annual operating cost, which is used on the EnergyGuide label as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

130

Development and testing of spheroidal inorganic sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective was to develop sodium titanate (ST) microspheres, made by the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine) internal gelation process, to remove radionuclides and heavy metals from waste streams at DOE sites. to determine the optimum amount of ST that can be embedded in hydrous Ti oxide (HTO) microspheres, batches of 9.2 to 23.3% ST in HTO were prepared. Crush strength of the air-dried microspheres was found to be highest. Sr was removed from simulated supernatant by all composite microspheres; 13.2% ST/HTO worked best.

Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective of this project is to develop a user-friendly, PC, foam drilling computer model, FOAM, which will accurately predict frictional pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocity, foam quality, and other drilling variables. The model will allow operating and service companies to accurately predict pressures and flow rates required at the surface and downhole to efficiently drill oil and gas wells with foam systems. The second objective of this project is to develop a lightweight drilling fluid that utilizes hollow glass spheres to reduce the density of the fluid and allow drilling underbalanced in low-pressure reservoirs. Since the resulting fluid will be incompressible, hydraulics calculations are greatly simplified, and expensive air compressors and booster pumps are eliminated. This lightweight fluid will also eliminate corrosion and downhole fire problems encountered with aerated fluids. Many tight-gas reservoirs in the US are attractive targets for underbalanced drilling because they are located in hard-rock country where tight, low-permeability formations compound the effect of formation damage encountered with conventional drilling fluids.

Maurer, W.; Medley, G. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stack Characterization System Development and Testing  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the rest of the U.S. Department of Energy community, has numerous off-gas stacks that need to be decommissioned, demolished, and packaged for disposal. Disposal requires a waste disposition determination phase. Process knowledge typically makes a worst-case scenario decision that may place lower-level waste into a more expensive higher-level waste disposal category. Truly useful radiological and chemical sampling can be problematic on old stacks due to their inherent height and access hazards, and many of these stacks have begun to deteriorate structurally. A remote stack characterization system (SCS) that can manage sample and data collection removes people from the hazards and provides an opportunity for access to difficult to reach internal stack areas. The SCS is a remotely operated articulated radiological data recovery system designed to deploy down into off-gas stacks from the top via crane. The battery-powered SCS is designed to stabilize itself against the stack walls and move various data recovery systems into areas of interest on the inner stack walls. Stabilization is provided by a tripod structure; sensors are mounted in a rotatable bipod underneath the tripod. Sensors include a beta/gamma/alpha detector, a removable contaminant multi-sample automated sampler, and a multi-core remote core drill. Multiple cameras provide remote task viewing, support for sampling, and video documentation of the process. A delay in funding has delayed project delivery somewhat. Therefore, this paper describes the technology and shows fabrication and testing progress to the extent that data is available.

Noakes, Mark W [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Pin, Francois G [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

134

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration,...

135

Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Home > About...

136

Developing Models and Test Structures of Next-Generation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, We are developing models and test structures of next-generation photovoltaics. In order to flexibly treat 2D and 3D nanostructures, with full...

137

Argonne, China sign agreement to develop Zero Power Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne, China sign agreement to develop Zero Power Test Facility Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia...

138

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of coupled SCALE4.2/GTRAN2 computational capability for advanced MOX fueled assembly designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced assembly code system that can efficiently and accurately analyze various designs (current and advanced) proposed for plutonium disposition is being developed by {open_quotes}marrying{close_quotes} two existing state-of-the-art methodologies-GTRAN2 and SCALE 4.2. The resulting code system, GT-SCALE, posses several unique characteristics: exact 2D representation of a complete fuel assembly, while preserving the heterogeniety of each of its pin cells; flexibility in the energy group structure, the present upper limit being 218 groups; a comprehensive cross-section library and material data base; and accurate burnup calculations. The resulting GT-SCALE is expected to be very useful for a wide variety of applications, including the analysis of very heterogeneous UO{sub 2} fueled LWR fuel assemblies; of hexagonal shaped fuel assemblies as of the Russian LWRs; of fuel assemblies for HTGRs; as well as for the analysis of criticality safety and for calculation of the source term of spent fuel.

Vujic, J.; Greenspan, E.; Slater, Postma, T.; Casher, G.; Soares, I. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Leal, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Overview of reduced enrichment fuels: Development, testing, and specification  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. This paper discusses relevant developments in fuel developments. 9 refs., 1 tab.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing, Phase 1: Initial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes initial results from the Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project at a 75-MW wind project in west Texas.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Overview of software development at the Parabolic Dish Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed in this report. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of the meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

Miyazono, C.K.

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

146

Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Developing a Standard Test Method for Characterizing Fan-filter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Standard Test Method for Characterizing Fan-filter Units Used in Industries Speaker(s): Tim Xu Date: July 21, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

148

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts research that supports the development and deployment of alternative fuel and advanced vehicle technologies in medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. Technology evaluation projects focus on drive cycle analysis, hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, truck stop electrification, and alternative fuels. Learn more about the team's project areas: Fleet DNA: Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification Alternative Fuels Truck Efficiency Printable Version Fleet Test and Evaluation Home Research & Development Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems

151

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development and Testing of Hydrogen Storage System(s) for Capturing Intermittent Renewable Energy ­ Analysis of Test Results for Hydrogen Storage Systems By Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean of Kahua Ranch Hydrogen Storage System 3 3.1 Kahua Ranch Power System 3 3.2 Electrolyzer Experimental

153

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

154

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Diagnostic development and support of MHD Test Facilities. Technical progress report, October 1991--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

160

Capabilities for information flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a capability-based mechanism for permissive yet secure enforcement of information-flow policies. Language capabilities have been studied widely, and several popular implementations, such as Caja and Joe-E, are available. By making ... Keywords: capabilities, information flow control

Arnar Birgisson; Alejandro Russo; Andrei Sabelfeld

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development and testing of the Perseus proof-of-concept aircraft. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many areas of global climate change research could benefit from a flexible, affordable, and near-term platform that could provide in situ measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. To provide such a capability, the Perseus unmanned science research aircraft was proposed in 1989. As a first step toward the development of Perseus, a proof-of-concept (POC) demonstrator was constructed and tested during 1990 and 1991. The POC was a full scale Perseus airframe intended to validate the structural, aerodynamic, and flight control technologies for the Perseus within a total budget of about $1.5 million. Advanced propulsion systems needed for the operational Perseus were not covered in the POC program due to funding limitations. This report documents the design, development, and testing of the Perseus POC.

Langford, J.S. [Aurora Flight Sciences Corp., Manassas, VA (United States)

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.  

SciTech Connect

Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

165

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

The research and development effort of a new kind of compressor and engine is presented. The superior performance of these two products arises from the superior performance of rotating supersonic shock-wave compression. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A High Risk Technology review was conducted and evaluated by a team of 20 senior engineers and scientists representing various branches of the federal government. The conceptual design of a compression test rig, test rotors, and test cell adaptor was completed. The work conducted lays the foundation for the completed design and testing of the compression test rig, and the design of a supersonic shock-wave compressor matched to a conventional combustor and turbine.

Aaron Koopman

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Exploratory battery technology development and testing report for 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, has been designated as Lead Center for the Exploratory Battery Technology Development and Testing Project, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering development of advanced rechargeable batteries for both mobile and stationary energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized in pursuit of the Lead Center's goals during calendar year 1989. 4 refs., 84 figs., 18 tabs.

Magnani, N.J.; Diegle, R.B.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Bush, D.M.; Freese, J.M.; Akhil, A.A.; Lott, S.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for over 7,750 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and modeling software, the...

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

169

Overview of PNGV Battery Development and Test Programs  

SciTech Connect

Affordable, safe, long-lasting, high-power batteries are requisites for successful commercialization of hybrid electric vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advance Automotive Technologies and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles are funding research and development programs to address each of these issues. An overview of these areas is presented along with a summary of battery development and test programs, as well as recent performance data from several of these programs.

Motloch, Chester George; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Sutula, Raymond; Miller, Ted J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Capabilities The...

171

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities FEI Titan Extreme Schottky-field emission gun (X-FEG) CEOS dodecapole probe (STEM) aberration corrector GIF Quantum with dual EELS and fast spectrum imaging...

172

GIS Capability.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GIS. ORNL's Capabilities Facilities and infrastructure management tools for space, maintenance, security, and use management. Route planning and analysis tools for...

173

Project development plan for East Mesa Geothermal Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test facility for geothermal energy systems and components designed for moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal fluids available at the East Mesa site in the Imperial Valley of California are discussed. Details of the following phases of development are given: technical plan; management plan; procurement and contracting plan; technology transfer and utilization plan; and resource requirements. (JGB)

Not Available

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

MWTF jumper connector integral seal block development and leak testing  

SciTech Connect

In fiscal year 1993, tests of an o-ring/tetraseal retainer designed to replace a gasket-type seal used in PUREX-type process jumper connectors encouraged the design of an improved seal block. This new seal block combines several parts into one unitized component called an integral seal block. This report summarizes development and leak testing of the new integral seal block. The integral seal block uses a standard o-ring nested in a groove to accomplish leak tightness. This seal block eliminates the need to machine acme threads into the lower skirt casting and seal retainers, eliminates tolerance stack-up, reduces parts inventory, and eliminates an unnecessary leak path in the jumper connector assembly. This report also includes test data on various types of o-ring materials subjected to heat and pressure. Materials tested included Viton, Kalrez, and fluorosilicone, with some incidental data on teflon coated silicone o-rings. Test experience clearly demonstrates the need to test each seal material for temperature and pressure in its intended application. Some materials advertised as being {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} at higher temperatures did not perform up to expectations. Inspection of the fluorosilicone and Kalrez seals after thermal testing indicates that they are much more susceptible to heat softening than Viton.

Ruff, E.S.; Jordan, S.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator  

SciTech Connect

In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GEs proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED  

SciTech Connect

The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Upgrading of TREAT experimental capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TREAT facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is being upgraded to provide capabilities for fast-reactor-safety transient experiments not possible at any other experimental facility. Principal TREAT Upgrade (TU) goal is provision for 37-pin size experiments on energetics of core-disruptive accidents (CDA) in fast breeder reactor cores with moderate sodium void coefficients. this goal requires a significant enhancement of the capabilities of the TREAT facility, specifically including reactor control, hardened neutron spectrum incident on the test sample, and enlarged building. The upgraded facility will retain the capability for small-size experiments of the types currently being performed in TREAT. Reactor building and crane upgrading have been completed. TU schedules call for the components of the upgraded reactor system to be finished in 1984, including upgraded TREAT fuel and control system, and expanded coverage by the hodoscope fuel-motion diagnostics system.

Dickerman, C.E.; Rose, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group, EMSL, PNNL Kathleen McAteer, College of Sciences, Washington State University, Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The overall goal of this project is to enhance EMSL's...

180

Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.

Hill, T.; Noble, C.; Martinell, J. (INEEL); Borowski, S. (NASA Glenn Research Center)

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing: Phase 2: 12-Month Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy forecasting systems are expected to support system operation in cases where wind generation contributes more than a few percent of total generating capacity. This report presents final results from the Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project at a 75-MW wind project in west Texas.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Planetary formation theory developed, tested: predicts timeline for life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planetary formation theory developed, tested: predicts timeline for Planetary formation theory developed, tested: predicts timeline for life After the Big Bang: Theory suggests first planets formed after first generations of stars The researchers' calculations predict properties of first planet and timeline for life. May 3, 2012 image description The researchers state that the formation of Earth-like planets is not itself a sufficient prerequisite for life. Early galaxies contained strong sources of life-threatening radiation, such as supernovae and black holes. Therefore, they conclude that the conditions for life emerged only after the earliest epoch of galaxy formation. Get Expertise Jarrett Johnson Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Email Hui Li Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology

183

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) Wayne Reedy Oak Ridge National Laboratory wreedy2@comcast.net 574-583-5487 April 2, 2013 Develop Standard Method of Test (MOT) for IHP 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * IHP → ≥50% savings in energy used for space conditioning and water heating - C. K. Rice, V. D. Baxter, S. A. Hern, T. P. McDowell, J. D. Munk, and B. Shen, 2013. "Development of a Residential Ground- Source Integrated Heat Pump", 2013 ASHRAE Winter Conference Paper, Dallas, TX., January. * No generally accepted MOT or rating standard exists

184

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) Wayne Reedy Oak Ridge National Laboratory wreedy2@comcast.net 574-583-5487 April 2, 2013 Develop Standard Method of Test (MOT) for IHP 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * IHP → ≥50% savings in energy used for space conditioning and water heating - C. K. Rice, V. D. Baxter, S. A. Hern, T. P. McDowell, J. D. Munk, and B. Shen, 2013. "Development of a Residential Ground- Source Integrated Heat Pump", 2013 ASHRAE Winter Conference Paper, Dallas, TX., January. * No generally accepted MOT or rating standard exists

185

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

Southern Company Services

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

187

NREL: About NREL - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Photo of a large, modern lab building. The Energy Systems Integration Facility, a U.S. Department of Energy user facility, is designed to support grid integration of...

188

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities: Hitachi NB-5000 FEG scanning electron microscope with STEM detector High-milling-rate Ga ion column W or C deposition Hitachi nanomanipulator for specimen lift-out...

189

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

NREL: Advanced Power Electronics - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Key to making hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles practical is the development of low-cost, high-power integrated power electronics devices. The research...

192

Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

194

Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

Southern Company Services

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Development report: automatic system test and calibration (ASTAC) equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Automatic System Test and Calibration (ASTAC) Equipment has been developed by Paragon Pacific, Inc. to be used in conjunction with the NASA Lewis Research Center Wind Energy System Time-Domain (WEST) Analyzer. ASTAC is used to monitor the performance of the WEST Analyzer and to identify component malfunctions which may occur from time to time within WEST. The heart of the ASTAC system is a microcomputer which is used to input prescribed test signals into all WEST subsystems via a hybrid interface unit, and to process WEST output responses to these test signals. Measured responses are compared to theoretical levels calculated off-line using specialized ASTAC software. This report describes the microcomputer, the interface unit and the software packages which in total comprise the ASTAC system. Examples of ASTAC test results obtained on the WEST Analyzer are presented and described in detail. In addition, a section has been included which briefly describes the methods by which the microcomputer and interface unit can be maintained.

Thoren, R.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development and testing of Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1 (PDC-1) is a 12-m-diameter prototype concentrator that evolved from a six-year effort to produce a unit with low life-cycle costs for use with thermal-to-electric energy conversion devices. The concentrator assembly features panels made of a resin transfer molded balsa core/fiberglass sandwich with plastic reflective film as the reflective surface and a ribbed framework to hold the panels in place. The concentrator assembly tracks in azimuth and elevation on a base frame riding on a circular track. In 1982, PDC-1 was installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Initial optical testing showed that the panels did not exhibit the proper parabolic contour. After reassembly to correct this problem, further optical testing discovered thermal gradients in the panels with daily temperature changes. In spite of this, PDC-1 has sufficient optical quality to operate satisfactorily in a dish-electric system. With suggested improvements, its performance could be increased. The PDC-1 development effort provided the impetus for creating innovative optical testing methods and also provided valuable information for use in designing and fabricating concentrators of future dish-electric systems.

Dennison, E.W.; Thostesen, T.O.

1984-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Organizational Learning and Capabilities for Onshore and Offshore Business Process Outsourcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper identifies and analyzes firm-level characteristics that facilitate onshore and offshore business process outsourcing (BPO). We use organizational learning and capabilities to develop a conceptual model. We test the conceptual model with archival ... Keywords: Business Process Outsourcing, Offshoring, Organizational Capabilities, Organizational Learning, Outsourcing

Jonathan Whitaker; Sunil Mithas; M. Krishnan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

202

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

203

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Work Breakdown Structure and Plant/Equipment Designation System Numbering Scheme for the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper investigates the potential integration of the CTC work breakdown structure numbering scheme with a plant/equipment numbering system (PNS), or alternatively referred to in industry as a reference designation system (RDS). Ideally, the goal of such integration would be a single, common referencing system for the life cycle of the CTC that supports all the various processes (e.g., information, execution, and control) that necessitate plant and equipment numbers be assigned. This white paper focuses on discovering the full scope of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) processes to which this goal might be applied as well as the factors likely to affect decisions about implementation. Later, a procedure for assigning these numbers will be developed using this white paper as a starting point and that reflects the resolved scope and outcome of associated decisions.

Jeffrey D Bryan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

207

A Test Stand for the Muon Trigger Development for the CMS Experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the flagship experiments in particle physics operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS was built to search for signatures of Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, and other new phenomena. The coming upgrade of the collider will increase the rate of collisions and expand the physics reach of CMS, but will also push the detector systems beyond their current capabilities. One critically affected element is the CMS trigger, a system responsible for making a fast decision if a particular event is of interest and trigger the readout of the detector. As saving the data from every collision would require a technically unattainable bandwidth and is not possible, triggering inefficiencies propagate into reduction of physics reach for the entire experiment. One proposal to handle the future increase in collision rates aims to combine the capabilities of the existing Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) with the newly proposed Gaseous Electron Multiplication (GEM) detectors to improve the efficiency and discriminating power of the electronics-based muon Level-1trigger. This project focuses on development of a test-stand to emulate operational conditions of such a system, taking into account geometries of the two detector elements. The results of this study will present a proof of principle that building a joint GEM-CSC trigger system is feasible and it can be used to improve trigger efficiency.

Lakdawala, Samir

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Will Lewis, Compiler

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Title Development and Testing of the Berkeley Darfur Stove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-116E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Amrose, Susan, G. Theodore Kisch, Charles Kirubi, Jesse Woo, and Ashok J. Gadgil Date Published 03/2008 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Darfur, one of the poorest regions in Sudan, has been in the midst of a complicated and bloody conflict since 2003 that has resulted in the displacement of 2.2 million citizens. The displaced, known as Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), are crowded into refugee camps scattered across the region with low fuelwood productivity and no alternative means of fuel. Unsustainable harvesting has led to increasing zones of total denudation around the camps, now extending several kilometers in all directions from the camp boundaries. Women who leave the camp to fetch fuelwood are subject to rape and mutilation due to the continuing conflict.In November of 2005, a team of scientists from LBNL visited Darfur to assess the potential of fuel-efficient stoves ("FES") as a means to mitigate the fuelwood shortage. In addition to conducting a systematic informal survey, the team found that a metal FES, known as the Tara, required 50% less fuelwood to cook an IDP meal than the inefficient three-stone-fire used by 90% of the IDPs. The LBNL team emerged from the triprecommending a metal FES based on the Tara, but with two specific design modifications to make it suitable for conditions in Darfur. These included improving the mechanical stability of the stove during vigorous stirring, and maintaining or improving performance during a breeze. In Spring 2006, an interdisciplinary team of four Berkeley students (3 graduate and 1 senior undergraduate) took on the project of designing, fabricating, and testing the recommended modifications as part of a UC-Berkeley course entitled Design forSustainable Communities. Under the guidance of Prof. Ashok Gadgil, the students designed several modifications to improve stove performance in windy weather, including a wind-shield around the upper stove body, and the addition of a metal ring to prevent direct air flow through the stove body. Stakes were also added to the stove body to improve stability during vigorous stirring. The students fabricated a prototype fortesting, known as the "Berkeley Darfur Stove," or BDS. Since no existing stove test was relevant to the conditions of Darfur, a new protocol, known as the Darfur Cooking Test (DCT), was developed by the students to compare the fuel efficiency of two stoves. This protocol is specific to the conditions in Darfur, incorporating both windy and non-windy conditions, along with the cooking pots, food preparation methods, and meals employed by IDPs. The complete DCT protocol is presented in Appendices 1 and 2. The BDS prototype was tested against the original Tara stove using the newly developed DCT along with a simple tipping test (to compare stability). Fuelwood usage by the BDS was found to be consistently less than that of the Tara stove under all tested conditions. Compared to the Tara, the BDS was found to save 56% (with wind) and 40% (without wind) of the fuelwood required to cook sauce-like mulah (one of two staple IDP foods)and to save 74% (with wind) and 8% (without wind) of the fuelwood required to cook the dough-like assida (the other staple food). Using these numbers, the BDS was found to have a net annual fuelwood savings of 72% over the three-stone-fire in Darfur. The 4 stability of the BDS during stirring was also found to be much better than the Tara, requiring > 117 N of lateral force to tip compared to just 22 N. Implications of full adoption of the BDS throughout Darfur include saving 370 million kg of fuelwood per year, along with a monetary savings of US $222 per family per year for IDPs who buy fuelwood or a savings of 18 hours of labor effort per week for IDPs who currently collect fuelwood. Annual avoided CO2 emissions would come to 6 million tonnes per year worth $12 million annually assuming the lowest market price of $3 per tonne1 of CO2. Most significantly, the risk of rape and mutilation for those who collect fuelwood would be reduced by three-quarters. Additional expected benefits include substantial reduction in the inhalation of harmful wood-smoke by IDP women and girls, and significant reduction in the risk of fire to the IDP shelters because the BDS fully encloses the open flames.

210

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

211

TMV Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TMV Technology Capabilities TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance systems that provide instant identification of wheel specific, out-of-adjustment, non-functioning or dragging brake issues. AC Shore Power Since the TMV is equipped with DC power in-vehicle, shore power is needed to 1) charge the batteries that supply power to those outlets and 2) be used when running off battery power is not necessary FMCSA Laptop The laptop contains key software which helps enforcement officials perform inspections, look up information, etc. This computer also contains software for the USDOT # reader. Electronic On-Board Recorder EOBRs remove the need for paper logs by automatically recording duty status and location. EOBRs help

212

Federal Technical Capability Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

213

Assessment, development, and testing of glass for blast environments.  

SciTech Connect

Glass can have lethal effects including fatalities and injuries when it breaks and then flies through the air under blast loading (''the glass problem''). One goal of this program was to assess the glass problem and solutions being pursued to mitigate it. One solution to the problem is the development of new glass technology that allows the strength and fragmentation to be controlled or selected depending on the blast performance specifications. For example the glass could be weak and fail, or it could be strong and survive, but it must perform reliably. Also, once it fails it should produce fragments of a controlled size. Under certain circumstances it may be beneficial to have very small fragments, in others it may be beneficial to have large fragments that stay together. The second goal of this program was to evaluate the performance (strength, reliability, and fragmentation) of Engineered Stress Profile (ESP) glass under different loading conditions. These included pseudo-static strength and pressure tests and free-field blast tests. The ultimate goal was to provide engineers and architects with a glass whose behavior under blast loading is less lethal. A near-term benefit is a new approach for improving the reliability of glass and modifying its fracture behavior.

Glass, Sarah Jill

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Nevada Test Site Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Test Site Development Corporation Department of Energy Awards 300,000 to Nevada Test Site Development Corporation Department of Energy Awards 300,000 to Nevada Test Site...

215

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Transport Urban and Regional Air Quality Research Facilities Advanced Windows Test Facility BATT Fabrication Laboratory Cookstove Efficiency and Emissions Testing...

216

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC22  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC22, the first test campaign using a high moisture lignite from Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC22 was conducted from March 24 to April 17, 2007. The gasification process was operated for 543 hours, increasing the total gasification operation at the PSDF to over 10,000 hours. The PSDF gasification process was operated in air-blown mode with a total of about 1,080 tons of coal. Coal feeder operation was challenging due to the high as-received moisture content of the lignite, but adjustments to the feeder operating parameters reduced the frequency of coal feeder trips. Gasifier operation was stable, and carbon conversions as high as 98.9 percent were demonstrated. Operation of the PCD and other support equipment such as the recycle gas compressor and ash removal systems operated reliably.

Southern Company Services

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of Onsite Transportation Safety Documents for Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) Orders require each DOE site to develop onsite transportation safety documents (OTSDs). The Nevada Test Site approach divided all onsite transfers into two groups with each group covered by a standalone OTSD identified as Non-Nuclear and Nuclear. The Non-Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive hazardous material in less than Hazard Category (HC)-3 quantities and all chemically hazardous materials. The Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive material equal to or greater than HC-3 quantities and radioactive material mated with high explosives regardless of quantity. Both OTSDs comply with DOE O 460.1B requirements. The Nuclear OTSD also complies with DOE O 461.1A requirements and includes a DOE-STD-3009 approach to hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis as needed. All Nuclear OTSD proposed transfers were determined to be non-equivalent and a methodology was developed to determine if equivalent safety to a fully compliant Department of Transportation (DOT) transfer was achieved. For each HA scenario, three hypothetical transfers were evaluated: a DOT-compliant, uncontrolled, and controlled transfer. Equivalent safety is demonstrated when the risk level for each controlled transfer is equal to or less than the corresponding DOT-compliant transfer risk level. In this comparison the typical DOE-STD-3009 risk matrix was modified to reflect transportation requirements. Design basis conditions (DBCs) were developed for each non-equivalent transfer. Initial DBCs were based solely upon the amount of material present. Route-, transfer-, and site-specific conditions were evaluated and the initial DBCs revised as needed. Final DBCs were evaluated for each transfers packaging and its contents.

Frank Hand, Willard Thomas, Frank Sciacca, Manny Negrete, Susan Kelley

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

219

ORISE Science Education Programs: Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Science Education Programs Capabilities The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) connects the best and most diverse students and faculty members to...

220

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

NIST, Partners Develop Testing Infrastructure for Health IT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health and Human Services (HHS) identified ... The health IT testing infrastructure does ... NIST's National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot- gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100-200 hours). A filter vessel will be used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot- gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and indirectly the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville and the Clean Coal IV Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project. This program has a phased approach involving modification and upgrades to the TRDU and the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a hot-gas filter vessel (HGFV) capable of operating at the outlet design conditions of the TRDU. Phase 1 upgraded the TRDU based upon past operating experiences. Additions included a nitrogen supply system upgrade, upgraded LASH auger and 1807 coal feed lines, the addition of a second pressurized coal feed hopper and a dipleg ash hopper, and modifications to spoil the performance of the primary cyclone. Phase 2 included the HGFV design, procurement, and installation. Phases 3 through 5 consist of 200-hour hot-gas filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at temperatures of 540-650{degrees}C (1000-1200{degrees}F), 9.3 bar, and face velocities of 1.4, 2. and 3.8 cm/s, respectively. The increased face velocities are achieved by removing candles between each test.

Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O., Jr. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development and application of optimal design capability for coal gasification systems - Task 1 (Volume 1, 2 and 3). Topical report, July 1995  

SciTech Connect

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a process for the post-combustion removal of NO{sub x} from the flue gas of fossil-fuel-fired power plants. SCR is capable of NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of up to 80 or 90 percent. SCR technology has been applied for treatment of flue gases from a variety of emission sources, including natural gas- and oil-fired gas turbines, process steam boilers in refineries, and coal-fired power plants. SCR applications to coal-fired power plants have occurred in Japan and Germany. Full-scale SCR systems have not been applied to coal-fired power plants in the U.S., although there have been small-scale demonstration projects. SCR has become increasingly widely applied in the U.S. to natural-gas fired gas turbine combined cycle systems. In the remainder of this section, we review the applicability of SCR, as well as the need for post-combustion NO{sub x} control, for several power generation systems.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-2023 4-2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where leading bioenergy feedstock processing, advanced battery testing, and hybrid energy systems integration research will be conducted. The Advanced Test Reactor is the world's most advanced nuclear research capability - crucial to (1) the ongoing development of safe, efficient

226

Surge and Choke Capable Compressor Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: A compressor model is developed. It is capable of representing mass flow and pressure characteristic for three different regions: surge, normal operation as well as for when the compressor acts as a restriction, i.e. having a pressure ratio of less than unity. Different submodels are discussed and methods to parametrize the given model structure are given. Both the parametrization and validation are supported extensively by measured data. Dynamic data sets include measurements from engine and surge test stands. The compressor model is further validated against a database of stationary compressor maps. The proposed model is shown to have good agreement with measured data for all regions, without the need for extensive geometric information or data.

Oskar Leufven; Lars Eriksson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterization Li-ion battery research and in-situ testing Fuel cell materials research Thermoelectric materials research Contact: Karren More, morelk1@ornl.gov (865) 574-7788...

229

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, R.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

CTH reference manual : composite capability and technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The composite material research and development performed over the last year has greatly enhanced the capabilities of CTH for non-isotropic materials. The enhancements provide the users and developers with greatly enhanced capabilities to address non-isotropic materials and their constitutive model development. The enhancements to CTH are intended to address various composite material applications such as armor systems, rocket motor cases, etc. A new method for inserting non-isotropic materials was developed using Diatom capabilities. This new insertion method makes it possible to add a layering capability to a shock physics hydrocode. This allows users to explicitly model each lamina of a composite without the overhead of modeling each lamina as a separate material to represent a laminate composite. This capability is designed for computational speed and modeling efficiency when studying composite material applications. In addition, the layering capability also allows a user to model interlaminar mechanisms. Finally, non-isotropic coupling methods have been investigated. The coupling methods are specific to shock physics where the Equation of State (EOS) is used with a nonisotropic constitutive model. This capability elastically corrects the EOS pressure (typically isotropic) for deviatoric pressure coupling for non-isotropic materials.

Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mobile systems capability plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing  

SciTech Connect

For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waal??s forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals ?? materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy test method development for electric heat pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Modifications are proposed for the current US Department of Energy test procedures for water heaters in order to make them applicable to electric heat pump water heaters. The modifications are in the areas of definitions and technical procedures. The latter include the test conditions, test procedures and measurements, and calculations. Reasons for making these modifications and laboratory test data are provided to support the modifications in the technical procedures. The main modifications include: (1) lowering the water supply temperature from 70/sup 0/F to 55/sup 0/F, (2) lowering the tank thermostat setting from 160/sup 0/F to 145/sup 0/F to maintain the same 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, (3) measuring the power input instead of using the nameplate rating as in the case for an electric water heater, and (4) measuring the recovery efficiency instead of calculating it by using the standby losses in the case for an electric water heater.

Wan, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Relational Contracts and Organizational Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large literature identifies unique organizational capabilities as a potent source of competitive advantage, yet our knowledge of why capabilities fail to diffuse more rapidlyparticularly in situations in which competitors ...

Gibbons, Robert S.

239

LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt these advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and work load increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and Advanced Post Irradiation Examination Capability , these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the work of PIE that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley.

J. L. Schulthess; K. E. Rosenberg

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

May 15, 2012, Federal Technical Capability Program Face to Face Meeting … Presentation: Technical Training Needs Assessment (TNA)/Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Continuing Education  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Needs Training Needs Assessment (TNA)/Individual Assessment (TNA)/Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Continuing Education Continuing Education Las Vegas, NV May 15 2012 May 15, 2012 TNA/IDP and Continuing Education Objective Goal: Integrate the numerous Departmental training Objective Goal: Integrate the numerous Departmental training needs assessments into one viable tool that includes input from IDPs and includes continuing education.  Determine the needs and purpose of a TNA  Conducted 3 meetings with NTC, LDTS, Project Management, and A i i i M R i Acquisition Management Representatives  Identified current processes  Identified assessment timing and most desired outcomes  Identified assessment timing and most desired outcomes Effort put on hold until July 1 due to conduct of FY13 TNAs

242

UPDATE ON GASIFICATION TESTING AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama was established in 1995 to lead the United States ' effort to develop cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable, coal-based power plant technologies. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key components of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power

Senior Engineer; Pannalal Vimalchand; Roxann Leonard; Robert C. Lambrecht

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF PULSED DETONATION ENGINE GROUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/4 in.) i.d., to two 25 mm (1 in.) i.d. setups, to a 101 mm (4 in.) i.d. dual-stage PDE setup with a pre valves were tested at up to 30 Hz on a 25 mm i.d. PDE. The dual-stage PDE was run at both 1 Hz and 10 Hz ................................................................................................................47 2.5 Detonation Nomenclature

Texas at Arlington, University of

246

Development of structural health monitoring techniques using dynamics testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today`s society depends upon many structures (such as aircraft, bridges, wind turbines, offshore platforms, buildings, and nuclear weapons) which are nearing the end of their design lifetime. Since these structures cannot be economically replaced, techniques for structural health monitoring must be developed and implemented. Modal and structural dynamics measurements hold promise for the global non-destructive inspection of a variety of structures since surface measurements of a vibrating structure can provide information about the health of the internal members without costly (or impossible) dismantling of the structure. In order to develop structural health monitoring for application to operational structures, developments in four areas have been undertaken within this project: operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage identification. The developments in each of these four aspects of structural health monitoring have been exercised on a broad range of experimental data. This experimental data has been extracted from structures from several application areas which include aging aircraft, wind energy, aging bridges, offshore structures, structural supports, and mechanical parts. As a result of these advances, Sandia National Laboratories is in a position to perform further advanced development, operational implementation, and technical consulting for a broad class of the nation`s aging infrastructure problems.

James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SERAPH facility capabilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

Castle, J.; Su, W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of an Aerosol Retrieval Method: Description and Preliminary Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud-nucleating aerosol retrieval method was developed. It allows the estimation of ice-forming nuclei and cloud condensation nuclei (IFN and CCN) for regions in which boundary layer clouds prevail. The method is based on the assumption that ...

G. G. Carri; W. R. Cotton; D. Zupanski; M. Zupanski

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development and testing of a Mudjet-augmented PDC bit.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a project to develop technology to integrate passively pulsating, cavitating nozzles within Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) bits for use with conventional rig pressures to improve the rock-cutting process in geothermal formations. The hydraulic horsepower on a conventional drill rig is significantly greater than that delivered to the rock through bit rotation. This project seeks to leverage this hydraulic resource to extend PDC bits to geothermal drilling.

Black, Alan (TerraTek, Inc.); Chahine, Georges (DynaFlow, Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Matthews, Oliver (Security DBS); Grossman, James W.; Bertagnolli, Ken (US Synthetic); Vail, Michael (US Synthetic)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Air Conditioning Stall Phenomenon Testing, Model Development, and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric distribution systems are experiencing power quality issues of extended reduced voltage due to fault-induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR). FIDVR occurs in part because modern air conditioner (A/C) and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip such as a sub-transmission fault. They are more susceptible than older A/C compressor motors due to the low inertia of these newer and more energy efficient motors. There is a concern that these local reduced voltage events on the distribution system will become more frequent and prevalent and will combine over larger areas and challenge transmission system voltage and ultimately power grid reliability. The Distributed Energy Communications and Controls (DECC) Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been employed to (1) test, (2) characterize and (3) model the A/C stall phenomenon.

Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Smith, Travis [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability  

SciTech Connect

The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Research into producing microalgal biofuels for transportation has been revitalized at NREL. Because algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for a number of transportation fuels-biodiesel, "green" diesel and gasoline, and jet fuel-NREL has developed strong capabilities in producing biofuels from microalgae. Through standard procedures for microalgal biofuels analysis, NREL helps scientists and researchers understand more about the chemical composition of algae. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the microalgae-to-biofuels conversion process. NREL's capabilities in microalgal biofuels R&D include: Why is algal research important? Algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for transportation fuels.

254

On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew [Grand Valley State University (GVSU), Michigan; Allman, Mark [International Computer Science Institute (ICSI); Taylor, Curtis R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EMSL: Capabilities: Instrument Development Laboratory: Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Information IDL Home Meet the IDL Experts IDL Innovations IDL Brochure 7-12 Tesla FTICR Mass Spectrometers The IDL Team has built the electronics and data systems for...

256

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Affinity and Structure of Biomolecules Immobilized on a 3-D Substrate: Time-resolved EPR The Affinity and Structure of Biomolecules Immobilized on a 3-D Substrate: Time-resolved EPR Detection During Mobile Phase Gradients Project start date: Spring 2010 EMSL Lead Investigator: Eric Walter Magnetic Resonance Group, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigator: Glenn Millhauser Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz The parameters governing the interaction between chemical binding partners are of fundamental interest to chemists, biochemists, and chemical engineers. Techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence) that can determine the affinity, kinetics, structural change, and chemical reactions due to interactions usually require the analyte and the ligand to be in solution. Two

257

Terminal Developments and Their Media Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building a 3G network is like building a PC just because you buy the fastest elements, it does not mean that you get the most efficient PC. It is important to integrate and optimise all the elements correctly in order to achieve the best performance. ...

W. Johnston

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

California Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing, Phase 1: Initial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy forecasting uses sophisticated numerical weather forecasting and wind plant power generation models to predict the hourly energy generation of a wind power plant up to 48 hours in advance. As a result, it has great potential to address the needs of the California Independent System Operator (ISO) and the wind plant operators, as well as power marketers and buyers and utility system dispatch personnel. This report gives the results of 28 days of testing of wind energy forecasting at a Californ...

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

General-Purpose Heat Source development: Extended series test program large fragment tests  

SciTech Connect

General-Purpose Heat Source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) will provide electric power for the NASA Galileo and European Space Agency Ulysses missions. Each GPHS-RTG comprises two major components: GPHS modules, which provide thermal energy, and a thermoelectric converter, which converts the thermal energy into electric power. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in a GPHS-RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled capsules. LANL conducted a series of safety verification tests on the GPHS-RTG before the scheduled May 1986 launch of the Galileo spacecraft to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in potential accident environments. As a result of the Challenger 51-L accident in January 1986, NASA postponed the launch of Galileo; the launch vehicle was reconfigured and the spacecraft trajectory was modified. These actions prompted NASA to reevaluate potential mission accidents, and an extended series safety test program was initiated. The program included a series of large fragment tests that simulated the collision of solid rocket booster (SRB) fragments, generated in an SRB motor case rupture or resulting from a range safety officer SRB destruct action, with the GPHS-RTG. The tests indicated that fueled clads, inside a converter, will not breach or release fuel after a square (142 cm on a side) SRB fragment impacts flat-on at velocities up to 212 m/s, and that only the leading fueled capsules breach and release fuel after the square SRB fragment impacts the modules, inside the converter, edge-on at 95 m/s. 8 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

Cull, T.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development and Implementation of Radiation-Hydrodynamics Verification Test Problems  

SciTech Connect

Analytic solutions to the radiation-hydrodynamic equations are useful for verifying any large-scale numerical simulation software that solves the same set of equations. The one-dimensional, spherically symmetric Coggeshall No.9 and No.11 analytic solutions, cell-averaged over a uniform-grid have been developed to analyze the corresponding solutions from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Eulerian Applications Project radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE. These Coggeshall solutions have been shown to be independent of heat conduction, providing a unique opportunity for comparison with xRAGE solutions with and without the heat conduction module. Solution convergence was analyzed based on radial step size. Since no shocks are involved in either problem and the solutions are smooth, second-order convergence was expected for both cases. The global L1 errors were used to estimate the convergence rates with and without the heat conduction module implemented.

Marcath, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Matthew Y. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development and testing of improved statistical wind power forecasting methods.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind power forecasting (WPF) provides important inputs to power system operators and electricity market participants. It is therefore not surprising that WPF has attracted increasing interest within the electric power industry. In this report, we document our research on improving statistical WPF algorithms for point, uncertainty, and ramp forecasting. Below, we provide a brief introduction to the research presented in the following chapters. For a detailed overview of the state-of-the-art in wind power forecasting, we refer to [1]. Our related work on the application of WPF in operational decisions is documented in [2]. Point forecasts of wind power are highly dependent on the training criteria used in the statistical algorithms that are used to convert weather forecasts and observational data to a power forecast. In Chapter 2, we explore the application of information theoretic learning (ITL) as opposed to the classical minimum square error (MSE) criterion for point forecasting. In contrast to the MSE criterion, ITL criteria do not assume a Gaussian distribution of the forecasting errors. We investigate to what extent ITL criteria yield better results. In addition, we analyze time-adaptive training algorithms and how they enable WPF algorithms to cope with non-stationary data and, thus, to adapt to new situations without requiring additional offline training of the model. We test the new point forecasting algorithms on two wind farms located in the U.S. Midwest. Although there have been advancements in deterministic WPF, a single-valued forecast cannot provide information on the dispersion of observations around the predicted value. We argue that it is essential to generate, together with (or as an alternative to) point forecasts, a representation of the wind power uncertainty. Wind power uncertainty representation can take the form of probabilistic forecasts (e.g., probability density function, quantiles), risk indices (e.g., prediction risk index) or scenarios (with spatial and/or temporal dependence). Statistical approaches to uncertainty forecasting basically consist of estimating the uncertainty based on observed forecasting errors. Quantile regression (QR) is currently a commonly used approach in uncertainty forecasting. In Chapter 3, we propose new statistical approaches to the uncertainty estimation problem by employing kernel density forecast (KDF) methods. We use two estimators in both offline and time-adaptive modes, namely, the Nadaraya-Watson (NW) and Quantilecopula (QC) estimators. We conduct detailed tests of the new approaches using QR as a benchmark. One of the major issues in wind power generation are sudden and large changes of wind power output over a short period of time, namely ramping events. In Chapter 4, we perform a comparative study of existing definitions and methodologies for ramp forecasting. We also introduce a new probabilistic method for ramp event detection. The method starts with a stochastic algorithm that generates wind power scenarios, which are passed through a high-pass filter for ramp detection and estimation of the likelihood of ramp events to happen. The report is organized as follows: Chapter 2 presents the results of the application of ITL training criteria to deterministic WPF; Chapter 3 reports the study on probabilistic WPF, including new contributions to wind power uncertainty forecasting; Chapter 4 presents a new method to predict and visualize ramp events, comparing it with state-of-the-art methodologies; Chapter 5 briefly summarizes the main findings and contributions of this report.

Mendes, J.; Bessa, R.J.; Keko, H.; Sumaili, J.; Miranda, V.; Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, J. (Decision and Information Sciences); (INESC Porto)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Advisory Committee...

265

Developing Test Procedures for Measuring Stored Thermal Energy in Firefighter Protective Clothing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research studied stored thermal energy in fire fighter's turnout systems. It developed a novel laboratory apparatus and test protocols for measuring the contribution of (more)

Eni, Egbe Uchechi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2005 Annual Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Technical Capability Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 Annual Plan January 15, 2005 FTCP Annual Plan, FY 2005 INTRODUCTION The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program (Program) is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy (also known as the "Department" or DOE) missions and responsibilities. The current Program was formalized in 1998 through Department directives DOE Policy 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Program for Defense Nuclear Facilities, and DOE Manual (M) 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) provides leadership in implementing the

267

Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE AND CRITERIA Federal Technical Capability Panel and the Office of Human Resources and Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 September 1998 Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria 1 September 15, 1998 INTRODUCTION The Federal Technical Capability Program provides for the recruitment, deployment, development and retention of federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department' s missions and responsibilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) reports to the Deputy Secretary and oversees and resolves issues affecting the Federal Technical Capability Program. The Panel periodically assesses the effectiveness of the four functions of the

268

Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation modular industrial solar retrofit qualification test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations test to demonstrate automatic operation, performance tests to provide a database for predicting system performance, and life cycle tests to evaluate component and maintenance requirements. Component-level modifications to improve system performance and reliability were also evaluated.

Cameron, C.P.; Dudley, V.E.; Lewandoski, A.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs  

SciTech Connect

LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

Olivares, Jose A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Min S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Capabilities listed by Department: Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Bio Research & Test Reactor Advanced Reactor Development Decontamination and Decommissioning Heat Transfer and fluid Mechanics International Nuclear Safety Reactor...

271

Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Inorganic ions determined by ion chromatography...Barium Pyrophosphate Cobalt Chloride Borate Calcium Silicate Copper Cyanide Bromide Cesium Tripolyphosphate Gold Iodide Carbonate Lithium lridium Sulfide Chlorate Magnesium Iron(II,III) Chlorite Rubidium Lead Chromate Sodium Mercury Dithionite Strontium Nickel Fluoride Platinum Iodate Zinc Iodide...

272

Development of a Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation System for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to facilitate control strategy development and performance test of hybrid electric vehicle, a hardware-in-the-loop simulation system is developed. The system is constructed with LabVIEW and PXI hardware. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation test ... Keywords: hybrid electric vehicle, hardware-in-the-loop simulation, fuel economy, exhaust emission

Yanyi Zhang, Zhenhua Jin, Haoduan Wang, Qingchun Lu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Standard Method of Test for Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into the development of standard Method of Test (MOT) for integrated heat pumps (IHPs). No active, recognized test procedure or rating standard exists for IHPs. Generating a rating standard with supporting test procedure that is approved by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning (ASHRAE) and the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) is necessary for these products to be viably marketed. The primary market segment for IHPs is residential buildings, both single-family and small, low-rise multifamily dwellings.

274

Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Vision For DOE to be a technically proficient enterprise, with federal technical personnel overseeing Defense Nuclear Facilities in a manner that enables and enhances the DOE mission in a technically defensible fashion, while being recognized as preeminent in federal technical leadership and competency. Missions and Functions The Department of Energy is committed to developing and maintaining a technically competent workforce to accomplish its missions in a safe and efficient manner. The Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) provides for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely

275

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

276

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

277

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Dec 16 2013 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Chris A. Fischer Speaker(s) Title: National Center for Atmospheric Research The Community Earth System Model (CESM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) are community models involving several different developers. With so many different developers it becomes imperative to carry out continuous testing during development. I'll provide a brief introduction to CESM and CAM then cover the testing that is being carried out on both. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a global climate model used to predict past, present and future climates. CESM is a fully couple model,

278

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

279

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES OF THE SINGLE CELL TEST SYSTEM FOR SO2 DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

The single cell test system development for the SRNL sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer has been completed. Operating experience and improved operating procedures were developed during test operations in FY06 and the first quarter of FY07. Eight different cell configurations, using various MEA designs, have been tested. The single cell test electrolyzer has been modified to overcome difficulties experienced during testing, including modifications to the inlet connection to eliminate minute acid leaks that caused short circuits. The test facility was modified by adding a water bath for cell heating, thus permitting operation over a wider range of flowrates and cell temperatures. Modifications were also identified to permit continuous water flushing of the cathode to remove sulfur, thus extending operating time between required shutdowns. This is also expected to permit a means of independently measuring the rate of sulfur formation, and the corresponding SO{sub 2} flux through the membrane. This report contains a discussion of the design issues being addressed by the single cell test program, a test matrix being conducted to address these issues, and a summary of the performance objectives for the single cell test system. The current primary objective of single cell test system is to characterize and qualify electrolyzer configurations for the following 100-hour longevity tests. Although the single cell test system development is considered complete, SRNL will continue to utilize the test facility and the single cell electrolyzer to measure the operability and performance of various cell design configurations, including new MEA's produced by the component development tasks.

Steimke, J

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Partnering: Designated Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnerships Research Partnering Designated Capabilities The "Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Designated Capabilities" 'umbrella' agreement, approved by the Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Capabilities and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities and Technologies Capabilities and Technologies Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Capabilities and Technologies product images The Sandia National Laboratories MSTC's capabilities are designed to integrate the numerous scientific disciplines necessary to produce functional, robust, integrated microsystems. This represents the center of Sandia's investment in microsystems research, development, and prototyping activities. This facility encompasses approximately nearly 400,000 square feet and includes cleanroom facilities, laboratories and supporting administrate offices. These facilities are divided between the Silicon Fab and the MicroFab.

282

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2004 Annual Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Technical Capalbility Program Federal Technical Capalbility Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Plan November 20,2003 FTCP Annual Plan. FY 2004 INTRODUCTION The objective of the Federal Technical Capability Program (Program) is to recruit, deploy, develop, and retain Federal personnel with the necessary technical capabilities to safely accomplish the Department's missions and responsibilities. The current Program was formalized in 1998 through Department directives DOE P 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Program for Defense Nuclear Facilities, and DOE M 426. l-l, Federal Technical Capability Manual. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) provides leadership in implementing the Program. The FTCP consists of senior technical safety managers representing nuclear facilities,

283

Functional capability of piping systems  

SciTech Connect

General Design Criterion I of Appendix A to Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations requires, in part, that structures, systems, and components important to safety be designed to withstand the effects of earthquakes without a loss of capability to perform their safety function. ne function of a piping system is to convey fluids from one location to another. The functional capability of a piping system might be lost if, for example, the cross-sectional flow area of the pipe were deformed to such an extent that the required flow through the pipe would be restricted. The objective of this report is to examine the present rules in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, and potential changes to these rules, to determine if they are adequate for ensuring the functional capability of safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants.

Terao, D.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Physical Protection Systems Test Bed for International Counter-Trafficking System Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical protection systems have a widespread impact on the nuclear industry in areas such as nuclear safeguards, arms control, and trafficking of illicit goods (e.g., nuclear materials) across international borders around the world. Many challenges must be overcome in design and deployment of foreign border security systems such as lack of infrastructure, extreme environmental conditions, limited knowledge of terrain, insider threats, and occasional cultural resistance. Successful security systems, whether it be a system designed to secure a single facility or a whole border security system, rely on the entire integrated system composed of multiple subsystems. This test bed is composed of many unique sensors and subsystems, including wireless unattended ground sensors, a buried fiber-optic acoustic sensor, a lossy coaxial distributed sensor, wireless links, pan-tilt-zoom cameras, mobile power generation systems, unmanned aerial vehicles, and fiber-optic-fence intrusion detection systems. A Common Operating Picture software architecture is utilized to integrate a number of these subsystems. We are currently performance testing each system for border security and perimeter security applications by examining metrics such as probability of sense and a qualitative understanding of the sensor s vulnerability of defeat. The testing process includes different soil conditions for buried sensors (e.g., dry, wet, and frozen) and an array of different tests including walking, running, stealth detection, and vehicle detection. Also, long term sustainability of systems is tested including performance differences due to seasonal variations (e.g. summer versus winter, while raining, in foggy conditions). The capabilities of the test bed are discussed. Performance testing results, both at the individual component level and integrated into a larger system for a specific deployment (in situ), help illustrate the usefulness and need for integrated testing facilities to carry out this mission. The test bed provides access to grassy fields, wooded areas, and a large waterway three distinct testing environments. The infrastructure supporting deployment of systems at the test bed includes grid power, renewable power systems, climate controlled enclosures, high bandwidth wireless links, and a fiber optic communications backbone. With over 10 acres of dedicated area and direct waterway access, the test bed is well suited for long term test and evaluation of physical protection and security systems targeting a wide range of applications.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Donaldson, Terrence L [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Argonne CNM: Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and three-dimensional crystals and binary superlattices Bioconjugation and biochemical techniques with a focus on the synthetic biology and recombinant DNA/protein techniques Peptide synthesis (CSBio CS136XT) Functionalization of nanocrystalline surfaces with biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins and antibodies, using biochemical, electrochemical, and photochemical techniques Equipment Centrifuges (Beckman Coulter Optima L-100 XP Ultracentrifuge and Avanti J-E Centrifuge) Biological safety cabinets [Labconco Purifier Delta Series (Class II, B2)] Glovebox (MBraun LabMaster 130)

286

Quality of Mobile Air Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Observations from the 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of ...

Amanda R. S. Anderson; Michael Chapman; Sheldon D. Drobot; Alemu Tadesse; Brice Lambi; Gerry Wiener; Paul Pisano

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of a Scale Model Wind Turbine for Testing of Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the development of a 1/50th scale 5 MW wind turbine intended for wind and wave basin model testing of commercially viable floating (more)

Martin, Heather Rae

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Agile enterprise software development using domain-driven design and test first  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the experience gained and lessons learned when the IT department at Statoil ASA, a large Oil and Gas company in Norway, applied Domain-Driven design techniques in combination with agile software development practices to assess ... Keywords: PL/SQL, agile software development, domain-driven design, object databases, object-relational mapping, oracle, relational databases, test driven design, test first, versant

Einar Landre; Harald Wesenberg; Jorn Olmheim

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Development and Testing Final Report- Phase 4  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a research and development (R&D) program to design and optimize an active desiccant-vapor compression hybrid rooftop system. The primary objective was to combine the strengths of both technologies to produce a compact, high-performing, energy-efficient system that could accommodate any percentage of outdoor air and deliver essentially any required combination of temperature and humidity, or sensible heat ratio (SHR). In doing so, such a product would address the significant challenges imposed on the performance capabilities of conventional packaged rooftop equipment by standards 62 and 90.1 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The body of work completed as part of this program built upon previous R&D efforts supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and summarized by the Phase 3b report ''Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC Units'' (Fischer and Sand 2002), in addition to Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000; and Fischer and Sand 2004. All initial design objectives established for this development program were successfully achieved. The performance flexibility desired was accomplished by a down-sized active desiccant wheel that processes only a portion of the supply airflow, which is pre-conditioned by a novel vapor compression cycle. Variable-speed compressors are used to deliver the capacity control required by a system handling a high percentage of outdoor air. An integrated direct digital control system allows for control capabilities not generally offered by conventional packaged rooftop systems. A 3000-cfm prototype system was constructed and tested in the SEMCO engineering test laboratory in Columbia, MO, and was found to operate in an energy-efficient fashion relative to more conventional systems. Most important, the system offered the capability to independently control the supply air temperature and humidity content to provide individual sensible and latent loads required by an occupied space without over-cooling and reheating air. The product was developed using a housing construction similar to that of a conventional packaged rooftop unit. The resulting integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) is similar in size to a currently available conventional rooftop unit sized to provide an equivalent total cooling capacity. Unlike a conventional rooftop unit, the IADR can be operated as a dedicated outdoor air system processing 100% outdoor air, as well as a total conditioning system capable of handling any ratio of return air to outdoor air. As part of this R&D program, a detailed investigation compared the first cost and operating cost of the IADR with costs for a conventional packaged approach for an office building located in Jefferson City, MO. The results of this comparison suggest that the IADR approach, once commercialized, could be cost-competitive with existing technology--exhibiting a one-year to two-year payback period--while simultaneously offering improved humidity control, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency.

Fischer, J

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility at Ohio Power Company's Muskingum River Plant was modified to enable performance of a comprehensive test program concerning duct injection of sorbents for SO[sub 2] control. Injection of slaked lime slurries and injection of dry calcium hydroxide powder with humidification were carried out under a variety of process conditions. Slaked lime slurry injection as found to be superior in both operational reliability and S0[sub 2] removal capability compared with dry hydrated lime injection with humidification. Calcium utilization of 50% was achieved with 50% S0[sub 2] removal at the ESP outlet with recycle of unreacted sorbent collected in the precipitatorhoppers. Electrostatic precipitator collection performance was found to be highly variable with sorbent injection, especially with close approach to saturation temperatures and high inlet mass loadings. Small-scale tests with a fabric filter in parallel with the precipitator indicated 5 to 10% more S0[sub 2] removal could be obtained across the fabric filter than the ESP for all test conditions. Over 95% S0[sub 2] removal was achieved with the fabric filter using a two stage cooling process in which the filter was cooled below the operating temperature ofthe duct spray dryer.

Felix, L.G.; Gooch, J.P.; Merritt, R.L. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Interim implementation structure for development of performance criteria and test standards for photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents an implementation structure for the near-term development of performance criteria and test methods for photovoltaic (PV) materials, components, subsystems, and systems. The approach is designed to be responsive to the Photovoltaic Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL-95-590). The project is organized into four tasks: (1) establishment of performance criteria and the development of test methods; (2) development of laboratory accreditation/product certification guidelines; (3) development of validation methodologies; and (4) coordination of the quality assurance effort with consensus standards and code organizations. A schedule and milestones are presented for each task. The appendices provide a brief overview of standards and the standards development process. The philosophy behind this project is to develop industry- and user-established performance criteria, test methods, and accreditation procedures which may then be referred to independent consensus standards organizations for the preparation of consensus standards. The emphasis in execution of this approach will be to develop uniform, fair performance criteria and tests and to avoid rigid, prescriptive criteria. Photovoltaics is an emerging technology; criteria written now must be able to accommodate devices and techniques not yet developed.

Not Available

1979-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of the JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) fuel cleanup system for tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed the Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) which accepts simulated fusion reactor exhaust and produces pure hydrogen isotopes and tritium-free waste. The major components are: a palladium diffuser, a catalytic reactor, cold traps, a ceramic electrolysis cell, and zirconium-cobalt beds. In 1988, an integrated loop of the FCU process was installed in the TPL and a number of hot'' runs were performed to study the system characteristics and improve system performance. Under the US-Japan collaboration program, the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' (JFCU) was designed and fabricated by JAERI/TPL for testing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory as a major subsystem of the simulated fusion fuel cycle. The JFCU was installed in the TSTA in early 1990.

Konishi, S.; Inoue, M.; Hayashi, T.; Okuno, K.; Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Barnes, J.W.; Anderson, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fuel Performance Analysis Capability in FALCON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Analysis and Licensing Code -- New (FALCON) is being developed as a state-of-the-art light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance analysis and modeling code validated to high burnup. Based on a robust finite-element numerical structure, it is capable of analyzing both steady-state and transient fuel behaviors with a seamless transition between the two modes. EPRI plans to release a fully benchmarked and validated beta version of FALCON in 2003.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

Nelson, E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Built by the Russian State Rocket Center under Berkeley Lab auspices Speaker(s): Anthony Radspieler Jr. Glen Dahlbacka Joseph Rasson Date: March 4, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Berkeley Lab Engineering Division teamed with Empire Magnetics, Rohnert Park and the Makeyev State Rocket Center under a DOE NNSA non-proliferation project to develop and test a series of small wind turbines of vertical axis design. Over the years, about 100 Russian scientists and engineers worked on the project and the hydrodynamic, aerodynamic and mechanical test facilities of the SRC were used. The objective was to create a highly manufacturable Darieus unit with a modest Tip Speed Ratio (quiet and low

300

Design, Development and Testing of a DSP Based Dynamic Voltage Restorer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the design, development and testing of a three phase prototype Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) as part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system technology development at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata. ... Keywords: SMES, DSC, LC filter, Injection Transformer, Space Vector PWM, Software PLL

A. De, S. Kumari, V. K. Khare, S. S. Pal, A. Sadhukhan, V. K. Meshram, S. K. Thakur, S. Saha

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PROTOTYPE TUNER FOR THE CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PROTOTYPE TUNER FOR THE CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE* G. Davis , J developed for CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The high-gradient, low-current operation of the superconductingHz and resolution of 1Hz that will be used during normal operation [1]. Fig. 1: CEBAF Upgrade Tuner 2 MECHANICAL

302

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases to Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations in order to achieve more accurate energy use and savings predictions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analytical and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results. Testing the new cases with EnergyPlus identified issues with the conduction finite difference (CondFD) heat transfer algorithm in versions 5 and 6. NREL researchers resolved these issues for EnergyPlus version 7. The new test cases will help users and developers of EnergyPlus and other building energy tools to identify and fix problems associated with solid conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes and their boundary conditions. In the long term, improvements to software algorithms will result in more accurate energy use and savings predictions. NREL researchers plan to document the set of test cases and make them available for future consideration by validation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 140: Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. EnergyPlus users will also have access to the improved CondFD model in version 7 after its next scheduled release.

Not Available

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

40-kW field test power plant modification and development. Monthly technical status report No. 13, September 16, 1978-October 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contract objective is to complete the design and development actions that upgrade the 40-kW fuel cell power plant to a configuration suitable for on-site demonstration testing. The modifications will improve operating capability, durability and maintenance interval and lead to reduced production costs. Equipment to recover and use the by-product heat of electric generation will be available on the power plant for field verification of on-site heat recovery. The 40-kW power plant will be compatible with the power characteristics required for conventional heat pumps and conventional 60 Hz, 120/208 volts electrically operated equipment. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of debonds and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

15KV Class 25KVA Single-Phase IUT Prototype Development, Testing, and Performance Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is leading the development and demonstration of fully integrated, production-grade 4-kV and 15-kV-class solid-state transformers for integrating energy storage technologies and electric vehicle (EV) fast charging. The development team includes utilities, power electronics experts, and a transformer manufacturer to provide guidance on taking the technologies from concept to production. The intelligent universal transformer (IUT) technology has been validated through development and lab testing, ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)  

SciTech Connect

Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other hand, the purchase of universal testing machine or Bose dual LM2 TB was completed and the testing system was delivered to ORNL in August 2012. The preliminary confirmation of the system and on-site training were given by Bose field engineer and regional manager on 8/1-8/2/2012. The calibration of Bose testing system has been performed by ORNL because the integration of ORNL setup into the Bose TestBench occurred after the installation. Major challenge with this process arose from two aspects: 1) the load control involves two load cells, and 2) U-frame setup itself is a non-standard specimen. ORNL has been able to implement the load control through Cycle Indirect along with pinning the U-frame setup. Two meetings with ORNL hot-cell group (November 2012 and January 2013) were held to discuss the potential issues with both epoxy mounting of rigid sleeve and U-frame setup. Many suggestions were provided to make the procedure friendlier to the manipulator in hot cell. Addressing of these suggestions resulted in another cycle of modifications of both vise mold and setup. The initial meeting with ORNL I&C group occurred in November 2012 with regard to the Bose cable modification and design of central panel to integrate the cables and wires. The first round of cable modification and central panel fabrication was completed in February 2012. The testing with the modified cables exhibited substantial noises and the testing system was not shown to be stable. It was believed the cross talk was responsible to the noise, and a central panel with a better grounding and shielding was highly recommended. The central panel has been re-designed and fabricated in March 2013. In the subsequent period, the ORNL made substantial effort to debug the noises with the load cell channel, and to resolve the noises and nonlinearity with RDP LVDTs related to the integration of RDP LVDTs to Bose system. At the same time, ORNL has completed the verification tests of Bose test system, including cycle tests under reversal bending in load control, bending tests under monotonic load, and cycle test

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Cox, Thomas S [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The Solid-State Fault Current Limiter (SSCL) is a promising technology that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the problem of increasing fault currents associated with load growth. As demand continues to grow, more power is added to utility system either by increasing generator capacity or by adding distributed generators, resulting in higher available fault currents, often beyond the capabilities of the present infrastructure. The SSCL is power-electronics based equipment designed to work with the present utility system to address this problem. The SSCL monitors the line current and dynamically inserts additional impedance into the line in the event of a fault being detected. The SSCL is based on a modular design and can be configured for 5kV through 69kV systems at nominal current ratings of 1000A to 4000A. Results and Findings This report provides the final test results on the development of 15kV class SSCL single phase power stack. The scope of work included the design of the modular standard building block sub-assemblies, the design and manufacture of the power stack and the testing of the power stack for the key functional tests of continuous current capability and fault current limiting action. Challenges and Objectives Solid-State Current Limiter technology impacts a wide spectrum of utility engineering and operating personnel. It addresses the problems associated with load growth both at Transmission and Distribution class networks. The design concept is pioneering in terms of developing the most efficient and compact power electronics equipment for utility use. The initial test results of the standard building blocks are promising. The independent laboratory tests of the power stack are promising. However the complete 3 phase system needs rigorous testing for performance and reliability. Applications, Values, and Use The SSCL is an intelligent power-electronics device which is modular in design and can provide current limiting or current interrupting capabilities. It can be applied to variety of applications from distribution class to transmission class power delivery grids and networks. It can also be applied to single major commercial and industrial loads and distributed generator supplies. The active switching of devices can be further utilized for protection of substation transformers. The stress on the system can be reduced substantially improving the life of the power system. It minimizes the voltage sag by speedy elimination of heavy fault currents and promises to be an important element of the utility power system. DOE Perspective This development effort is now focused on a 15kV system. This project will help mitigate the challenges of increasing available fault current. DOE has made a major contribution in providing a cost effective SSCL designed to integrate seamlessly into the Transmission and Distribution networks of today and the future. Approach SSCL development program for a 69kV SSCL was initiated which included the use of the Super GTO advanced semiconductor device which won the 2007 R&D100 Award. In the beginning, steps were identified to accomplish the economically viable design of a 69kV class Solid State Current Limiter that is extremely reliable, cost effective, and compact enough to be applied in urban transmission. The prime thrust in design and development was to encompass the 1000A and the 3000A ratings and provide a modular design to cover the wide range of applications. The focus of the project was then shifted to a 15kV class SSCL. The specifications for the 15kV power stack are reviewed. The design changes integrated into the 15kV power stack are discussed. In this Technical Update the complete project is summarized followed by a detailed test report. The power stack independent high voltage laboratory test requirements and results are presented. Keywords Solid State Current Limiter, SSCL, Fault Current Limiter, Fault Current Controller, Power electronics controller, Intelligent power-electronics Device, IED

Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development and Testing of Commercial Prototype Wind-Electric Battery Charging Station  

SciTech Connect

The technical aspects of charging 12-volt (V) batteries with a small permanent magnet wind-turbine generator suggested that a special battery-charging station be developed. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted research on several possible configurations of wind-electric battery-charging stations. Based on preliminary modeling and test results, the optimal system for this application was the one with individual charge controllers. This paper presents the development efforts and test results of a commercial prototype wind-electric battery-charging station designed and manufactured by Ascension Technology, a Division of Applied Power Corporation (APC). The system, which is powered by a 3-kilowatt (kW) wind turbine, was tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The paper discusses control strategies to improve system performance, and includes recommendations for system integrators based on the testing experience accumulated at the NWTC.

Gevorgian, V.; Corbus, D.; Kern, G.

2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Analysis and Web Delivery Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

Projects for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the very high temperature reactor. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high-temperature and high-fluence environments. The NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) at the Idaho National Laboratory has been established to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and for data analysis to identify useful relationships among the measured quantities. The capabilities are described from the perspective of NDMAS users, starting with those who just view experimental data and analytical results on the INL NDMAS web portal. Web display and delivery capabilities are described in detail. Also the current web pages that show Advanced Gas Reactor, Advanced Graphite Capsule, and High Temperature Materials test results are itemized. Capabilities available to NDMAS developers are more extensive, and are described using a second series of examples. Much of the data analysis efforts focus on understanding how thermocouple measurements relate to simulated temperatures and other experimental parameters. Statistical control charts and correlation monitoring provide an ongoing assessment of instrument accuracy. Data analysis capabilities are virtually unlimited for those who use the NDMAS web data download capabilities and the analysis software of their choice. Overall, the NDMAS provides convenient data analysis and web delivery capabilities for studying a very large and rapidly increasing database of well-documented, pedigreed data.

Cynthia D. Gentillon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act Logo EMSL researchers are benefitting from a recent $60 million investment in innovation through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. These Recovery Act funds were employed to further develop and deploy transformational capabilities that deliver scientific discoveries in support of DOE's mission. Today, they are helping EMSL accomplish the following: Establish leadership in in situ chemical imaging and procure ultrahigh-resolution microscopy tools Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald

317

NREL: Biomass Research - Biomass Characterization Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Characterization Capabilities Biomass Characterization Capabilities A photo of a man wearing a white lab coat and looking into a large microscope. A researcher uses an Atomic Force Microscope to image enzymes used in biochemical conversion. Through biomass characterization, NREL develops, refines, and validates rapid and cost-effective methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before and after pretreatment, as well as during bioconversion processing. Detailed and accurate characterization of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products is a necessity for any biomass-to-biofuels conversion. Understanding how the individual biomass components and reaction products interact at each stage in the process is important for researchers. With a large inventory of standard biomass samples as reference materials,

318

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

319

Test method development for evaluating the freeze-thaw performance of segmental retaining wall blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmental retaining walls (SRW), typically constructed along highways, have grown in popularity over the past decade. Manufacturers of SRW blocks have estimated the service life of a properly constructed wall to be approximately 75 years. However, there have been reports of SRW systems failing after only five years in service. Suspected causes of the SRW failures are freeze-thaw damage while exposed to deicing salts sprayed by snow plows from highways. The current standard test method used for evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of SRW blocks has several drawbacks and does not accurately replicate environmental exposure field conditions. The objective of this research is to develop and assess a new standard test method for evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of SRW blocks that obtains reproducible results and offers sufficient information on the freeze-thaw performance for SRW block manufacturers and state highway agencies (SHAs). The research completed a preliminary proof of concept test for the new freezethaw test method developed using small, commercially available SRW blocks to mitigate potential problems and establish appropriate test parameters. The testing produced results of freeze-thaw degradation that followed the same modes of failure that has been discovered during field evaluations. After the proof of concept test was completed, a series of freeze-thaw tests were conducted using sets of SHA approved and non-SHA approved SRW blocks. Three different manufacturersâ?? SRW blocks were evaluated. There was no significant freezethaw degradation of any of the blocks after 200 freeze-thaw cycles, so for two blocks, experiments were extended to 400 cycles using a twelve-hour freeze-thaw cycle. The modification of the test did not result in more rapid deterioration of the SRW blocks. The researchers found that the freeze-thaw durability test method developed herein is beneficial for determining the freeze-thaw performance of the lower quality specified blocks. The test method gives realistic results, which match typical deterioration modes that are common in field settings, in a timely manner. However, the test method for testing SHA quality SRW blocks takes longer times and may not be a reasonable test for such products.

Hoelscher, Aaron Kindall

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Development Test. Second annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second annual report covering progress made under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC21-92MC29237, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test. The project is for the design, construction, and testing of a 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant in the City of Santa Clara, California. The report is divided into sections which describe the progress in various program activities, and provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management. 6 figs., 2 tabs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced development of the spectrum sciences Model 5005-TF, single-event test fixture  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the advanced development of the Spectrum Sciences Model 5005-TF, Single-Event Test Fixture. The Model 5005-TF uses a Californium-252 (Cf-252) fission-fragment source to test integrated circuits and other devices for the effects of single-event phenomena. Particle identification methods commonly used in high-energy physics research and nuclear engineering have been incorporated into the Model 5005-TF for estimating the particle charge, mass, and energy parameters. All single-event phenomena observed in a device under test (DUT) are correlated with an identified fission fragment, and its linear energy transfer (LET) and range in the semiconductor material of the DUT.

Ackermann, M.R.; Browning, J.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hughlock, B.W. (Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Co., Seattle, WA (USA)); Lum, G.K. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Sunnyvale, CA (USA)); Tsacoyeanes, W.C. (Draper (Charles Stark) Lab., Inc., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Weeks, M.D. (Spectrum Sciences, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

325

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Diffraction Spectroscopy and Diffraction Additional Information Meet the Spectroscopy and Diffraction Experts Related EMSL User Projects Spectroscopy and Diffraction Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Tutorial: XPS Tools for Surface Analysis Spectroscopy and Diffraction brochure EMSL's suite of spectroscopy and diffraction instruments allows users to study solid-, liquid-, and gas-phase sample structure and composition with remarkable resolution. Ideal for integrated studies, spectrometers and diffractometers are easily coupled with EMSL's computational and modeling capabilities, allowing users to apply a multifaceted research approach for experimental data interpretation and gain fundamental understanding of scientific problems. At EMSL, spectroscopy and diffraction instruments are

326

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

327

Development and Testing of Model Predictive Control for a Campus Chilled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Testing of Model Predictive Control for a Campus Chilled Development and Testing of Model Predictive Control for a Campus Chilled Water Plant with Thermal Storage Title Development and Testing of Model Predictive Control for a Campus Chilled Water Plant with Thermal Storage Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2010 Authors Coffey, Brian, Philip Haves, Michael Wetter, Brandon Hencey, Francesco Borrelli, Yudong Ma, and Sorin Bengea Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 2010 Publisher Omnipress Conference Location Asilomar, California, USA ISBN 0-918249-60-0 Abstract A Model Predictive Control (MPC) implementation was developed for a university campus chilled water plant. The plant includes three water-cooled chillers and a two million gallon chilled water storage tank. The tank is charged during the night to minimize on-peak electricity consumption and take advantage of the lower ambient wet bulb temperature. A detailed model of the chilled water plant and simplified models of the campus buildings were developed using the equation-based modeling language Modelica. Steady state models of the chillers, cooling towers and pumps were developed, based on manufacturers' performance data, and calibrated using measured data collected and archived by the control system. A dynamic model of the chilled water storage tank was also developed and calibrated. A semi-empirical model was developed to predict the temperature and flow rate of the chilled water returning to the plant from the buildings. These models were then combined and simplified for use in a MPC algorithm that determines the optimal chiller start and stop times and set-points for the condenser water temperature and the chilled water supply temperature. The paper describes the development and testing of the MPC implementation and discusses lessons learned and next steps in further research

328

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity...

329

Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) 2003 Annual Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Technical Capability Program FY 2003 Annual Plan Washington, D.C. 20585 September 2002 FTCP FY 2003 Annual Action Plan INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) provides management direction to assist the Federal workforce in maintaining necessary technical competencies to safely operate its defense nuclear facilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) consists of senior technical safety managers representing nuclear facilities, and reports to the Deputy Secretary for workforce safety technical capabilities' matters. The Panel will continue to pursue progress in the following areas: 1. Continued development of senior management commitment and support for the technical intern

330

Managing corporate capabilities:theory and industry approaches.  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes theoretical and industry approaches to organizational capabilities management and ascertains whether there is a distinct ''best practice'' in this regard. We consider both physical capabilities, such as technical disciplines and infrastructure, and non-physical capabilities such as corporate culture and organizational procedures. We examine Resource-Based Theory (RBT), which is the predominant organizational management theory focused on capabilities. RBT seeks to explain the effect of capabilities on competitiveness, and thus provide a basis for investment/divestment decisions. We then analyze industry approaches described to us in interviews with representatives from Goodyear, 3M, Intel, Ford, NASA, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing. We found diversity amongst the industry capability management approaches. Although all organizations manage capabilities and consider them to some degree in their strategies, no two approaches that we observed were identical. Furthermore, we observed that theory is not a strong driver in this regard. No organization used the term ''Resource-Based Theory'', nor did any organization mention any other guiding theory or practice from the organizational management literature when explaining their capabilities management approaches. As such, we concluded that there is no single best practice for capabilities management. Nevertheless, we believe that RBT and the diverse industry experiences described herein can provide useful insights to support development of capabilities management approaches.

Slavin, Adam M.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development, setup and testing of a dynamic hydraulic fracture conductivity apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most critical parameters in the success of a hydraulic fracturing treatment is to have sufficiently high fracture conductivity. Unbroken polymers can cause permeability impairment in the proppant pack and/or in the matrix along the fracture face. The objectives of this research project were to design and set up an experimental apparatus for dynamic fracture conductivity testing and to create a fracture conductivity test workflow standard. This entirely new dynamic fracture conductivity measurement will be used to perform extensive experiments to study fracturing fluid cleanup characteristics and investigate damage resulting from unbroken polymer gel in the proppant pack. The dynamic fracture conductivity experiment comprises two parts: pumping fracturing fluid into the cell and measuring proppant pack conductivity. I carefully designed the hydraulic fracturing laboratory to provide appropriate scaling of the field conditions experimentally. The specifications for each apparatus were carefully considered with flexibility for further studies and the capability of each apparatus was defined. I generated comprehensive experimental procedures for each experiment stage. By following the procedure, the experiment can run smoothly. Most of dry runs and experiments performed with sandstone were successful.

Pongthunya, Potcharaporn

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development and testing of a wastewater recycler and heater. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of this program have demonstrated the feasibility of an automatic and self-contained appliance that can recover and store usable hot water from waste laundry water, using essentially the same amount of energy as an equivalent-capacity water heater. It has been shown by extended evaluation tests with a waste stream of real laundry water that this unit is capable of recovering sterile hot water at a steady state rate of 22.7 liters/hour (6 gph) with a specific energy draw of 79 watt-hours/liter (299 watt-hours/gal), without the use of any expendable chemicals. It has also been shown by extended evaluation tests with a feed that simulates hospital wastewater preconcentrated by ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis that this unit can increase the solids concentration of a waste water from less than 2% to at least 29.3%. The results of a manufacturing cost analysis have shown that a conservative annual cost (that is, a maximum annual cost) of this appliance is $717 per year. Economic feasibility therefore is not demonstrable at present on a large scale. However, should water cost increase or the cost of the appliance decrease, a viable demand for household water recovery with the appliance would be possible.

Guarino, V.J.; Bambenek, R.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (May 2012) The Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2), which allows electric utilities and grid operators to assess their cybersecurity capabilities and prioritize their actions and investments to improve cybersecurity, combines elements from existing cybersecurity efforts into a common tool that can be used consistently across the industry. The Maturity Model was developed as part of a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and involved close collaboration with industry, other Federal agencies, and other stakeholders. Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) -

334

Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel of similar size and none have an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course built around it. Many universities use smaller wind tunnels for laboratory instruction, but these experiments are meant to only demonstrate basic concepts. Students go beyond conceptual learning in this wind tunnel test engineering course and conduct real-world experiments in the LSWT. This course puts knowledge into practice and further prepares students whether continuing on to graduate school or industry. Course content mainly originates from the chapters in Low Speed Wind Tunnel Testing by Barlow, Rae, and Pope. This is the most comprehensive book that addresses the specific requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel testing. It is not a textbook for novices. The three experiments used in the course are modeled on actual experiments that were performed at the LSWT. They are exactly what a commercial entity would want performed although the time scale is drastically reduced because of class requirements. Students complete the course with a working knowledge of the requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel tests because they have successfully performed real-world tests and have performed data reduction that is needed for high-quality industrial tests.

Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

Egle, Brian [ORNL; Aaron, W Scott [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and leadership. Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office Senior Advisor and Program Coordinator, Health IT Information Technology Laboratory bjlide@nist.gov (301Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing, security and privacy

337

Recently developed well test insrumentation for low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering drawings, assembly instructions, and recommended usage for several of the instruments developed for low and moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal well testing are presented. Included are the drawings for: a downhole pressure and temperature instrument, a multi-conductor cablehead, a line driver to be used with the downhole pressure and temperature instrument, and a fluid-level detector.

Solbau, R.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL: Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Project No.: DE-FE0007948 InnoSepra, LLC is demonstrating the effectiveness of an innovative adsorption-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology utilizing a combination of novel microporous materials and process cycles. The process utilizes physical sorbents with much lower heats of adsorption compared to competing processes. Lab scale testing has produced greater than 99 percent CO2 purity and greater than 90 percent CO2 recovery from synthetic flue gas. Projections based on detailed engineering evaluations show that at commercial scale, the technology can reduce the power consumption for CO2 capture by more than 40 percent and the capital cost for the CO2 capture equipment by more than 60 percent, resulting in a more than a 40 percent reduction in the CO2 capture cost compared to alternate technologies such as amines and chilled ammonia.

339

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE/GRI development and testing of a downhole pump for jet-assist drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to accelerate development and commercialization of a high pressure downhole pump (DHP{trademark}) to be used for ultra-high pressure, jet-assisted drilling. The purpose of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in the drilling of deeper gas and oil wells where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. As a means to accomplishing this objective, a second generation commercial prototype of a DHP is to be designed, fabricated, tested in the laboratory, and eventually tested in the field. The design of the DOE commercial prototype DHP is current in progress. The layout of the complete DHP is expected to be completed by mid-April. Fabrication and laboratory experimentation is expected to be completed in September. Pending successful completion of the laboratory testing phase, the DOE commercial DHP should be ready for testing in the field by the end of the calendar year.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

344

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

345

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Chinook! Welcome to Chinook! Chinook Supercomputer Chinook is a supercluster with 2310 HP(tm) dual-socket, quad-core AMD(tm) nodes for computation. With 32 GB of memory per node, each processor-core has 4 GB available. Thus, Chinook is the only computer in its class capable of running certain chemical computations. The overall system has 74 TB of memory, 350 GB of local scratch disk per node, a 250 TB of global parallel file system, and a peak performance 163 teraFLOPs. Fast communication between nodes is obtained using single rail InfiniBand interconnect from Voltaire (switches) and Mellanox (network interface cards). Currently, Chinook's operating system is an EMSL modified version of a Red Hat's Scientific Linux. Node allocation is scheduled using Moab® and Simple

346

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

347

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Photo of researcher in the Graphics and Visualization Laboratory EMSL's Graphics and Visualization Laboratory (GVL) helps researchers visualize and analyze complex experimental and computational data sets. GVL provides EMSL users with high-performance graphics systems as well as support staff who have capabilities in illustration and image editing, data modeling and image analysis, scene rendering and model creation, as well as audio/video compositing and editing. The GVL contains five high-performance graphics stations based on SGI technologies with high-speed connections to parallel computers and the database/archive system, a video system integrated with the workstations to facilitate the display and capture of scientific data, and video editing

348

Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine  

SciTech Connect

This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

Reilly, Raymond W.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Crosswalk of Target Capabilities to Core Capabilities The following table maps the target capabilities outlined in the former Target Capabilities List (TCL) version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capabilities outlined in the former Target Capabilities List (TCL) version 2.0, released in September 2007 was performed such that all thirty-seven target capabilities from the TCL were mapped; and each target target capability in the TCL. This crosswalk was created to support the transition that states

Harms, Kyle E.

350

BESTEST Test Suites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESTEST Test Suites BESTEST (Building Energy Simulation TEST) is a method for testing, diagnosing, and validating the capabilities of building energy simulation programs. The...

351

Facilities & Capabilities | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiated Material Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility was designed and built as a hot cell facility. It is a two-story block and brick structure with a two-story high bay...

352

Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evolution of cartesian genetic programs capable of learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new form of Cartesian Genetic Programming (CGP) that develops into a computational network capable of learning. The developed network architecture is inspired by the brain. When the genetically encoded programs are run, a networks develops ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, cartesian genetic programming, checkers, co-evolution, computational development

Gul Muhammad Khan; Julian F. Miller

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the development of an analysis tool capable of analyzing a variety of wind turbine, support platform, and mooring system configurations.The simulation capability was tested by model-to-model comparisons to ensure its correctness.

Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L. Jr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Report on the development of the large-bore powder gun for the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are needed to locate phase boundaries and to provide both Hugoniot data and off-Hugoniot data (such as principle isentrope, refreezing, dynamic strength, etc.) achieved through complex loading paths. The objective of the current work was to de- velop a large bore (3.5 inch or greater) powder gun capable of accelerating projectiles to moderately high velocities exceeding 2 km/s for impact experiments. A total of 24 ex- periments were performed to measure the projectile velocity, breech strain, and projectile tilt to demonstrate the performance of the gun up to the maximum breech capacity of 16 pounds of propellant. Physics experiments using a multislug method were performed to obtain sound speed and Hugoniot for shocked cerium metal and to demonstrate the ability of the large bore gun to conduct well-defined, plate-impact experiments. In addition, six experiments were performed on the prototype containment system to examine the ability of the launcher and containment system to withstand the impact event and contain the propellant gases and impact debris postshot. The data presented here were essential for qualification of the launcher for experiments to be conducted at the U1a complex of the Nevada Test Site.

B.J. Jensen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Engineering evaluation of the General Motors (GM) diesel rating and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

K-Reactor`s number one GM diesel (GM-lK) suffered recurrent, premature piston pin bushing failures between July 1990 and January 1991. These failures raised a concern that the engine`s original design capabilities were being exceeded. Were we asking old engines to do too much by powering 1200 kw (continuous) rated electrical generators? Was excessive wear of the piston pin bushings a result of having exceeded the engine`s capabilities (overload), or were the recent failures a direct result of poor quality, poor design, or defective replacement parts? Considering the engine`s overall performance for the past 30 years, during which an engine failure of this nature had never occurred, and the fact that 1200 kw was approximately 50% of the engine`s original tested capability, Reactor Engineering did not consider it likely that an overloaded engine caused bushing failures. What seemed more plausible was that the engine`s failure to perform was caused by deficiencies in, or poor quality of, replacement parts.The following report documents: (1) the results of K-Reactor EDG failure analysis; (2) correlation of P- and C-Reactor GM diesel teardowns; (3) the engine rebuild to blueprint specification; (4) how the engine was determined ready for test; (5) testing parameters that were developed; (6) a summary of test results and test insights; (7) how WSRC determined engine operation was acceptable; (8) independent review of 1200 kw operational data; (9) approval of the engines` 12OOkw continuous rating.

Gross, R.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

created strategic and highly collaborative multi-year programs with impactful results. An industry-driven research initiative that develops innovative solutions to achieve...

358

NREL: Water Power Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Grid Integration Read more about NREL's offshore wind research and development activities. Printable Version Water Power Research...

359

NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Program and Wind Program by researching and developing technologies, systems, and methods to interconnect variable renewable energy...

360

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The eight-month program for 1990 is separated into seven tasks. There are tasks for each of the three solar houses, a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, a management task, and a task funding travel to attend the Field Monitoring for a Purpose'' workshop which was held April 2--5, 1990, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Testing Protocols and Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI-Resnet Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing Protocols & Results: Testing Protocols & Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI/RESNET Development Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting: Combustion Safety in Tight Houses Jim Fitzgerald Center for Energy and Environment Building Performance Institute Page 2  Weatherization, custom windows & central air conditioning  Attic insulation, wall insulation, and attic air sealing - borrowed specs from energy programs and used weatherization contractors  Average house leakage: 7.8 ACH50 before 5.4 ACH50 after MSP secret: this Airport Sound Program does weatherization work to reduce sound All Tightening of Existing Homes Can Affect Combustion Appliance Safety Tightening work was done on 3000 homes with no testing, what could possibly go wrong?

362

Developing a standardized test procedure for hybrid vehicles: The challenge of the SAE HEV task force  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) established a task force to develop a procedure for measuring electric energy consumption, all-electric range, fuel economy, and exhaust emissions for hybrid vehicles; the procedure will be submitted to regulatory agencies as representing the automotive industry`s recommendations. The draft procedure is currently being tested on hybrid vehicles. The University of Maryland`s parallel hybrid was tested in September 1994, and the University of California-Davis` parallel hybrid and the University of Illinois` series hybrid will be tested in November 1994 and January 1995, respectively. The procedure is being modified to incorporate any lessons learned, and the task force hopes to recommend the final procedure to the SAE by mid 1995.

Penney, T; Christensen, D [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Poulos, S [General Motors Corp., Warren, MI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Simulant Development for Hanford Tank Farms Double Valve Isolation (DVI) Valves Testing  

SciTech Connect

Leakage testing of a representative sample of the safety-significant isolation valves for Double Valve Isolation (DVI) in an environment that simulates the abrasive characteristics of the Hanford Tank Farms Waste Transfer System during waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to be conducted. The testing will consist of periodic leak performed on the DVI valves after prescribed numbers of valve cycles (open and close) in a simulated environment representative of the abrasive properties of the waste and the Waste Transfer System. The valve operations include exposure to cycling conditions that include gravity drain and flush operation following slurry transfer. The simulant test will establish the performance characteristics and verify compliance with the Documented Safety Analysis. Proper simulant development is essential to ensure that the critical process streams characteristics are represented, National Research Council report Advice on the Department of Energy's Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges

Wells, Beric E.

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

Develop and test an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) for large scale MHD magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work conducted under DOE/PETC Contract DE-AC22-84PC70512 has included four principal tasks, (1) development of a Design Requirements Definition for a retrofit MHD magnet system, (2) analysis of an internally cooled, cabled superconductor (ICCS) to use in that design, (3) design of an experiment to test a subscale version of that conductor, which is a NbTi, copper stabilized superconductor, and (4) proof-of-concept testing of the conductor. The program was carried forth through the third task with very successful development and test of a conventional ICCS conductor with 27 multifilamentary copper-superconductor composite strands and a new concept conductor in which, in each triplet, two strands were pure copper and the third strand was a multifilamentary composite. In reviewing the magnet design and the premises for the conductor design it became obvious that, since the principal source of perturbation in MHD magnets derives from slippage between coils, or between turns in a coil, thereby producing frictional heat which must flow through the conductor sheath and the helium to the superconductor strands, an extra barrier might be highly effective in enhancing magnet stability and protection. This concept was developed and a sample conductor manufactured and tested in comparison with an identical conductor lacking such an additional barrier. Results of these conductor tests confirm the potential value of such a barrier. As the work of tasks 1 through 3 has been reported in detail in quarterly and semiannual reports, as well as in special reports prepared throughout the course of this project, this report reviews early work briefly and then discusses this last phase in great detail. 8 refs., 36 figs.

Marston, P.G.; Hale, J.R.; Dawson, A.M.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products. Topical report, September 1994--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses the development and testing of two products designed to advance the application of underbalanced drilling techniques. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment. The program predicts pressure and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test well measurements, and field data. This model does not handle air or mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. An incompressible drilling fluid was developed that utilizes lightweight solid additives (hollow glass spheres) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. This fluid is designed for underbalanced drilling situations where compressible lightweight fluids are inadequate. In addition to development of these new products, an analysis was performed to determine the market potential of lightweight fluids, and a forecast of underbalanced drilling in the USA over the next decade was developed. This analysis indicated that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30 percent of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the USA within the next ten years.

Medley, G.H., Jr; Maurer, W.C.; Liu, G.; Garkasi, A.Y.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development and Testing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Cogeneration Applications: FY 2000 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim technical progress report describes efforts to develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems that provide both electric power generation and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). Since SOFC systems operate at high temperature (650 to 1000 degrees Celsius), cogeneration seems to be a natural fit. In SOFC-HVAC systems, the exhaust heat from the SOFC is used to drive heat-actuated HVAC subsystems such as absorption chillers or boilers. SOFC-HVAC...

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development and testing of an automated wood-burning heating system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved wood continuous, automated combustion system has been developed using a tunnel burner. The tunnel burner implemented into a boiler heating system has proven to be very efficient. The prototype was tested and evaluated. A second generation tunnel system was designed and fabricated. Work performed between April 1980 and April 1981 is summarized. The most important results of the project are: the finalized tunnel burner design; high combustion efficiency; and low air pollution emissions. 3 tables. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Capabilities Briefingp g Engineering Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines · Geothermal water heater at a l bcommercial businesses · Zero emission natural gas wellhead gas, Electrical Resistivity Water/Wastewater Analysis and Remediation National Carbon Capture Center (Wilsonville;Electro-Mechanical SystemsElectro Mechanical Systems · Design, Modeling, Fabrication, Integration, Test

370

High-Voltage Direct Current Corona Testing of Transmission Line Hardware and Insulator Assemblies: Development of Test Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When specifying hardware for new high-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines or replacement hardware for existing HVDC lines utilities generally require that the hardware meet specific corona performance requirements.While standards and test methods exist for testing hardware used on HVAC systems, no such material is available for HVDC systems.HVAC tests are sometimes conducted on the hardware and the results obtained are then related to HVDC by utilizing the peak HVAC line to ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A FAST NEUTRON TEST CONCEPT FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has provided state-of-the-art experimental irradiation testing capability. A unique design is investigated herein for the purpose of providing a fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. This new test capability could be brought on line in approximately 5 or 6 years, much sooner than a new test reactor could be built, to provide an interim fast-flux test capability in the timeframe before a fast-flux research reactor could be built. The proposed cost for this system is approximately $63M, much less than the cost of a new fast-flux test reactor. A concept has been developed to filter out a large portion of the thermal flux component by using a thermally conductive neutron absorber block. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of this experiment cooling concept.

Donna Post Guillen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development of simple quantitative test for lack of field emission orthodoxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple quantitative test applicable to current-voltage data for cold field electron emission (CFE). It can decide whether individual reported field-enhancement-factor (FEF) values are spuriously large. The paper defines an "orthodox emission situation" by a set of ideal experimental, physical and mathematical conditions, and shows how (in these conditions) operating values of scaled barrier field (f) can be extracted from Fowler-Nordheim (FN) and Millikan-Lauritsen (ML) plots. By analyzing historical CFE experiments, which are expected to nearly satisfy the orthodoxy conditions, "apparently reasonable" and "clearly unreasonable" experimental ranges for f are found. These provide a test for lack of orthodoxy. For illustration, this test is applied to 17 post-1975 CFE data sets, mainly for carbon and semiconductor nanostructures. Some extracted f-value ranges are apparently reasonable (including many carbon results), some are clearly unreasonable. It is shown that this test applies to any field-emission diode geometry and any form of FN or ML plot. It is proved mathematically that, if the extracted f-value range is "unreasonably high", then FEF-values extracted by the usual literature method are spuriously large. Probably, all new field-emitter materials should be tested in this way. Appropriate data-analysis theory needs developing for non-orthodox emitters.

Richard G. Forbes

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of Monitoring Control and Fuzzy Control Test of Finned-Tube Heat-Exchanger Test-Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to satisfy the testing requirement of finned-tube heat-exchanger test-board, this paper designs an exclusive auto-monitor and control subsystem, studies the fuzzy control means for the supply air temperature of the heat-exchanger, and accomplishes the fuzzy control performance test. According to the experimental results, this auto-monitor and control subsystem could not only reduce the testing time for thermodynamic performances of finned-tube heat-exchanger, but also actualize easily the stable control of the supply air temperature of the heat-exchanger.

Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Gao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

New User Interface Capabilities for Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latest technologies promise new control system User Interface (UI) features and greater interoperability of applications. New developments using Java and Eclipse aim to unify diverse control systems and make communication between applications seamless. Web based user interfaces can improve portability and remote access. Modern programming tools improve efficiency, support testing and facilitate shared code. This paper will discuss new developments aimed at improving control system interfaces and their development environment.

Kasemir, Kay [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Secure Facilities & Capabilities | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Facilities SHARE Secure Facilities and Capabilities...

379

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management  

Multi-Process High Performance Computing Simulator Modular simulation capability for barrier and waste form degradation, multiphase flow and reactive ...

380

Los Alamos Lab: Bioscience Division: Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Capabilities Biomaterials Cell Biology Computational Biology Environmental Microbiology Genomic Science Measurement Science and Diagnostics Metabolomics Molecular...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fermilab PXIE Beam Diagnostics Development and Testing at the HINS Beam Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermilab is planning the construction of a prototype front end of the Project X linac. The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) is expected to accelerate 1 mA CW H- beam up to 30 MeV. Some of the major goals of the project are to test a CW RFQ and H- source, a broadband bunch-by-bunch beam chopper and a low-energy superconducting linac. The successful characterization and operation of such an accelerator place stringent requirements on beamline diagnostics. These crucial beam measurements include bunch currents, beam orbit, beam phase, bunch length, transverse profile and emittance and beam halo and tails, as well as the extinction performance of the broadband chopper. This paper presents PXIE beam measurement requirements and instrumentation development plans. Presented are plans to test key instruments at the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) beam facility. Since HINS is already an operational accelerator, utilizing HINS for instrumentation testing will allow for quicker development of the required PXIE diagnostics.

Lebedev, V.A.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Steimel, J.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab; Hanna, B.M.; Prost, L.R.; Scarpine, V.E.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Unusual capabilities and new programs  

SciTech Connect

A multipurpose NDE laboratory develops many techniques for special purposes. Without an intentional effort to relate these techniques to problems of the nuclear weapons community we pass by opportunities for valuable interchanges. Several solutions to weapons problems are described. Out of these descriptions better NDE techniques will emerge for use in examination of weapons and weapon components.

Janney, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Diagnostic Wind Field Modeling for Complex Terrain: Model Development and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three dimensional diagnostic wind field model is shown to be capable of generating potential flow solutions associated with simple terrain features. This is achieved by modifying an initially uniform background wind to make the flow divergence ...

D. G. Ross; I. N. Smith; P. C. Manins; D. G. Fox

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development and testing of shingle-type solar cell modules. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, development, fabrication and testing of a shingle-type terrestrial solar cell module which produces 98 watts/m/sup 2/ of exposed module area at 1 kW/m/sup 2/ insolation and 61/sup 0/C are reported. These modules make it possible to easily incorporate photovoltaic power generation into the sloping roofs of residential or commercial buildings by simply nailing the modules to the plywood roof sheathing. This design consists of nineteen series-connected 53 mm diameter solar cells arranged in a closely packaged hexagon configuration. These cells are individually bonded to the embossed surface of a 3 mm thick thermally tempered hexagon-shaped piece of ASG SUNADEX glass. Monsanto SAFLEX polyvinyl butyral is used as the laminating adhesive. RTVII functions as the encapsulant between the underside of the glass superstrate and a rear protective sheet of 0.8 mm thick TEXTOLITE. The semi-flexible portion of each shingle module is a composite laminate construction consisting of outer layers of B.F. Goodrich FLEXSEAL and an epichlorohydrin closed cell foam core. The module design has satisfactorily survived the JPL-defined qualification testing program which includes 50 thermal cycles between -40 and +90/sup 0/C, a seven-day temperature-humidity exposure test and a mechanical integrity test consisting of a bidirectional cyclic loading at 2390 Pa (50 lb/ft/sup 2/) which is intended to simulate loads due to a 45 m/s (100 mph) wind.

Shepard, N.F.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

Bert Zauderer

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

MCFC product development test. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report covering progress made under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC21-92MC29237, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test. The project is for the design, construction, and testing of a 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant in the City of Santa Clara, California, and the period covered in this fourth annual report is October, 1995 to September, 1996. The report is divided into sections which describe the progress in various program activities. Section 2.0 provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule. Section 3 presents a summary by Task of the progress achieved in this fourth year of the program.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

Longanbach, J.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C. (Trane Co., La Crosse, WI (United States). Applied Unitary/Refrigeration Systems Div.)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Definition: Available Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Available Transfer Capability A measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. It is defined as Total Transfer Capability less existing transmission commitments (including retail customer service), less a Capacity Benefit Margin, less a Transmission Reliability Margin.[1] Related Terms transfer capability, transmission lines, transmission line, capacity benefit margin, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Available_Transfer_Capability&oldid=502496

396

Office of Test Capabilities and Evaluation | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and increase the ability to predict their response to external stimuli (large thermal, mechanical, and combined forces and extremely high radiation fields) and the effects...

397

Early Warning Capabilities for Firefighters: Testing of Collapse ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... before ignition and continued through the collapse of the roof at 426 ... in the index indicate changes in structural stability, whereas flat regions are ...

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Testing of and model development for double-walled thermal tubular  

SciTech Connect

Insulated tubular products have become essential for use in steam injection projects. In a steam injection project, steam is created at the surface by either steam boilers or generators. During this process, steam travels from a boiler through surface lines to the wellhead, down the wellbore to the sandface, and into the reservoir. For some projects to be an economic success, cost must be reduced and oil recoveries must be increased by reducing heat losses in the wellbore. With reduced heats losses, steam generation costs are lowered and higher quality steam can be injected into the formation. To address this need, work under this project consisted of the design and construction of a thermal flow loop, testing a double-walled tubular product that was manufactured by Inter-Mountain Pipe Company, and the development and verification of a thermal hydraulic numerical simulator for steam injection. Four different experimental configurations of the double-walled pipe were tested. These configurations included: (1) bare pipe case, (2) bare pipe case with an applied annular vacuum, (3) insulated annular pipe case, and (4) insulated annular pipe case with an applied annular vacuum. Both the pipe body and coupling were tested with each configuration. The results of the experimental tests showed that the Inter-Mountain Pipe Company double-walled pipe body achieved a 98 percent reduction in heat loss when insulation was applied to the annular portion of the pipe. The application of insulation to the annular portion of the coupling reduced the heat losses by only 6 percent. In tests that specified the use of a vacuum in the annular portion of the pipe, leaks were detected and the vacuum could not be held.

Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A description of the physical capabilities of a mature workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to 1) describe and evaluate the physical capabilities and personal factors of a mature workforce, 2) to determine the relationship between identified risk factors and musculoskeletal morbidity 3) to compare the physical capabilities of the target group to young manual material handlers (MMHs) and 50th percentile U.S. male sample populations. The components related to the functional capacity of the individual workers were anthropometrics, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. This study was comprised of 42 male surface mine and power plant employees working different jobs: mechanics, heavy equipment operators, maintenance, and pump operators. Each worker's physical capabilities were evaluated using a standardized physical testing protocol: submaximal graded step-test, dynamic lift test (floor to knuckle, knuckle to acromial. and acromial to functional overhead reach), hand grip dynamometer strength test, sit-and-reach flexibility test, push-up test, and bent knee sit-up test. There were no reported incidents of musculoskeletal morbidity during the past three years of employment', therefore, there was no morbidity assessment. Compared to the younger MMHs, the physical capabilities of aerobic capacity, dynamic lifting (all three regions), flexibility, sit-ups, and push-ups were significantly lower for the mature workforce. However, handgrip strength was significantly greater for the mature workforce compared to the young MMHs. Compared to the 50th percentile U.S.male population, aerobic capacity, dynamic lift (acromial to functional overhead reach), and flexibility were significantly lower for the mature workforce. Push-ups, handgrip strength, and dynamic lift (floor to knuckle and knuckle to acromial) were significantly greater for the mature workforce. There was no significant difference for the physical capability of sit-ups between these two groups. The results of this study provide a database that may enhance job design/redesign, worker selection, work hardening programs, exercise programs, and manual material handling performance.

Bartels, Kendra Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ORISE: Web Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Development Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of these tools continues to grow. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides Web development capabilities to government agencies and organizations interested in converting training and education programs based on traditional means of communication into a variety of tools that suit the technology skills of today's health care providers and patients. ORISE develops Web-based training and informational products that expand the reach of targeted health messages to key audiences. Our specific capabilities include: Web applications development User experience testing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development test capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Development and interrupting tests on 250KV 8KA HVDC circuit breaker  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the circuit and component selections, development and equivalent circuit test results on an HVDC circuit breaker for an HVDC transmission line. A puffer type SF/sub 6/ gas interrupter for AC circuit breakers is utilized for interrupting DC current with injection of high-frequency inverse current from a commutating capacitor precharged to HVDC line voltage. Also, the effectiveness of application of the HVDC breaker to an HVDC system with two parallel transmission lines is demonstrated through the EMTP simulation.

Tokuyama, S.; Arimatsu, K.; Hirata, K.; Kato, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geothermal direct applications hardware systems development and testing. 1979 summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities performed during calendar year 1979 for the hardware system development and testing task are presented. The fluidized bed technology was applied to the drying of potato by-products and to the exchange of heat to air in the space heating experiment. Geothermal water was flashed to steam and also used as the prime energy source in the steam distillation of peppermint oil. Geothermal water temperatures as low as 112.8/sup 0/C were utilized to distill alcohol from sugar beet juice, and lower temperature water provided air conditioning through an absorption air conditioning system. These experiments are discussed.

Keller, J.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Federal Technical Capability Program - Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FTCP Meetings FTCP Meetings FTCP Conference Call Schedule - CY 2013 Face to Face Meeting: May 22, 2013 Agenda Meeting Minutes Meeting Briefings Face to Face Meeting: September 18, 2012 Agenda FAQS Status NTC Activities - NTC Briefing - NTC's 2012 Safety Training Delivery Schedule - NTC's 2013 Safety Training Delivery Schedule Competency Development & Critical Skills (Eric Coleman) - GAO Report - Modernizing the Nuclear Security Enterprise - DOE Occupational Competency Models DOE Management and Operations -- Strategic Perspective (VADM Melvin Williams) - Executive Summary - Management and Operations - IMS Executive Summary - DOE’s Integrated Management System - Leaders Influence Culture and Performance FTCP FY 2012 FTCP Operational Plan Goal Status - Goal 1 FTCP FY 2012 FTCP Operational Plan Goal Status - Goal 2

405

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partners and Related Links Partners and Related Links These are the organizations with which EMSL maintains closest relationships in high performance computing and software development. Partners Note: The links below leave this site Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Daresbury Laboratory San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UCSD Maui High Performance Computing Center (MHPCC) Intel Corporation Silicon Graphics, Inc. Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) Quadrics Ltd. Organizations SP-XXL SCICOMP Cray User Group (CUG) SC Conference Series - International Conference of High Performing Computing and Communications High Performance Computing Links Advanced Simulation and Computing at Lawrence Livermore National

406

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development and testing of a diagnostic system for intelligen distributed control at EBR-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic system is under development for demonstration of Intelligent Distributed Control at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR--II). In the first phase of the project a diagnostic system is being developed for the EBR-II steam plant based on the DISYS expert systems approach. Current testing uses recorded plant data and data from simulated plant faults. The dynamical simulation of the EBR-II steam plant uses the Babcock and Wilcox (B W) Modular Modeling System (MMS). At EBR-II the diagnostic system operates in the UNIX workstation and receives live plant data from the plant Data Acquisition System (DAS). Future work will seek implementation of the steam plant diagnostic in a distributed manner using UNIX based computers and Bailey microprocessor-based control system. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Edwards, R.M.; Ruhl, D.W.; Klevans, E.H.; Robinson, G.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes  

SciTech Connect

This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

DE-SOL-0003174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations 3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) Support 1. Interested parties shall have experience in: a. Developing training for emergency operations type programs such as response to radiological or nuclear incidents, emergency management and preparation, exercises (full scale through table top), continuity of operations, or other related programs, b. Coordinating consultants and instructional design staff to integrate content provided by the consultants with the course development process employed by instructional designers for technical training development, c. conducting comprehensive analyses such as needs assessments, training effectiveness evaluations, job analyses, functional analyses, task analyses, etc.,

410

EXPANDING THE CAPABILITIES OF DOE'S ENERGYPLUS BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION PROGRAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation analysis tool that is being developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It will also support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by six updated versions over the ensuing three-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features: (1) A model for energy recovery ventilation equipment that transfers both sensible (temperature) and latent (moisture) energy between building exhaust air and incoming outdoor ventilation air; (2) A model to account for the degradation of cooling coil dehumidification performance at part-load conditions; (3) A model for cooling coils augmented with air-to-air heat exchangers for improved dehumidification; and (4) A heat transfer coefficient calculator and automatic sizing algorithms for the existing EnergyPlus cooling tower model. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The software models were written using Fortran-90 and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new model/feature.

Don B. Shirey, III; Richard A. Raustad

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of analytical and numerical models for the assessment and interpretation of hydrogeological field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models of the flow and tracer tests in fractured aquifers are being developed for the further study of radioactive wastes migration in round water at the Lake Area, which is associated with one of the waste disposal site in Russia. The choice of testing methods, tracer types (chemical or thermal) and the appropriate models are determined by the nature of the ongoing ground-water pollution processes and the hydrogeological features of the site under consideration. Special importance is attached to the increased density of wastes as well as to the possible redistribution of solutes both in the liquid phase and in the absorbed state (largely, on fracture surfaces). This allows for studying physical-and-chemical (hydrogeochemical) interaction parameters which are hard to obtain (considering a fractured structure of the rock mass) in laboratory. Moreover, a theoretical substantiation is being given to the field methods of studying the properties of a fractured stratum aimed at the further construction of the drainage system or the subsurface flow barrier (cutoff wall), as well as the monitoring system that will evaluate the reliability of these ground-water protection measures. The proposed mathematical models are based on a tight combination of analytical and numerical methods, the former being preferred in solving the principal (2D axisymmetrical) class of the problems. The choice of appropriate problems is based on the close feedback with subsequent field tests in the Lake Area. 63 refs.

Mironenko, V.A.; Rumynin, V.G.; Konosavsky, P.K. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation); Pozdniakov, S.P.; Shestakov, V.M. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Roshal, A.A. [Geosoft-Eastlink, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The development of a C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test in dogs and cats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously, a function test that is both specific and sensitive for the assessment of hepatic function was not available. The studies presented in this thesis were performed as first steps in the development of a C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test for evaluation of hepatic function in dogs and cats. A preliminary study in dogs demonstrated that there was a detectable increase in percent dose (PCD) of CO? of the C administered as C-aminopyrine and recovered in gas extracted from blood samples. Pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in nine clinically healthy dogs and eight clinically healthy cats, respectively, in order to determine an optimal time point for sample collection after C-aminopyrine administration in both species. Also, dose studies were performed in the same 9 clinically healthy dogs and 8 clinically healthy cats in order to determine an optimal dose of C-aminopyrine to be administered in both species. In clinically healthy dogs, a 2 mg/kg dose is suitable for use and samples should be collected 45 min after intravenous C-aminopyrine administration. In clinically healthy cats, a 1 mg/kg dose is suitable for use and samples should be collected 90 min after intravenous C-aminopoyrine administration. In conclusion, C-aminopyrine demethylation testing appears safe in clinically healthy dogs and cats and leads to reproducible elevations in demethylation of C-aminopyrine.

Erik Michael Moeller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test SiteDirected Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Wil Lewis, editor

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers.

Harbour, John, R.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development and Testing of a Flattened U-Tube Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the present high cost of energy and the fact that costs are expected to continue rising in the future, those engaged in thermal processing must adapt new philosophies to maximize production efficiency. In most instances, the cost of energy may no longer be regarded as an insignificant factor in the cost of operation. Therefore, efficient use of energy and energy recuperation systems must be carefully evaluated. This paper discusses the development and testing of a U-Tube type flue gas energy recovery system for fuel fired industrial heat treating furnaces. The flattened U-Tube configuration was selected since its relative simple fabrication makes the unit quite cost effective. Development will be described beginning with the formulation of a numerical type mathematical model of the proposed heat exchanger which was computerized and then used to perform a parameter study to optimize the unit design. Analysis of data, generated by laboratory testing of the final computer selected design as a result of the computer study will be presented. Comparison of the experimental data to the computer model will also be demonstrated.

Huebner, S. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of a Forced-Convection Liquid-Fluoride-Salt Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

A small forced-convection molten-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. Objectives of the experiment include reestablishing infrastructure needed for fluoride-salt loop testing, developing a unique inductive heating technique for performing heat transfer (or other) experiments, measuring heat transfer characteristics in a liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled pebble bed, and demonstrating the use of silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural component for salt systems. The salt loop will consist of an Inconel 600 piping system, a sump-type pump, a SiC test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, as well as auxiliary systems needed to pre-heat the loop, transport salt into and out of the loop, and maintain an inert cover gas over the salt. A 30,000 Hz inductive heating system will be used to provide up to 250 kW of power to a 15 cm diameter SiC test section containing a packed bed of 3 cm graphite spheres. A SiC-to-Inconel 600 joint will use a conventional nickel/grafoil spiral wound gasket sandwiched between SiC and Inconel flanges. The loop system can provide up to 4.5 kg/s of salt flow at a head of 0.125 MPa and operate at a pressure just above atmospheric. Pebble Reynolds numbers of up to 2600 are possible with this configuration. A sump system is provided to drain and store the salt when not in use. Instrumentation on the loop will include pressure, temperature, and flow measurements, while the test section will be instrumented to provide pebble and FLiNaK temperatures.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Romanoski, Glenn R [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditionsit is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.