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1

Liquid fuel reformer development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thermochemical Fuel Reformer Development Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical Fuel Reforming (TCFR) is the recovery of internal combustion engine exhaust heat to chemically convert natural gas into a higher calorific flow fuel stream containing a significant concentration of hydrogen. This technique of recycling the engine exhaust heat can reduce fuel use (heat rate). In addition, the hydrogen enhanced combustion also allows stable engine operation at a higher air-fuel ratio (leaner combustion) which results in very low NOx production. This interim report covers two...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Liquid fuel reformer development: Autothermal reforming of Diesel fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to clean hydrogen feeds for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The process incorporates an autothermal reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. The authors have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, certified low-sulfur grade 1 diesel, and a standard grade 2 diesel. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 850 C, while maximum hydrogen product yields for the two diesel fuels were near 50%. Residual products in all cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, and methane. Further studies with grade 1 diesel showed improved conversion as the water:fuel ratio was increased from 1 to 2 at 850 C. Soot formation was reduced when the oxygen:carbon ratio was maintained at 1 at 850 C. There were no significant changes in hydrogen yield as the space velocity and the oxygen:fuel ratio were varied. Tests with a microchannel monolithic catalyst yielded similar or improved hydrogen levels at higher space velocities than with extruded pellets in a packed bed.

Pereira, C.; Bae, J-M.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Initial testing successfully completed * 1000 hrs of sub-scale durability completed (Target 8000). Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop; Washington, D.C. March 2011 27 Benefits of...

5

Development of internal reforming carbonate fuel cell stack technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities under this contract focused on the development of a coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system design and the stack technology consistent with the system design. The overall contract effort was divided into three phases. The first phase, completed in January 1988, provided carbonate fuel cell component scale-up from the 1ft{sup 2} size to the commercial 4ft{sup 2} size. The second phase of the program provided the coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system (CGCFC) conceptual design and carried out initial research and development needs of the CGCFC system. The final phase of the program emphasized stack height scale-up and improvement of stack life. The results of the second and third phases are included in this report. Program activities under Phase 2 and 3 were designed to address several key development areas to prepare the carbonate fuel cell system, particularly the coal-fueled CFC power plant, for commercialization in late 1990's. The issues addressed include: Coal-Gas Related Considerations; Cell and Stack Technology Improvement; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Design Development; Stack Tests for Design Verification; Full-Size Stack Design; Test Facility Development; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Cost Assessment; and Coal-Fueled Carbonate Fuel Cell System Design. All the major program objectives in each of the topical areas were successfully achieved. This report is organized along the above-mentioned topical areas. Each topical area has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Farooque, M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development of an impedance-based sensor for the detection of catalyst coking in fuel-reforming systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel sensor for detecting the early stages of catalyst coking in fuel reforming systems has been developed. The sensor was manufactured by inkjet printing… (more)

Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fuel Reformation: Microchannel Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing is used to extract hydrogen from conventional vehicle fuel and allow fuel cell powered vehicles to use the existing petroleum fuel infrastructure. Kilowatt scale micro-channel steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxida-tion reactors have been developed capable of achieving DOE required system performance metrics. Use of a microchannel design effectively supplies heat to the highly endothermic steam reforming reactor to maintain high conversions, controls the temperature profile for the exothermic water gas shift reactor, which optimizes the overall reaction conversion, and removes heat to prevent the unwanted hydrogen oxidation in the prefer-ential oxidation reactor. The reactors combined with micro-channel heat exchangers, when scaled to a full sized 50 kWe automotive system, will be less than 21 L in volume and 52 kg in weight.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Davis, James M.; Fischer, Christopher M.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rawlings, Gregg C.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Novacco, Lawrence J. (Brookfield, CT); Allen, Jeffrey P. (Naugatuck, CT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in buildings, or for portable power in remote locations. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a catalytic reactor based on partial oxidation reforming that is suitable for use in light-duty vehicles powered by fuel cells. The reactor has shown the ability to convert a wide variety of fuels to a hydrogen-rich gas at less than 800 C, temperatures that are several hundreds of degrees lower than alternative noncatalytic processes. The fuel may be methanol, ethanol, natural gas, or petroleum-derived fuels that are blends of various hydrocarbons such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, etc., as in gasoline. This paper will discuss the results obtained from a bench-scale (3-kWe) reactor., where the reforming of gasoline and natural gas generated a product gas that contained 38% and 42% hydrogen on a dry basis at the reformer exit, respectively.

Ahmed, S.

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Catalytic autothermal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels for fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell development has seen remarkable progress in the past decade because of an increasing need to improve energy efficiency as well as to address concerns about the environmental consequences of using fossil fuel for producing electricity and for propulsion of vehicles [1]. The lack of an infrastructure for producing and distributing H{sub 2} has led to a research effort to develop on-board fuel processing technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2} [2]. The primary focus is on reforming gasoline, because a production and distribution infrastructure for gasoline already exists to supply internal combustion engines [3]. Existing reforming technology for the production of H{sub 2} from hydrocarbon feedstocks used in large-scale manufacturing processes, such as ammonia synthesis, is cost prohibitive when scaled down to the size of the fuel processor required for transportation applications (50-80 kWe) nor is it designed to meet the varying power demands and frequent shutoffs and restarts that will be experienced during normal drive cycles. To meet the performance targets required of a fuel processor for transportation applications will require new reforming reactor technology developed to meet the volume, weight, cost, and operational characteristics for transportation applications and the development of new reforming catalysts that exhibit a higher activity and better thermal and mechanical stability than reforming catalysts currently used in the production of H{sub 2} for large-scale manufacturing processes.

Krumpelt, M.; Krause, T.; Kopasz, J.; Carter, D.; Ahmed, S.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development Task 8.3 - autothermal fuel reformer (ATR). Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autothermal fuel reforming (ATR) consists of reacting a hydrocarbon fuel such as natural gas or diesel with steam to produce a hydrogen-rich {open_quotes}reformed{close_quotes} fuel. This work has been designed to investigate the fuel reformation and the product gas combustion under gas turbine conditions. The hydrogen-rich gas has a high flammability with a wide range of combustion stability. Being lighter and more reactive than methane, the hydrogen-rich gas mixes readily with air and can be burned at low fuel/air ratios producing inherently low emissions. The reformed fuel also has a low ignition temperature which makes low temperature catalytic combustion possible. ATR can be designed for use with a variety of alternative fuels including heavy crudes, biomass and coal-derived fuels. When the steam required for fuel reforming is raised by using energy from the gas turbine exhaust, cycle efficiency is improved because of the steam and fuel chemically recuperating. Reformation of natural gas or diesel fuels to a homogeneous hydrogen-rich fuel has been demonstrated. Performance tests on screening various reforming catalysts and operating conditions were conducted on a batch-tube reactor. Producing over 70 percent of hydrogen (on a dry basis) in the product stream was obtained using natural gas as a feedstock. Hydrogen concentration is seen to increase with temperature but less rapidly above 1300{degrees}F. The percent reforming increases as the steam to carbon ratio is increased. Two basic groups of reforming catalysts, nickel - and platinum-basis, have been tested for the reforming activity.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE Prepared For: California Energy REPORT (FAR) INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE CYCLES EISG AWARDEE University://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Integral Catalytic Combustion/Fuel Reforming for Gas Turbine Cycles EISG Grant # 99

16

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA); Whelan, James A. (Bricktown, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Partial oxidation fuel reforming for automotive power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For widespread use of fuel cells to power automobiles in the near future, it is necessary to convert gasoline or other transportation fuels to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. Partial oxidation reforming is particularly suited to this application as it eliminates the need for heat exchange at high temperatures. Such reformers offer rapid start and good dynamic performance. Lowering the temperature of the partial oxidation process, which requires the development of a suitable catalyst, can increase the reforming efficiency. Catalytic partial oxidation (or autothermal) reformers and non-catalytic partial oxidation reformers developed by various organizations are presently undergoing testing and demonstration. This paper summarizes the process chemistries as well as recent test data from several different reformers operating on gasoline, methanol, and other fuels.

Ahmed, S.; Chalk, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Kumar, R.; Milliken, J.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

Edward F. Kiczek

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrocarbon Reformers for Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several new or emerging technologies are vying to compete in the distributed resources market; notably, fuel cells and microturbines. Fuel cells represent an idealized power generation technology with tremendous long-term promise. As a hydrogen-fueled system, however, fuel cells need either a hydrogen fuel supply infrastructure or fuel processing (reforming and clean-up) technology to convert conventional fossil fuels to a hydrogen-rich energy source. This report provides an overview of fuel processing t...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Chemical simulation of hydrogen generation in a plasma fuel reformer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for a plasma fuel reformer or plasmatron has been developed. The model was based in a series of experiments realized at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center with such a plasmatron. The device is set up to produce ...

Margarit Bel, Nuria, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorne Woods, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Methanol reformers for fuel cell powered vehicles: Some design considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for use in automotive propulsion systems as alternatives for the internal combustion engine in buses, vans, passenger cars. The two most important operational requirements for a stand-alone fuel cell power system for a vehicle are the ability to start up quickly and the ability to supply the necessary power on demand for the dynamically fluctuating load. Methanol is a likely fuel for use in fuel cells for transportation applications. It is a commodity chemical that is manufactured from coal, natural gas, and other feedstocks. For use in a fuel cell, however, the methanol must first be converted (reformed) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The desired features for a methanol reformer include rapid start-up, good dynamic response, high fuel conversion, small size and weight, simple construction and operation, and low cost. In this paper the present the design considerations that are important for developing such a reformer, namely: (1) a small catalyst bed for quick starting, small size, and low weight; (2) multiple catalysts for optimum operation of the dissociation and reforming reactions; (3) reforming by direct heat transfer partial oxidation for rapid response to fluctuating loads; and (4) thermal independence from the rest of the fuel cell system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Steam Reforming and Autothermal Reforming for Fuel Cell Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the increasing demand for fuel cell applications in transportation, the performance of reformers using gasoline or diesel as the fuel needs to be optimized.… (more)

Shi, Liming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reformate fuel cell system durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to identify the factors limiting the durability of fuel cells and fuel processors. This includes identifying PEM fuel cell durability issues for operating on pure hydrogen, and those that arise from the fuel processing of liquid hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline) as a function of fuel composition and impurity content. Benchmark comparisons with the durability of fuel cells operating on pure hydrogen are used to identify limiting factors unique to fuel processing. We describe the design, operation and operational results of the durability system, including the operating conditions for the system, fuel processor sub-section operation over 1000 hours, post-mortem characterization of the catalysts in the fuel processor, and single cell operation.

Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Uribe, F. A. (Francisco A.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

The low-temperature partial oxidation reforming of fuels for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne`s partial-oxidation reformer (APOR) is a compact, lightweight, rapid-start, and dynamically responsive device to convert liquid fuels to H{sub 2} for use in automotive fuel cells. An APOR catalyst for methanol has been developed and tested; catalysts for other fuels are being evaluated. Simple in design, operation, and control, the APOR can help develop efficient fuel cell propulsion systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Zhang, Gong (Murrysville, PA)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Performance of Sulfur Tolerant Reforming Catalysts for Production of Hydrogen from Jet Fuel Simulants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReceiVed August 2, 2007 The development of robust desulfurizers and new reforming catalysts for fuel cells: the desulfurization of jet fuel and the development of sulfur-tolerant reforming catalysts/C) ratios. The water gas shift reaction is then used to convert additional CO into CO2. Nickel has been

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

33

SMALL SCALE FUEL CELL AND REFORMER SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New developments in fuel cell technologies offer the promise of clean, reliable affordable power, resulting in reduced environmental impacts and reduced dependence on foreign oil. These developments are of particular interest to the people of Alaska, where many residents live in remote villages, with no roads or electrical grids and a very high cost of energy, where small residential power systems could replace diesel generators. Fuel cells require hydrogen for efficient electrical production, however. Hydrogen purchased through conventional compressed gas suppliers is very expensive and not a viable option for use in remote villages, so hydrogen production is a critical piece of making fuel cells work in these areas. While some have proposed generating hydrogen from renewable resources such as wind, this does not appear to be an economically viable alternative at this time. Hydrogen can also be produced from hydrocarbon feed stocks, in a process known as reforming. This program is interested in testing and evaluating currently available reformers using transportable fuels: methanol, propane, gasoline, and diesel fuels. Of these, diesel fuels are of most interest, since the existing energy infrastructure of rural Alaska is based primarily on diesel fuels, but this is also the most difficult fuel to reform, due to the propensity for coke formation, due to both the high vaporization temperature and to the high sulfur content in these fuels. There are several competing fuel cell technologies being developed in industry today. Prior work at UAF focused on the use of PEM fuel cells and diesel reformers, with significant barriers identified to their use for power in remote areas, including stack lifetime, system efficiency, and cost. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have demonstrated better stack lifetime and efficiency in demonstrations elsewhere (though cost still remains an issue), and procuring a system for testing was pursued. The primary function of UAF in the fuel cell industry is in the role of third party independent testing. In order for tests to be conducted, hardware must be purchased and delivered. The fuel cell industry is still in a pre-commercial state, however. Commercial products are defined as having a fixed set of specifications, fixed price, fixed delivery date, and a warrantee. Negotiations with fuel cell companies over these issues are often complex, and the results of these discussions often reveal much about the state of development of the technology. This work includes some of the results of these procurement experiments. Fuel cells may one day replace heat engines as the source of electrical power in remote areas. However, the results of this program to date indicate that currently available hardware is not developed sufficiently for these environments, and that significant time and resources will need to be committed for this to occur.

Dennis Witmer

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Diesel Reforming for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the development of a diesel reforming catalyst and catalytic system development.

Liu, D-J.; Sheen, S-H.; Krumpelt, M.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel reforming for fuel cell application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xviii, 119 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CENG 2006 Hung Fossil fuels, such as natural gas, petroleum, and coal are… (more)

Hung, Tak Cheong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

[98e]-Catalytic reforming of gasoline and diesel fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a fuel processor for converting liquid hydrocarbon fuels to a hydrogen-rich product suitable for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack. The processor uses an autothermal reformer to convert the feed to a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water with trace quantities of other components. The carbon monoxide in the product gas is then converted to carbon dioxide in water-gas shift and preferential oxidation reactors. Fuels that have been tested include standard and low-sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Iso-octane and n-hexadecane were also examined as surrogates for gasoline and diesel, respectively. Complete conversion of gasoline was achieved at 750 C in a microreactor over a novel catalyst developed at Argonne. Diesel fuel was completely converted at 850 C over this same catalyst. Product streams contained greater than 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis with iso-octane, gasoline, and n-hexadecane. For a diesel fuel, product streams contained >50% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis. The catalyst activity did not significantly decrease over >16 hours operation with the diesel fuel feed. Coke formation was not observed. The carbon monoxide fraction of the product gas could be reduced to as low as 1% on a dry, nitrogen-free basis when the water-gas shift reactors were used in tandem with the reformer.

Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Diesel Reforming for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This objective of this project was to develop technology suitable for onboard reforming of diesel. The approach was to examine catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming.

Borup, R.; Parkinson, W. J.; Inbody, M.; Brosha, E.L.; Guidry, D.R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

40

REFORMING PROCESSES FOR MICRO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM BASED ON SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy balance, different types of fuel reforming including steam reforming, autothermal reforming technologies. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming are the three major fuel of an activated carbon bed. Prior to enter the SOFC stack, the fuel is pre-reformed (methane is partially

Liso, Vincenzo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar Reforming of Carbon Dioxide to Produce Diesel Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the demonstration of an innovative technology, referred to as the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer, which utilizes waste CO2 as a feedstock for the efficient and economical production of synthetic diesel fuel using solar thermal energy as the primary energy input. The Sunexus technology employs a two stage process for the conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel. A solar reforming system, including a specially designed reactor and proprietary CO2 reforming catalyst, was developed and used to convert captured CO2 rich gas streams into syngas (primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide) using concentrated solar energy at high conversion efficiencies. The second stage of the system (which has been demonstrated under other funding) involves the direct conversion of the syngas into synthetic diesel fuel using a proprietary catalyst (Terra) previously developed and validated by Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals (PRFC). The overall system energy efficiency for conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel is 74%, due to the use of solar energy. The results herein describe modeling, design, construction, and testing of the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer. Extensive parametric testing of the solar reformer and candidate catalysts was conducted and chemical kinetic models were developed. Laboratory testing of the Solar Reformer was successfully completed using various gas mixtures, temperatures, and gas flow rates/space velocities to establish performance metrics which can be employed for the design of commercial plants. A variety of laboratory tests were conducted including dry reforming (CO2 and CH{sub 4}), combination dry/steam reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4} & H{sub 2}O), and tri-reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}O & O{sub 2}). CH{sub 4} and CO2 conversions averaged 95-100% and 50-90% per reformer cycle, respectively, depending upon the temperatures and gas space velocities. No formation of carbon deposits (coking) on the catalyst was observed in any of these tests. A 16 ft. diameter, concentrating solar dish was modified to accommodate the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer and the integrated system was installed at the Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals test site at McClellan, CA. Several test runs were conducted without catalyst during which the ceramic heat exchanger in the Sunexus Solar Reformer reached temperatures between 1,050 F (566 C) and 2,200 F (1,204 C) during the test period. A dry reforming mixture of CO2/CH{sub 4} (2.0/1.0 molar ratio) was chosen for all of the tests on the integrated solar dish/catalytic reformer during December 2010. Initial tests were carried out to determine heat transfer from the collimated solar beam to the catalytic reactor. The catalyst was operated successfully at a steady-state temperature of 1,125 F (607 C), which was sufficient to convert 35% of the 2/1 CO2/CH{sub 4} mixture to syngas. This conversion efficiency confirmed the results from laboratory testing of this catalyst which provided comparable syngas production efficiencies (40% at 1,200 F [650 C]) with a resulting syngas composition of 20% CO, 16% H{sub 2}, 39% CO2 and 25% CH{sub 4}. As based upon the laboratory results, it is predicted that 90% of the CO2 will be converted to syngas in the solar reformer at 1,440 F (782 C) resulting in a syngas composition of 50% CO: 43% H{sub 2}: 7% CO2: 0% CH{sub 4}. Laboratory tests show that the higher catalyst operating temperature of 1,440 F (782 C) for efficient conversion of CO2 can certainly be achieved by optimizing solar reactor heat transfer, which would result in the projected 90% CO2-to-syngas conversion efficiencies. Further testing will be carried out during 2011, through other funding support, to further optimize the solar dish CO2 reformer. Additional studies carried out in support of this project and described in this report include: (1) An Assessment of Potential Contaminants in Captured CO2 from Various Industrial Processes and Their Possible Effect on Sunexus CO2 Reforming Catalysts; (2) Recommended Measurement Methods for Assessing Contaminant Levels in Captured CO2 Streams; (3) An Asse

Dennis Schuetzle; Robert Schuetzle

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fuel cell system with combustor-heated reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode effluent and/or fuel from a liquid fuel supply providing fuel for the fuel cell. The combustor includes a vaporizer section heated by the combustor exhaust gases for vaporizing the fuel before feeding it into the combustor. Cathode effluent is used as the principle oxidant for the combustor.

Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of Steam Reforming for the Solidification of the Cesium and Stronitum Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Steam reforming is one option currently being investigated for stabilization of the cesium/strontium strip products from spent fuel reprocessing solvent extraction processes because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. To produce pollucite and other mineral analogs of the alkaline metals, the feeds must be mixed with aluminosilicate compounds and thermally sintered or calcined to activate solid-state crystal formation. Scoping tests completed indicated that the cesium/strontium in these organic and acid solutions can be converted into aluminosilicate materials using steam reforming.

Julia L. Tripp; T. Garn; R. Boardman; J. Law

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

Misage, Robert (Manchester, CT); Scheffler, Glenn W. (Tolland, CT); Setzer, Herbert J. (Ellington, CT); Margiott, Paul R. (Manchester, CT); Parenti, Jr., Edmund K. (Manchester, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Distributed Ethanol Reforming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Hydrogen from Bio-Derived Liquids Bio-derived liquid fuels can be produced from renewable agricultural products, such as wood chips. Background Bio-derived renewable fuels are attractive for their high energy density and ease of transport. One scenario for a sustainable hydrogen economy considers that these bio-derived liquid fuels will be produced at plants close to the biomass resource, and then transported to distributed hydrogen production centers (e.g., hydrogen refueling stations), where the fuels will be reformed via the steam reforming process, similar to the current centralized production of hydrogen by the steam reforming of natural gas. Hydrogen produced by reforming these fuels must first be purified and compressed to appropriate storage and dispensing pressures. Compressing

46

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Mars, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration.

Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

50

ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND ON-CELL REFORMATION MODELING FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL STACKS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Providing adequate and efficient cooling schemes for solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) stacks continues to be a challenge coincident with the development of larger, more powerful stacks. The endothermic steam-methane reformation reaction can provide cooling and improved system efficiency when performed directly on the electrochemically active anode. Rapid kinetics of the endothermic reaction typically causes a localized temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet. It is desirable to extend the endothermic effect over more of the cell area and mitigate the associated differences in temperature on the cell to alleviate subsequent thermal stresses. In this study, modeling tools validated for the prediction of fuel use, on-cell methane reforming, and the distribution of temperature within SOFC stacks, are employed to provide direction for modifying the catalytic activity of anode materials to control the methane conversion rate. Improvements in thermal management that can be achieved through on-cell reforming is predicted and discussed. Two operating scenarios are considered: one in which the methane fuel is fully pre-reformed, and another in which a substantial percentage of the methane is reformed on-cell. For the latter, a range of catalytic activity is considered and the predicted thermal effects on the cell are presented. Simulations of the cell electrochemical and thermal performance with and without on-cell reforming, including structural analyses, show a substantial decrease in thermal stresses for an on-cell reforming case with slowed methane conversion.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Korolev, Alexander; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Catalytic reforming of liquid fuels: Deactivation of catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of logistic fuels (e.g., diesel) to provide hydrogen-rich gas for various fuel cells is inevitably accompanied by deactivation. This deactivation can be caused by various mechanisms, such as carbon deposition, sintering, and sulfur poisoning. In general, these mechanisms are, not independent—e.g., carbon deposition may affect sulfur poisoning. However, they are typically studied in separate experiments, with relatively little work reported on their interaction at conditions typical of liquid fuel reforming. Recent work at the U.S. Dept. of Energy/NETL and Louisiana State University has shown progress in understanding the interaction of these deactivation processes, and catalysts designed to minimize them.

Spivey, J.J.; Haynes, D.J.; Berry, D.A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Gardner, T.H.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

OXIDATION OF FUELS IN THE COOL FLAME REGIME FOR COMBUSTION AND REFORMING FOR FUEL CELLS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

THE REVIEW INTEGRATES RECENT INVESTIGATIONS ON AUTO OXIDATION OF FUEL OILS AND THEIR REFORMING INTO HYDROGEN RICH GAS THAT COULD SERVE AS A FEED FOR FUEL CELLS AND COMBUSTION SYSTEMS.

NAIDJA,A.; KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.; MAHAJAN,D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermally efficient melting and fuel reforming for glass making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated process is described for utilizing waste heat from a glass making furnace. The hot off-gas from the furnace is initially partially cooled, then fed to a reformer. In the reformer, the partially cooled off-gas is further cooled against a hydrocarbon which is thus reformed into a synthesis gas, which is then fed into the glass making furnace as a fuel. The further cooled off-gas is then recycled back to absorb the heat from the hot off-gas to perform the initial cooling. 2 figures.

Chen, M.S.; Painter, C.F.; Pastore, S.P.; Roth, G.S.; Winchester, D.C.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a portion of the work performed Multi-fuel Reformers for Fuel Cells Used in Transportation. One objective for development is to develop advanced fuel processing systems to reform methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and other hydrocarbons into hydrogen for use in transportation fuel cell systems, while a second objective is to develop better systems for on-board hydrogen storage. This report examines techniques and technology available for storage of pure hydrogen on board a vehicle as pure hydrogen of hydrides. The report focuses separately on near- and far-term technologies, with particular emphasis on the former. Development of lighter, more compact near-term storage systems is recommended to enhance competitiveness and simplify fuel cell design. The far-term storage technologies require substantial applied research in order to become serious contenders.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

Ma, Zhiwen (Sandy Hook, CT); Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan (New Milford, CT); Novacco, Lawrence J. (Brookfield, CT)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Pyrochem Catalysts for Diesel Fuel Reforming - Energy ...  

Summary. Converting heavy hydrocarbons, such as diesel and coal-based fuels, into hydrogen-rich synthesis gas is a necessary step for fuel cells and ...

57

Tailored Macroporous SiCN and SiC Structures for High-Temperature Fuel Reforming**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in a microreformer is an attractive approach to supply hydrogen to fuel

Kenis, Paul J. A.

58

Dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical models were developed for the dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications. Focus is on heat transfer effects likely to limit rapid response of PEFC systems. Depending on the thermal mass, the heat exchangers and steam reformer can have time constants on the order of several seconds to many minutes. On the other hand, the characteristic time constants associated with pressure/density disturbances arising from flow rate fluctuations are on the order of milliseconds. In vehicular applications, the response time of the turbomachinery, which is determined by rotational inertia, can be on the order of seconds or less. Dynamic reformer model was used to examine methanol conversion efficiency and thermal performance during a cold start. Response times are determined to achieve 50-100% of the steady-state methanol conversion for two catalyst tube diameters. Thermal performance is considered in terms of the approach to steady-state temperature, possibility of catalyst overheating, and penalty in system efficiency incurred during startup time. For the complete reference PEFC system, various turn-down scenarios were simulated by varying the relative rates of change of fuel cell loading and system flows. Depending on relative rates of cell loading changes to flow rate changes, overheating of the catalyst can occur due to excess heat transfer in the reformer preheater; this can be controlled by an additional water quench between catalyst bed and preheater, but only if the flow rate change is sufficiently fast relative to load changes.

Geyer, H.K.; Ahluwalia, R.K.; Kumar, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV); Shekhawat, Dushyant (Morgantown, WV); Haynes, Daniel (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Mark (Morgantown, WV); Spivey, James J. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV); Shekhawat, Dushyant (Morgantown, WV); Haynes, Daniel (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Mark (Morgantown, WV); Spivey, James J. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Testing of a Catalytic Partial Oxidation Diesel Reformer with a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rural Alaska currently uses diesel generator sets to produce much of its power. The high energy content of diesel (i.e. ~140,000 BTU per gallon) makes it the fuel of choice because this reduces the volume of fuel that must be transported, stored, and consumed in generating the power. There is an existing investment in infrastructure for the distribution and use of diesel fuel. Problems do exist, however, in that diesel generators are not very efficient in their use of diesel, maintenance levels can be rather high as systems age, and the environmental issues related to present diesel generators are of concern. The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory at the University of Alaska -- Fairbanks is sponsoring a project to address the issues mentioned above. The project takes two successful systems, a diesel reformer and a tubular solid oxide fuel cell unit, and jointly tests those systems with the objective of producing a for-purpose diesel fueled solid oxide fuel cell system that can be deployed in rural Alaska. The reformer will convert the diesel to a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used as a fuel by the fuel cell. The high temperature nature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is capable of using this mixture to generate electricity and provide usable heat with higher efficiency and lower emissions. The high temperature nature of the SOFC is more compatible with the arctic climate than are low temperature technologies such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This paper will look at the interaction of a SOFC system that is designed to internally reform methane and a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer. The diesel reformer produces a reformate that is approximately 140 BTU per scf (after removal of much of the reformate water) as compared to a methane based reformate that is over twice that value in BTU content. The project also considers the effect of altitude since the test location will be at 4800 feet with the consequential drop in oxygen content and necessary increases in flow rates.

Lyman Frost; Bob Carrington; Rodger McKain; Dennis Witmer

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Electricity reform in developing and transition countries: A reappraisal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity reform in developing and transition countries: A reappraisal J.H. Williams, R. Ghanadan-oriented reforms in their electric power sectors. Despite the widespread adoption of a standard policy model features of non-OECD electricity reform and reappraises reform policies and underlying assumptions

Kammen, Daniel M.

64

Electricity Reform in Chile: Lessons for Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% for the country as a whole, but 58% in the central system)7 but as demand increases fossil fuels have become more important (in this it is comparable to Columbia and the south west of Brazil). However Chile is perhaps unusual among developing countries because... of the strength of protection for private property and the stability engendered by the long period of economically disciplined military rule. 2. Chile’s Electricity Reform In 1974 Chile’s electricity utilities were in a mess.8 Inflation, high fuel prices...

Pollitt, Michael G.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the ninth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2005-December 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) reformate purification, (2) heat transfer enhancement, (3) autothermal reforming coal-derived methanol degradation test; and (4) model development for fuel cell system integration. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on biodiesel with a partial oxidation reformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development (NETL/ORD) has successfully demonstrated the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using reformed biodiesel. The biodiesel for the project was produced and characterized by West Virginia State University (WVSU). This project had two main aspects: 1) demonstrate a catalyst formulation on monolith for biodiesel fuel reforming; and 2) establish SOFC stack test stand capabilities. Both aspects have been completed successfully. For the first aspect, in–house patented catalyst specifications were developed, fabricated and tested. Parametric reforming studies of biofuels provided data on fuel composition, catalyst degradation, syngas composition, and operating parameters required for successful reforming and integration with the SOFC test stand. For the second aspect, a stack test fixture (STF) for standardized testing, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the Solid Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program, was engineered and constructed at NETL. To facilitate the demonstration of the STF, NETL employed H.C. Starck Ceramics GmbH & Co. (Germany) anode supported solid oxide cells. In addition, anode supported cells, SS441 end plates, and cell frames were transferred from PNNL to NETL. The stack assembly and conditioning procedures, including stack welding and sealing, contact paste application, binder burn-out, seal-setting, hot standby, and other stack assembly and conditioning methods were transferred to NETL. In the future, fuel cell stacks provided by SECA or other developers could be tested at the STF to validate SOFC performance on various fuels. The STF operated on hydrogen for over 1000 hrs before switching over to reformed biodiesel for 100 hrs of operation. Combining these first two aspects led to demonstrating the biodiesel syngas in the STF. A reformer was built and used to convert 0.5 ml/min of biodiesel into mostly hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas.) The syngas was fed to the STF and fuel cell stack. The results presented in this experimental report document one of the first times a SOFC has been operated on syngas from reformed biodiesel.

Siefert, N, Shekhawat, D.; Gemmen, R.; Berry, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electricity reform in Chile : lessons for developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chile was the first country in the world to implement a comprehensive reform of its electricity sector in the recent period. Among developing countries only Argentina has had a comparably comprehensive and successful reform. ...

Pollitt, Michael G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Internal natural gas reformer-dividers for a solid oxide fuel cell generator configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a fuel cell generator configuration. It comprises electrically connected, axially elongated, fuel cells, each cell having an outer and inner electrode with solid oxide electrolyte therebetween; where elongated dividers separate and are positioned between fuel cells, and where at least one of the elongated dividers is hollow, the hollow divider having solid elongated walls, a reformable fuel mixture entrance, and an exit allowing passage of reformed fuel to the fuel cells, and where the cross-section of the divider contains a catalytic reforming material.

Reichner, P.

1992-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Methanol Steam Reforming Micro Reactor for Proton Exchange Membrane Micro Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat, mass and momentum transfer from a fuel reforming packed bed to a surrounding silicon wafer has been simulated. Modeling showed quantitatively reasonable agreement with experimental data for fuel conversion efficiency, hydrogen production rate, outlet methanol mole fraction and outlet steam mole fraction. The variation in fuel conversion efficiency with the micro reformer thermal isolation can be used to optimize fuel-processing conditions for micro PEM fuel cells.

Park, H G; Piggott, W T; Chung, J; Morse, J D; Havstad, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Benett, W; Sopchak, D; Upadhye, R

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro combined heat and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid recirculation are used along with steam methane reforming. Further Steam Methane Reforming process produces Cell fueled by natural gas with two different types of pre-reforming systems, namely Steam Reforming

Liso, Vincenzo

74

Fuel-flexible partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbons for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-reactor tests indicate that our partial oxidation catalyst is fuel-flexible and can reform conventional (gasoline and diesel) and alternative (ethanol, methanol, natural gas) fuels to hydrogen rich product gases with high hydrogen selectivity. Alcohols are reformed at lower temperatures (< 600 C) while alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons require slightly higher temperatures. Cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics have also been reformed at relatively low temperatures, however, a different mechanism appears to be responsible for their reforming. Complex fuels like gasoline and diesel, which are mixtures of a broad range of hydrocarbons, require temperatures of > 700 C for maximum hydrogen production.

Ahmed, S.; Carter, J. D.; Kopasz, J. P.; Krumpelt, M.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Efficiency of a hybrid-type plasma-assisted fuel reformation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major advantages of a new plasma-assisted fuel reformation system are its cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. Applied Plasma Technologies has proposed its new highly efficient hybrid-type plasma-assisted system for organic fuel combustion and gasification. The system operates as a multimode multipurpose reactor in a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turndown ratios. This system also has convenient and simultaneous feeding of several reagents in the reaction zone such as liquid fuels, coal, steam, and air. A special methodology has been developed for such a system in terms of heat balance evaluation and optimization. This methodology considers all existing and possible energy streams, which could influence the system's efficiency. The developed hybrid-type plasma system could be suitable for combustion applications, mobile and autonomous small- to mid-size liquid fuel and coal gasification modules, hydrogen-rich gas generators, waste-processing facilities, and plasma chemical reactors.

Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I.; Lux, S.M. [Applied Plasma Technologies, Mclean, VA (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTENERGY/Resources/Energy19.pdf References: Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries [1] Summary "This paper complements the World Bank's Operational Guidance Note by compiling lessons of this experience that help in applying the Note's guidance. These lessons are taken from the rapidly growing literature on power market reform in developing countries. They cover the range of issues

77

Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

University of Utah's project entitled 'Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer' (DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation released by the U.S. Department of Energy in December 2001, requesting proposals for projects targeted towards black liquor/biomass gasification technology support research and development. Specifically, the solicitation was seeking projects that would provide technical support for Department of Energy supported black liquor and biomass gasification demonstration projects under development at the time.

Kevin Whitty

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based fuel processor, method for improving catalyst function in autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a fuel processor comprising a linear flow structure having an upstream portion and a downstream portion; a first catalyst supported at the upstream portion; and a second catalyst supported at the downstream portion, wherein the first catalyst is in fluid communication with the second catalyst. Also provided is a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

79

Novel Catalytic Fuel Reforming Using Micro-Technology with Advanced Separations Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the combustion of membrane raffinate for the production of clean hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas primary fuel sources from existing production and distribution networks ­ i.e. natural gas, gasoline gas -- optimize catalyst composition and evaluate reforming conditions. · Hydrogen purification using

80

Gas-to-liquids synthetic fuels for use in fuel cells : reformability, energy density, and infrastructure compatibility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel cell has many potential applications, from power sources for electric hybrid vehicles to small power plants for commercial buildings. The choice of fuel will be critical to the pace of its commercialization. This paper reviews the various liquid fuels being considered as an alternative to direct hydrogen gas for the fuel cell application, presents calculations of the hydrogen and carbon dioxide yields from autothermal reforming of candidate liquid fuels, and reports the product gas composition measured from the autothermal reforming of a synthetic fuel in a micro-reactor. The hydrogen yield for a synthetic paraffin fuel produced by a cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch process was found to be similar to that of retail gasoline. The advantages of the synthetic fuel are that it contains no contaminants that would poison the fuel cell catalyst, is relatively benign to the environment, and could be transported in the existing fuel distribution system.

Ahmed, S.; Kopasz, J. P.; Russell, B. J.; Tomlinson, H. L.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electricity Reform in Chile. Lessons for Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chile was the first country in the world to implement a comprehensive reform of its electricity sector in the recent period. Among developing countries only Argentina has had a comparably comprehensive and successful reform. This paper traces the history of the Chilean reform, which began in 1982, and assesses its progress and its lessons. We conclude that the reform has been very successful. We suggest lessons for the generation, transmission and distribution sectors, as well as the economic regulation of electricity and the general institutional environment favourable to reform. We note that while the initial market structure and regulatory arrangements did give rise to certain problems, the overall experience argues strongly for the private ownership and operation of the electricity industry.

Michael Pollitt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling of Pressurized Electrochemistry and Steam-Methane Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and the Effects on Thermal and Electrical Stack Performance  

SciTech Connect

Summarizes work done to extend the electrochemical performance and methane reforming submodels to include the effects of pressurization and to demonstrate this new modeling capability by simulating large stacks operating on methane-rich fuel under pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. Pressurized operation boosts electrochemical performance, alters the kinetics of methane reforming, and effects the equilibrium composition of methane fuels. This work developed constitutive submodels that couple the electrochemistry, reforming, and pressurization to yield an increased capability of the modeling tool for prediction of SOFC stack performance.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. GTI has been developing high-efficiency steam methane reformers and fuel processing technology looks to introduce innovative, compact natural gas steam reforming system and appliance quality hydrogen system integration for efficient operation of the unit. High- Efficiency Natural Gas Steam Reformer

85

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the tenth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2006. This quarter saw progress in six areas. These areas are: (1) The effect of catalyst dimension on steam reforming, (2) Transient characteristics of autothermal reforming, (3) Rich and lean autothermal reformation startup, (4) Autothermal reformation degradation with coal derived methanol, (5) Reformate purification system, and (6) Fuel cell system integration. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBONS IN A NOVEL HYDROGEN-SELECTIVE MEMBRANE-BASED FUEL PROCESSOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose to develop an inorganic metal-metal composite membrane to study reforming of liquid hydrocarbons and methanol by equilibrium shift in membrane-reactor configuration, viewed as fuel processor. Based on our current understanding and experience in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane, we propose to further develop this membrane to a Pd and Pd-Ag alloy membrane on microporous stainless steel support to provide structural reliability from distortion due to thermal cycling. Because of the metal-metal composite structure, we believe that the associated end-seal problem in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane in tubular configuration would not be an issue at all. We plan to test this membrane as membrane-reactor-separator for reforming liquid hydrocarbons and methanol for simultaneous production and separation of high-purity hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications. To improve the robustness of the membrane film and deep penetration into the pores, we have used osmotic pressure field in the electroless plating process. Using this novel method, we deposited thin Pd-film on the inside of microporous stainless steel tube and the deposited film appears to robust and defect free. Work is in progress to evaluate the hydrogen perm-selectivity of the Pd-stainless steel membrane.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the eighth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005 and includes an entire review of the progress for year 2 of the project. This year saw progress in eight areas. These areas are: (1) steam reformer transient response, (2) steam reformer catalyst degradation, (3) steam reformer degradation tests using bluff bodies, (4) optimization of bluff bodies for steam reformation, (5) heat transfer enhancement, (6) autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (7) autothermal catalyst degradation, and (8) autothermal reformation with bluff bodies. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

92

Development of a Natural Gas-to-Hydrogen Fueling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Losses Steam Methane Reformer/Fuel Processor CH4 + 2 H20 4H2 + CO2 #12;8 Some Keys to Success 99 fuel processing using efficient steam methane reforming process Advanced oil-free high- pressure with gasoline on a $/vehicle mile basis > Challenges ­ Flexible fuel reformers & systems ­ Fuel purity ­ Long

93

INVESTIGATION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY AND BED PERFORMANCE IN A FLUIDIZED BED BLACK LIQUOR STEAM REFORMER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Utah project ''Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer'' (DOE award number DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation for projects to provide technical support for black liquor and biomass gasification. The primary focus of the project is to provide support for a DOE-sponsored demonstration of MTCI's black liquor steam reforming technology at Georgia-Pacific's paper mill in Big Island, Virginia. A more overarching goal is to improve the understanding of phenomena that take place during low temperature black liquor gasification. This is achieved through five complementary technical tasks: (1) construction of a fluidized bed black liquor gasification test system, (2) investigation of bed performance, (3) evaluation of product gas quality, (4) black liquor conversion analysis and modeling and (5) computational modeling of the Big Island gasifier. Four experimental devices have been constructed under this project. The largest facility, which is the heart of the experimental effort, is a pressurized fluidized bed gasification test system. The system is designed to be able to reproduce conditions near the black liquor injectors in the Big Island steam reformer, so the behavior of black liquor pyrolysis and char gasification can be quantified in a representative environment. The gasification test system comprises five subsystems: steam generation and superheating, black liquor feed, fluidized bed reactor, afterburner for syngas combustion and a flue gas cooler/condenser. The three-story system is located at University of Utah's Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility, and all resources there are available to support the research.

Kevin Whitty

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Stefan Czernik (Primary Contact), Richard French, Michael Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 384-6135 Email: Stefan.Czernik@nrel.gov DOE Manager Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-1623 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Project Start Date: October 1, 2004 Project End Date: September 30, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives By 2012, develop and demonstrate distributed reforming * technology for producing hydrogen from bio-oil at $4.10/ kilogram (kg) purified hydrogen. Demonstrate integrated performance at bench scale * including bio-oil vaporization, partial-oxidation (POX)

95

Multifuel reformer R D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The on-board fuel for fuel cell powered vehicles may be one or more of hydrogen, methanol, ethanol, natural gas, propane, or other liquified petroleum gases. To use hydrogen as the fuel, suitable means of storing, and subsequently delivering, adequate quantities of the gas must be developed. For all other fuels suitable reformers must be developed to convert the fuel to hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas mixture at rates corresponding to the varying power demand rates of the automotive system; this is especially true for the lower temperature fuel cells, such as the polymer electrolyte fuel cell which operates at 80{degrees}C and the phosphoric acid fuel cell which operates at 190{degrees}C. This paper discusses the key design and performance characteristics of such hydrogen storage and fuel reformer systems for use in stand-alone fuel cell automotive applications.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

97

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

99

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Research and Development Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

102

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives

104

Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of Ni-based Sulfur Resistant Catalyst for Diesel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order for diesel fuel to be used in a solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit, the diesel fuel must be reformed into hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. One of the major problems facing catalytic reforming is that the level of sulfur found in low sulfur diesel can poison most catalysts. This report shows that a proprietary low cost Ni-based reforming catalyst can be used to reform a 7 and 50 ppm sulfur containing diesel fuel for over 500 hours of operation. Coking, which appears to be route of catalyst deactivation due to metal stripping, can be controlled by catalyst modifications, introduction of turbulence, and/or by application of an electromagnetic field with a frequency from {approx}50 kHz to 13.56 MHz with field strength greater than about 100 V/cm and more preferably greater about 500 V/cm.

Gunther Dieckmann

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most and promote H2O and CO2 production. Keywords: Plasma reformer, syngas, diesel fuel reforming, NOx trap. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

107

Investigation of carbon-formation mechanisms and fuel-conversion rates in the adiabatic reformer. Annual report, March 19, 1980-March 19, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell power plants may be required to use coal derived liquid fuels or heavy petroleum distillates as fuels. Among the fuel processor candidates, the adiabatic reformer is at the most advanced state of development. The objective of the present program is to establish a reactor model for the adiabatic reformer which will predict process stream compositions and include carbon formation processes. Four subordinate tasks were proposed to achieve the objective. These are: 1) to determine on selected catalysts rate expressions for catalytic reactions occurring in the entrance section of the adiabatic reformer; 2) to determine with microbalance experiments critical conditions for carbon formation on selected catalysts; 3) to establish a reactor model to predict process stream compositions in the adiabatic reformer using data from Task 1 for catalytic reactions and data from the literature for homogeneous gas phase reactions; and 4) to establish a model to predict carbon formation by combination of the model for process stream composition from Task 3 and data for carbon formation from Task 2. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

DEVELOPMENT OF A CATALYST/SORBENT FOR METHANE REFORMING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has led to the initial development of a very promising material that has the potential to greatly simplify hydrocarbon reforming for the production of hydrogen and to improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. This material, which was derived from an advanced calcium-based sorbent, was composed of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consisted of a CaO core and an alumina-based shell. By incorporating a nickel catalyst in the shell, a combined catalyst and sorbent was prepared to facilitate the reaction of hydrocarbons with steam. It was shown that this material not only catalyzes the reactions of methane and propane with steam, it also absorbs CO{sub 2} simultaneously, and thereby separates the principal reaction products, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the absorption of CO{sub 2} permits the water gas shift reaction to proceed much further towards completion at temperatures where otherwise it would be limited severely by thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, an additional water gas shift reaction step would not be required to achieve low concentrations of CO. In a laboratory test of methane reforming at 600 C and 1 atm it was possible to produce a gaseous product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} (dry basis) while also achieving a H{sub 2} yield of 95%. Methane reforming under these conditions without CO{sub 2} absorption provided a H{sub 2} concentration of 75 mole% and yield of 82%. Similar results were achieved in a test of propane reforming at 560 C and 1 atm which produced a product containing 96 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was being absorbed but which contained only 69 mole% H{sub 2} while CO{sub 2} was not being absorbed. These results were achieved with an improved catalyst support that was developed by replacing a portion of the {alpha}-alumina in the original shell material with {gamma}-alumina having a much greater surface area. This replacement had the unfortunate consequence of reducing the overall compressive strength of the core-in-shell pellets. Therefore, a preliminary study of the factors that control the surface area and compressive strength of the shell material was conducted. The important factors were identified as the relative concentrations and particle size distributions of the {alpha}-alumina, {gamma}-alumina, and limestone particles plus the calcination temperature and time used for sintering the shell material. An optimization of these factors in the future could lead to the development of a material that has both the necessary mechanical strength and catalytic activity.

B.H. Shanks; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus A. Satrio; Timothy Diehl; Brigitte Vollmer

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Integrated fuel processor development challenges.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the absence of a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, the success of the fuel cell system in the market will depend on fuel processors to enable the use of available fuels, such as gasoline, natural gas, etc. The fuel processor includes several catalytic reactors, scrubbers to remove chemical species that can poison downstream catalysts or the fuel cell electrocatalyst, and heat exchangers. Most fuel cell power applications seek compact, lightweight hardware with rapid-start and load- following capabilities. Although packaging can partially address the size and volume, balancing the performance parameters while maintaining the fuel conversion (to hydrogen) efficiency requires careful integration of the unit operations and processes. Argonne National Laboratory has developed integrated fuel processors that are compact and light, and that operate efficiently. This paper discusses some of the difficulties encountered in the development process, focusing on the factors/components that constrain performance, and areas that need further research and development.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, Lee, S. H. D.; Kaun, T.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Standard Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Standard Development The state of Hawaii is responsible for facilitating the development of

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Economic Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Economic Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Economic Development To stimulate local economic development, landowners may apply to amend the

112

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

HTR Fuel Development in Europe  

SciTech Connect

In the frame of the European Network HTR-TN and in the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) European programmes have been launched to consolidate advanced modular HTR technology in Europe. This paper gives an overall description and first results of this programme. The major tasks covered concern a complete recovery of the past experience on fuel irradiation behaviour in Europe, qualification of HTR fuel by irradiating of fuel elements in the HFR reactor, understanding of fuel behaviour with the development of a fuel particle code and finally a recover of the fuel fabrication capability. (authors)

Languille, Alain [CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance BP1 (France); Conrad, R. [CEC/JRC/IE Petten (Netherlands); Guillermier, P. [Framatome-ANP/ Lyon (France); Nabielek, H. [FZJ/Juelich (Germany); Bakker, K. [NRG/Petten (Netherlands); Abram, T. [BNFL UK (United Kingdom); Haas, D. [JRC/ITU/Karlsruhe (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel-Efficient Tire Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development The California Energy Commission (CEC) must adopt and implement a

115

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development and Deployment Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

118

Electro-catalytic oxidation device for removing carbon from a fuel reformate  

SciTech Connect

An electro-catalytic oxidation device (ECOD) for the removal of contaminates, preferably carbonaceous materials, from an influent comprising an ECOD anode, an ECOD cathode, and an ECOD electrolyte. The ECOD anode is at a temperature whereby the contaminate collects on the surface of the ECOD anode as a buildup. The ECOD anode is electrically connected to the ECOD cathode, which consumes the buildup producing electricity and carbon dioxide. The ECOD anode is porous and chemically active to the electro-catalytic oxidation of the contaminate. The ECOD cathode is exposed to oxygen, and made of a material which promotes the electro-chemical reduction of oxygen to oxidized ions. The ECOD electrolyte is non-permeable to gas, electrically insulating and a conductor to oxidized. The ECOD anode is connected to the fuel reformer and the fuel cell. The ECOD electrolyte is between and in ionic contact with the ECOD anode and the ECOD cathode.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Development Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Development Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Development Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Reforming Targets Arlene F. Anderson Technology Development Manager, U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group and Hydrogen Production Technical Team Review November 6, 2007 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) The Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG), launched in October 2006, provides a forum for effective communication and collaboration among participants in DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) cost-shared research directed at distributed bio-liquid reforming. The Working Group includes

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Industry Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data...

123

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the first such report that will be submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1--December 31, 2003. This quarter saw progress in three areas. These areas are: (1) Evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor, as well as (3) Set up and data collection of baseline performance using the steam reformer. All of the projects are proceeding on schedule. During this quarter one conference paper was written that will be presented at the ASME Power 2004 conference in March 2004, which outlines the research direction and basis for looking at the coal to hydrogen pathway.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Octane Number Prediction in a Reforming Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a neural network for the prediction of the complex and non-linear behavior of a Catalytic Reforming of a refinery has been developed. In a fuel, refinery reforming is a conversion process to increase octane number (RON) of the desulphurated ...

E. Chibaro

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reform and Regulation of the Electricity Sectors in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in investment patterns reflect the differences in the reform strategies adopted by the countries in these regions during the 1990s. By and large, the EAP and SA countries opted for power purchase agreements (PPAs) with independent power producers (IPPs) while...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Littlechild, Stephen C

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of a Catalyst/Sorbent for Methane Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project led to the further development of a combined catalyst and sorbent for improving the process technology required for converting CH{sub 4} and/or CO into H{sub 2} while simultaneously separating the CO{sub 2} byproduct all in a single step. The new material is in the form of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consists of a CaO core surrounded by an alumina-based shell capable of supporting a Ni catalyst. The Ni is capable of catalyzing the reactions of steam with CH{sub 4} or CO to produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, whereas the CaO is capable of absorbing the CO{sub 2} as it is produced. The absorption of CO{sub 2} eliminates the reaction inhibiting effects of CO{sub 2} and provides a means for recovering the CO{sub 2} in a useful form. The present work showed that the lifecycle performance of the sorbent can be improved either by incorporating a specific amount of MgO in the material or by calcining CaO derived from limestone at 1100 C for an extended period. It also showed how to prepare a strong shell material with a large surface area required for supporting an active Ni catalyst. The method combines graded particles of {alpha}-alumina with noncrystalline alumina having a large specific surface area together with a strength promoting additive followed by controlled calcination. Two different additives produced good results: 3 {micro}m limestone and lanthanum nitrate which were converted to their respective oxides upon calcination. The oxides partially reacted with the alumina to form aluminates which probably accounted for the strength enhancing properties of the additives. The use of lanthanum made it possible to calcine the shell material at a lower temperature, which was less detrimental to the surface area, but still capable of producing a strong shell. Core-in-shell pellets made with the improved shell materials and impregnated with a Ni catalyst were used for steam reforming CH{sub 4} at different temperatures and pressures. Under all conditions tested, the CH{sub 4} conversion was large (>80%) and nearly equal to the predicted thermodynamic equilibrium level as long as CO{sub 2} was being rapidly absorbed. Similar results were obtained with both shell material additives. Limited lifecycle tests of the pellets also produced similar results that were not affected by the choice of additive. However, during each lifecycle test the period during which CO{sub 2} was rapidly absorbed declined from cycle to cycle which directly affected the corresponding period when CH{sub 4} was reformed rapidly. Therefore, the results showed a continuing need for improving the lifecycle performance of the sorbent. Core-in-shell pellets with the improved shell materials were also utilized for conducting the water gas shift reaction in a single step. Three different catalyst formulations were tested. The best results were achieved with a Ni catalyst, which proved capable of catalyzing the reaction whether CO{sub 2} was being absorbed or not. The calcined alumina shell material by itself also proved to be a very good catalyst for the reaction as long as CO{sub 2} was being fully absorbed by the core material. However, neither the alumina nor a third formulation containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were good catalysts for the reaction when CO{sub 2} was not absorbed by the core material. Furthermore, the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing catalyst was not as good as the other two catalysts when CO{sub 2} was being absorbed.

B.H. Shans; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus Satrio; Karl Albrecht; Tanya Harris Janine Keeley; Ben Silva; Aaron Shell; Molly Lohry; Zachary Beversdorf

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Applications of solar reforming technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in recent years has demonstrated the efficient use of solar thermal energy for driving endothermic chemical reforming reactions in which hydrocarbons are reacted to form synthesis gas (syngas). Closed-loop reforming/methanation systems can be used for storage and transport of process heat and for short-term storage for peaking power generation. Open-loop systems can be used for direct fuel production; for production of syngas feedstock for further processing to specialty chemicals and plastics and bulk ammonia, hydrogen, and liquid fuels; and directly for industrial processes such as iron ore reduction. In addition, reforming of organic chemical wastes and hazardous materials can be accomplished using the high-efficiency destruction capabilities of steam reforming. To help identify the most promising areas for future development of this technology, we discuss in this paper the economics and market potential of these applications.

Spiewak, I. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel); Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Langnickel, U. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

130

Sulfur-tolerant natural gas reforming for fuel-cell applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An attractive simplification of PEM-FC systems operated with natural gas would be the use of a sulfur tolerant reforming catalyst, but such a catalyst has… (more)

Hennings, Ulrich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of a comprehensive reporting system for a school reform organization: The Accelerated Schools Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the conflicting research results on the effectiveness of whole-school reform models (Nunnery, 1998; Stringfield & Herman, 1997; American Institutes for Research, 1999; U.S. Department of Education, 2004), there is a need to focus on the evaluation procedures of whole-school reform organizations. Because the ultimate goal is to improve school performance, it should also be a goal of each whole-school reform organization to design a comprehensive data collection system to evaluate each schoolÂ?s performance. A comprehensive reporting system was developed for a school reform organization, the Accelerated Schools Project (ASP). Using the steps of the research and development process recommended by Borg and Gall (1989), this study: (a) developed a theoretical framework for the reporting system, (b) identified data that should be collected in the reporting system, (c) performed a field test with an expert panel of educational professionals, (d) developed a preliminary form of the reporting system, (e) performed a main field test with principals and coaches in the ASP network, (f) reported field test results, (g) revised the preliminary reporting system, (h) developed a website for the reporting system, and (i) provided recommendations for the completion, dissemination and implementation of the system in accelerated schools across the nation. This study has important implications for both the ASP community and for the entire whole-school reform community. For the ASP community, the reporting system could be used: (a) to collect data in all accelerated schools across the nation (b) as a longitudinal database of information to monitor data on each ASP school, and (c) to generate school summary reports on ASP schools. These data will assist researchers in measuring the effectiveness of the ASP model on student achievement and other important variables. For the whole-school reform community, the method used in this study could be replicated in other school reform organizations to develop a comprehensive reporting system. By providing consistent data for school reform organizations to evaluate the impact of their models on students and schools, educational researchers will be better equipped to understand each modelÂ?s impact, and thus will better understand the diverse research results on school reform effectiveness.

Stephens, Jennifer Anne

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REFORM COMMISSION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA ON COOPERATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BIOFUELS The Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America, acting jointly, and the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the People's Republic of China, hereinafter the "Participants", Acknowledging that developing fuels that utilize biomass resources is an important way to significantly reduce fossil fuel consumption, promote the agricultural sector, and support rural development, Recognizing the important role played by other government entities in both countries in the area of biofuels development, and the benefits expected from their potential

133

Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights  

SciTech Connect

Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

Suljo Linic

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights  

SciTech Connect

Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

Suljo Linic

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing Technology development -...

136

BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Steam Reforming of High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids S. Ahmed, S. Lee, D. Papadias, and R. Kumar November 6, 2007 Laurel, MD Research sponsored by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Rationale and objective Rationale „ Steam reforming of liquid fuels at high pressures can reduce hydrogen compression costs - Much less energy is needed to pressurize liquids (fuel and water) than compressing gases (reformate or H 2 ) „ High pressure reforming is advantageous for subsequent separations and hydrogen purification Objective „ Develop a reformer design that takes advantage of the savings in compression cost in the steam reforming bio-derived liquid fuels - Metric:

137

FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were found to have lower activities under S-free conditions, but did show less effect of S on performance, in this study. Imidazolium-based ILs, choline chloride compounds and low-melting eutectics of metal nitrates were evaluated, and it was found that, ILs have some capacity to dissolve cellulose and show thermal stability to temperatures where pyrolysis begins, have no vapor pressure, (simplifying product recoveries), and can dissolve ionic metal salts, allowing for the potential of catalytic reactions on breakdown intermediates. Clear evidence of photoactive commercial TiO2 was obtained, but in-house synthesis of photoactive TiO2 proved difficult, as did fixed-bed gasification, primarily due to the challenge of removing the condensable products from the reaction zone quickly enough to prevent additional reaction. Further investigation into additional non-PGM catalysts and ILs is recommended as a follow-up to this work.

Kelly Jezierski; Andrew Tadd; Johannes Schwank; Roland Kibler; David McLean; Mahesh Samineni; Ryan Smith; Sameer Parvathikar; Joe Mayne; Tom Westrich; Jerry Mader; F. Michael Faubert

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbons in a Novel Hydrogen-Selective Membrane-Based Fuel Processor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, asymmetric dense Pd/porous stainless steel composite membranes were fabricated by depositing palladium on the outer surface of the tubular support. The electroless plating method combined with an osmotic pressure field was used to deposit the palladium film. Surface morphology and microstructure of the composite membranes were characterized by SEM and EDX. The SEM and EDX analyses revealed strong adhesion of the plated pure palladium film on the substrate and dense coalescence of the Pd film. Membranes were further characterized by conducting permeability experiments with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium gases at temperatures from 325 to 450 C and transmembrane pressure differences from 5 to 45 psi. The permeation results showed that the fabricated membranes have both high hydrogen permeability and selectivity. For example, the hydrogen permeability for a composite membrane with a 20 {micro}m Pd film was 3.02 x 10{sup -5} moles/m{sup 2}.s.Pa{sup 0.765} at 450 C. Hydrogen/nitrogen selectivity for this composite membrane was 1000 at 450 C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 14.7 psi. Steam reforming of methane is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen and syngas production. To investigate the usefulness of palladium-based composite membranes in membrane-reactor configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen, steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift was studied. The steam reforming of methane using a packed-bed inert membrane tubular reactor (PBIMTR) was simulated. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model with parallel flow configuration was developed for steam reforming of methane. The shell volume was taken as the feed and sweep gas was fed to the inside of the membrane tube. Radial diffusion was taken into account for concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system and then solved by finite difference method with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. An iterative scheme was used to obtain a converged solution. Membrane reactor performance was compared to that in a traditional non-membrane packed-bed reactor (PBR). Their performances were also compared with thermodynamic equilibrium values achievable in a conventional non-membrane reactor. Numerical results of the models show that the methane conversions in the PBIMTR are always higher than that in the PBR, as well as thermodynamic equilibrium conversions. For instance, at a reaction pressure of 6 atm, a temperature of 650 C, a space velocity of 900/16.0 SCCM/gm{sub cat}, a steam to methane molar feed ratio of 3.0, a sweep ratio of 0.15, the conversion in the membrane reactor is about 86.5%, while the conversion in the non-membrane reactor is about 50.8%. The corresponding equilibrium conversion is about 56.4%. The effects on the degree of conversion and hydrogen yield were analyzed for different parameters such as temperature, reactor pressure, feed and sweep flow rate, feed molar ratio, and space time. From the analysis of the model results, it is obvious that the membrane reactor operation can be optimized for conversion or yield through the choice of proper operating and design parameters. Comparisons with available literature data for both membrane and non-membrane reactors showed a good agreement.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nonlinear multivariable predictive control of an autothermal reforming reactor for fuel cell applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a computationally efficient nonlinear multivariable predictive controller (NMPC) for an autothermal reforming (ATR) reactor. The proposed NMPC scheme is based on a fast reduced order nonlinear model and consists of three parts. ...

Yongyou Hu; Donald J. Chmielewski

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Program Presentation to Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline Fuel Cycle R&D Mission Changes from the Former Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative The Science-Based Approach Key Collaborators Budget History Program Elements Summary July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 3 Fuel Cycle R&D Mission The mission of Fuel Cycle Research and Development is to develop options to current fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while reducing proliferation risks by conducting

144

Fuel Cells: Identifying Promising Development Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low temperature PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells are in the initial stage of commercialization, while high temperature SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) are under development because they hold promise of higher efficiency and lower costs. To assess their future market potential, this study analyzed several innovative market applications and technical improvements: PEM fuel cells for peak shaving, PEM fuel cells for uninterruptible power supply (UPS), tubular and planar SOFC units for residential use...

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

146

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separations and Waste Form. Campaign Objectives. ?Develop the next generation of fuel cycle separation and waste management technologies that enable a.

148

Overview of reduced-enrichment fuels - development  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. A large increase in /sup 238/U is required to reduce the enrichment, and a 10 to 15% increase in /sup 235/U is required to compensate for the extra absorption in /sup 238/U. The additional uranium can be accommodated by redesigning the fuel element to increase the fuel volume fraction in the reactor core and/or by increasing the uranium density in the fuel meat. Since fuel element redesign coupled with the highest density fuel available in 1978 is sufficient for only a few reactors, a fuel development and testing effort was begun to qualify much higher density fuels. The greatest emphasis has been on plate-type fuels, since plate-type reactors are the largest users of highly enriched uranium (HEU). In addition to the RERTR program's work with plate-type dispersion fuels, the CEA developed and tested the caramel fuel, consisting of sintered UO/sub 2/ wafers in Zircaloy-clad plates; GA Technologies developed highly loaded UZrH/sub x/ fuel for TRIGA reactors and tested it in cooperation with the RERTR Program; and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. developed and tested rod-type uranium silicide-Al dispersion fuel. The dispersion fuels were irradiated to high burnups to establish their limits of usability. A whole-core demonstration has been conducted in the ORR using 4.8 Mg U/m/sup 3/ U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersion fuel. Twenty-nine elements have achieved average burnups in excess of 40%.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fuel consolidation demonstration: Consolidation concept development  

SciTech Connect

EPRI, Northeast utilities Service Company (NUSCO), DOE, Baltimore Gas Electric Company, and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel, in which the consolidated fuel will be licensable by NRC for storage in the spent-fuel storage pool. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent-fuel storage pools. Consolidation equipment design, development, construction, and testing are being performed by C-E in Windsor, Connecticut. Seismic and structural evaluation of the capability of the Millstone Unit 2 spent-fuel pool and building to accommodate the increased fuel capacity is being conducted by NUSCO. NUSCO plans to obtain a license to store consolidated fuel in the Millstone-2 spent-fuel storage pool. NUSCO also plans to perform a hot demonstration of the integrated consolidation system with spent fuel at Millstone-2. This report describes the consolidation system design that forms the basis for the detailed design of the equipment comprising the system, including information on the fabrication and testing of the equipment. Appendix B describes an evaluation of the ability of the system under development to consolidate LWR spent-fuel assemblies other than the 14 {times} 14 fuel of C-E design stored at Millstone-2. A comparison was made of fuel-assembly designs on the basis of information available in open literature. It was concluded that with appropriate dimensional modifications the spent-fuel consolidation system equipment design is applicable to almost all PWR fuel-assembly configurations. 8 refs., 20 figs.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ratio Parameters in Steam-Reforming Hydrogen productionan Insufficient Parameter in the Steam-Reforming Process,”Impurities on the Methanol Steam-Reforming Process for Fuel

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Fuel Cell Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility & High Impact 3 FCEB Development Timeline since 2000 California Air Resources Board Transit Rule Early demonstrations of single prototypes DOE begins funding NREL technology validation for FCEBs First multiple bus fleet demonstrations in California FTA initiates National Fuel Cell Bus Program and

153

Progress in the development OF LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

New nuclear fuels are being developed to enable many of the most important research and test reactors worldwide to convert from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuels to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels without significant loss in performance. The development work is an international effort lead by the US RERTR program under the NNSA's GTRI. Initial testing (circa 2003) demonstrated that the unexpected tendency of U-Mo fuels dispersed in aluminum toward unstable swelling (pillowing) under high-power conditions. Technical investigations were initiated worldwide at this time by the partners (including Argentina, Canada, France, South Korea and Russia) understand this behaviour as well as to develop and test remedies. This paper gives an overview of the current status of U-Mo fuel development, including basic research results, manufacturing aspects, and the results of the latest irradiations and post irradiation examinations. (authors)

Wachs, Daniel; Keiser, Dennis; Meyer, Mitchell; Burkes, Douglas; Clark, Curtis; Moore, Glen; Jue, Jan-Fong; Ross Finlay, M. [Idaho National Laboratory P.O Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Totev, Totju; Hofman, Gerard; Wiencek, Tom; Kim, Yeon So; Snelgrove, Jim [Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Olefins from High Yield Autothermal Reforming Process ...  

Isobutylene is used to produce fuel additives. The autothermal reforming process can produce isobutylene and requires no external energy input ...

155

2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- kinetics models have been developed to study partial oxidation, steam or autothermal reforming of methane1 Reforming Alexandre Lebouvier, François Cauneau and Laurent Fulcheri* Center for Energy and Processes, MINES-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Development of 50 kW Fuel Processor for Stationary Fuel Cell Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop and test a fuel processor capable of producing high hydrogen concentration (>98%) with less than ppm quantities of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at lower capital cost and higher efficiency, compared to conventional natural gas reformers. It was intended that we achieve our objective by developing simple reactor/process design, and high durability CO2 absorbents, to replace pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or membrane separators. Cost analysis indicated that we would not meet DOE cost goals so the project was terminated before construction of the full scale fuel processor. The work on adsorbent development was focused on the development of calcium oxide-based reversible CO2 absorbents with various microstructures and morphologies to determine the optimum microstructure for long-term reversible CO2 absorption. The effect of powder production process variables was systematically studied including: the final target compositions, the reagents from which the final products were derived, the pore forming additives, the processing time and temperature. The sorbent materials were characterized in terms of their performance in the reversible reaction with CO2 and correlation made to their microstructure.

James F. Stevens; Balaji Krishnamurthy; Paolina Atanassova; Kerry Spilker

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 2: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase 1 of this program, the authors evaluated all known hydrogen storage technologies (including those that are now practiced and those that are development) in the context of fuel cell vehicles. They determined that among the development technologies, carbon sorbents could most benefit from closer scrutiny. During Phase 2 of this program, they tested ten different carbon sorbents at various practical temperatures and pressures, and developed the concept of the usable Capacity Ratio, which is the ratio of the mass of hydrogen that can be released from a carbon-filled tank to the mass of hydrogen that can be released from an empty tank. The authors also commissioned the design, fabrication, and NGV2 (Natural Gas Vehicle) testing of an aluminum-lined, carbon-composite, full-wrapped pressure vessel to store hydrogen at 78 K and 3,000 psi. They constructed a facility to pressure cycle the tank at 78 K and to temperature cycle the tank at 3,000 psi, tested one such tank, and submitted it for a burst test. Finally, they devised a means by which cryogenic compressed hydrogen gas tanks can be filled and discharged using standard hardware--that is, without using filters, valves, or pressure regulators that must operate at both low temperature and high pressure. This report describes test methods and test results of carbon sorbents and the design of tanks for cold storage. 7 refs., 91 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Low-Enrichment Fuel Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The national program of the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory for the development of highly loaded uranium fuels, which provide the means for enrichment reduction, has been briefly described. The objectives of > 60 wt % uranium in plate-type fuels and greater than or equal to 45 wt % uranium in U--ZrH/sub x/ rod-type fuels are expected to be met. The most promising fuels will be further evaluated in full-size element irradiations and whole-core demonstrations on the route toward commercialization.

Stahl, D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SiC Research for SiC Research for Accident Tolerant Fuels Shannon Bragg-Sitton Idaho National Laboratory Advanced LWR Fuels Technical Lead Advanced Fuels Campaign Advanced LWR Fuels Pathway Lead Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program August 2013 Outline  Overview of DOE SiC research  Severe accident modeling: MELCOR analysis w/SiC  Recent characterization test results - Oxidation kinetics - Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing  Technology development - ASTM standards development - SiC/SiC joining technology 2 SiC Gap Analysis and Feasibility Study  SiC Gap Analysis / Feasibility - Milestone report issued July 30, 2013 - Incorporates results of work funded

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline...

163

Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development...

165

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the...

166

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels &039;Plus&039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada)...

167

Fuel cells for transportation R and D at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the transportation fuel cell systems research at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two areas of research are discussed: the development of a catalytic partial-oxidation reformer for conventional and alternative transportation fuels, and a novel approach for the removal of carbon monoxide from reformate for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The objective of the first study is to develop reformers for converting liquid fuels (gasoline, ethanol, or methanol) to hydrogen gas for use with fuel cell systems in light-duty vehicles. The second study is investigating the use of acidic cuprous chloride (or other suitable sorbent) to chemically bind and thus remove the CO from the reformate.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Bloom, I.; Carter, J.D.; Doshi, R.; Kramarz, K.; Lee, S.H.D.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Syngas production from heavy liquid fuel reforming in inert porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the low H2 density is the movement: the power required to pump hydrogen is around 4.5 times higher than for natural gas per unit of delivered energy [17]. Hydrogen can be stored on-board a vehicle as a compressed gas, as a liquid in cryogenic containers... and the transportation system are mainly based on the combustion of fossil fuels, generally defined as oil, coal and natural gas, as shown in Fig. 1.1. There are several issues to be considered about fossil fuel consumption. First of all, the greenhouse gas emission, due...

Pastore, Andrea

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

NP-MHTGR Fuel Development Program Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 1988, the Secretary of Energy announced a strategy to acquire New Production Reactor capacity for producing tritium. The strategy involved construction of a New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) where the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was selected as the Management and Operations contractor for the project. Immediately after the announcement in August 1988, tritium target particle development began with the INEEL selected as the lead laboratory. Fuel particle development was initially not considered to be on a critical path for the project, therefore, the fuel development program was to run concurrently with the design effort of the NP-MHTGR.

Maki, John Thomas; Petti, David Andrew; Hobbins, Richard Redfield; McCardell, Richard K.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Southworth, Finis Hio

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Unconventional Fuels Conference Tribal Energy Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for oil shale development or other unconventional resources on the Reservation be improved by encouraging commercial leasing of oil shale on the considerable public lands where oil shale formations are found out: ­ 1. Learn more about oil shale and other unconventional fuels development, and ­ 2. To understand

Utah, University of

171

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Catalytic Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

Little, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2013 Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Supported by Research Funding...

176

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF)...

177

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of...

178

Berkeley Lab Startup Brings Fuel Cells to the Developing ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Berkeley Lab Startup Brings Fuel Cells to the Developing World Point Source Power’s cheap, rugged fuel cells can provide ...

179

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Research and Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bank Reform in Greece with reference to Eastern Europe The Case of The Hellenic Industrial Development Bank S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is Greece a reforming economy? The purpose of this paper is to present the evolution and structure of the banking sector in Greece, with reference to the parallel experiences of the Eastern European (EE) countries. In Section 2, we are concerned with the domestic economic environment within which the Greek Banking System (GBS) operates. and the pressures building up within the system encouraging reform. In Section 3, we look into the evolution of the Greek Banking System, both in terms of structures and in terms of policy. Changes in the instruments of monetary policy are also considered in this section. In Section 4, we present the case of the Hellenic Industrial Development Bank, currently undergoing a thorough restructuring plan. In Section 5, we examine some of the main similarities and differences between Greece and the EE countries in relation to banking sector problems and reforms.

Marica Frangakis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Quick-start catalyzed methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic methanol partial oxidation reformer described in this paper offers all the necessary attributes for use in transportation fuel cell systems. The bench-scale prototype methanol reformer developed at Argonne is a cylindrical reactor loaded with copper zinc oxide catalyst. Liquid methanol, along with a small amount of water, is injected as a fine spray into a flowing air stream, past an igniter onto the catalyst bed where the partial oxidation reaction takes place.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operator’s garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The station’s efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce on–site hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Research Electricity Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

187

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass Research and Biomass Research and Development Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass Research and Development Initiative

188

Steam reformer with catalytic combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

Voecks, Gerald E. (La Crescenta, CA)

1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

190

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

Ray, E.R.; Cracraft, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

Reifsnider, Kenneth

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electricity Sector Reform in Developing Countries: A Survey of Empirical Evidence on Determinants and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, patronage, labour opposition to reducing waste, poor collection and other fiscal leakage. Simpler reforms, such as encouraging Independent Power Producers to enter into long-term Power Purchase Agreements with financially fragile counterparts, stored up...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Mota, Raffaella L; Newbery, David; Pollitt, Michael G.

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

The wholesale market for electricity in England and Wales : recent developments and future reforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The England and Wales wholesale electricity market is about to undergo major reform (NETA). I describe and analyse the proposed arrangements, contrasting them with those currently in operation. I argue that while NETA will ...

Sweeting, Andrew

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fuel Cycle Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Research & Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development The mission of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is to conduct research and development to help develop sustainable fuel cycles, as described in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. Sustainable fuel cycle options are those that improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation, minimize waste generation, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. The FCRD program will develop a suite of options to enable future policymakers to make informed decisions about how best to manage used fuel from nuclear reactors. The overall goal is to demonstrate the technologies necessary to allow commercial deployment of solutions for the sustainable management of used

197

Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development  

SciTech Connect

Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Developing alternative feedstocks for fuel alcohol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews recent research to examine the viability of energy sorghum as a feedstock for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum is the name given to any sweet sorghum shown to be feasible for producing fuel alcohol. Energy sorghum can grow on a variety of soils, in 90 day cycles, with up to three crops a year. Crop rotation is rarely needed; most of the nitrogen and potassium returns to the soil. Harmon Engineering and Testing initiated an inhouse program to research sweet sorghum development. Equipment specifications and preliminary results are given. An ''energy farm'' process is explained step by step. Stalk juice, grain, and stalk fiber yields are listed. The use of bagasse and carbon dioxide is also considered.

Verma, V.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Present status and development of PWR fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the nuclear power plant fuel design, manufacture and R and D capability in Republic of China; the progress condition of Qinshan fuel assemblies and preparatory work for Guandong and other PWR's fuel assemblies; and the program of research and development of high performance fuel.

Shouhui, D.; Yinian, Z; Dingcang, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Power Generation from an Integrated Biomass Reformer and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SBIR Phase III) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Quentin Ming (Primary Contact), Patricia Irving InnovaTek, Inc. 3100 George Washington Way, Suite 108 Richland, WA 99354 Phone: (509) 375-1093 Email: ming@innovatek.com DOE Managers HQ: Charles Russomanno Phone: (202) 586-7543 Email: Charles.Russomanno@ee.doe.gov HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0004535 Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Establish the requirements and design for an integrated * fuel cell and fuel processor that will meet the technical and operational needs for distributed energy production. Develop and integrate key system components - *

202

Energy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell(tm) Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption capability wide temperature range instant...

203

WHEC 16 / 13-16 June 2006 Lyon France Plasma assisted fuel reforming for on-board hydrogen rich gas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through hydrogen on-board storage. The main reforming technology is catalytic reforming, which has been points are challenges for automotive applications. In parallel with research on catalytic reforming assisted reforming could be used complementary to catalytic reforming to ensure dynamics performance (start

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS REPORT (FAR) INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, or the state of California. The Commission, the state of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warranty, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the Commission nor has the Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information in this report. PREFACE The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program supports public interest energy research and development that will help improve the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The PIER Program, managed by the California Energy Commission (Commission), annually awards up to $62 million of which $2 million/year is allocated to the Energy Innovation Small Grant (EISG) Program for grants. The EISG Program is administered by the San Diego State

Energy Innovations; Small Grant Program; Eisg Awardee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful release of radioactive material. A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful release of radioactive material. In order to assure the development of a sustainable nuclear fuel cycle for the nation's energy future, to provide a sound technical basis for implementation of a new national policy for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, and to better understand, assess, and communicate the

206

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

207

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Manufacturing Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Research and Development The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's manufacturing research and development (R&D) activity improves processes and reduces the cost of...

208

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preface Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page i Preface The Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan (MYRD&D...

209

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM PLASMATRON REFORMERS: A PROMISING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOX ADSORBER REGENERATION AND OTHER AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmatron reformers are being developed at MIT and ArvinMeritor [1]. In these reformers a special low power electrical discharge is used to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The partial oxidation reaction of this very fuel rich mixture is difficult to initiate. The plasmatron provides continuous enhanced volume initiation. To minimize electrode erosion and electrical power requirements, a low current, high voltage discharge with wide area electrodes is used. The reformers operate at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Plasmatron reformers provide the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels, such as diesel and bio-oils. These advantages facilitate use of onboard hydrogen-generation technology for diesel exhaust after-treatment. Plasma-enhanced reformer technology can provide substantial conversion even without the use of a catalyst. Recent progress includes a substantial decrease in electrical power consumption (to about 200 W), increased flow rate (above 1 g/s of diesel fuel corresponding to approximately 40 kW of chemical energy), soot suppression and improvements in other operational features.. Plasmatron reformer technology has been evaluated for regeneration of NOx adsorber after-treatment systems. At ArvinMeritor tests were performed on a dual-leg NOx adsorber system using a Cummins 8.3L diesel engine both in a test cell and on a vehicle. A NOx adsorber system was tested using the plasmatron reformer as a regenerator and without the reformer i.e., with straight diesel fuel based regeneration as the baseline case. The plasmatron reformer was shown to improve NOx regeneration significantly compared to the baseline diesel case. The net result of these initial tests was a significant decrease in fuel penalty, roughly 50% at moderate adsorber temperatures. This fuel penalty improvement is accompanied by a dramatic drop in slipped hydrocarbon emissions, which decreased by 90% or more. Significant advantages are demonstrated across a wide range of engine conditions and temperatures. The study also indicated the potential to regenerate NOx adsorbers at low temperatures where diesel fuel based regeneration is not effective, such as those typical of idle conditions. Two vehicles, a bus and a light duty truck, have been equipped for plasmatron reformer NOx adsorber regeneration tests.

Bromberg, L.; Crane, S; Rabinovich, A.; Kong, Y; Cohn, D; Heywood, J; Alexeev, N.; Samokhin, A.

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

Computational Model For Transient And Steady State Analysis Of A 1-dimensional Auto-thermal Reformer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kim, Daejong This study presents a 1-dimensional mathematical model of steam reformer to be used with high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Steam reforming… (more)

Honavara-Prasad, Srikanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development at Westinghouse is presented in this paper. The basic operating principles of SOFCs, evolution in tubular cell design and performance improvement, selection criteria for cell component materials, and cell processing techniques are discussed. The commercial goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 5 to 10 years. Results of cell test operated for more than 50,000 hours are presented. Since 1986, significant progress has been made in the evolution of cells with higher power, lower cost and improved thermal cyclic capability. Also in this period, successively larger multi-kilowatt electrical generators systems have been built and successfully operated for more than 7000 hours.

Bratton, R.J.; Singh, P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Research and Vehicle Research and Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Research and Development Grants The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IDEC) administers the Indiana

213

Micro fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrolysis Technology Development and Fueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production from electrolysis *General electrolysis fueling overview *Near term hydrogen electricity integration *Grid based renewable hydrogen integration Receive feedback from...

215

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Support for Advance Support for Advance Biofuel Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Advance Biofuel Development The California Legislature urges the U.S. Congress or the U.S.

216

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Energy Strategy State Energy Strategy Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Strategy Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Energy Strategy Development The New Hampshire Office of Energy Planning, in consultation with the New

217

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives

219

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Smart Grid Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smart Grid Infrastructure Development and Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

220

Developments in U.S. Alternative Fuel Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The alternative fueled vehicle (AFV)/alternative fuels industry experienced a number of market-related changes in the second half of the 1990s. This article describes each of the alternative transportation fuels and the AFVs in detail. It provides information on the development to date and looks at trends likely to occur in the future.

Information Center

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Development » Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents November 8, 2011 2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting As the largest domestic source of low-carbon energy, nuclear power is making major contributions toward meeting our nation's current and future energy demands. The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. July 11, 2011 Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report

222

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 Executive Summary The United States pioneered the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and we continue to lead the way as these technologies emerge from the...

223

Fuel Cells vs. Batteries: Issues and Challenges Facing the Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells vs. Batteries: Issues and Challenges Facing the Development of Electrochemical Power Systems for Transportation Applications Speaker(s): Elton Cairns Frank McLarnon John...

224

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Manufacturing Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Development on AddThis.com... Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Safety, Codes & Standards Education Systems...

225

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

226

Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications  

SciTech Connect

The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Catalyst and process development for the H/sub 2/ preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of this contract, which involved preliminary catalyst and process evaluations, has been completed. A decision has been made to pursue the autothermal reforming process during the remainder of this contract as the most likely process for producing hydrogen for fuel cells from No. 2 oil. The basis for this decision is presented in this report. Work on Phase II of this contract, which involves catalyst preparation and development, was started during the quarter. As part of an Engelhard cost contribution, catalyst samples were prepared for potential use in the steam reforming section of the ATR. These catalysts, after steam treatment at high temperatures, are being screened for steam reforming activity using ethane as a model compound. Those samples passing this screening test will be evaluated in an ATR catalyst screening unit which was assembled during the quarter. Preliminary work on supporting studies was started with the use of a thermogravimetric apparatus to measure coke laydown using ethylene as a model compound.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S; Mayer, C P

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Advanced Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cells have many potential utility applications including new multi-megawatt central power plants, repowering existing plants, and dispersed generation. A newly designed 25 kW planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system offers simplicity of construction, low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of by product heat, and straight-forward system integration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Partial oxidation reforming of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol is an attractive fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles because it has a fairly high energy density, can be pumped into the tank of a vehicle mush like gasoline, and is relatively easy to reform. For on-board reforming, the reformer must be compact and lightweight, and have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Steam reforming reactors with the tube-and-shell geometry that was used on the prototype fuel cell-powered buses are heat transfer limited. To reach their normal operating temperature, these types of reactors need 45 minutes from ambient temperature start-up. The dynamic response is poor due to temperature control problems. To overcome the limitations of steam reforming, ANL explored the partial oxidation concept used in the petroleum industry to process crude oils. In contrast to the endothermic steam reforming reaction, partial oxidations is exothermic. Fuel and air are passed together over a catalyst or reacted thermally, yielding a hydrogen-rich gas. Since the operating temperature of such a reactor can be controlled by the oxygen-to- methanol ratio, the rates of reaction are not heat transfer limited. Start-up and transient response should be rapid, and the mass and volume are expected to be small by comparison.

Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development of inexpensive metal macrocyclic complexes for use in fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several metal macrocyclic complexes were synthesized for use as catalysts in fuel cells. An initial evaluation of their ability to catalyze the fuel cell reactions were completed. Based on this initial evaluation, one metal macrocyclic catalyst was selected and long-term stability testing in a fuel cell was initiated. The fuel cell employing this catalyst was operated continuously for one year with little signs of catalyst degradation. The effect of synthetic reformates on the performance of the catalyst in the fuel cell environment also demonstrated high tolerance of this catalyst for common contaminants and poisons.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Lithium Battery Research and Development Dept.; Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; Hamdan, M. [Giner, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Catalytic Tri-reforming of Biomass-Derived Syngas to Produce Desired H2:CO Ratios for Fuel Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on upgrading biomass derived syngas for the synthesis of liquid fuels using Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The process includes novel gasification of biomass… (more)

Walker, Devin Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of an ASPEN Plus Model of a Chemical-Looping Reformer Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) from biomass gasification is viewed as a promising option for production of transport fuels. A major problem associated is the removal… (more)

Lohse, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Linear air-fuel sensor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

Garzon, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, C. [General Motors, Flint, MI (United States). GM/Delphi E. Division

1996-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Overview of reduced enrichment fuels: Development, testing, and specification  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. This paper discusses relevant developments in fuel developments. 9 refs., 1 tab.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

TransForum v4n2 - Diesel Reformer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ARGONNE SCIENTISTS TEAM UP TO DEVELOP NEW DIESEL REFORMER Liu tests diesel reformer Argonne's Di-Jia Liu conducted extensive testing of the diesel reformer; his experiments are...

240

Update on Fuel Cell Development: Review of Major and Stealth Fuel Cell Players' Activities: Stealth Player Reviews  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting fuel cell technology assessments and sponsoring research and development of fuel cell technologies for distributed power market applications for the past 20 years. Over the past several years, four fuel cell technologies have emerged for stationary power generation applications: • Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) • Phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) • Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) • Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) There are dozens of companies...

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

Aldag, A.W. Jr.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed during the period February 21, 2006 through August 21, 2006 is summarized herein. During this period, efforts were focused on 5 kWe bundle testing, development of on-cell reformation, the conceptual design of an advanced module, and the development of a manufacturing roadmap for cells and bundles. A 5 kWe SOFC system was built and delivered to the Pennsylvania State University; fabrication of a second 5 kWe SOFC for delivery to Montana State University was initiated. Cell testing and microstructural analysis in support of these efforts was also conducted.

Joseph F. Pierre

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

NREL: News - NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

713 713 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released New application for iPhone helps users find stations offering electricity, biodiesel, natural gas, and other alternative fuels. November 7, 2013 iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile application for DOE's Clean Cities program. Clean Cities supports local stakeholders across the country in an effort to cut petroleum use in transportation. The Alternative Fueling Station Locator App, now available through Apple's App Store, allows iPhone users to select an alternative fuel and

244

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. This document provides an evaluation and prioritization of R&D opportunities

245

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

248

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

249

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Alternative Renewable Fuels &#039;Plus&#039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial State/Provincial Govt Industrial Local Government Schools Institutional Program Info State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Provider Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs "Exploration of new markets and new uses for bioproducts, alternative renewable fuels and their co-products will contribute to the long term sustainability of Ontario's agri-food, energy and rural sectors. Investment in research will help position Ontario to take advantage of new technologies in these areas. The Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund is a

250

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels development Unit (AFDU). The program will initially involve a continuation of the work performed under the Liquid Phase Methanol Program but will later draw upon information and technologies generated in current and future DOE-funded contracts, as well as test commercially available catalysts. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

252

Development of PC 4 dual-fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

Recently, utilization of natural gas, which is considered to be one of most important alternative fuels for petroleum, has been marked. As thermal efficiency of dual-fuel engine is higher than those of other prime movers with gaseous fuel, i.e., spark-ignited gas engine or gas turbine, it is possible to construct fuel-economical gas power plants with dual-fuel engines. However, its horsepower has been limited to the rather lower range. In 1984, NKK succeeded in developing large-sized dual-fuel engines based on the Pielstick PC4 diesel engine. The horsepower is 1200 HP/cyl, i.e. 21,600 HP for 18-cyclinder engine.

Nishikawa, T.; Utsuyama, S.; Maruyama, S.; Ono, T.; Kitahara, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

Daniel T. Hennessy

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

M-C Power Corporation will design, fabricate, install, test and evaluate a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Power Plant. The plant is to be located at the Naval Air Station Miramar in San Diego, California. This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with this project in 1994. M-C Power has completed the tape casting and sintering of cathodes and is proceeding with the tape casting and sintering of anodes for the first 250 cell stack. M-C Power and San Diego Gas and Electric relocated the fuel cell demonstration project to an alternate site at the Naval Air Station Miramar. For the new project location at the Naval Air Station Miramar, an Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the Department of Energy in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Environmental Assessment resulted in a categorical exclusion of the proposed action from all environmental permit requirements. Bechtel Corporation has completed the reformer process design coordination, a Process Description, the Pipe and Instrumentation Diagrams, a Design Criteria Document and General Project Requirement Document. Bechtel developed the requirements for soils investigation report and issued the following equipment bid packages to the suppliers for bids: Inverter, Reformer, Desulfurization Vessels, Hot Gas Recycle Blower, Heat Recovery Steam Generator, and Recycle Gas Cooler. SDG and E has secured necessary site permits, conducted soils investigations, and is working on the construction plan. They are in final negotiations with the US Navy on a site agreement. Site drawings are required for finalization of the agreement.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

PROGRESS REPORT ON FUEL ELEMENT DEVELOPMENT AND ASSOCIATED PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

; 9 < 4 6 9 7 ; 6 8 7 6 sting Deactor (MTR) has sought to develop improved, economical, long-life fuel assemblies through a comprehensive study of various fuel compositions, enrichments, claddings, burnable poisons, fuel and poison distributions, and fuelelement geometry optimization. The core materials, including uranium -- aluminum alloys, uranium oxide -aluminum cermets, thorium, thorium oxide, boron, gadolinium, dysprosium, and iridium, are tested in pilot-plant scale by irradiating them as sandwich type sample fuel plates. In the procurement of these sample plates, fabrication techniques were developed and evaluated for incorporation of all the fuels and poisons (except Ir/sub 2/O/sub 3/) into cores of aluminum or aluminum alloys. Methods were developed to minimize "dog-boning" and to produce graded fuels. Some of the sample plate compcsitions have been irradiated to high burn-up, i.e., over 50% of the U/sup 235/ content, and have operated successfully in the MTR for seven or more cycles. The irradiated uranium-- aluminum alloy and uranium oxide-- aluminum cermet fuel plates have shown excellent dimensional stability and good corrosion resistance to long-term irradiation. However, some of the thorium oxide fuel plates failed during one cycle of irradiation because of blistering, rupturing, or forming of pinholes in the cladding. The isostatic bonding procedure used to bond aluminum plates to the ThO/sub 2/ cores is apparently not adequate for reactor use. The sample fuel plate work has demonstrated the suitability of high wt.% uranium oxide--aluminum fuels for testing reactors, indicated the potential of systematically varying the fuel loading within a single plate, and experimentally verified the applicability of burnable poisons for reducing reactivity changes resulting from fuel burnup. The Deactivity Measurement Facility has proved to be an excellent nondestructive analytical tool for determination of fuel and poison burn-up. This program has stimulated several new developments and revealed many interesting facts in the fabrication and testing of reactor fuel materials. For example: (1) ultrasonic inspection has proved to be an excellent nondestructive method for determination of small voids in the core and unbonded cladding not otherwise detected by radiographing, (2) the ultrasonic inspection of irradiated fuel plates in the MTR canal is feasible, and (3) analytical procedures were developed for the determination of the small quantities of gadolinium added to the cores. The prototype studies consisted of theoretical and experimental evaluations of the hydraulic and heat- transfer characteristics, the structural properties, the economics and the reactor operating characteristics of various full-sized fuel assemblies and shim rods. The results of the sample fuel plate studies were incorporated in these prototypes to obtain optimum practical designs for testing reactors. The fuel element geometries investigated include plates, tube bundles, hexagonal honeycomb, and concentric cylinders. A MTR shim rod with renewable fuel and poison sections was designed, tested hydraulically, and is now considered ready for final in-pile testing. This rod outlasts the existing shim rods, is cheaper, and allows more operational flexibility. A theoretical analysis, hydraulic tests, and a mechanical evaluation have shown that an improvement can be made in plate type fuel elements by using an increased number of thinner high-strength fuel plates in the fuel element. An in-pile prototype test of such an element is now planned. An analysis of roughened surfaces indicates that economy or increases in reactor power may be gained through the use of roughened heat- transfer surfaces in nonboiling watercooled reactors. Preliminary hydraulic tests were performed and indicate that practical roughened surfaces may be formed. Out-of-pile heat-transfer tests are now planned. The theoretical analysis of geometries indicates that tube bundles, honeycomb, and concentric cylinder de

Francis, W.C.; Craig, S.E. ed.

1960-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: Connecticut Department of Economic & Community Development Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Socio-Economic Website: www.chfcc.org/Publications/reports/Fuel_Cell_Plan%201-31-08_DECD.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/fuel-cell-economic-development-plan-h Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: "Safety Standards,Emissions Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

257

Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell generator module.

Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and com

260

DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks June 30, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner and Volvo Group CEO Leif Johansson today agreed to expand cooperation to develop more fuel-efficient trucks. Once contractual negotiations are complete later this year, the cooperative program will be extended for three more years. An additional $9 million over three years in DOE funds will be matched by $9 million in Swedish government funds and $18 million from Volvo Group. When added with the existing $12 million commitment from the United States, Sweden and the Volvo Group the overall value of the cooperation will be $48

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DOE supported research in alcohol fuel technology development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy sponsored research in alcohol fuel technology development under the direction of Congress and Public Law 96-126. Twenty-seven research grants of about $50,000 each were funded to develop lower cost methods for alcohol fuel production. This paper discusses the objectives of the program and relates the accomplishments achieved by the research. A discussion of the highlights of several selected projects is included.

Dodds, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of a mathematical description of catalytic reforming taking into account changes of the individual components of the feedstock and catalyst coking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for modeling petroleum and petrochemical processing. Based on this approach a mathematical model has been developed for catalytic reforming taking into account changes of individual feedstock components and catalyst coking. Examples are given of calculations and optimization of industrial equipment.

Rabinovich, G.B.; Dynkina, N.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Research and Development of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section...

268

Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on â??green fuelsâ? which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PIâ??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development of a Reliable Fuel Depletion Methodology for the HTR-10 Spent Fuel Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technical working group formed in 2007 between NNSA and CAEA to develop a reliable fuel depletion method for HTR-10 based on MCNPX and to analyze the isotopic inventory and radiation source terms of the HTR-10 spent fuel. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Established a fuel depletion methodology and demonstrated its safeguards application; (2) Proliferation resistant at high discharge burnup ({approx}80 GWD/MtHM) - Unfavorable isotopics, high number of pebbles needed, harder to reprocess pebbles; (3) SF should remain under safeguards comparable to that of LWR; and (4) Diversion scenarios not considered, but can be performed.

Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang-Yoon [unaffiliated

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall. 5 figs.

Singh, P.; Shockling, L.A.; George, R.A.; Basel, R.A.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels July 7, 2006 - 2:52pm Addthis Research Aimed at Making Cellulosic Ethanol a Practical Alternative to Gasoline WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released an ambitious new research agenda for the development of cellulosic ethanol as an alternative to gasoline. The 200-page scientific "roadmap" cites recent advances in biotechnology that have made cost-effective production of ethanol from cellulose, or inedible plant fiber, an attainable goal. The report outlines a detailed research plan for developing new technologies to transform cellulosic ethanol-a renewable, cleaner-burning, and carbon-neutral alternative to gasoline-into an economically viable

274

Program plan for molten carbonate fuel-cell systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe in both programmatic and technical terms the methodology that the US Department of Energy will use to commercialize a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. Responsibility for the planning and management of the program resides in the molten carbonate fuel cell program office at the Argonne National Laboratory which reports to the Assistant Director for Fuel Cells in the Division of Fossil Fuel utilization of DOE/FE. The actual development of technology is carried out by selected contractors. The technology development phase of the program will culminate with the construction and operation of two demonstration power plants. The first power plant will be an industrial cogeneration plant which will be completed in 1987. The other power plant will be a baseload electric power plant to be completed in 1989.

Not Available

1978-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recent Developments in Mems-Based Micro Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro fuel cells ($\\mu$-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one of the technological ways to make $\\mu$-FC is to have recourse to standard microfabrication techniques used in the fabrication of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper shows an overview on the applications of MEMS techniques on miniature FC by presenting several solutions developed throughout the world. It also describes the latest developments of a new porous silicon-based miniature fuel cell. Using a silane grafted on an inorganic porous media as the proton-exchange membrane instead of a common ionomer such as Nafion, the fuel cell achieved a maximum power density of 58 mW cm-2 at room temperature with hydrogen as fuel.

Pichonat, T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Supporting R&D of industrial fuel cell developers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is supporting the industrial developers of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) and tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results suggest that a lithium concentration level of 65-75 mol% in the LiNa electrolyte will improve cell performance. They have made inroads in understanding the interfacial resistance of bipolar plate materials, and they have reduced the air electrode overpotential in OSFCs by adding dopants.

Krumpelt, M.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Evaluate reformer performance at a glance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic reforming is becoming increasingly important in replacing octane lost as the removal of lead from worldwide gasoline pools continues. A method has been developed that can quickly evaluate the performance of any catalytic reformer. The catalytic naphtha reforming process primarily involves three well-known reactions. These are aromatization of naphthenes, cyclization of paraffins and hydrocracking of paraffins. Hydrogen is produced in the process of aromatization and dehydrocyclization of paraffins. Reformer performance is normally evaluated with a reformate analysis (PONA) and yield of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate. This method of quick evaluation of reformer performance is based upon the main assumption that the increase in hydrocarbon moles in the process is equal to the number of C{single_bond}C bond ruptures and one mole of hydrogen is absorbed to saturate the same. This new method calculates aromatization efficiency, paraffin conversion, aromatic selectivity and finally the paraffin, naphthene and aromatic content of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate.

Nag, A. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., Gujarat (India)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Biomass Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilize ceramic microchannel reactor technology for * reforming of natural gas and biogas fuels for subsequent electrochemical oxidation within a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC)....

280

A natural-gas fuel processor for a residential fuel cell system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system model was used to develop an autothermal reforming fuel processor to meet the targets of 80% efficiency (higher heating value) and start-up energy consumption of less than 500 kJ when operated as part of a 1-kWe natural-gas fueled fuel cell system for cogeneration of heat and power. The key catalytic reactors of the fuel processor--namely the autothermal reformer, a two-stage water gas shift reactor and a preferential oxidation reactor--were configured and tested in a breadboard apparatus. Experimental results demonstrated a reformate containing {approx} 48% hydrogen (on a dry basis and with pure methane as fuel) and less than 5 ppm CO. The effects of steam-to-carbon and part load operations were explored.

Adachi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Lee, S. H. D.; Papadias, D.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Bendert, J. C.; Kanner, S. A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Japan Institute of Energy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development of an engine fuel and spark controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an engine control unit (ECU) for a four cylinder engine to be used in a Formula SAE racers. The ECU must provide effective fuel injection and spark ignition control and provide for easy adjustment by the user for engine tuning purposes. The controller was designed to operate using a speed-throttle fuel map, with acceleration enrich, meet and other fuel compensating factors. A paired double-tiring strategy was adapted to avoid the complications associated with sequential fuel injection. The ECU utilized a Motorola 68HC16 development board, as well as special injector and ignition driver circuits. The software was designed to be primarily interrupt driven, with a task manager to arbitrate among other tasks. A user interface program, which runs on a PC, allows the user to instantly alter operating parameters in the ECU during engine tuning and development. The controller was tested on a Yamaha YZF 600 motorcycle engine with a custom intake manifold and fuel injection system. The fuel and spark maps and other parameters were configured for this engine by using the user interface. Dynamometer testing verities that engine performance with this ECU meets design specifications.

Suter, William Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Developing bioenergy fuels: Biopower fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful development of biomass crops requires unique cooperation between researchers and members of the energy, agriculture, forestry, and environmental communities. DOE's Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program provides a mechanism to integrate the efforts of this diverse group. The federal government must continue to share risks (costs of growing, harvesting, storing, and supplying energy crops) for early adopters of energy crop technology and biomass energy producers.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

Ray, E.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Address One Bear Place #97413 Place Waco, Texas Zip 76798 Region Texas Area Coordinates 31.496762°, -97.305664° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.496762,"lon":-97.305664,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Development and characterization of the magnetic plasmatron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the plausibility of developing a low current plasmatron fuel reformer that utilizes magnetic fields to hydrodynamically induce spin of the arc discharge. The proof of principle, ...

Anziani, Felipe Rene, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of Reliable Methods for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the development of reliable methods for sealing solid oxide fuel cell stacks.

Loehman, R.; Brochu. M.; Gauntt, B.; Shah, R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

AEC FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Seventh Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is the seventh annual report of the unclassified portion of the Fuels and Materials Development Programs being conducted by the General Electric Company's Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation under Contract AT(40-1)-2847, issued by the Fuels and Materials Branch, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, of the Atomic Energy Commission. This report covers the period from January 31, 1967 to January 31, 1968, and thus also serves as the quarterly progress report for the final quarter of the year.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Parking requirements as a barrier to housing development: regulation and reform in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to both the developer, CIM group, and the tenants. Forof financial volatility. CIM reports that as Los Angelesparking structure. As one CIM official put it: Effectively,

Manville, Michael; Shoup, Donald C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation The Department of Energy (DOE) today publishes a final statement of policy on intergovernmental consultation under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The policy reflects the guidelines and instructions that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided to each agency to develop, with input from State, local, and tribal officials, an intergovernmental consultation process with regard to significant intergovernmental mandates contained in a notice of proposed rulemaking. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents

293

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation The Department of Energy (DOE) today publishes a final statement of policy on intergovernmental consultation under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The policy reflects the guidelines and instructions that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provided to each agency to develop, with input from State, local, and tribal officials, an intergovernmental consultation process with regard to significant intergovernmental mandates contained in a notice of proposed rulemaking. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Intergovernmental Consultation More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents

294

Development of Fuel Shuffling Module for PHISICS  

SciTech Connect

PHISICS (Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for the INL Code System) [4] code toolkit has been in development at the Idaho National Laboratory. This package is intended to provide a modern analysis tool for reactor physics investigation. It is designed with the mindset to maximize accuracy for a given availability of computational resources and to give state of the art tools to the modern nuclear engineer. This is obtained by implementing several different algorithms and meshing approaches among which the user will be able to choose, in order to optimize his computational resources and accuracy needs. The software is completely modular in order to simplify the independent development of modules by different teams and future maintenance. The package is coupled with the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5-3D [3]. In the following the structure of the different PHISICS modules is briefly recalled, focusing on the new shuffling module (SHUFFLE), object of this paper.

Allan Mabe; Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Aaron Epiney; Michael Lineberry

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at temperatures up to 160 C.

L.G. Marianowski

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Status of Automotive Fuel Cell Development: Applicability to Stationary Fuel Cell Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology -- targeting the automotive as well as the stationary markets -- are making significant strides in performance improvements and cost reductions. In concept, PEMFC systems could either replace internal combustion engine drivetrains or power auxiliary loads that would otherwise be powered by propulsion power plants. This report describes how automotive PEMFC development and stationary power PEMFC development will complement each other.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbonate fuel cell powerplant development and commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CFC powerplants offer the potential for ultrahigh efficiency energy conversion and the enhancement of the quality of our environment. Since combustion is not utilized, CFCs generate very low amounts of NOx. CFC powerplants have been exempt from air permitting requirements in California, Massachusetts. CFC is attractive for both polluted urban areas and remote applications. It is ideal as a distributed generator (sited at or near the electricity user). The US CFC developers enjoy the support of user groups (utility, other end-user members). DOE cooperates with GRI and EPRI in funding the US CFC program.

Williams, M.C. [Fuel Cells Product Manager, USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Catalysts for improved fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers our technical progress on fuel processing catalyst characterization for the specific purpose of hydrogen production for proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These development efforts support DOE activities in the development of compact, transient capable reformers for on-board hydrogen generation starting from candidate fuels. The long-term objective includes increased durability and lifetime, in addition to smaller volume, improved performance, and other specifications required meeting fuel processor goals. The technical barriers of compact fuel processor size, transient capability, and compact, efficient thermal management all are functions of catalyst performance. Significantly, work at LANL now tests large-scale fuel processors for performance and durability, as influenced by fuels and fuel constituents, and complements that testing with micro-scale catalyst evaluation which is accomplished under well controlled conditions.

Borup, R.L.; Inbody, M.A. [and others

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products' laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively benign'' system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE's program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

Brown, D.M.

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

302

Advanced ECU Software Development Method for Fuel Cell Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electronic control unit (ECU) in electrical powered hybrid and fuel cell vehicles is exceedingly complex. Rapid prototyping control is used to reduce development time and eliminate errors during software development. This paper describes a high-efficiency development method and a flexible tool chain suitable for various applications in automotive engineering. The control algorithm can be deployed directly from a Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow environment into the ECU hardware together with an OSEK real-time operating system (RTOS). The system has been successfully used to develop a 20-kW fuel cell system ECU based on a Motorola PowerPC 555 (MPC555) microcontroller. The total software development time is greatly reduced and the code quality and reliability are greatly enhanced.

Tian Shuo; Liu Yuan; Xia Wenchuan; Li Jianqiu; Yang Minggao

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of fission gas swelling and release models for metallic nuclear fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel swelling and fission gas generation for fast reactor fuels are of high importance since they are among the main limiting factors in the development of metallic fast reactor fuel. Five new fission gas and swelling ...

Andrews, Nathan Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Component Development - Advanced Fuel Cells for Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes results of second phase of development of Vairex air compressor/expander for automotive fuel cell power systems. Project included optimizing key system performance parameters, as well as reducing number of components and the project cost, size and weight of the air system. Objectives were attained. Advanced prototypes are in commercial test environments.

Butler, William

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of Partial Oxidation Reformer Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, a gasoline fuel processor and an ethanol fuel processor were operated under conditions simulating both startup and normal operation. Emissions were measured before and after the AGB in order to quantify the effectiveness of the burner catalyst in controlling emissions. The emissions sampling system includes CEM for O2, CO2, CO, NOx, and THC. Also, integrated gas samples are collected in evacuated canisters for hydrocarbon speciation analysis via GC. This analysis yields the concentrations of the hydrocarbon species required for the California NMOG calculation. The PM concentration in the anode burner exhaust was measured through the placement of a filter in the exhaust stream. The emissions from vehicles with fully developed on board reformer systems were estimated.

Unnasch, Stefan; Fable, Scott; Waterland, Larry

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reforming of Renewable Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) * U. (Balu) Balachandran, T. H. Lee, C. Y. Park, and S. E. Dorris Energy Systems Division E-mail: balu@anl.gov * Work supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Presented at the Bio-derived Liquids Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007. BILIWG Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007 2 Objective & Rationale Objective: Develop compact dense ceramic membrane reactors that enable the efficient and cost-effective production of hydrogen by reforming renewable liquid fuels using pure oxygen produced by water splitting and transported by an OTM. Rationale: Membrane technology provides the means to attack barriers to the

307

Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Catalysts for hydrogen production by steam reforming of dimethyl ether (DME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is expected as one of clean fuels. We have been studying on DME steam reforming for hydrogen production. Copper alumina catalysts prepared by a sol-gel method produced large quantities of H2 with DME steam reforming. The reason was ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Fuel cells provide these benefits and address critical challenges in all energy...

310

Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moderate PEM Light Duty Vehicles- Fuel Cell Limited Limited to Moderate Steam Methane Reformer Hydrogen

312

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. The carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electrocatalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decrease the cell performance. This irreversible poisoning of the anode can happen even in CO concentrations as low as few ppm, and therefore, require expensive scrubbing of the H{sub 2}-fuel to reduce the contaminant concentration to acceptable level. In order to commercialize this environmentally sound source of energy/power system, development of suitable CO-tolerant catalyst is needed. In this work, we have synthesized several novel electrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell. The concentration of CO in the H{sub 2} fuel varied from 10 ppm to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effect of temperature, catalyst compositions, and electrode film preparation methods on the performance of PEM fuel cell has also been studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalysts (10 wt % Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt % Pt/Mo/C) were more CO-tolerant than 20 wt % Pt catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method is better for the preparation of electrode film than the brushing technique. Some of these results are summarized in this report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Environmental fiscal reform (EFR) Agency/Company /Organization: Global Subsidies Initiative (GSI), International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), World Bank Phase: Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs References: Environmental fiscal reform - What should be done and how to achieve it[1] Reforming fiscal policies to close the gap between economic and ecological efficiencies[2] Overview "The term environmental fiscal reform (EFR) refers to: a range of taxation or pricing instruments that can raise revenue, while simultaneously furthering environmental goals. This is achieved by providing economic

314

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Water Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development program is being conducted by International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water-cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Study of low-temperature-combustion diesel engines as an on-board reformer for intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been recognized as a feasible alternative to current IC engines. A significant technical problem yet to be resolved is the on bound fuel supply before fuel cells can be practically used for vehicles. Use ...

Hahn, Tairin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Auxiliary Power Units (APUs), driven by truck engines, consume over 800 million gallon of diesel fuel while idling. Use of separate SOFC based APUs are an excellent choice to reduce the cost and pollution associated with producing auxiliary power. However, diesel fuel is a challenging fuel to use in fuel cell systems because it has heavy hydrocarbons that can transform into carbon deposits and gums that can block passages and deactivate fuel reformer and fuel cell reactor elements. The work reported herein addresses the challenges associated with the diesel fuel sulfur and carbon producing contaminants in a Fuel Preprocessor (FPP). FPP processes the diesel fuel onboard and ahead of the reformer to reduce its carbon deposition tendency and its sulfur content, thus producing a fuel suitable for SOFC APU systems. The goal of this DOE supported Invention and Innovation program was to design, develop and test a prototype Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) that efficiently and safely converts the diesel fuel into a clean fuel suitable for a SOFC APU system. The goals were achieved. A 5 kWe FPP was designed, developed and tested. It was demonstrated that FPP removes over 80% of the fuel sulfur and over 90% of its carbon residues and it was demonstrated that FPP performance exceeds the original project goals.

M. Namazian, S. Sethuraman and G. Venkataraman

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Autothermal Reforming of Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of biomass into energy and chemicals is a major research and technology challenge of this century, comparable to petroleum processing in the last century. Recently we have successfully transformed both volatile liquids and nonvolatile liquids and solids into syngas with no carbon formation in autothermal catalytic reactors with residence times of ~10 milliseconds. In the proposed research program we explore the mechanisms of these processes and their extensions to other biomass sources and applications by examining different feeds, catalysts, flow conditions, and steam addition to maximize production of either syngas or chemicals. We will systematically study the catalytic partial oxidation in millisecond autothermal reactors of solid biomass and the liquid products formed by pyrolysis of solid biomass. We will examine alcohols, polyols, esters, solid carbohydrates, and lignocellulose to try to maximize formation of either hydrogen and syngas or olefins and oxygenated chemicals. We will explore molecules and mixtures of practical interest as well as surrogate molecules that contain the functional groups of biofuels but are simpler to analyze and interpret. We will examine spatial profiles within the catalyst and transient and periodic operation of these reactors at pressures up to 10 atm to obtain data from which to explore more detailed mechanistic models and optimize performance to produce a specific desired product. New experiments will examine the conversion of syngas into biofuels such as methanol and dimethyl ether to explore the entire process of producing biofuels from biomass in small distributed systems. Experiments and modeling will be integrated to probe and understand detailed reaction kinetics and the processes by which solid biomass particles are transformed into syngas and chemicals by reactive flash volatilization.

Schmidt, Lanny D

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels.

Stout, R.B.; Merckx, K.R.; Holm, J.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack, having a reformer adapted to reform a hydrocarbon fuel stream containing sulfur contaminants, thereby providing a reformate stream having sulfur; a sulfur trap fluidly coupled downstream of the reformer for removing sulfur from the reformate stream, thereby providing a desulfurized reformate stream; and a metering device in fluid communication with the reformate stream upstream of the sulfur trap and with the desulfurized reformate stream downstream of the sulfur trap. The metering device is adapted to bypass a portion of the reformate stream to mix with the desulfurized reformate stream, thereby producing a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish (Pittsford, NY); Haltiner, Jr., Karl J (Fairport, NY); Weissman, Jeffrey G. (West Henrietta, NY)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum gas (LPG, consisting predominantly of propane) or renewable fuels such as biogas from wastewater treatments plants. Fuel cells for auxiliary power units in trucks will...

326

Fundamental kinetic modeling of the catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a fundamental kinetic model for the catalytic reforming process has been developed. The complex network of elementary steps and molecular reactions occurring in catalytic reforming has been generated through a computer algorithm characterizing ...

Rogelio Sotelo-Boyas / Gilbert F. Froment; Rayford G. Anthony

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Industrial Technologies Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

Pitz, W J

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Role of metal-support interactions on the activity of Pt and Rh catalysts for reforming methane and butane.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For residential fuel cell systems, reforming of natural gas is one option being considered for providing the H{sub 2} necessary for the fuel cell to operate. Industrially, natural gas is reformed using Ni-based catalysts supported on an alumina substrate, which has been modified to inhibit coke formation. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new family of catalysts derived from solid oxide fuel cell technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2}. These catalysts consist of a transition metal supported on an oxide-ion-conducting substrate, such as ceria, that has been doped with a small amount of a non-reducible element, such as gadolinium, samarium, or zirconium. Unlike alumina, the oxide-ion-conducting substrate has been shown to induce strong metal-support interactions. Metal-support interactions are known to play an important role in influencing the catalytic activity of many metals supported on oxide supports. Based on results from temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation and kinetic reaction studies, this paper discusses the role of the metal and the substrate in the metal-support interactions, and how these interactions influence the activity and the selectivity of the catalyst in reforming methane and butane to hydrogen for use in fuel cell power systems.

Rossignol, C.; Krause, T.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting Disruption Mitigation studies for ITER on NSTX-U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting 2012) 1/3 White Paper for Developing Advanced Fueling System are not to scale. #12;White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System

332

Development of Standards in Support of Hydrogen-Fueled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society of Automotive Engineers International (SAE) has proposed a Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification Guideline. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Modular pebble-bed reactor reforming plant design for process heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary design study of a Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor System Reforming (MPB-R) Plant. The system uses one pressure vessel for the reactor and a second pressure vessel for the components, i.e., reformer, steam generator and coolant circulator. The two vessels are connected by coaxial pipes in an arrangement known as the side-by-side (SBS). The goal of the study is to gain an understanding of this particular system and to identify any technical issues that must be resolved for its application to a modular reformer plant. The basic conditions for the MPB-R were selected in common with those of the current study of the MRS-R in-line prismatic fuel concept, specifically, the module core power of 250 MWt, average core power density of 4.1 w/cc, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel with a /sup 235/U content of 20% homogeneously mixed with thorium, and a target burnup of 80,000 MWD/MT. Study results include the pebble-bed core neutronics and thermal-hydraulic calculations. Core characteristics for both the once-through-then-out (OTTO) and recirculation of fuel sphere refueling schemes were developed. The plant heat balance was calculated with 55% of core power allotted to the reformer.

Lutz, D.E.; Cowan, C.L.; Davis, C.R.; El Sheikh, K.A.; Hui, M.M.; Lipps, A.J.; Wu, T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hydrogen Production via a High-Efficiency Low-Temperature Reformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells are promoted by the US government as a viable alternative for clean and efficient energy generation. It is anticipated that the fuel cell market will rise if the key technical barriers can be overcome. One of them is certainly fuel processing and purification. Existing fuel reforming processes are energy intensive, extremely complicated and capital intensive; these disadvantages handicap the scale-down of existing reforming process, targeting distributed or on-board/stationary hydrogen production applications. Our project involves the bench-scale demonstration of a high-efficiency low-temperature steam reforming process. Hydrogen production can be operated at 350 to 400ºC with our invention, as opposed to >800ºC of existing reforming. In addition, our proposed process improves the start-up deficiency of conventional reforming due to its low temperature operation. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the invented process concept via a bench scale unit and verify mathematical simulation for future process optimization study. Under this project, we have performed the experimental work to determine the adsorption isotherm, reaction kinetics, and membrane permeances required to perform the process simulation based upon the mathematical model developed by us. A ceramic membrane coated with palladium thin film fabricated by us was employed in this study. The adsorption isotherm for a selected hydrotalcite adsorbent was determined experimentally. Further, the capacity loss under cyclic adsorption/desorption was confirmed to be negligible. Finally a commercial steam reforming catalyst was used to produce the reaction kinetic parameters required for the proposed operating condition. With these input parameters, a mathematical simulation was performed to predict the performance of the invented process. According to our simulation, our invented hybrid process can deliver 35 to 55% methane conversion, in comparison with the 12 and 18-21% conversion of the packed bed and an adsorptive reactor respectively. In addition CO contamination with energy savings and ~50% capital savings over conventional reforming for fuel cell applications. The pollution abatement potential associated with the implementation of fuel cells, including the elimination of nitrogen oxides and CO, and the reduction in volatile organics and CO2, can thus be realized with the implementation of this invented process. The projected total market size for equipment sale for the proposed process in US is $1.5 billion annually.

Paul KT Liu; Theo T. Tsotsis

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen wig need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S. and other nations in understanding disposal concepts in different geologic media, but gaps in knowledge still exist. A principal aspect of concern to the UFDC as it considers the broad issues of siting a repository in different geologic media are the marked differences in the regulatory bases for assessing suitability and safety of a repository between the U.S. and other nations. Because the probability based - risked informed nature of the current U.S. regulations for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is sufficiently different from other regulations, information gained in previous studies, while useful, likely need to be supplemented to enable more convincing communication with the public, better defense of the numerical models, and stronger safety cases. Thus, it was recognized when the UFDC was established that there were readily identified disposal-related R&D opportunities to address knowledge gaps. An effort to document these research opportunities was a key component of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 engineered system, natural system, and system-level modeling activities for a range of disposal environments. A principal contribution to identifying these gaps was a workshop held to gather perspectives from experts both within and external to the UFDC regarding R&D opportunities. In the planning for FY2010 it was expected that these activities would culminate with a UFDC research and development roadmap that would identify the knowledge gaps, discuss the R&D needed to fill these gaps, and prioritize the proposed R&D over both the near- and long-term. A number of knowledge gaps and needed R&D were identified and are discussed in this report. However, these preliminary R&D topics have not been evaluated in detail nor have they been prioritized to support future planning efforts. This will be completed in FY11 and the final UFDC Research and Development Roadmap will be completed. This report discusses proposed R&D topics in three areas related to repository siting, design, and performance: natural systems

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO{sub 2} and 85% for NO{sub x} were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO[sub 2] and 85% for NO[sub x] were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Argonne TTRDC - Experts - Fuel Cell Experts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of micro-reactor test facility for steam reforming of ethanol Integrated methane reformer system development Michele Lewis, Chemist phone: 630252-6603; fax: 630...

346

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Thermochemical Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Thermochemical Processes Photo of a researcher wearing a hardhat and examining a catalytic steam reformer. Catalytic steam reforming increases the overall yield of fuel gas from biomass. NREL's researchers have investigated the thermochemical conversion of renewable energy feedstocks since the lab's inception. Researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes to convert biomass and its residues to hydrogen, fuels, chemicals, and power. Building on past successes, biomass is increasingly one of the best near-term options for renewable hydrogen production. Thermochemical Process R&D Research and development at NREL provides a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of biomass pyrolysis. This R&D includes stabilizing and

347

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the sample’s burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber contains an outer portion containing reforming material, an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle and a mixer-diffuser, and a middle portion for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle and mixer-diffuser are preferably both within the reforming chamber and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 1 figure.

Shockling, L.A.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M H x N i H 2 N i C d P b a c i d Energy Storage System Source: Mitlitsky, et al, "Regenerative Fuel Cells", Energy and Fuels, 1998. Packaged specific energy of up to 1,000...

351

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled central power generation is being adapted to power UUVs. U.S. Navy photo by Mr. John F. Williams/Released. An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Developing Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Developing Infrastructure to Charge Plug-In Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com...

355

Task 1. 0, Development of improved molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this task was to develop an improved cell configuration for molten carbonate fuel cells which has improved performance, meets a 40,000 hour projected life, maintains existing cell cost, and is adaptable to a range of power plant applications. A new cell configuration designed to be manufactured using conventional and available equipment and processes was developed and verified in subscale single cells. This cell configuration is adaptable to a broad range of fuels without redesign, operating on very weak low Btu coal gas as well as high Btu gas and natural gas. The success of this program has provided the confidence to proceed with a scale-up to 8-ft{sup 2} cells and a stack verification in a 20-cell, 25 kW stack test. Design requirements and specifications for components in an improved cell design were defined. Electrolyte requirements for the cell components were established, the estimated time-to-short was updated, and a design operating point and gas composition for single cell testing was defined. Four anode, four cathode, five matrix configurations, and three end-cell reservoirs were defined. A total of 54 single cell tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of individual improvements and combinations of improved configurations. Anodes were successfully fabricated by tape casting. A new tape cast cathode for improved electrolyte sharing, new tape cast matrix materials and matrix reinforcement, and an end-cell reservoir configuration using conductive material were developed. Reports on the separate subtasks have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

Johnson, W.H.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of improved cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Missouri-Rolla conducted a 17 month research program focused on the development and evaluation of improved cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The objectives of this program were: (1) the development of cathode materials of improved stability in reducing environments; and (2) the development of cathode materials with improved electrical conductivity. The program was successful in identifying some potential candidate materials: Air sinterable (La,Ca)(Cr,Co)O{sub 3} compositions were developed and found to be more stable than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} towards reduction. Their conductivity at 1000{degrees}C ranged between 30 to 60 S/cm. Compositions within the (Y,Ca)(Cr,Co,Mn)O{sub 3} system were developed and found to have higher electrical conductivity than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} and preliminary results suggest that their stability towards reduction is superior.

Anderson, H.U.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fisher Coachworks Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fisher Coachworks Develops Plug-In Electric Bus in Michigan on AddThis.com...

358

Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

Krumpel, Michael (Naperville, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding systems that retain standard UO2 fuel pellets for deployment in currently operating LWR power plants. The LWRS work scope focuses on fuel system components outside of the fuel pellet, allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coatings, addition of ceramic sleeves, or complete replacement

362

New model accurately predicts reformate composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. (Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview  

SciTech Connect

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Water-Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is being conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes requested to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen is a clean fuel. When used in fuel cells, the Hydrogen is a clean fuel. When used in fuel cells, the only byproducts are water and heat. * Clean hydrogen technology has the potential to strengthen national economies and create high-quali- ty jobs in industries such as fuel cell manufacturing. * Hydrogen can be derived from renewable sources and is fully interchangeable with electricity - hydrogen can be used to generate electricity, while electricity can be used to produce hydrogen. * Over 100 years of safe production, transportation and use of hydrogen shows that it carries no more risk than natural gas or gasoline. * Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic sources and processes, freeing it from the political instabilities that affect the world's oil and gas supplies. * Fuel cells have more than double the energy-efficien-

367

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a total of up to 74 million to support the research and development of clean, reliable fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications. The solicitations include up to...

369

New Developments in High Velocity Air-fuel Spraying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is possible because of the low temperature of air-fuel combustion. The heating of the spray ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray.

370

Trends and new developments in automotive fuel economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significant improvements in passenger car fuel economy that have been achieved up to the present time are identified, and the changes that have produced these improvements are examined in detail. Included are several comparisons of domestic versus foreign vehicles. The potential for further increases in fuel economy is then reviewed by examining the technological, marketing/economic, and other significant factors that will affect future fuel economy levels. Special attention is given to the effect that changing market mix has on corporate average fuel economy and to the future benefits that may be realized through the use of continuously variable transmissions, adiabatic diesel engines, and improved lubricants.

Simpson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Effects of operating conditions, compression ratio, and gasoline reformate on SI engine knock limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of experiments was performed to investigate the effects of air-fuel ratio, inlet boost pressure, hydrogen rich fuel reformate, and compression ratio on engine knock behavior. For each condition the effect of spark ...

Gerty, Michael D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fuel cell electric power production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

Hwang, Herng-Shinn (Livingston, NJ); Heck, Ronald M. (Frenchtown, NJ); Yarrington, Robert M. (Westfield, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development DOE Announces up to $74 Million for Fuel Cell Research and Development December 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced it is accepting applications for a total of up to $74 million to support the research and development of clean, reliable fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications. The solicitations include up to $65 million over three years to fund continued research and development (R&D) on fuel cell components, such as catalysts and membrane electrode assemblies, with the goal of reducing costs, improving durability and increasing the efficiency of fuel cell systems. The funding also includes up to $9 million to conduct independent cost analyses that will assess the progress of the

374

Process for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein hydrogen and light hydrocarbons generated in the catalytic reaction zone are passed to a hydrogen production/purification zone and and reacted and processed therein to produce substantially pure hydrogen. A portion of the hydrogen is then admixed with the charge stock to the catalytic reforming zone to provide the hydrogen requirements of the catalytic reforming reaction zone.

James, R. B. Jr.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

HTGR fuel recycle development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1978  

SciTech Connect

The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on tradeoff studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Systemic Reform Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(5) support local initiatives and model sites; (6) align state policy; (7) reform higher education and teacher preparation; and (8) mobilize public and professional...

377

Plasma—Methane Reformation  

INL thermal plasma methane reformation process produces hydrogen and elemental carbon from natural gas and other hydrocarbons, such as natural gas or ...

378

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed in which substantially all of the heat requirements of the product stabilizer column is supplied by multiple indirect heat exchange.

Peters, K.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

TRIGA high wt -% LEU fuel development program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The principal purpose of this work was to investigate the characteristics of TRIGA fuel where the contained U-235 was in a relatively high weight percent (wt %) of LEU (low enriched uranium - enrichment of less than 20%) rather than a relatively low weight percent of HEU (high enriched uranium). Fuel with up to 45 wt % U was fabricated and found to be acceptable after metallurgical examinations, fission product retention tests and physical property examinations. Design and safety analysis studies also indicated acceptable prompt negative temperature coefficient and core lifetime characteristics for these fuels.

West, G.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly-March 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several MPACT BCPs were executed in February, reflecting the shift in MPACT priorities directed late last year. Work continued on the FY2014 IPL, also bringing it in line with the new priorities. Preparations were made for the March MPACT Working Group meeting, in conjunction with Savannah River which is hosting the meeting. Steps were taken to initiate a new project with the World Institute for Nuclear Security, including discussions with WINS staff and preliminary work on the required procurement documentation. Several hardware issues were worked through. The newest detector array is working at LANL. A thorough analysis of previously collected Pu sample data using recently developed analysis code with improved spectral energy calibrations was completed. We now have a significantly better understanding of measurement uncertainties. Post-test analyses of the salt and sensor material for the first sensor test are almost complete. Sensor testing with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first sensor test. Sensor materials for the next couple of tests are being fabricated. Materials with different annealing temperatures are being prepared for analysis. Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imager detectors repairs are complete and work with the imager is under way. The milestone requiring a report on LANSCE experiments was completed and submitted. Analysis of previous experiments and comparisons to simulations is near complete. Results are being compared with previous LANSCE-LSDS and RPI results. Additional data library (TENDL) is also being checked to see whether there are differences in the simulation results. The mid-year MIP Monitor project accomplishments and progress was presented at the MPACT meeting held in March at SRNL. Discussions around the meeting included inquiries into the feasibility of collecting process measurement data at H-Canyon, and it was explored further after the meeting. Kenneth Dayman, the graduate student from University of Texas, completed an initial draft of his master's thesis. His research will contribute to the multivariate classifier currently under development. Sarah Bender, the graduate student from Pennsylvania State University, presented her work on a poster and in a conference paper at the MARC IX meeting. A mass balance flowsheet for the fast reactor fuel was completed and a model simulation is scheduled to begin construction next month. The development of a mass balance flowsheet for light water reactor fuel will predict the behavior of the separation process using mathematical functions. The completed flowsheet will be utilized as the basis for constructing the model simulation for the electrochemical separations. Comments and review of the model from the MPACT Working Group meeting have been used to evaluate updates to the EChem model. A preliminary physical security layout has been developed in ATLAS. Thermal stability tests for high temperature microfluidic interconnections were completed on all compounds tested for bonding strength. An interconnection strategy was determined based on these results that we expect will allow for operation at 400C in the first generation of sampling systems. Design of the sampling system using the chosen interconnections was initiated, with handoff to an external foundry for fabrication based on ANL specified process conditions expected by the middle of the month. Monte Carlo simulations of the sampling system were conducted under conditions of realistic sampling size distributions, electrorefiner inhomogeneity distributions, and detector efficiencies. These simulations were used to establish a baseline limit of detection for system operation, assuming an on-line separation step is conducted before detection. Sensor for measuring density and depth of molten electrolyte - The procurement effort continued. 80% of the components ordered to assemble the double bubbler have arrived at the INL. Pratap Sadasivan, and his team have been working on the new metrics for proliferation a

Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fuels for fuel cells: Fuel and catalyst effects on carbon formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to explore the effects of fuels, fuel constituents, additives and impurities on the performance of on-board hydrogen generation devices and consequently on the overall performance of fuel cell systems using reformed hydrocarbon fuels. Different fuels and components have been tested in automotive scale, adiabatic autothermal reactors to observe their relative reforming characteristics with various operating conditions. Carbon formation has been modeled and was experimentally monitored in situ during operation by laser measurements of the effluent reformate. Ammonia formation was monitored, and conditions varied to observe under what conditions N H 3 is made.

Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Perry, W. L. (William Lee); Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Page iManaging Investment Climate Reforms: Viet Nam Case Study Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to learn about Viet Nam’s experience with reforms aimed at facilitating private entry into businesses, and in particular to understand how the reform process itself was managed, what have been the results or outcomes of the reforms, and what lessons have been learned. The focus of the analysis is the Enterprise Law reform episode and related reforms to promote domestic private sector development in Viet Nam.

Viet Nam; Raymond Mallon; Economic Consultant

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology echnology Hydro- -Desulfurization T Funded by y Arm y y TARDEC Brass board, transportable system Ran 10 kW PEM fuel cell Demonstrated on JP-8 with...

385

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Page 3.8 - 1 3.8 Education and Outreach Expanding the role of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as an integral part of the Nation's energy portfolio requires sustained...

386

High-density Fuel Development for High Performance Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High density UMo (7-12wt% Mo) fuel for high performance research ... High Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Deformation Behavior of Alloy HT9.

387

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_NETL_ Oxide-Based Reforming...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structured Oxide - Based Reforming Catalyst Development U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Dushyant Shekhawat Dushyant.Shekhawat@NETL....

388

Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

Talbott, A.D. [AlliedSignal FM& T, Kansas City, MO (United States)]|[Full Circle Engineering, Northglenn, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Security and Suitability Process Reform  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security and Suitability Process Reform December 2008 Provided by the Joint Security and Suitability Reform Team EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET...

390

Performance of Ni-Fe/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub2} anode supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells using steam reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect

Iron nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to NiO/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub 2} (GDC) anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for the direct methane-water fuel operation. The cell was co-sintered at 1400 C, and the anode porosity is 31.8%. The main size corresponding to peak volume is around 1.5 {mu}m. When steam and methane directly fed to the cell, the power density is about 0.57 W cm{sup -2} at 650 C. It is the familiar performance for H{sub 2} operation (4 times of flow rate) with same fuel utilization. Compare with the testing temperature of 600 and 650 C, there is almost no carbon fiber deposition at 700 C with steam/methane (S/C) of 5. At the same time, fuel operation of high value of S/C (=3.3) resulted in fiber-like deposition and degradation of power performance based on loading test results.

Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Copyright reform step zero  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'A reasonable person might well think it's a fool's errand to contemplate a [copyright] reform project of any sort.' The US Copyright Act of 1976 and its subsequent amendments is contained in over 200 pages of incomprehensible, sometimes inconsistent, ... Keywords: US copyright law, administrative law, copyright reform, institutional frameworks

Terry Hart

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein the reboiler heat requirements of the stabilizer column are supplied by means of indirect heat exchange with hot combustion gases in the reforming reactants fired heater convection heating section. Heat in excess of the reboiler requirements is passed to the stabilizer column with control being effected by removal of excess heat from the column.

James, R.B. Jr.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the available chemical free energy directly into electrical energy, without going through heat exchange process. Of all different types of fuel cells, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

395

SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of the Low Swirl Injector for Fuel-Flexible GasTurbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gas turbines are primarily fueled with natural gas. However, changes in fuel cost and availability, and a desire to control carbon dioxide emissions, are creating pressure to utilize other fuels. There is an increased interest in the use of fuels from coal gasification, such as syngas and hydrogen, and renewable fuels, such as biogas and biodiesel. Current turbine fuel injectors have had years of development to optimize their performance with natural gas. The new fuels appearing on the horizon can have combustion properties that differ substantially from natural gas. Factors such as turbulent flame speed, heat content, autoignition characteristics, and range of flammability must be considered when evaluating injector performance. The low swirl injector utilizes a unique flame stabilization mechanism and is under development for gas turbine applications. Its design and mode of operation allow it to operate effectively over a wide range of conditions. Studies conducted at LBNL indicate that the LSI can operate on fuels with a wide range of flame speeds, including hydrogen. It can also utilize low heat content fuels, such as biogas and syngas. We will discuss the low swirl injector operating parameters, and how the LSC performs with various alternative fuels.

Littlejohn, D.; Cheng, R.K.; Nazeer,W.A.; Smith, K.O

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

Controlling Activity and Stability of Ni-YSZ Catalysts for On-Anode Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purposes of the project are to develop an effective Ni-YSZ-based anode for on-anode reforming of methane and natural gas and develop methods to control endothermic steam reforming activity.

King, D.L.; Wang, Y.; Chin, Y-H.; Lin, Y.; Roh, H-S.; Rozmiarek, B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Integrated fuel cell energy systems for modern buildings. Final technical report for contract period October 1997 to September 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and results of a cooperative agreement. The scope focused on natural gas fuel processing subsystems for fuel cell systems that could be used in modern buildings. The focus of this project was the development of a natural gas (NG) fueled, fuel processing subsystem (FPS) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems in modern buildings applications. This cooperative development program was coordinated with several parallel programs that were related to integrated fuel processor developments for fuel cell systems. The most significant were the development of an integrated fuel-flexible, fuel processing subsystem (DE-FC02-97EE0482) and internal HbT programs to develop autothermal reforming (ATR) technologies and to develop a commercially viable stationary subsystem.

Woods, Richard

2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "development reformed fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Fuel Quality Research and Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Tommy Rockward (Primary Contact), C. Quesada, K. Rau, E. Brosha, F. Garzon, R. Mukundan, and C. Padró Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-9587 Email: trock@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2015 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel * contaminants in support of the development of science- based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] TC197 WG-12). Validate the ASTM International test method for * determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

402

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the President's FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the

403

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

404

Electricity reform abroad and US investment  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and analyzes the recent electricity reforms in Argentina, Australia, and the United Kingdom (UK) to illustrate how different models of privatization and reform have worked in practice. This report also analyzes the motivations of the U.S. companies who have invested in the electricity industries in these countries, which have become the largest targets of U.S. foreign investment in electricity. Two calculations of foreign investment are used. One is the foreign direct investment series produced by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The other is based on transactions in electric utilities of the three countries. The electricity reform and privatization experiences reviewed may offer some insight as to how the U.S. electricity industry might develop as a result of recent domestic reform efforts and deregulation at the state and national levels. 126 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Research and development of americium-containing mixed oxide fuel for fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

The present status of the R and D program for americium-containing MOX fuel is reported. Successful achievements for development of fabrication technology with remote handling and evaluation of irradiation behavior together with evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are mentioned with emphasis on effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Sato, Isamu; Miwa, Shuhei; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ishi, Yohei; Hirosawa, Takashi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrids for Distributed Power Market Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project was initiated with Rolls-Royce PLC to assess the technical and economic feasibility of their advanced solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology and to better understand the development hurdles to achieving megawatt-scale commercial products. This effort was part of a series of projects in 2001 assessing solid oxide fuel cell technology.

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. 10 refs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Methods and apparatuses for the development of microstructured nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microstructured nuclear fuel adapted for nuclear power system use includes fissile material structures of micrometer-scale dimension dispersed in a matrix material. In one method of production, fissile material particles are processed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized-bed reactor including a gas inlet for providing controlled gas flow into a particle coating chamber, a lower bed hot zone region to contain powder, and an upper bed region to enable powder expansion. At least one pneumatic or electric vibrator is operationally coupled to the particle coating chamber for causing vibration of the particle coater to promote uniform powder coating within the particle coater during fuel processing. An exhaust associated with the particle coating chamber and can provide a port for placement and removal of particles and powder. During use of the fuel in a nuclear power reactor, fission products escape from the fissile material structures and come to rest in the matrix material. After a period of use in a nuclear power reactor and subsequent cooling, separation of the fissile material from the matrix containing the embedded fission products will provide an efficient partitioning of the bulk of the fissile material from the fission products. The fissile material can be reused by incorporating it into new microstructured fuel. The fission products and matrix material can be incorporated into a waste form for disposal or processed to separate valuable components from the fission products mixture.

Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Carroll, David W. (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David J. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

409

Biodiesel from Microalgae: Complementarity in a Fuel Development Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel produces fewer pollutants than petroleum diesel, and is virtually free of sulfur. These properties make biodiesel an attractive candidate to facilitate compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). This fuel is ordinarily considered to be derived from oilseeds, but an essentially identical biodiesel can be made from microalgae.

Brown, L. M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT WASTE-AS-FUEL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream char acterization for co-firing RDF and coal as perti nent to the progress of the study to date TECHNOLOGIES There are three primary thermal waste-as-fuel technologies described below: (1) co-firing of an RDF suit able for co-firing. In most instances there is little or no preprocessing associated

Columbia University

411

Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing Fischerâ??Tropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through the EERCâ??U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding for BP1 was provided by the North Dakota Industrial Commissionâ??s (NDIC) Renewable Energy Council.

Joshua Strege; Anthony Snyder; Jason Laumb; Joshua Stanislowski; Michael Swanson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z